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Ezekiel25:17
01-13-2008, 07:20 PM
New boat aims to make SEALs' travels less painful

Story Highlights
Boats now used to transport Navy SEALs give violent ride with forces over 20 Gs
Rough ride blamed for injuries, and for wearing out SEALs before missions begin
Boat builder creating a new, high-tech version of the boat to ease the ride
Carbon-Kevlar composite boat built to absorb impact as it hits waves at high speedBOOTHBAY, Maine (AP) -- Navy SEALs are tough by nature, but they take a beating from their patrol boats: bruises, bumps and sore backs, even sprained ankles and chipped teeth.
An all-composite version of the aluminum Mark V patrol boat, constructed by luxury boat builder Hodgdon Yachts Inc., is aimed at reducing the wear and tear on boat operators and SEALs by absorbing the impact as the vessel crashes through the waves at 50-plus knots.
The goal is a boat that can deliver up to 16 combat-ready Navy SEALS in shape to carry out their missions and will reduce the boat operators' neck, back and joint injuries.
"The idea is to build a boat out of the best carbon-Kevlar composite that we can build to reduce those slamming forces," said David Packhem Jr., president and chief executive officer of Maine Marine Manufacturing LLC, a military spinoff of Hodgdon Yachts.
The 82-foot research prototype unveiled Friday looks similar to current patrol boats, but it has a new hull made from advanced composite materials.
Though designed to reduce slamming forces, the prototype is actually 50 percent stronger -- and slightly lighter -- than the aluminum version. Packhem thinks even more weight can be eliminated without sacrificing performance.
"This extraordinary boat is going to be of extraordinary value to the Navy and to our SEALs," said U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, who christened the vessel Friday with a bottle of champagne.
The original Mark V, known in military parlance as the MK V Special Operations Craft, was created in the mid-1990s to get special operations forces, primarily SEAL (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/u_s_navy_seals) combat swimmers, quickly in and out of messy situations.
Powered by a pair of diesel engines, the vessel is propelled to a top speed of about 60 mph by twin water jets.
The aluminum hull is stiff and lightweight, but the ocean's force is transmitted to the boat's occupants in bone-jarring fashion.
Fighter jet pilots are subjected to forces up to 10 times the pull of gravity, but the Mark V has produced forces upward of 20 Gs slamming against waves, said Lt. Damon Shearer, senior medical officer of Naval Special Warfare Group 4.
Soon after the vessel went into service, the Navy began getting reports of injuries.
Though it responded by installing shock-absorbing seats, there continues to be a problem with back, neck and joint injuries that occur over time, Shearer said in a phone interview. Furthermore, SEALs are sometimes weary from the beating by the time they arrive for their mission, he said.
Navy Capt. Evin H. Thompson, commander of Naval Special Warfare Group 4 in Norfolk, Virginia, who attended the ceremony in Maine, said he hopes the new vessel -- dubbed the Mark V.1 -- will build upon the lessons learned at sea with the original vessel.
"We've learned along the way about the power of the sea," Thompson said. "The sea can be cruel."
Hodgdon Yachts worked with the University of Maine's Advanced Engineered Wood Composites Center on the project. Maine's congressional delegation secured $14 million through a series of earmarks over several years.
The prototype developed for the Office of Naval Research and the Special Operations Command was created using multiple layers of carbon with a foam core and an outer layer of Kevlar for additional strength, Packhem said.
Dubbed MAKO for the shark that frequents the Gulf of Maine, the vessel will undergo shipbuilder testing this month in Maine's coastal waters before traveling to Norfolk for further evaluation by the Navy.
If it performs as expected, it could be deployed within two to three years, Thompson said.
Copyright 2008 The Associated Press (http://www.cnn.com/interactive_legal.html#AP). All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
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http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/TECH/01/13/seals.new.boat.ap/art.seals.boat.apdotjpg

An all-composite version of the aluminum Mark V patrol boat is launched n East Boothbay, Maine on Friday.

Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/01/13/seals.new.boat.ap/index.html

JJC
01-13-2008, 07:52 PM
20 Gs holly cow, it's some serious beating.

drunken sailor
01-14-2008, 08:48 AM
Speed kills lol. Its the bottom design that makes it so rough and this one looks like less of a deep v than the previous boat. The jet drives don't help either, They suck the boat down and don't let the bow come up enough so it plows more often instead of sailing over the waves. A deep v racing type hull with surface drives would be better for the ride but the seals may hit bottom and be out of commission in the shallows.

velvet-cream
01-14-2008, 08:52 AM
Painful?? .....softies!!

haha! :)

He219
01-14-2008, 09:48 AM
A couple of years ago I was shown a MK5 at the Amphib base in Coronado. The SWICC crewmen showed me how a seat flew through the cockpit window with a person in it after the bolts to the floorboard sheared off (due to the tremendous fatigue stresses of operations). The copilot was medically discharged due to the injuries he sustained while strapped to the seat.

Little J
01-14-2008, 11:28 AM
Dont know much about boats, so was expecting some sort of wave piercing type of thing... then I saw the pic :oops:

LillaMy
01-14-2008, 03:59 PM
Are the throttle on those things binary?? i.e. how about reducing the speed if the sea is rough..

SHAM
01-14-2008, 06:40 PM
Were they not testing out the VSV that the SBS "allegedly" use, wave piercing and "allegedly" 60 knots in harsh weather.
There was a couple of photos on here a while back of one on test in the states some place.


The Very Slender Vessel (VSV) is a program teamed with DARPA [Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency] and OSD’s Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). FY2000 funding for Very Slender Vessel technologies demonstrated advanced technologies to minimize signature and wave-shock impact to personnel onboard SOF maritime craft. The VSV is a wave piercing craft. In contrast to a standard high speed boat, which produces an extremely uncomfortable ride over long, high-speed transits in higher sea states. The VSV is expected to deliver SEAL or other SOF operators to objective areas who are much more mission capable.

In 1999 the Special Boat Squadron, Britain's marine special forces unit, acquired a VSV (Very Slender Vessel). It can go faster than any other ocean-going fast pursuit vessel in the world. It is capable of speeds of more than 60 knots, is 53 feet long and cylindrical, with a 10 foot cross-section so it can punch straight through waves rather than go through the top of them.

VSV™ hulls have lower overall power requirements than comparable Deep'V' planing hulls. This leads to reduced engine size and increased range. Traditional Deep'V' hulls have two modes of operation, low speed displacement mode and a high speed planing mode. The vessel may operate only at displacement speed or planing speed. The VSV™ hull, by contrast, exhibits no discernible planing '****'. The vessel can maintain any speed within its performance envelope returning full command to the driver.

When traditional Deep 'V' boats travel at speed in rough conditions, they jump from wave to wave and land with high vertical acceleration or 'g' force. As the speed of the vessel increases or the sea gets rougher, the 'g' force on landing increases. Peak readings regularly exceed 20g which is sufficient to cause injury to the personnel and damage to the vessel and its equipment.

Deep'V' hulls are the traditional solution for traveling at high speeds in offshore waters. By their nature they are planing craft and spend their time on the surface of the water. They are therefore, on occasion, subject to extreme vertical accelerations created by waves. Wave piercers are not completely novel as designers have been developing slim sharp fronted boats for years that are encouraged to cut through the waves rather than bouncing over them. The VSV™ applies these principles to high-speed patrol vessels. This has enabled crews to travel at high speeds in adverse sea conditions in relative comfort and safety.


http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/vsv.htm

drunken sailor
01-14-2008, 07:24 PM
The seal team boats need to operate in shallow water. Deep Vs will hit bottom long before the current boats. They will have to find a happy medium. It sounds like the boys need better high performance boat driving lessons. You can only go so fast in rough seas or risk breaking the boat or your back. The Evinrude guys can show them the way to go and they are already on the payroll. The new Evinrudes that the teams have are some mean machines, I got up close with some at Evinrudes training center.

SHAM
01-14-2008, 07:49 PM
The seal team boats need to operate in shallow water. Deep Vs will hit bottom long before the current boats. They will have to find a happy medium. It sounds like the boys need better high performance boat driving lessons. You can only go so fast in rough seas or risk breaking the boat or your back. The Evinrude guys can show them the way to go and they are already on the payroll. The new Evinrudes that the teams have are some mean machines, I got up close with some at Evinrudes training center.

You could hardly call it deep hull.
http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/6479/vsv2cx2dotjpg (http://imageshack.us)
http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/6479/vsv2cx2.8c48c1ce97dotjpg (http://g.imageshack.us/g.php?h=504&i=vsv2cx2dotjpg)
But anyway, I am sure they know what they are doing.

petop
06-08-2008, 05:27 PM
Were they not testing out the VSV t
hat the SBS "allegedly" use, wave piercing and "allegedly" 60 knots in harsh weather.
There was a couple of photos on here a while back of one on test in the states some place.



http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/vsv.htm

Just like to say, the SBS don't "allegedly" use them anymore!
Good home wanted, apparently!

SHAM
06-08-2008, 05:29 PM
Just like to say, the SBS don't "allegedly" use them anymore!
Good home wanted, apparently!

Dont be shy, tell us more.

petop
06-08-2008, 05:39 PM
Dont be shy, tell us more.

Lets just say, they are not being used, do do what has been said but there is a better version in place of them.