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Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 01:39 PM
(thks for the help with the updating/edit, wasn't logged in before)

Hello, first time poster, long time reader I guess you could say

I know how you guys are into all gear & general military stuff, so i thought you guys might like a few pictures my instructor snapped of my recent Robin Sage class (Phase 4 of the US SF Q Course for the people who don't know what robin sage is)

oh yea.... im sorry for not knowing how to crop, like i said, first time. maybe someone can throw me a bone on how to do that.

Basically robin sage is a unconventional warfare scenario which takes place in the southeast united states, mostly in NC. Your Oda infils, meets with the resistance G's, teaches them to fight, then leads them in a battle.... basically all the while normal US life is going around. If anyone is interested more in the exercise, i can go into more detail. To sum it up, its kinda the last test in the Q course (exception being language school and SERE) before you earn your beret. (on a side note, my entire team passed and we got our green bs)

hope you enjoy....

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085604175_theteampic.jpg

(I'm the guy on the far left, the low ranking man on the totem pole i guess you can say.... oh yea, we had two foreigners on the team, the guy with the saw is from Japan.... and the other asian looking officer was from singapore. Japanese officer served as the senior Charlie, the other served as the warrent officer 180. oh yea.... you might notice that the team is "rather small"..... height wise and size wise.... we had the nickname of the dirty dime... because of both things, we only had 10 members... 7 NC0s, 1 US officer and 2 foreign officers)

The picture :The team prior to infiltration, we kept our rucks pretty light, roughly 120 US lbs, compared to some teams that had abit more. My particular team was scheduled to jump in, with 2 bundles with more of our gear, those would go out of the plane first onto the DZ, then we would follow.

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085603935_ggreeting.jpg

Having a Welcome drink with the G Commander (Day 2 Robin Sage Exercise) Team ODA 932 ..... (was surprised that it was the real deal southern moonshine)

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085604254_airdropground.jpg

Calling in a Bundle Drop out of a Casa Aircraft (Day 6 Robin Sage Exercise) Team ODA 932

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085604592_lastminute.jpg

Last Minute Planning Before a Raid (Robin Sage Exercise) Team ODA 932

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085604014_commocrosstraining.jpg

My Senior and I doing some Cross Training on Commo Prior to the exercise (Robin Sage Exercise) Team ODA 932

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085603963_democrosstraining.jpg

The Charlie (Engs/Demo) guys going over some Bridge takedown ideas with us prior to infil

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/536_1085603905_delmastations.jpg

This is what we call a dilemma (mispell?) station, where basically 2 members of the team are tasked with a certain objective... whether it be black market or something along that line... and basically these old former SF dudes play the parts of the different scenarios..... man can they make you feel very sad indeed.

Well i hope you enjoyed um, if u want more, maybe i can throw a few more up there.... oh yea, thks to picture hangar for hosting.... i have some vids, but can't find anyplace to host them. Popping smoke.

Argyll
05-26-2004, 01:47 PM
Nice pics mate,Hope you fulfill your dream ;)

was this one of the 18x intakes perchance?

shrek
05-26-2004, 01:47 PM
Good pics bud, good luck to you in the rest of your training!

Man those sand and pines bring back memories!! Sandhills game land!

Fearless-Falcon
05-26-2004, 01:48 PM
Wow!

Nice Pictures

chauncy republicans
05-26-2004, 01:50 PM
Wakizashis are the ****! Perfect length and weight.

Marsuitor
05-26-2004, 01:50 PM
Excellent stuff... Not something you come about every day.
Keep posting mate!

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 01:53 PM
actually I'm one of the first batches of 18x / now 18e through the pipeline atleast in my MOS, it takes abit longer for us SF commos and medics.... the junior charlie on the team is also an 18x turned 18c.... maybe ill throw up a few more.

(and as for wakizashis.... yes, they are quite nice)

Uncle Sam
05-26-2004, 02:34 PM
Great Pics. I remember chasing your predecessors down while I was OPFOR, back in the day.....

Seraphim
05-26-2004, 02:42 PM
Welcome to the board.

Apogee
05-26-2004, 03:06 PM
Congrats on making it through bro. And welcome

Jack Mehoff
05-26-2004, 03:10 PM
Hey, do you happen to know SPC Song Anderson from 19th SFG?

ibstolidude
05-26-2004, 03:14 PM
Hey, do you happen to know XX from 19th SFG?
hey Jack try a PM, dude

I'm just guessing he isn't into having his name blasted on the internet.
but that is just me.

Jack Mehoff
05-26-2004, 03:16 PM
:roll: yes stoli, it's just you.

scm77
05-26-2004, 03:25 PM
Cool pics. woot

moughoun
05-26-2004, 03:41 PM
Great pic's but you probably should have blacked out the faces, btw aren't all these guy's a little on the young side or am I just getting old :(

droopy
05-26-2004, 03:58 PM
I have a question how do people get to carry a M203 or SAW i mean what is the selection process like.
Also no harm intended only a observation the guys in the picture look short especialy the 3rd from the right in 1st picture am i right again just a observation.
Thanks

moughoun
05-26-2004, 04:09 PM
I have a question how do people get to carry a M203 or SAW i mean what is the selection process like.
Also no harm intended only a observation the guys in the picture look short especialy the 3rd from the right in 1st picture am i right again just a observation.
Thanks

It usually shorter guy's who make it through sf, the big muscle men can't stand the pace and get injured more

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 04:11 PM
Thks for the nice comments all, as for the opsec, i think ill update the pics and any future pics with abit of blacked out faces... the whole opsec stuff is ironic to the third degree especially because the army tends to parade us around like animals constantly infront of writers/journalists and such.

as for the question who carries the 203,SAW..... typically the weapon sergeants or 18Bs usually carry any heavy stuff.... simply because usually they have the most hands on experience working with such weapons.... although for example on my ODA in Sage, we had the charlies (the demo guys) carrying the saws because our Bravos (weapon sergeants) were serving as team sergeant and intel respectively. As for 203... i carried that here, usually its any guy with a half-decent nack for shooting it....in training, its more like who is unlucky (due to the vest of pain.... if any of u old timers know what im talking about). In training and on a real team are a much different animal so i can't really say much because i offically have zero time on a active ODA.

As for the fact that we are all young... i was the youngest at 21 (because im an 18x), most were in there late 20's or early 30's. For some reason, we just look like a freaken young team (which isn't a bad thing), plus the fact that i think no one was over 6 feet tall)

as for the individual u asked about, sorry i don't, maybe you can PM me his mos.... with a few exceptions, ive been mostly hanging out with 18Es for the last year ive been in the course.

NcDeuce
05-26-2004, 04:12 PM
I have a question how do people get to carry a M203 or SAW i mean what is the selection process like.
Also no harm intended only a observation the guys in the picture look short especialy the 3rd from the right in 1st picture am i right again just a observation.
Thanks

It usually shorter guy's who make it through sf, the big muscle men can't stand the pace and get injured more

:roll: :cantbeli:

OzMan
05-26-2004, 04:33 PM
Just an obersvation, but why is it that nearly all Ranger or SF trainees always wear the same old crappy LBEs? The ****ty Y suspenders and looks like the metal hook and loop belt. Is that just the equipment they give you for the exercise/school, or do you simply not have access to anything better?

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 04:37 PM
lol good old lbe is surprisely useful.... but yes, thats what they give us for the school.... actually in sage, you could bring out any gear u wanted during the excersise (the only time in the Q course they give you that option actually)... so two of our guys did have chest rigs (racks also known as) .... but for the most part, you can complete mission without the fancy stuff, why bother getting your personel stuff messed up for simply a training mission.

when we get to teams they issue us a truck load of the really nice stuff so we hear

duck
05-26-2004, 04:47 PM
The Worldwide Web-some of your instructors might be reading this, maybe a few future teammates or guys from the FBI most wanted list. Just a thought...

moughoun
05-26-2004, 04:50 PM
I have a question how do people get to carry a M203 or SAW i mean what is the selection process like.
Also no harm intended only a observation the guys in the picture look short especialy the 3rd from the right in 1st picture am i right again just a observation.
Thanks

It usually shorter guy's who make it through sf, the big muscle men can't stand the pace and get injured more

:roll: :cantbeli:

It is true, how many 6`4 250lb green beret's have you seen, I was even told that my chances in selection are only about a 1/3 that of most of thae other's going by past experience, look at those pic's not many arnie's in there

Uncle Sam
05-26-2004, 04:51 PM
Just an obersvation, but why is it that nearly all Ranger or SF trainees always wear the same old crappy LBEs? The ****ty Y suspenders and looks like the metal hook and loop belt. Is that just the equipment they give you for the exercise/school, or do you simply not have access to anything better?

I'll tell you why...It's simple and It works! That's all I wore when I was in (Slighly modified).

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 04:54 PM
mistake nm

tuckerhat
05-26-2004, 04:59 PM
(Sorry, wasn't exactly sure how to update my first post... heck, not sure if this forum allows it.... so excuse the double post.... these images have correct "opsec" faces blacked out.... (im sure im missing something also).... lastly, added two more images at the end... again, sorry for the double post)

there should be an edit option next to your original post. it should be in the top right hand corner, make sure you are logged in.

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 05:02 PM
as for the comment about selection not being good for big strong tall dudes... selection is pretty simple, start here > walk there, rinse and repeat.... SF selection is 90 percent walking/land nav.... the weight is pretty light actually, so i don't think it favors really any particular weight or build. Simply put, you just got to not quit when the simple stuff like rain or snow or heat gets some people down mentally.

moughoun
05-26-2004, 05:11 PM
as for the comment about selection not being good for big strong tall dudes... selection is pretty simple, start here > walk there, rinse and repeat.... SF selection is 90 percent walking/land nav.... the weight is pretty light actually, so i don't think it favors really any particular weight or build. Simply put, you just got to not quit when the simple stuff like rain or snow or heat gets some people down mentally.

Ya I understand that, but tell me were there many very big well built guy's on your selection who passed, I know that just because of size doesn't mean you'll fail but when doing certain task's put's a far higher burden then on a smaller person, that's way marathon runner's are smaller then weightlifter's less weght and mass to carry around for long distence and that US sf are more inclined to the muscler side of the bussiness and our's is the JTF-2 based cooper's test which is more biased toward's extreme endurence

NcDeuce
05-26-2004, 05:14 PM
as for the comment about selection not being good for big strong tall dudes... selection is pretty simple, start here > walk there, rinse and repeat.... SF selection is 90 percent walking/land nav.... the weight is pretty light actually, so i don't think it favors really any particular weight or build. Simply put, you just got to not quit when the simple stuff like rain or snow or heat gets some people down mentally.

Ya I understand that, but tell me were there many very big well built guy's on your selection who passed, I know that just because of size doesn't mean you'll fail but when doing certain task's put's a far higher burden then on a smaller person, that's way marathon runner's are smaller then weightlifter's less weght and mass to carry around for long distence and that US sf are more inclined to the muscler side of the bussiness and our's is the JTF-2 based cooper's test which is more biased toward's extreme endurence

They come in all shapes and sizes. I've met guys who are built like a freakin rock in Group.

moughoun
05-26-2004, 05:21 PM
[/quote]

They come in all shapes and sizes. I've met guys who are built like a freakin rock in Group.[/quote]

I'm not denying that it's the same here but the large majority of operator's I have met here are on the smaller side of the coin I'm not saying there below average but they are exactly average you couldn't pick them out of a crowd, and most sf are biased toward the more "compact" person because they stand out less as well wouldn't you agree

ZeroPositive
05-26-2004, 06:29 PM
awesome photos it is good to see training photos of the US guys.

Thanks a lot :D

100_Percent_HOOAH
05-26-2004, 07:50 PM
My best friend shipped out yesterday to Benning with an 18x contract. I hope he makes it.

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 09:54 PM
just tell him not to quit when push comes to serve... so many 18x guys quick for stupid reasons.... i had 120 in my company for basic/infantry training... only 11 are still with me (counting me) .... most due to the most stupidous reasons for quiting/failing out.... blah.... rain... blah... tired... blah DWIs... sorry I get abit pissed on the whole quitting thing, its given 18x kinda a bad name

and the best of luck to him, SF definitely needs the bodies

100_Percent_HOOAH
05-26-2004, 10:17 PM
just tell him not to quit when push comes to serve... so many 18x guys quick for stupid reasons.... i had 120 in my company for basic/infantry training... only 11 are still with me (counting me) .... most due to the most stupidous reasons for quiting/failing out.... blah.... rain... blah... tired... blah DWIs... sorry I get abit pissed on the whole quitting thing, its given 18x kinda a bad name

and the best of luck to him, SF definitely needs the bodies

He wants it pretty bad, so I see him making through. I was actually going to enlist with him for 18x, but I decided to try for Air Force Pararescue instead.

Wakizashi
05-26-2004, 10:59 PM
no comment on PJs... just kidding, quite a few guys i know tried that road.... actually met quite a few of them because they go through some of our delta (sf medical course) course. Good luck down that road, although ill always suggest SF

Red
05-26-2004, 11:22 PM
Good luck on your achievement,and i know that you know that your training has just begun.Congratulations,that is no small feat.I have a few questions for you though that i will pass along through PM.Congrats again.

I love Rachael Leigh Cook
05-27-2004, 12:50 AM
for the most part, you can complete mission without the fancy stuff, why bother getting your personel stuff messed up for simply a training mission.


Here's your biggest opsec breach. Once all the Airsoft kiddies figure this out, how can we tell them apart from the real thing?

TacoDelRio
05-27-2004, 05:04 AM
Nice photos!

Good luck with everything. I've got a bunch of buddies who are going through SFAS now, just out of SOPC.

Hooah!

DB

tenda
05-27-2004, 05:13 AM
great pic's ;)

brachialstun
05-27-2004, 06:41 AM
wow...some of you guys really go overboard with the whole "black their faces" out bit. I can see it for the guys going through the Q Course, but not the role players. Half of the those people are pouges from COSCOM or guys from the 82nd and the rest tend to be civies from around the Badin area.

Wakizashi
05-27-2004, 06:52 AM
lol about the black faces.... yeah, i know what you mean.... our "G's" were from the 82 combat engineers, some commo guys from 1/12 th or some unit and some civil affairs/psiops fellas.... quite an interesting bunch.... but in the end they actually were quite good. Never the less, i never asked those guys if they mind there picture up, so i blacked out everything.

if your friends went through SOPC, im sure they are well prepared for selection, after all, its the easiest phase in the Q in my opinion. Oh yea.... take it easy on the Hooah stuff... a word best never used where im from.... but thats just my opinion

Colt45
05-27-2004, 09:31 AM
Hey Waki, you arent going through 18d right? Just going through 18e? If so, my father is one of the instructors through the 18d portion. Cpt. Marcum ring a bell by any chance?

front
05-27-2004, 11:01 AM
Robin Sage: Fight for Pineland

By Justin Willett
Staff writer

http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=military&Story=6362333

http://fayettevillenc.mycapture.com/mycapture/folder.asp?event=6839

The guerrillas are lined up by the campfire, waiting to embark on a mission, as a few American soldiers huddle nearby.

http://www.fayettevillenc.com/photos/2004/may/m23gray.jpg

Staff photo by David Smith
Special Forces candidate Sgt. Cory Gray crosses a Union County field during Robin Sage training. Gray was leading a mission to ’destroy’ a communications tower in the role-playing field exercise.

It is around noon on May 12 and it is humid. The sky is threatening rain.

The 13 G's - as the guerrillas are known - look weary and limp in their dirty black uniforms.

The Americans look more attentive, yet no cleaner, in their familiar green camouflage.

The two groups have been living and training side by side for the past week and a half as part of the Robin Sage field training exercise, the "final exam" of Fort Bragg's Special Forces Qualification Course. Billed as the largest unconventional warfare training exercise in the world, Robin Sage is the last step before earning a green beret for hundreds of soldiers every year.

"The Americans," as the G's call them, are 11 Special Forces candidates known as Operational Detachment Alpha 917.

Their goal is to train and build ******* with the guerrillas - who are played by regular Fort Bragg soldiers.

Robin Sage takes place four times a year in Pineland, a fictional country that encompasses all or parts of more than a dozen counties in central North Carolina. Detachment 917 is in Union County.

Although just a field exercise, many aspects are real enough.

The students must ingratiate themselves with the querulous guerrilla chief and mold inexperienced soldiers into a potent fighting force.

The year's second installment of Robin Sage began May 1, when 200 Special Forces candidates in 21 teams fanned out across Pineland to link up with 450 guerrillas and fight 200 "opposition forces."

Growing need

Special operations forces have a central role in the battle against terrorists.

The U.S. Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg plans to add more than 1,800 Special Forces soldiers over the next four years. It has already increased the number of Special Forces trainees from 350 annually over the past decade to 450 in 2003, according to the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School. The goal this year is 550 trainees. Plans call for 650 in 2005 and 750 in 2006.

Master Sgt. Daniel Hahn, the cadre sergeant overseeing Detachment 917, said Robin Sage was expanded by three teams this year to accommodate recruits.

Special Forces is highly selective, and the training takes one to two years. Most soldiers who want to earn the green beret don't make it.

Robin Sage represents the end of the gantlet for the 11 men in ODA 917. Some are regular soldiers who chose Special Forces while others came in "off the street" through an Army program that allows people to choose the training when they enlist. All have to make it through the qualification course.

Spc. Tony Glover, 23, of Mobile, Ala., went to Auburn before he decided to try out for Special Forces.

Spc. Bert Kuntz has a soil conservation degree from the University of Kansas. He decided to join the military after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and chose Special Forces because it mixes humanitarian missions with fighting.

"It's the quiet professional stuff," he said, quoting the Special Forces nickname.

Sgt. Christopher David, 29, is a member of the Florida National Guard. He was in a Ranger battalion before he earned a biology degree and then looked to get back in the Army.

"I always wanted to do this," he said.

Hahn says that civilian recruits are valuable because they have diverse life experiences and come without "bad habits." The regular Army soldiers, however, have more Army experience.

"It's a tradeoff," he says. "We get great soldiers from both sources."

On the way

The soldiers of Operational Detachment Alpha 917 are well on the way to becoming Green Berets. In camp, the G's and their three trainees playing American advisers are back at 4:30 p.m., having successfully completed the mission of the day.

Each soldier carries a weapon, but their guns are all muzzled with blank adapters. Army officials are careful with safety.

In 2002, a Moore County deputy stopped a vehicle carrying two Special Forces candidates. The soldiers thought the deputy was part of the exercise, but he had no idea what they were up to.

Investigators said the deputy saw guns, felt threatened and shot both men. One died. No charges were pressed against the deputy.

Now vehicles are clearly marked, instructors and guerrilla chiefs wear black Pineland baseball caps and every law enforcement agency in the operation area is briefed.

The team members are not interested in real-world questions of safety at the moment. They're focused on the final mission, which involves "killing" and "blowing things up."

The Americans have spent nearly 14 days - six months in Pineland time - with the guerrillas. After the final mission the Americans will pull out, declaring Pineland safe for the freedom fighters.

Sgt. Cory Gray says things have gone well.

"You live and you learn," he says.

Capt. Kevin Trujillo, in his role as the American detachment commander, says the team studied Pineland extensively before linking up with the guerrillas.

"That way we have an understanding of why they're fighting and what they're fighting for," he says. "We don't want to be ugly Americans."

Joe H. Johnson plays Col. Bradford Gordon, the guerrilla chief in this section of Pineland. He is the best judge of the Americans' progress.

Johnson is a tall black man with a Buddha-like belly who in his role as guerrilla chief enjoys commandeering sweet tea packets from his soldiers' Meal, Ready-to-Eat pouches and ranting about "the Americans."

Johnson, who slips easily between his two roles, acknowledges that the Special Forces trainees have done well.

"They came in and trained my soldiers, and now they can take my people out and bring them back alive," he says in his role as the colonel.

But the final mission will be the riskiest yet.

The target is a well-guarded enemy command and control center - really a turkey house turned into paintball course "guarded" by role-playing soldiers.

Shadowing candidates

Throughout the exercise, Dave Horne has been shadowing the Special Forces candidates.

A former Special Forces soldier who now works for Northrop-Grumman, he cuts an intimidating figure with his tall wooden walking stick and crisp, clean green camouflage uniform.

As the Americans await their ride to the final objective, Horne pulls them aside. The men seem restless as he asks last-minute questions. Horne brings them back to the real world.

"We are at war right now," he says. "Excuses don't matter when you're in a CMH."

Horne pauses.

"Do you know what a CMH is? It's a casket with metal handles. So tighten up and think about what you're doing."

Rick Tarlton, a civilian who has volunteered his assistance, arrives with his dump truck to take the men to the target. The Americans and guerrillas climb in.

"Tonight is going to be controlled chaos, boys," Sgt. David says as the truck rumbles away.

In a low voice, Spc. Kuntz calls out each turn of the truck before Tarlton makes it. He knows the route that well.

After a 20-minute ride, the team jumps off at a church near the target. At 8:50 p.m., they reach the rally point. Horne moves off toward their final goal.

Jim Shuler is the owner and operator of Paintball Kingdom.

The business consists of a store and indoor and outdoor firing courses near his home, which is between Marshville and Wingate in Union County.

The converted turkey house where the Robin Sage action will take place is about 200 feet long and has 10-by-20-foot rooms on both sides.

Blue lights cast shadows everywhere from the stacked crates that block nearly all lines of sight to the windows, which are barely visible in their faded orange frames.

"Paintballs echo off the boxes, and you can't tell where they're coming from," Shuler says with a grin. "It's eerie."

Shuler has been participating in Robin Sage for the past three years. A few friends and neighbors have already gathered to watch the raid.

Rick Tarlton stands nearby with his wife and children. This is his first time in Robin Sage. He heard about it during a town meeting in New Salem.

"I love it," he says with a boyish grin. "I wish they'd do this all the time."

Simulated artillery

Just before 11 p.m. the assault begins with simulated grenade and artillery blasts.

The action, however, takes a detour almost immediately as a grenade simulator hits an "enemy" soldier.

The explosion burns his legs, and a piece of the grenade lodges in his thigh. The medics rush over and begin treating him as Hahn calls an ambulance. The soldier is later treated and returned to his unit.

Meanwhile, the mission goes on.

Just as they rehe****d, the team members storm the building.

Shouts and muzzle flashes mark their progress as they "kill" the opposition forces and "destroy" old computer monitors.

The assault takes less than 15 minutes. All of the guerrillas and Americans from Detachment 917 emerge unscathed.

The ride back to camp is silent as the men stand in the back of the dump truck looking out over the countryside.

When they return, Horne gathers the men to discuss the mission. After going over several points, he gives his prognosis.

They are ready for the next phase of training - the language courses that teach them how to communicate with the foreign soldiers or guerrillas they will be working with when the bullets are real.

"You did good tonight," he says. "You showed control. Right now you're fairly entry level.

"But how many of you can do it in a foreign language?"

http://fayettevillenc.mycapture.com/PHOTOS/FAYE/6839/10130576E.jpg

Students Ronfeld, right, and Bo apply makeup before a recon mission. (David Smith photo)

Wakizashi
05-27-2004, 02:16 PM
sorry just an echo, although i know a few instructors over there in the delta course.... the name though doesn't ring a bell. There's probably a heck more instructors working over there than in the other MOS phase 3 classes...

Colt45
05-27-2004, 02:32 PM
I know of a Putzer in the 18e area, but not much knowledge of others. My father was an 18e when he came in as an "SF baby" but went through the army nurse corp from there and got picked up. Well, congratulations...
Hard time don't last, Hard men do ;).

pipaz
05-27-2004, 04:10 PM
hmm what can I say De Oppresso Liber and best of luck mate.

ibstolidude
05-27-2004, 04:35 PM
that article offers a pretty poor account of the tragic events during 2002 involving the deputy and 2 SFQC students.

hank
05-27-2004, 04:39 PM
Thanks for posting these wakizashi. Congrats and stick around.

hank

droopy
05-27-2004, 05:04 PM
Is it me or do the faces of SF look more inteligent and normal than the SEALs who look more badass but not too smart.

Roger Rabbit
05-27-2004, 05:32 PM
that article offers a pretty poor account of the tregic events during 2002 involving the deputy and 2 SFQC students.
Do you mind if i ask what that was about or is it private infomation?

Wakizashi
05-27-2004, 06:24 PM
im not going to go into much detail on the matter with the 2 sfqc students.... we actually later on in the "war" linked up with another ODA, which just happened to be the exact ODA that those former two members were on. We worked with that ODA throughout the last parts of sage. As part of DEMOBILIZATION phase & honoring the lost fighters of the war, we payed a tribute to the two former students infront of a large rock. On that rock is a plack (mispell?) with there names in honor. Since the incident, we index the training with a 21 gun salute in their honor.... i was the young guy on the totem poll, so i actually had to be one of the firers. Rest in peace boys.

moughoun
05-27-2004, 06:48 PM
RIP, Wakizashi do you have any clue what sfg you'll be posted to yet

100_Percent_HOOAH
05-27-2004, 07:46 PM
Is it me or do the faces of SF look more inteligent and normal than the SEALs who look more badass but not too smart.

SEALs are just as smart as any of them. They have a lot of class time to endure.

Wakizashi
05-27-2004, 09:43 PM
i guess its not opsec to say so, but i got fifth group / arabic language .. heh.... shall we say.... "hello sandbox?"

100_Percent_HOOAH
05-27-2004, 10:02 PM
Wakizashi,

Do you happen to know if there are certain vision requirements for SF? The AF is giving me crap about my eyes and told me it's possible they won't waiver me even after a year of having the prk done.

Wakizashi
05-27-2004, 10:37 PM
I have 20/15 or something like that... so i never had a problem.... but i do know a ton of guys have glasses.... and or contacts. Actually the deal is, once you pass Robin sage, you are eligible for the military to give you laser eye surgery... i think i know 3 guys in the echo course that i went through getting it soon.... sounds like a good deal, although i don't know much on the subject... so don't quote but im pretty sure its not a factor

alphabet
05-27-2004, 11:43 PM
Good man, way to stick it out throughout all the hardships.

Nokkvi
05-27-2004, 11:51 PM
If you are for real you might want to stop posting information about the course as well as posting pictures immediately!

sla8485
05-28-2004, 12:18 AM
If you are for real you might want to stop posting information about the course as well as posting pictures immediately!

Relax mate,
He has posted less information than the many articles that have been published on the event by US newspapers have over the years. Including the tragic accident recently mentioned in this thread.

pipaz
05-28-2004, 04:06 PM
If you are for real you might want to stop posting information about the course as well as posting pictures immediately!

After all this is a military forum...you know :cantbeli:

DPGLAW
05-28-2004, 04:33 PM
Nokkvi .....before you start to tell others what to do I would have more than 6 posts.....just my opinion

mack pl
05-28-2004, 04:41 PM
Nokkvi .....before you start to tell others what to do I would have more than 6 posts.....just my opinion
I have almost 1600, and I never say what someone must to do ;) .

btw Wakizashi is adult person, and i think he know better than you(Nokkvi) what he should to do :|

regards all

ibstolidude
05-28-2004, 05:21 PM
I have 20/15 or something like that... so i never had a problem.... but i do know a ton of guys have glasses.... and or contacts. Actually the deal is, once you pass Robin sage, you are eligible for the military to give you laser eye surgery... i think i know 3 guys in the echo course that i went through getting it soon.... sounds like a good deal, although i don't know much on the subject... so don't quote but im pretty sure its not a factor
that goes beyond the 18 series.
96th - CAPOC and SOSC and others also have it done.

Really rather a nice move.

NcDeuce
05-28-2004, 06:33 PM
i guess its not opsec to say so, but i got fifth group / arabic language .. heh.... shall we say.... "hello sandbox?"

and to Fort Campbell. ;)


Is it me or do the faces of SF look more inteligent and normal than the SEALs who look more badass but not too smart.

How can you judge one's intelligence by the 'look' on their face? :cantbeli:

Colt45
05-28-2004, 08:05 PM
Wakizashi,

Do you happen to know if there are certain vision requirements for SF? The AF is giving me crap about my eyes and told me it's possible they won't waiver me even after a year of having the prk done.

Regarding that, most of the guys going to group are gettign their eyes taken care of with lasik (spell?). My father had it done before he left group not to long ago.

bison
05-28-2004, 08:40 PM
are the hearing requirements any diff. for sf? (honest question :oops: )

brachialstun
05-30-2004, 03:05 AM
For quite a while, Lasik was a disqualifier for selection. Perhaps things have changed since the procedure has improved some.


Oh and the details about the deaths of the two guys is pretty easily obtained online. There were certainly emough articles done about it.

About the "G's". I should have corrected my original statement about them all being pouges. The scout plt from my unit used to go out and take part whenever they had some down time. Like anything else in the military, sometimes you have good guys out there, sometimes you dont.

Wakizashi
05-30-2004, 10:50 AM
we had one lucky team who got a bunch of division scouts go out be there G's.... which i guess now that i think about it is good and bad.... G's tend to sharpshoot alot more if they think you don't know what your saying or they think they know more than you.... which is certainly possible in certain subjects.

18C4V
05-30-2004, 01:44 PM
im not going to go into much detail on the matter with the 2 sfqc students.... we actually later on in the "war" linked up with another ODA, which just happened to be the exact ODA that those former two members were on. We worked with that ODA throughout the last parts of sage. As part of DEMOBILIZATION phase & honoring the lost fighters of the war, we payed a tribute to the two former students infront of a large rock. On that rock is a plack (mispell?) with there names in honor. Since the incident, we index the training with a 21 gun salute in their honor.... i was the young guy on the totem poll, so i actually had to be one of the firers. Rest in peace boys.

I guess your CTS wasn't there in SFQC 04-01, since only only one soldier died. I was in that class and knew both of them. The DFAC in CJSOTF (A-stan) at Camp Vance is named in the officer's name.

Wakizashi
05-30-2004, 02:14 PM
trying to picture the rock plak in my mind again.... could have sworn two names were on it.... were u on 933? i was on 932, since we linked up with that team only at the late stages, we didn't realy hear the main story other than what was printed in the adrow.

18C4V
05-30-2004, 02:38 PM
trying to picture the rock plak in my mind again.... could have sworn two names were on it.... were u on 933? i was on 932, since we linked up with that team only at the late stages, we didn't realy hear the main story other than what was printed in the adrow.

No,
I was the team sergeant for 916. The one who died was an officer, the other who survived was an 18C. He graduated with us, he stood up from his wheelchair and walked across the stage to a standing ovation from us.

Wakizashi
05-30-2004, 04:08 PM
Ah, thks for the clarification, sorry for putting out the incorrect info. Oh yea, nice work surviving 16.... the 1's had it alot harder than the rest of us. 15 being the worst though. Of course.... i guess cadre was different when u went through

pipaz
05-30-2004, 05:36 PM
Do you happen to know if there are certain vision requirements for SF? The AF is giving me crap about my eyes and told me it's possible they won't waiver me even after a year of having the prk done.

Hmm seems like Air Force puts a lot of emphesis on your eyesight, my best gues, well it's Air Force you need to have good eyesight to fly an airplane, but than again why ground troops. Maybe its just there logic.

Just a thought mate :)

18C4V
05-31-2004, 03:49 AM
Ah, thks for the clarification, sorry for putting out the incorrect info. Oh yea, nice work surviving 16.... the 1's had it alot harder than the rest of us. 15 being the worst though. Of course.... i guess cadre was different when u went through

Lol,
No problem, now you know the correct information. Did you make E-4 yet? I know two of your 18E classmates, both of them are senior E-6's.

Hudson
06-04-2004, 09:37 AM
Nice pictures

Are LBE`s usually worn with the web belt that high on the back? looks quite uncomfortable, and is that a member of the course wearing it that way?

Can someone inform me as to what an 18x/18e is please?

Probably bone questions I know, but they have been bugging me enough to register on this site.

Thanks

WolverineBlue
06-04-2004, 10:19 AM
5 SFG know the Middle East like you and I know our neighborhoods like the back of our hand. Big up!!!!!!!!!!!!

Stl. boy
06-04-2004, 09:16 PM
Do you mind me asking the path you took and how long was it, from basic through today. And congrats by the way.

Wakizashi
06-04-2004, 10:00 PM
2 very very long years of nothing but training.... going through basic/airborne/sopc/selection/qcourse (no recycles :) ).... and u know what, i still got freaken 6 months of arabic and sere to go...(sorry am abit annoyed, was hoping for a much shorter language) never the less

the 18x program is a program the army set up to bring kids off the street (when i say kids, we have a full range of people from straight out of highschool to guys with doctors degrees) straight into the pipeline into special forces.... they go through all the training a normal person goes through.... plus a few things to bring them up to speed. I think the army website has some info on it if your interested.

18e is one of the actually jobs in US SF, 18e just happens to be a special forces communication sergeant.

as for if its worth the long long years of army training, absolutely... without a shadow of a doubt

as for the high riding of the LBE, im not sure which picture... but most of us high ride the lbe/v because when your in the ****e shooting, for me, its easier to get to magazines and such, without having to rotate completely my body... if that makes any sense. Plus, most of us like rack style equipment, which is kinda like high riding a lbe, unfortunately sometimes we need to wear the older gear do to it being a school environment.

hope the info helped.... excuse grammer/spelling

Wakizashi
06-04-2004, 10:02 PM
oh yea, got my e4 finally after sage.... long time coming heh... looks like they are going to send us to the board for e5 during language... so we go to teams basically as an e5 p, ready for e6

usa320
06-04-2004, 11:32 PM
For quite a while, Lasik was a disqualifier for selection. Perhaps things have changed since the procedure has improved some

I can shed a bit of light on this.

The air force does require fair eye sight, for obvious reasons. Last time i checked people with lasik surgery were NOT allowed flight positions. The reason being is lasik surgery basically uses a laser to cut some small slits in the eyeball. When the pilot pulls more than 3 or 4 G's in the aircraft, its possible that the slits in the pilots eyeballs may literally tear, causing permanent damage to the eyeball.

I think i read something about the Navy doing clinical trials of an alternative to Lasik that would NOT cause this problem for pilots, but im not sure...

With regards to SF language training, what languages do you learn there? Only arabic or other languages? IMHO it would probably be most helpful to learn some key phrases in many languages, seeing as many of these tribal regions in the middle east and southwest asia have a mesh of different cultures and linguistics.

I know English and Spanish fluently, and im pretty good at Italian as well. Also i know a bit of Russian and Turkish.

And thanks for your photos Wakizashi, and thanks for your service as well. Good lucks and stay sharp.

Pook2
06-05-2004, 01:06 AM
In the book "US Special Forces" ( sorry I forgot the author) it tells the story of one A-team who was sent in early in the Afghan war. They humped many miles through the mountains before they made contact with a group of rebel fighters. First they tried to communicate in English, no luck. Then they tried Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, German, and finally Russian, which one of the rebels spoke, and they proceeded with thier mission.

Hudson
06-05-2004, 04:22 AM
Thanks for the reply most helpful

Did not relise you could join Amrican Special Forces straight from civi street

With regards to my comments on the LBE`s if I could figure out how to post the pictures I would. My comments were regarding the last two pictures posted by Wakizashi on his first post. Hope that makes sense. The pouches are low but the rear center of the belt is pulled quite high up the back.

sigh...wishing i had not started this...and wondering why I actually care....

cheers[/img]

Wakizashi
06-05-2004, 07:54 AM
heh, now i know what your talking about.... actually in those pictures, the LBE is not connected in the front, basically the man is wearing it relaxed. If it was connected in front, the magazine/canteen part would be much higher on the chest, not low like it looks in the picture. Im not sure if you'ev ever worn an lbe, but alot of guys wear it not connected when they aren't in a gunfight or such.

As for language school .... languages... you get asigned a language depending on which group you get.... out of the 7 groups (5 active, 2 ng). For example, if you were getting first group, you would probably learn korean or some asian themed.... fifth group most of the guys are learning farsi or arabic.... and so on with all the groups. Heck, even a few 7th groupers i heard got arabic.

hope this helped.

Hudson
06-05-2004, 01:31 PM
Thanks

I take it that it is worn like a chest rig. I saw the pictures and assumed it was meant to be webbing. Ive used the British 58 pattern and the PLCE equipment which is worn quite low around the hip area. So you can get more pouches on the back and your bergen can sit on them. Im sure you have something similar. The link shows what I mean better, but the video quality is a bit rubbish

http://www.janes.com/defence/video/squadfin.mpg

Looking forward to any future photo you post.

Thanks again for your help

End of bone questions (for now anyway)