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Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 11:10 AM
http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/2876/mttcs9zs.jpg

Multipurpose Troop Transport Carrier System

The Multipurpose Troop Transport Carrier System (MTTCS) from Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc., converts a standard military vehicle into an armored troop carrier.

The MTTCS is designed to enhance the soldier's ability: first, to get safely to the objective by providing defensive means of deflecting assaults against convoys; second, to remain in a fixed location and support defensive positions.
The modular nature of the system allows configurations that can be mounted on the cargo bed of a variety of standard military trucks and trailers, and can be quickly configured as troop carriers, medical evacuation units, or cargo carriers.
MTTCS can transport up to 10 people and their associated gear while countering the ballistic threats of small-arms fire, up to and including 7.62 mm AP, and most fragmentation from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blast threats.
The system is modularly packaged to enable the soldiers or unit-of-action (UA) to remain in a fixed location for extended periods of time and sustain adequate security for a single soldier or a UA to support defensive positions.
The MTTCS has been test proven by the Rapid Equipping Force at the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, and has undergone combat operational evaluation under REF sponsorship in Iraq.
http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/6812/images5cpictures5cfigur5ex.jpg


The different configurations of MTTCS are constructed using four basic modules. These are:

4-foot Center Module with and without gun ring
2-foot Center Module
Roll Cage Module
Door Module A typical module configuration, and the one tested at USATEC, is the S424; it is constructed using:

2 x 4-foot Center Modules with gun rings
1 x 2-foot Center Modules
1 X RC Roll Cage Module
1 x D Door Module For fixed postion configurations of MTTCS, special connecting modules are used.



http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/1893/rollover8kr.jpg

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/9217/seatsinward3li.jpg


U.S. Army and USMC operational units stationed in Iraq evaluated the operational functionality of the mobile MTTCS.
These evaluations included:

Assembly & Disassembly of MTTCS on Tactical Trucks
Transportation of Troops in Convoy
Transportation of Enemy Combatants
A total of over 40 missions were accomplished, logging over 2000 miles over various terrains.

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/2355/iraq015ng.jpg

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/8702/iraq021yy.jpg

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/5994/iraq035fd.jpg

More info:
http://mttcs.tbe.com

jerka71_1
01-23-2007, 11:12 AM
Looks comfy, but not very low profile!

Count Lippe
01-23-2007, 11:30 AM
how is the mine protection?

playtym
01-23-2007, 11:33 AM
how is the mine protection?

Up to **** I'd say - that's sure as hell no V-shaped monocoque hull that they've got there.

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 11:34 AM
how is the mine protection?
Only seen this mentioned:

MTTCS can transport up to 10 people and their associated gear while countering the ballistic threats of small-arms fire, up to and including 7.62 mm AP, and most fragmentation from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blast threats.
It doesn't has a V-shaped hull but the belly armor looks fairly thick.

playtym
01-23-2007, 11:38 AM
It doesn't has a V-shaped hull but the belly armor looks fairly thick.

All the better to trap the blast rather than deflecting it. Maybe the blast won't penetrate, but the vehicle/module will probably end up on its back then.

stayr
01-23-2007, 11:39 AM
best target for rpg ))

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 11:42 AM
All the better to trap the blast rather than deflecting it. Maybe the blast won't penetrate, but the vehicle/module will probably end up on its back then.
Yep you're probably right seeing how vulnerable it already is for tipping over.

playtym
01-23-2007, 11:46 AM
Yep you're probably right seeing how vulnerable it already is for tipping over.

OMG! You mean someone's finally built something more unstable than our Buffels?

lightfire
01-23-2007, 11:48 AM
It looks like a heavy armoured horse carrier to me, but if that protects, then ok..

and...
are these coffe tables in the middle?p-) Hell, that's quite a riding bar!

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/9217/seatsinward3li.jpg

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 11:49 AM
OMG! You mean someone's finally built something more unstable than our Buffels?
You should check the vid on their site. It needed all it's strenght to stay on its wheels on the testing range.

Curious how cost effective this thing is. I'd imagine the military would be better off buying new mine protected APC's.

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 11:49 AM
and...
are these coffe tables in the middle?p-) Hell, that's quite a riding bar!
Gunner platforms. Check the hatches above.

Thumpsquid
01-23-2007, 11:52 AM
Gunner platforms. Check the hatches above.
...that seem perfectly placed for someone to fall into and injure themselves just as it rolls over.

lightfire
01-23-2007, 11:57 AM
...that seem perfectly placed for someone to fall into and injure themselves just as it rolls over.
but still are perfectly suitable for dual purpose-coffe tables p-)

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 12:12 PM
...that seem perfectly placed for someone to fall into and injure themselves just as it rolls over.
When it rolls over and you have your head out the hatch you're ****ed anyway.

aclark79
01-23-2007, 12:24 PM
I would think exiting and entering from a door facing the main drivers cab would be pretty difficult as well as dangerous with the exposed muffler. Id love to hear from someone who had to get ina nd out while wearing thier gear. Props though to anyone who works on improvements to protection.

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 12:31 PM
An article I found:


Teledyne Brown Develops First Armored Multi-Purpose Troop Carrier System

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (October 3, 2005)- Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. has developed, built and tested an armored troop carrier system, the Multipurpose Troop Transport Carrier System (MTTCS), which is designed to protect soldiers from small arms fire and most fragments from Improvised Explosive Devises (IEDs). The MTTCS successfully supported numerous transport and convoy missions recently in Iraq as part of the Army Rapid Equipping Force's operational evaluation in a combat environment.

The MTTCS is a modular armor troop transportation system that mounts directly on the bed of any of the common family of Army trucks (2, 5, or 7 tons). It provides armor protection from most common battlefield weapons being used against American soldiers today. It also has the capacity to mount any of the Army's crew-served weapon systems such as the M2 and M240 machine guns or the MK19 automatic grenade launcher in order to provide protection from attack for the truck and the convoys they travel in. The system is multipurpose since it can be dismounted and used for defensive positions on the ground or buried for greater security.
"We're hopeful that getting this system into Iraq will result in less casualties and lives being saved," said Jim Link, president, Teledyne Brown. "Every day, soldiers are being transported in the back of the Army's fleet trucks with limited protection. The MTTCS not only meets this need but can also provide increased armor protection for Army base camps and critical facilities. The multi functionality of the MTTCS provides the Army with a level of protection that is not currently available anywhere else."

In addition to its use in transporting troops, the MTTCS modules can be dismounted from the vehicles and be used in fixed position on the ground or buried. This makes the system ideal for Force Protection missions such as defensive positions, access control points, check points, base camp infrastructure such as sleeping quarters and Command and Control Centers. MTTCS, therefore, provides armor protection capabilities not currently seen in the Army today.

Teledyne Brown Engineering has an exclusive license for production and sales of the MTTCS. The technology was developed by SAIC with patent pending.
Mobile bunker anyone?

Count Lippe
01-23-2007, 12:54 PM
Up to **** I'd say - that's sure as hell no V-shaped monocoque hull that they've got there.
that was my first thought, those things are not that safe...

I wouldn't trust those seats and the tiny coffee tables to stand on as a machinegunner.

why doesn't it have a small emergency escape hatch? those huge swinging doors are a death trap...:|

playtym
01-23-2007, 12:58 PM
that was my first thought, those things are not that safe...

I wouldn't trust those seats and the tiny coffee tables to stand on as a machinegunner.

why doesn't it have a small emergency escape hatch. those huge swinging doors are a death trap...:|

Yup, I'd rather ride in that than a soft skinned truck, but if I had a choice I'd much rather be in a Casspir or Mamba any day.

8thidpathfinderpower
01-23-2007, 01:01 PM
man, that thing looks highly unstable....I wonder what the army is doing to protect those things from ATGM and RPG? But, I guess, some protection is better than nothing

8thidpathfinderpower
01-23-2007, 01:04 PM
It looks like a heavy armoured horse carrier to me, but if that protects, then ok..

and...
are these coffe tables in the middle?p-) Hell, that's quite a riding bar!

bartender, another round, please!!!!

Mastermind
01-23-2007, 02:29 PM
So, aside from the top hatch(s)...how do you get in or out? Please tell me the entrance/exit is not via the vulnerable cab.MM

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 02:44 PM
So, aside from the top hatch(s)...how do you get in or out? Please tell me the entrance/exit is not via the vulnerable cab.MM
What do you think this is? :roll:

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/9217/seatsinward3li.jpg

countermeasure
01-23-2007, 02:54 PM
best target for rpg ))
That's what I was thinking....

Mastermind
01-23-2007, 02:56 PM
The whole ass clam shells? :-0! Well, there goes the blast resistance. MM

GreySpawn
01-23-2007, 02:59 PM
looks like at-at. wonder when they install legs on that thing.

Dominique
01-23-2007, 03:14 PM
I don't like the looks of it. I's huge for one thing, all the passengers backs are facing the walls (they shoud face out so they can actually use their weapons); no weapon ports, other than the gunners hatches; it looks really top heavy; the gunners patforms are not designed very well; where do you store equipment to keep it from bouncing around? What happens if it cathces fire? Form what I can see a mine will blow right through it, and I could go on.

Birger
01-23-2007, 03:17 PM
The fact that it has a "roll cage" seems sort of disturbing to me, as if they actually expect it to roll over lol :cantbeli:

neophyte77
01-23-2007, 03:20 PM
and last but not least, it's ugly

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 03:24 PM
I don't like the looks of it. I's huge for one thing, all the passengers backs are facing the walls (they shoud face out so they can actually use their weapons); no weapon ports, other than the gunners hatches; it looks really top heavy; the gunners patforms are not designed very well; where do you store equipment to keep it from bouncing around? What happens if it cathces fire? Form what I can see a mine will blow right through it, and I could go on.
Still the US military sees this as a product with great potential. Don't ask me why. :roll:

Dominique
01-23-2007, 03:25 PM
Still the US military sees this as a product with great potential. Don't ask me why. :roll:

That's becuase the people buying them, won't actually have to use them.

Ironsight06
01-23-2007, 03:33 PM
That's becuase the people buying them, won't actually have to use them.
Money would have been better spent on a ****load of excisting mine-protected vehicles.

Mastermind
01-23-2007, 03:35 PM
Any doctrine on armor design will tell you several basics. 1) low is good. Low centers of gravity prevent roll over, reduce enemy targeting area and exposure at longer range. 2) Minimize surface area at all opportunity. 3) Slopes are excellent, especially at 27 degrees to the flat (the angle at which shell fragments leave the blast point. 4)Effecient egress points should be maintained & designed with evacuation of wounded in mind. 5) hatches must be solidly surrounded by solid armor...blast deformation will jamb hatches otherwise. 6) Strong separation from engine and fuel compartments are a must.

There are more...but that's a start! MM

MkH
01-23-2007, 04:10 PM
Looks like a born-dead idea. Extremely high profile, very ****e to tip over and offers not much more protection than conventional armoured personnel carriers. I could have designed a better one.

p$ycho+log!cal
01-23-2007, 08:33 PM
An article I found:

Mobile bunker anyone?

thats what i was going to say ;)

SoftLion
01-24-2007, 02:24 AM
although somewhat off-topic, in terms of volume of production and ultimate miles traveled, wouldn't using more high-technology composite armor (ie lighter but more expensive) ultimately yield savings in something as gay as gas mileage? My ignorant 2 cents.

kpt. Zbik
01-24-2007, 05:29 AM
You must remember that RG-31 or other mine-protected vehicles can be use only for particular tasks and they aren't cheap. Afghanistan and Iraq are specific war theatres, but still vehicles like Cougar, Mamba or Reva won't be for most armies theirs main troops carriers or patrol vehicles. I know that South Africa has different experience (Bush War) than Europe or USA, and has developed whole family of mine protected vehicles. We can't now buy hundreds of RG-31 so we are try to find other solutions.
This carrier system you can put on any truck if you need better protection and then take it off, and used this truck to transport normal cargos or troops. German army has also armoured carrier system for troops.
MTTCS for me it is some kind of gun truck, which can be use in convoy.
For patrolling or EOD missions better is to use vehicles such as RG-31 MkV or Buffalo.
In spring polish troops will start their mission in Afghanistan. We don't have even such armoured carriers or armoured Humvee. About Dingo, Eagle IV, Bushmaster or RG-31 we can only dream....