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Adux
02-09-2009, 11:56 AM
http://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/l2009020921981dotjpg


http://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/l2009020921982dotjpg

http://pib.nic.in/photo/2009/Feb/l2009020921981dotjpg.


Amphibious Landing Exercise off Gujarat Coast - PIB (http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=47351)

The Indian Army, Navy and the Air Force today jointly conducted the largest ever Amphibious Exercise codenamed "EXERCISE TROPEX-2009" at Madhavpur beach, Gujarat. The amphibious landing, the most complex of all military manoeuvres involving coordination and synergy from conceptualization to planning and final execution, was ably demonstrated on the shores of Madhavpur. The element of Coast Guard was also a part of this short, swift and intense conflict.

The pre-assault operations of planning, mobilization and embarkation having been achieved at Karwar, the Amphibious Task Force sailed from Karwar on February 05, 2009 and landed on the shores of Madhavpur today using the newly inducted Landing Platform Dock (LPD) INS Jalashwa, several Landing Ship Tank Large {LST(L)}, fleet ships with their integral helicopters, shore-based aircraft and submarines from the Indian Navy and Hovercraft of the Coast Guard. This is the first time the Joint Doctrine on Amphibious Warfare of the Indian Armed Forces which was formulated last year was put into practice with its full scope. As a precursor to the present operation, a tri-service landing operation, 'TRIVENI' was conducted at Lakshadweep Islands in early January this year.

Air support is critical to any amphibious operations since mortars and artilliary are not available abinitio on landing. HQ Southern Western Air Command deployed its Jaguars which carry a large array of weapons, flying at 200 feet pulled up and carried out rocket attacks with pin-point accuracy on simulated enemy targets. MiG 29 aircraft with its state of the art radar and ultra modern missiles carried out Combat Air Patrol over Madhopur to out-manoeuvre incoming enemy aircraft.

Tanks, Armoured Personnel Carriers and Infantry troops of 91 Infantry Brigade of the Sudarshan Chakra Corps were carried in both stand-off and hard beaching modes. Use of deployment of troops exploiting third dimension, i.e. airborne and heliborne formed an integral part of the exercise. AN-32 aircraft paradropped Para troopers from the skies followed by slithering operations by MI-8 helicopters to deploy troops at the assault area. Troops in waves emerged from the sea and carried out effective assaults on the beach of Madhavpur. The defensive layout depicting the enemy were from the Golden Katar Division of the Indian Army.

The exercise exhibited high level of coordination and synergy between the Armed Forces to carry out such swift and intense conflict during military operations. It also provided tremendous training value through the testing of human and material endurance, execution of organizational and logistics plans and finally delivering the punch in a mock battle.

The exercise was witnessed by Air Marshal KD Singh, AOC in C, South Western Air Command, Vice Admiral JS Bedi, FOC in C, Western Naval Command and Lieutenant General Pradeep Khanna, GOC in C, Southern Command and other senior military officers from the three services.

Adux
02-09-2009, 11:58 AM
http://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/Project17ddotjpg


Shivalik-class frigates ready for trial

Mumbai, Feb 08: The first of the three Shivalik-class stealth frigates being built at Mazagon Dock here is ready for sea trial in March-April and it would be delivered to the Indian Navy in the next few months.

"We are taking the frigate for sea trials after March. We may deliver the frigate either before the monsoon or after the monsoon," an official of Mazagon Dock said.

"Delivery of the frigate during the monsoon will not be appropriate," the official said.

The Dock has begun work on the second and third frigates, too. The company expects to finish and deliver remaining frigates by 2010, the official said. ……………..

www.zeenews.com/nation/2009-02-09/505715news.html (http://www.zeenews.com/nation/2009-02-09/505715news.html)

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:06 PM
Too little, too lateCdr Gurpreet S Khurana
Despite lessons from the past when India was subjugated by major sea powers, modern India is not particularly known for a maritime outlook. Recent events go further to underscore the ‘sea-blindness’ of its policymakers, which bears the potential to undermine not only India’s ‘vital’ interests, but also its foremost strategic imperative of ‘self-preservation.’
On 15 September 2008, Somali pirates hijacked MT Stolt Valor and held 18 of its Indian crewmen hostage. The Indian government took more than a month to respond. Furthermore, it was evident — at least from media reports — that its decision to dispatch warships for anti-piracy patrol was driven neither by the crisis per se nor by the recommendations of its Navy. It seemed to be impelled by public opinion, mobilised by the wife of Stolt Valor’s master.
The response was not only ‘too late’ but ‘too little’ as well. Even factoring the presence of warships from other countries, the sea area in question is too vast for a few warships to prevent attacks by the 1,000-odd Somali pirates operating in groups of 25 to 30. Once a merchant ship, fishing boat or yacht has been hijacked and taken into Somalia’s territorial waters, patrolling is pointless from the perspective of the victim vessel. A covert rescue operation by Special Forces in territorial waters then becomes exigent. http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/nov2008/News/14800160_indian_defence_100dotjpg (http://www.indiandefencereview.com/)
However, New Delhi dithered to task its Navy for something that was legally permitted and more importantly, encouraged by UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1816 of June 2008.
In contrast, many other seafaring nations like Denmark and France used the said legal provision for commando action in Somali waters, leading to the rescue of their citizens and capture or elimination of pirates.
Of course, there are risks involved in such an operation, such as in terms of adverse international ramifications of collateral damage.
But if the use of force is ‘proportionate,’ its legitimacy can be justified. Even a failed mission is invaluable for deterring pirate activity.



Nourishing the monsterIt was thus hardly surprising that by the time UNSCR 1816 (June 2008) neared the end of its six-month life, it had made little progress to rein in the pirates.
The success achieved by Indian warships to neutralise some of the criminals is commendable, but it has hardly made a difference, perhaps even in terms of deterrence.
In December 2008, concerted efforts of the US, Belgium, France, Greece, Liberia and South Korea led the UN Security Council to adopt UNSCR 1851, which went further to authorise international military action against pirates on Somalia’s land territory.
But India — acclaimed as a “regional naval power” — was nowhere on the scene to display the will for a similar response.
This was not the first time that Indian lives were held hostage by Somali pirates. There have been many such occasions since February 2006 when the Indian ship MV Bhaktisagar was hijacked along with its 22 crewmen.
In all cases, the pirates got away with substantial sums of money as ransom.
Bitter experiences of terrorism have lately led Indian policymakers to discard negotiation as an option in hostage situations.
However, when a situation relates to piracy, there seems to be no resort other than waiting for the shipping company involved to pay ransom money to the pirates.
There is little realisation that this is akin to whetting the pirates’ appetite and providing nourishment to a ‘monster.’
.
Where’s the will?Piracy off Somalia and the Gulf of Aden became rampant since the first half of 2005. This maritime area falls well within India’s primary area of strategic interest, which has often been articulated by its political leadership.
Sixty percent of its trade transits through these seas. Besides, considering that India contributes more than 1,00,000 seafarers to the global shipping fleet (11 percent of world’s mercantile human resource), many of the 25,000-odd merchant vessels traversing these seas each year are crewed by Indians.
Despite so much at stake in the area, it took India a long time and unusual circumstances to deploy its naval power; and that too, sans its full potential.
Its well-trained and world renowned Marine Commandos (MARCOS) have since been employed on the warships on patrol for ‘visit and search’ if and when the warship succeeds in making the pirates surrender. However, this is the task of a ‘ship’s boarding party,’ rather than the elite MARCOS, who have been imparted specialised training for hostage rescue.
This indicates that despite possessing the capability, India is not yet poised to secure its expanding vital overseas interests. Perhaps, this is due to the absence of will on the part of Indian decision-makers to take calculated risks, besides their lack of awareness of military operations, especially those relating to the maritime realm.


The stark realityNow let’s appraise India’s ability to respond to trans-national cross-coast threats to its homeland. There is probably a sense of complacency among Indian policymakers since the probability of traditional military threat manifesting through an amphibious assault is low.
While this perception is not unwarranted, it does not factor two stark realities with regard to low-intensity threats. Firstly, many of India’s island territories are uninhabited and remain extremely vulnerable. Secondly, ‘non-state actors’ from neighbouring countries have the advantage of penetrating incognito from seawards, by mixing with the local populace engaged in dense maritime activity.
To attack Mumbai, the terrorist-laden mother ship made an unimpeded transit across all Indian maritime zones well into its sovereign 12-nautical mile (nm) territorial sea.
The terrorists even dared to conduct a mid-sea transfer into the inflatable craft barely 3 nm off the coast, which was close enough to be observed from the shore without optical aids.
Evidently, the planners of the brazen strike were confident that they would not be detected.
However, holding the Navy or Coast Guard accountable for the attacks indicates the lack of awareness of ‘matters maritime.’
By its inherent nature, the ocean is the most unregulated domain on earth. There are more than 50,000 fishing vessels registered in Gujarat and Maharashtra, with an equal number being unregistered. Almost all of these rely on shallow-water ‘catch’ in territorial waters.
The territorial sea of about 37,000 sq km adjoining India and Pakistan itself translates into about three fishing boats operating in each sq km of the area.
In practical terms, many areas adjoining fishing villages and ports have hundreds of these boats operating across the entire visual seafront.
Added to it are the other equally intense maritime-economic activities - including the offshore supply vessels (OSV) catering to the extraction of hydrocarbon resources as well as those involved in coastal and overseas trade.
Given the practically infeasible proposition of boarding and searching each vessel, any open-ended intelligence input of a “probable sea-borne infiltration” (as was provided in this case) would hardly suffice for any maritime security force to sift the terrorist-borne vessel from those engaged in legitimate activity.
Even with the latest technological means currently available worldwide, achieving a complete domain awareness of the maritime activity in busy coastal areas is virtually impossible.
Major maritime nations have lately initiated intense efforts to improve such awareness through means like coastal radar chains, complemented by electronic identification equipment on vessels engaged in legitimate activities.
However, these measures would take time to take effect, even if the impediment of astronomical costs involved can be overcome by a developing country like India. In the interim, it would be more realistic to sanitise the sea-front up to a couple of nautical miles from the coast, with particular emphasis on the seaward approach routes to ports.


The weakest linkTowards this end, following the landing of explosives on the Maharashtra coast in 1993 (that led to the infamous Mumbai blasts), India’s eight coastal (provincial) states were directed to establish marine police stations and allocated funds for the purchase of patrol boats.
This was essential as the Navy and Coast Guard are not meant for coastal defence. (The word ‘coast-guard’ is actually a misnomer).
Till date however, barring one or two states, none have implemented coastal patrols on the premise that the operating and maintenance costs are too high to be borne by the state government.
Ironically, while these states have been unwilling to give up their jurisdiction/authority over their respective 12-nautical mile seaward area to central government agencies, many of their brand new boats have been junked without having even been put into water.
Evidently, the gravity of the threat was never realised. Despite the harrowing experience of 1993, the government of Maharashtra, which prides itself in governing the land of the 18th century Maratha Admiral Kanoji Angre with its strong maritime traditions, has been among the foremost of the defaulters.
On its part, the central government has adopted a laissez faire attitude to the complacency of the states. Also, until after the Mumbai terror attack, national law (Coastal Regulation Zone notification of 1991) did not permit the state marine police to build police stations within 500 metres from the coast.
Sadly thus, long-term environmental protection was given precedence over the looming threat from seaward. Furthermore, despite the Navy and security analysts clamouring for a central apex body to co-ordinate and oversee the security-related activities of various departments/ministries involved with maritime issues, ‘static inertia’ in the government machinery has been too overwhelming for this essential change.
The ‘sea-blindness’ in India seems to be a systemic phenomenon. At the outset, we as Indians must acknowledge our ‘sea-blindness’ before we set out to put our house in order. Much against what one might tend to believe, the sea no longer presents a barrier for trans-national low-intensity threats that seek to undermine India’s survival as a nation-state.
The maritime domain cannot remain the ‘weakest link’ in the chain of India’s comprehensive security.
Image: A Scorpène class submarine, jointly developed by the French company DCNS and the Spanish company Navantia. The Indian Navy has ordered six of them, to be built indigenously at Mazagon Dock Limited. Photograph copyright Indian Defence Review. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.
Unsung Heroes: His last cigarette (http://sify.com/news/imagegallery/galleryDetail.php?hcategory=14684615&hgallery=14762526) | External link: Combating Maritime Piracy (http://www.cfr.org/publication/18376/combating_maritime_piracy.html#1)
http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14853090_Khurana_150dotjpgCdr Gurpreet S Khurana is a Research Fellow, Institute for Defence Studies & Analyses (IDSA), New Delhi.
COURTESY: INDIAN DEFENCE REVIEW (http://www.indiandefencereview.com/)










http://publication.samachar.com/topstorytopmast.php?sify_url=http://sify.com/news/imagegallery/galleryDetail.php?hcategory=13733685||hgallery=14853088||?vsv=TopHP1

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:09 PM
India sends 2nd ship to Africa


New Delhi, Feb. 8: The Indian Navy has sent warship INS Tabar to the Gulf of Aden to conduct anti-piracy operations, an official source said here Sunday.
The navy's guided missile frigate INS Beas is already in the region patrolling the seas against pirates.
"INS Tabar has sailed from Mumbai to the Gulf of Aden to conduct patrolling," a senior navy official told IANS requesting anonymity.
The Gulf of Aden have turned extremely dangerous for commercial ships following attacks by Somalia-based pirates. India is among several countries, including the US, Britain, France, Iran, South Korea and China, who have sent warships to patrol the seas to prevent attacks.
INS Tabar, one of the frontline warships of the navy, last year was successful in repulsing pirate attacks and sinking one of the pirates' "mother ship".
The Indian Navy had recently scaled down its anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. The navy replaced its Delhi class missile-guided destroyer INS Mysore by a smaller INS Beas due to operational engagements back home.
The move has come days after reports appeared in the Chinese media that an Indian submarine and two Chinese warships, on anti-piracy mission in the region, were "locked in a tense standoff for at least an hour" after which the Indian submarine was forced to surface.
The Indian Navy had, however, said that none of its submarines was there.


http://www.deccanchronicle.com/india-sends-2nd-ship-africa-167

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:10 PM
Production of MiG-29K
http://pilot.strizhi.info/2009/02/08/6201

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:10 PM
Govt reassessing Navy's needs, says Minister. (http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/blnus/14061651.htm)

The Government was reassessing the needs of the Indian Navy and would boost its capabilities in the aftermath of the 26/11 terror strikes in Mumbai, a Union minister said here on Friday.

“Naval needs are being reassessed in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in Mumbai,'' Minister of State for Defence Rao Inderjit Singh said here. The Mumbai terror attack perpetrators had entered the metropolis through the sea route, demonstratin g loopholes in the country's coastal security.

Earlier, the Minister kickstarted the Rs 826-crore Mazgaon Dock Modernisation Programme, scheduled to be completed by 2011. The modernisation project is being funded by the Indian Navy,'' he said, adding that the shipyard would be building submari nes, frigates and destroyers.

The process for utilisation of defence funds were being simplified, he said, adding that “funds given for defence projects should be spent on time''.


Too little too late

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:11 PM
From Indian Express:


The first of the three stealth frigates awaiting commissioning — the Shivalik launched in April 2003 — now undergoing trials, is expected to be commissioned by the Indian Navy by April.
Although the date is tentative, a spokesperson from Mazagaon Dock Limited (MDL), the country’s largest shipbuilding and offshore fabrication yard, confirmed it to The Indian Express.

The second and third frigates of the same class, the Satpura and Sahyadri, would be commissioned by 2010, an official said.

Apart from the commissioning of Shivalik, designed indigenously by the Directorate of Naval Design, MDL officials are also gearing up for the launch of the second Kolkata-class stealth destroyer, the Navy’s latest addition to the first, launched in March 2006.

Explaining the difference between commissioning and launch, an MDL officer said that a launch means the ship is launched into sea but essential fittings such as electrical and hull fittings are still to go and that may take two to four years. Commissioning would mean handing over the ship, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, is the Indian Navy.

The official was speaking during the foundation-stone laying ceremony of the Rs 826 crore modernisation programme undertaken by the public sector undertaking (PSU), which is being funded by the Navy.

According to MDL, the modernisation project comprises creating a new wet basin to park more ships, adding a 300-tonne capacity Goliath crane and setting up of a modular workshop as well as a cradle assembly store.

The new wet basin is of prime importance as it would help MDL start work on more ships than it can under the current set up. According to the spokesperson, at the moment there is space for just three ships-and-a-half (under construction) in the wet basin. “After the new one comes up, we can park three more ships and begin work on them,” he said. “The biggest reason for the delay in delivery of ships is because of limitations in parking under-construction ships,” said the MDL official.

After laying down the foundation stone of the modernisation project, Minister of State for Defence Production, Rao Inderjit Singh, stressed the need for increasing efficiency in PSUs. Without mentioning MDL, he said, “Production efficiency has not always been a hallmark of PSUs.” He urged workers to make relentless efforts to meet production deadlines.

Vice Admiral (Retd.) H S Malhi, CMD, MDL, in his remark on the project, said the target of the ‘Mini Ratna’ PSU was to increase value of production (VOP) to Rs 3,000 crore from the current Rs 2,321 crore.

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:15 PM
After 26/11, Defence Ministry puts purchase of hi-tech weapons for Army on fast track


New Delhi: Jolted by 26/11, the Defence Ministry has directed the Indian Army to fast-track its hardware acquisition on the pattern of US land forces in Afghanistan and has projected more than 30 per cent hike in the capital outlay (Rs 42,000-43,000 crore) for the armed forces in the defence budget for the coming fiscal to maintain its conventional edge in the region. The Ministry took up the delay in military hardware acquisition with the Army as it has not been able to spend its budgetary capital outlay this year though it is less than that of the Air Force and the Navy. While the budgetary capital outlay for 2008-09 for the 1.1 million-strong Army was Rs 7,607 crore, its revised estimates are pegged at Rs 5,740 crore. Both the Navy and the Air Force are expected to spend their respective capital outlays of Rs 16,108 crore and Rs 8,564 crore.
Government sources told The Sunday Express that the Army has been told to expedite the purchase of the latest generation Harop loitering weapon system aka missile firing drone, Heron long-duration unmanned aerial vehicles, armoured vehicles and Tangushka air defence systems. A classic example of delay in the Army is field guns or howitzers to replace the ageing Bofors 155 mm gun. Despite the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) giving an in-principle approval to the Army’s proposal way back in 2001, the force is still to get back to the CCS with the finalised gun.
The fact is that Army Deputy Chief of Staff (Systems) Lt General Manbir Singh Dadwal was sent by the Government (http://www.indianexpress.com/special/government,%20india/) to Israel after the Mumbai (http://www.indianexpress.com/special/maharashtra,%20politics/) attack to explore hardware options to tackle asymmetric threats posed by non-state players in the region. With the US land forces in Afghanistan in mind, the Army is all set to acquire the Harop weapon system that has the capability to loiter in the enemy territory and pick up targets through its electro-optical sensors and destroy them with its 23-kg warhead. The Defence Ministry is giving a hard look at the delays in weapon systems acquisitions as the capital outlay budget of Rs 32,826 crore was revised to Rs 28,110 crore but only Rs 27903 crore could be spent due to limited absorption capacities of the armed forces and the delays in due diligence particularly in the Army in 2007-08. In 2008-09, the budget capital outlay of Rs 37,482 crore was revised to Rs 30,614 crore as payouts earmarked for Admiral Gorshkov ($250-300 million), Brahmos missiles (Rs 2000 crore) and Eurocopter (Rs 3200 Cr) for the Indian Army were not made.
The Defence Ministry is now rushing to spend the revised capital outlay of Rs 30, 614 crore even though it will not be able to pay the initial amount for the $ 2 billion acquisition of long-range maritime reconnaissance aircraft from Boeing until the US Congress (http://www.indianexpress.com/special/congress,%20politics/) approves the deal. Also, the Finance Ministry has objected to any decision to park the advances with the defence PSUs. The South Block is now projecting a capital outlay of Rs 42,000-43,000 crore for 2009-10 keeping in mind the initial payouts (Rs 50,000 crore) for multi-role medium range combat aircraft acquisition for the Indian Air Force.
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/after-26-11-defence-ministry-puts-purchase-of-hitech-weapons-for-army-on-fast-track/420634/0

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:15 PM
Defence Ministry surrenders Rs 16,000 cr

Pioneer News Service | New Delhi

Fails to use budget allocation to buy weaponry


Antony blames procedures, red tape


The modernisation plans of the armed forces to maintain operational preparedness have been badly compromised as the Defence Ministry surrendered a whopping Rs 16,000 crore in the five years of the UPA rule.

The Defence Minister returned to the Government kitty nearly Rs 5,000 crore in the 2003-04 budget, Rs 1,300 crore in 2005-06, Rs 3,000 crore in 2006-07, Rs 4,200 crore in 2007-08. It is estimated that the Ministry will surrender Rs 400 crore in the current fiscal also.

Despite repeated assurances by the Government that funds will not be a constraint in equipping the soldiers with the best weapons, the unspent capital outlay tells a different story.

In fact, the cumulative impact of the paucity of weapons and equipment was felt acutely in the wake of the Mumbai terror attacks in November last year as the armed forces were not ready for a conventional war. They were simply not equipped to carry out military strikes against terrorists in Pakistan and the Government was forced to hasten the procurement of weapons through fast track.

Given the reluctance to utilise the allocated funds over the years, the armed forces were not able to procure a whole range of weaponry ranging from artillery guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, electronic warfare systems and radars to name a few.

To quote an instance about the state of affairs on tardy pace of modernisation, the Army was yet to buy new 155mm artillery guns since 1987 in the wake of the Bofors scandal. While the services were not so concerned with big-ticket items, they wanted equipment for maintaining operational preparedness and repeated surrendering of funds every year took a toll of this crucial aspect, sources said here on Wednesday.

Highlighting the importance of this factor, they gave the example of the troops engaged in counter-terrorist operations in Jammu and Kashmir and the North-East. They were yet to be equipped with the state-of-the-art and lighter bullet-proof jackets, night vision devices, top quality rifles and communication systems, sources said here on Wednesday.

Elaborating upon the aspect of operational preparedness, they said in case the Government decided to exercise the military option against Pakistan, the Army lacked long range artillery guns to pummel strategic locations and the IAF did not have enough number of precision guided ammunition to neutralise terrorist camps without collateral damage.

As regards the poor radar coverage of the 7,000 km long coastline in the aftermath of the terrorists sneaking into Mumbai through the sea route, the story was same as the proposals to acquire radars and patrol boats were there on paper but non-utilisation of funds saw virtually no acquisition in the last couple of years, they said.

Reasons like contractual obligations overlapping two financial years and long gestation period of defence deals due to stringent technical trials and price negotiations were justified in delays and, therefore, unspent money.

However, fear of witch-hunt of military and civil bureaucracy in defence deals and probes by various agencies were major factors behind the slow rate of modernisation. Sources said officials and for that matter political leadership was scared to take a decision in defence procurements and more so when the incumbent Government was to face an election within the next 100 days. Appreciating these reasons, Defence Minister AK Antony admitted here on Wednesday that "unnecessary procedures, bottlenecks and red-tape" should be cut down for hastening procurement procedures.

"We need to cut down on the unnecessary procedures, bottlenecks and red-tapism in our procurement mechanism," he said while addressing a seminar. The Minister said “even though our Government is earmarking huge budgets, it is not being fully reflected in our modernisation efforts.”

Elaborating upon this aspect, Antony said “allocation of money has never been a problem. The issue has rather been the timely and judicious utilisation of the money allocated.”

He said the Government had come up with the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) to cut down red-tapism and delays and if required, further changes can also be made.

"We have framed our defence procurement procedures. If changes in the present procedures are required to ensure speedy procurement, we will examine them," Antony said. He also urged the armed forces to timely and judiciously utilise the money allocated to them.



http://www.dailypioneer.com/154469/Defence-Ministry-surrenders-Rs-16000-cr.html

Adux
02-09-2009, 12:34 PM
http://www.domain-b.com/aero/20090209_dr_prahlad.html

DRDO has developed extreme technologies, says Dr Prahlad news

In a wide ranging,comprehensive interview on DRDO's capabilties and development programme, Dr Prahalad, chief controller R&D (SI), points out that the gap between users needs and DRDO's capabilities is reducing. The organisation is now fully capable of working out a road map with the army, navy and air force to develop weapon systems needed over the next 5-7 years.

Dr Prahalad,
Distinguished scientist and chief controller, R&D (SI), DRDO

1. Could you speak about the Akash and Nag missiles? How do they fare with comparable technologies and how far away are they from induction?

The Akash and Nag missiles were part of the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme begun in 1984 under Dr Abdul Kalam as the chairman. We then took a purposeful decision that Akash and Nag would be the most complex and sophisticated missile systems in the IGMDP.

So, it was given the maximum time also, as compared to Prithvi, Trishul and Agni and others. Akash and Nag were given nearly 15 years. So, we knew at that time it was a very complex system and taking up the challenge we began developing these two systems.

In case of Akash, it has been uniquely configured and customised for our own Indian Army and air force. During the initial discussions with the army and the air force, they gave some requirements like it should be mobile, it should have a 30 km range, a very effective high kill probability, it should be integrated with the automatic command and control system, it cannot be manually operated, should have multiple target handling capability, which means that several targets could be engaged with several missiles simultaneously.

In most missile systems you have boost and coast – that is you boost the missile for some time and allow it to coast, or, boost, sustain and coast. The requirement here, however, was continuous thrust, or, all the way thrust. Once you start coasting, the maneuverability of the missile comes down. This was not acceptable to the services. They felt it should be continuously maneuverable till it intercepts the target, which meant the requirement was that the power/thrust had to be continuously on.

These were a unique set of requirements –such a missile doesn't exist anywhere in the world and it meant that we had to uniquely configure the missiles. That's how Akash was realised, We took 5 years more than what we promised to the army and air force, but when tested in the last development phase the results were 9/9 –that is out of the 9 missiles tested all them met the guidance and accuracy control requirements. Based on these tests the Indian Air Force has placed orders for 2 squadrons and the army is expected to follow suit.

Bharat Electronics will be the nodal production agency along with Bharat Dynamics and there will be at least 40 industries from the public and private sectors that will be involved with the manufacture of these missiles in large numbers.

So, this is one story and we expect that based on the expenditure of Rs600 crore that we have invested in the Akash missile, business worth about Rs7,000 crore should result for radars, missiles, launchers and control systems all put together within the next 5 years.

So, this is the story for Akash.

Coming to Nag, similarly, this missile is meant for the army, which wanted a missile with a 4-km range and fire-and-forget capability. That means we launch the missile from a tank and leave the place - this is also called the shoot-and-scoot technique. The Nag was specifically designed with a fire-and-forget capability.

The missile has what is called a tandem warhead. The warhead will have two stages – in the first stage the missile will make a hole in an enemy tank and in the second stage it will go inside and blow it up. This is a very special technology and we had to perfect it.

So this is the Nag- a tandem warhead, 4-km, tank-mounted, fire-and-forget, and very accurate, missile.

The last flight test has been successfully completed in day and night desert conditions in short range and long range test firings and we expect the army to place an order over the next couple of months.

2. The 'Shaurya' was a surprise development – where does it fit into the Indian missile spectrum?

If you look at our long-range strategic missiles you know we have Prithvi and Agni for ballistic or near-ballistic systems. Prithvi is a liquid fuel system and Agni is a solid fuel system.

Now the Agni has certain mobility, certain freedom to move from place to place. The Prithvi has its own certain requirements - it requires preparation time because of its liquid engines.

So we had to configure a unique third missile called 'Shaurya' which can be canisterised. Once sealed in a canister, it can be taken to any place giving it great tactical and operational advantage. It canbe deployed anywhere - in hilly terrain, desert etc. It is a relatively light, highly mobile, solid propellant fuelled missile. There is no preparation required.

So it has its own USP - and as per the requirement of the services we will be taking up the production of Shaurya.

3. The country's BMD technology would appear to be moving apace – could you dwell on aspects of the technologies that are being brought into play for the whole programme?

Ballistic Missile Defence or missile defence systems, are developed based on the threat perceptions as presented to us by the armed forces, which take into consideration threats from our neighbours, their plans etc. Based on these inputs we are developing certain critical technologies against ballistic missiles.

For this we need some unique technologies, such as high-speed propulsion, which can take missiles to hypersonic speeds. You need a high burning rate, solid propellants, which can take the missile quickly to high Mach number.

We need very high accuracy guidance so that the missile can even physically obliterate a hostile missile – what is called a hit-to-kill capability. For this we need not only radio gadgets but also thermal infra-red gadgets. So for this we need a combined dual-guidance –not only radar but also imaging guidance. This requires very high accuracy algorithms.

Also we need very quick reaction systems. When somebody launches a ballistic missile the time available to react to the threat is very short - a few seconds. So, the instant you know a missile has been launched you have to launch the defence system within seconds, fly at a much higher speed than the attacking missile and intercept very accurately at very high altitudes. So this requires what is known as extreme technologies. These have now been developed and we are trying to integrate these technologies and produce a weapon that can be used by the armed forces.

4. How do you look at an era of increased international cooperation in the development of technologies in the defence sector?

This is the new era of 2000+. In the 80s when we started our major system programmes like Arjun or Sonar or IGMDP or torpedo or radar, we never had the opportunity of international co-operation.

We were buying some components and making everything in-house. We built the computer from scratch from circuit boards. That was an era where we had to do everything in-house and within our industries and everything was a long drawn out and hard process.

Whereas in 2000, fortunately, the whole world has recognised our capability by seeing our LCA, main battle tank Arjun, radars, torpedoes, missiles and small arms that are in production. Our capabilities in prototyping, developing, testing and fielding our own weapons have been recognised.

So now they know that they cannot take us for granted. If they want business, they have to work together. Many countries have come forward for collaborative research and joint development. We have projects now with USA, Israel, Russia, Italy, Germany, Belarus, Brazil, France, UK among others.

In the 80s era what used to take 15 years to make we can now make in 5 years to 7 years. So, we have cut down the development time by almost 1/3rd because of the immense opportunities for international collaboration.

5. With respect to the areas of missiles could you dwell on two aspects:

b)One being the development of technology in this sector
c)The level of operationalisation that such technology has attained
Missile technologies are front-end technologies - very challenging and display characteristics such as high speed, high lethality, high maneuverability and quick reaction. So all this require the limits of technology whether you take materials, propulsion or control.

So of the technologies for this kind of technology for eg propulsion: solid propulsion, liquid propulsion and ramjet propulsion or if you take flight control systems and autocontrol systems, we need computers, electro actuation systems, lot of software intelligence for making the control system work and then we have navigation and guidance, we have to take the missile to long distances and guide it accurately to intercept the target.

When we take the warheads, each missile requires a different type of warhead Nag requires a tandem warhead, Akash requires a fragmentation warhead, Prithvi requires a runway penetration warhead.

We also have the C4I - command, control communication and intelligence integration. How do we do it? The missile is the part of network centric operation. We have to also develop guidance on how to use radar gadgets and imaging infrared technology to recognise targets using its thermal characteristics by getting a thermal picture to reach the tank and finding out its centre of gravity to hit it at the centre of the tank. This type of technology is the imaging infrared technology and you need millimeter wave technology for very accurate guidance and infrared imaging for imaging of a target.

So these technologies are required to be simultaneously developed for the missiles India has developed.

For operationalisation, these technologies go into the missiles eg: the Akash missile the ram jet propulsion is inside; the pre-fragmented warhead technology inside, very accurate radio or radar guidance is used in the missile system and auto pilot with a very powerful computer to make the missile maneuver to hit a maneuvering target, so you can out-maneuver a maneuvering target, at low, medium and high altitudes under any conditions rain, dust, summer, winter night etc.

So, these technologies get imbibed into the missile system, the ground system, the launcher system, and is integrated into the command control network. So the technology gets operationalised in the missile systems when they get fielded.

Now how we get these technologies? We have three strategies to develop: some of it is got from academic institutions. We go to the university professors, work with them on how to develop new science and technology.

Secondly, DRDO can jointly develop new technologies with industrial partners. For example, an actuation system, which we have mostly done in DRDO-industry collaboration.

Then comes foreign collaboration. Sometimes we develop technologies with foreign collaboration with our partner countries.

If none of this works, then the final strategy is in-house development within our laboratories and we have developed many technologies in-house.

So this is how we develop new technology, new science, perfect it and incorporate it into weapon systems

6. Obviously there exists 'dynamic tension' between the need to develop indigenous technologies and the need for the
services to be in a state of readiness, armed with contemporary technologies. How do you harmonise such tensions?

Fortunately this harmonisation is already taking place. Probably there was some gap in the capabilities of DRDO and the requirements of the armed forces. They require it fast and the latest to be made available. Since things were always available to them on their tables they always were bombarded with temptations to purchase but today two things are happening - arms research development and marketing has slowed down tremendously worldwide in comparison to the '80s. They are no more developing things just like that but develop it only on demand.

Secondly the armed forces have realised that a homegrown weapon system, sonar or radar etc has many advantages to them. They will be able to get life support very easily, product up-gradation, software and customisation. So, many things are possible and finally both cost of ownership, maintenance will be much lower if it is indigenously based and the things are available at your fingertips. So the armed forces are also trying to tap DRDO's capabilities to the maximum.

The gap between the user's needs and DRDO's capabilities is reducing. Today we are able to sit down with the army, navy air force to work out a road map on the kind of weapons they would need in the next 5-7 years. What new technologies they think we should develop and how to realise these technologies?

Thus we have generated 2 road maps - one for technology and the other for products. We have had extensive discussions on these even up to how they should look. For example Rustum, a medium altitude, long endurance unmanned vehicle where we have combined QRs (qualitative requirements) where the order rate is above 100 for all forces combined. When the services say that if you can develop this within the next 4 years within our requirements, at least an order of x number will be placed. The services are ready today how much they will order called MOQ (minimum order quantity).

When we have such a guarantee from the buyers, then it is easy to go the industry which can work with us to expedite the development because the industry will make the prototype, assemble it immediately and production time or realisation time will come down. Some of the industry partners are ready to fund the development cost also, even if it is 15 per cent or 20 per cent. When they fund the development cost they become the stakeholders and then responsibility increases and then it is produced according to specifications within the stipulated time and assemble and market it as well.

So, we are tying up the industry, the MOD, the three services and DRDO – we are converging, synergising, harmonising so we work together and see that the systems are developed for the good of the country, to meet our own a la carte service - customised to the taste, schedule, performance, quality, upgradation.

Plus this is also good for the health of the Indian economy as employment opportunities increase and industry capabilities increase, even drawing orders from other countries. Based on these technologies, I have observed that many of our SME and small-scale industries getting export orders.

So you see how the level of the economy goes up, the employment potential increases, our knowledge expands, university research level goes up, and our own departments of science and technology, their own understanding and knowledge goes up. So, as a country we can see an elevation of status technologically and economically.

With this harmony we see many good things happening


Top (http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3903&start=2040#wrapheader)

Quite a revealing article!

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:08 AM
'Our defence products are indigenous'


BANGALORE: Defence Minister A K Antony on Monday expressed disappointment at the slow pace of indigenisation of defence production.

Delivering the presidential address at the international seminar on Aerospace-Perspectives and Trends in Technologies, Antony said he felt “guilty” as far as indigenisation of defence production was concerned as the growth was “very very slow”.

“We are still far behind as far as Jawaharlal Nehru’s dream on achieving self-reliance in defence sector is concerned.

Despite being fourth largest scientific community in the world, only 30 per cent of our defence products are indigenous,” he said.



On the research and development (R&D) in defence production, he said India was not spending enough and even the budgetary allocation for R&D is only 6 per cent.

“I now realise the importance of R&D. If needed, we will spend more and give all the support to safeguard the security of the country. http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/images/smilies/eekdotgif http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/images/smilies/eekdotgif I appeal to private industry to also spend more on R&D now that we are allowing 100 percent participation from them,” he said.

‘Recession will have no impact’

The Defence Minister said economic recession will not hamper modernisation programme of the armed forces and the government was fully committed to promoting modernisation in a big way.

“Our defence planning has a two-fold objective - modernisation and indigenisation. To achieve these, and to optimise transparency and fairness, the government has come out with ‘offsets’ policy. It is our firm belief that the offsets policy will prove beneficial to both the Indian industry and foreign partners,” he said.

He added a calibrated international response is needed in the wake of the recent terrorist attacks.

“The conventional means of warfare used by the terrorists as seen as in the 9/11 attacks and the Mumbai attacks, demand a calibrated international response,” Antony added.



IAF needs finest technology

Earlier in his address, Chief of Air Staff F H Major called for creation of an apex body to coordinate and regulate aerospace industry in order to cut wasteful expenditure and duplication of efforts.

“It’s time to approach issues head-on and identify core technologies to be developed and aggressively design and manufacture them. The development cycle of a product from design to operational stage should be reduced. Otherwise it runs the risk of being obsolete. I cannot let this happen in IAF given the current security scenario. IAF wants the best and finest in cutting edge aviation technology. Not just IAF, it is a national requirement,” Major said.

Space vehicle planned with three astronauts on board, says ISRO chief

BANGALORE: Buoyed by the resounding success of its Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) plans to develop a space vehicle that can carry up to three astronauts on the seven-day manned mission to space.

Speaking at an international Seminar on “Aerospace- Perspectives and Trends in Technologies”, ISRO chairman and Padma Vibhushan, G Madhavan Nair, said that the space agency is looking at developing a capsule spacecraft with service module, which can accommodate three astronauts and take it to lower earth orbit using the indigenous Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) in the year 2015.

Regarding Chandrayaan-1, Nair said that “voluminous data” has been retrieved, which would “take a few years for scientists to analyse and come out with concrete results”. “The entire mapping of the lunar surface is expected to be carried out in a year and there is no trace of water on moon so far,” he said.



HAL to build three-tonne class helicopter

BANGALORE: The government has given the go-ahead to Hindustan Aeronautics Limited to roll out the threetonne class helicopter, informed HAL chairman Ashok Baweja.

Speaking about other projects, he said that HAL is undertaking multirole transport aircraft, Indian regional transport aircraft, fifth generation fighter with stealth features, 35-tonne aircraft, uninhabited aerial vehicle and also uninhabited combat helicopter in the future.

He also emphasised on the importance to make an aircraft green for which it is necessary to reduce noise, carbon emissions, lower fuel consumption and better aerodynamic efficiency.http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/stor ... ,Antony%20 (http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/story.aspx?Title=Our+defence+products+are+indigenous&artid=pS2luQWFLm8=&SectionID=Qz/kHVp9tEs=&MainSectionID=w44iAeuGCu8=&SectionName=UOaHCPTTmuP3XGzZRCAUTQ==&SEO=Defence,%20Minister,%20A%20K%20,Antony%20),

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:08 AM
Recession will not affect defence modernisation: Antony



Special Correspondent Feels “guilty” that indigenous development and production of defence items was “very, very slow” — Photo: G.P. Sampath Kumar
http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/10/images/2009021054931301dotjpg
Thrust on MODERNISATION: Defence Minister A.K. Antony, Air Chief Marshal F.H. Major, and Pradeep Kumar, Secretary, Department of Defence Production, at the Aero India 2009 Seminar on Aerospace Perspectives and Trends in Technologies, in Bangalore on Monday. BANGALORE: India will not allow the economic recession to affect the modernisation programme of the armed forces, Defence Minister A. K. Antony said here on Monday.
Mr. Antony was presiding over the inaugural of a three-day international seminar on “Aerospace – Perspectives and Trends in Technologies,” organised as part of Aero India 2009 here.
The Minister admitted that the country was hit by economic slowdown, but asserted that the government would provide “whatever” the armed forces required for modernisation and “safeguarding national interests.”
Mr. Antony deviated from his prepared speech to respond to Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major’s emphasis on modernisation of the Air Force.
He regretted the country’s high dependence on imports for its defence requirements. With India meeting only 30 per cent of its defence requirements from within the country and imports the remaining 70 per cent, he bemoaned that the country was still “far, far away” from realising the former Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru’s dream of becoming self-reliant in defence sector.
Mr. Antony said he felt “guilty” that indigenous development and production of defence items was “very, very slow.”
He emphasised the need to enhance the expenditure on Research and Development by both the government and private players. The government was spending a mere 6 per cent of its budget on R&D, but now realised the need to increase the same.
The Minister also lamented the long time taken by Defence Research Development Organization and other private sector companies to “deliver.” “Far too much time is taken for delivery. PSUs and private sector should speed up the delivery of products.”
Fight against terror Mr. Antony called for a calibrated international response to the “unconventional” means of warfare resorted to by terrorists.
Referring to new methods adopted by terrorists to wreak havoc on the civil society as seen in the 9/11 attacks and the November Mumbai terror attacks, he said there was need for calibrated international response to prevent recurrence of such attacks in future.
The dynamics of security were changing continuously across the world and the methods used by terrorists required collective and well-coordinated response.
“Technology has to be backed up by a proactive response from the Government and the civil society in unison.”
However, India’s security objectives were rooted in core values such as democracy, secularism and peaceful co-existence.
Earlier, Air Chief Marshal Major emphasised the need for the country to embark on a focussed modernisation programme for the IAF to possess the capability to “provide a swift and potent response anywhere anytime.” He pointed out that aerospace power would play a crucial role in future conflicts. He emphasised the need for India to display a credible aerospace power, particularly in the context of a “turbulent neighbourhood.”
M. Natarajan, Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister, said India was poised to emerge as a key outsourcing hub for global aerospace industry.
Secretary to the Department of Defence Production Pradeep Kumar and President of Aeronautical Society of India Ashok Baweja were also present on the occasion.
http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/10/stories/2009021054931300.htm

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:11 AM
LiveFist Photos: Aero India 2009 / Feb 9 (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/02/livefist-photos-aero-india-2009-feb-9.html)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_o_no4M2xEPY/SZD7iTthXkI/AAAAAAAAF4E/1v4eFe-O31s/s320/DSC01557-744974dotJPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_o_no4M2xEPY/SZD7iTthXkI/AAAAAAAAF4E/1v4eFe-O31s/s1600-h/DSC01557-744974dotJPG)
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From top: First three photos are of the the ALH Dhruv built by HAL for export to Ecuador; the other two are of one of the four Luftwaffe Typhoons.

All Photos by Shiv Aroor / LiveFist
Love those Ecudorian Dhruv's, Beautiful paint scheme!



9G in a Desert Falcon! (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/02/9g-in-desert-falcon.html)

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Adux
02-10-2009, 02:35 AM
Speck, Israel Aerospace to produce UAVs (http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/10/stories/2009021055271600.htm)

Quote:
HYDERABAD: Speck Systems, a manufacturer, integrator and designer of products and computer-based solutions for improving situational awareness, will extend manufacturing and support services for mini and micro unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) of Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd (IAI).

Addressing a press conference here on Monday, K. C. M. Kumar, Chairman and Managing Director of Speck Systems, said his company was the first in India to invest on developing technology for manufacturing of UAVs on a large scale. The company had the strength to understand the real-time access to mission critical information. It could provide single-window solutions to the increasing requirements of military and civilian applications.

The company would develop domestic market and also expand to countries where the Israeli partners had agreements.

The agreement paved the way for making the products indigenously to an extent of 30-40 per cent and the initial investment was expected to be about Rs. 100 crore.

To begin with, the target application would be for military, homeland security, disaster management and police.

Speck Systems was also planning to launch commercial production of optical cameras for capturing aerial digital images. “We have gone for the calibration tests in the U.S. and hope to get into commercial production and supply even to the developed markets in the next six months,” Mr. Kumar said.

The company was proposing to deploy light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology in the country whenever the Government granted permission.

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:36 AM
Sukhoi opens office in New Delhi for fifth generation jets


In October 2007, India and Russia signed the fifth generation fighter aircraft agreement under which keeping in view the Indian Air Force’s specific requirements a lighter version would be developed for India
Moscow: Ahead of the signing of a contract for the joint development of fifth generation fighter aircraft (FGFA), the leading Russian manufacturer Sukhoi has opened its office in the Indian capital.
“India and Russia are to shortly sign the general contract for the joint development of fifth generation fighter and the New Delhi office will facilitate speedy implementation of the project,” Sukhoi CEO Mikhail Pogosyan said.
The FGFA based on Sukhoi’s secret PAKFA project is expected to make its maiden flight later this year. This will be the second major Indo-Russian joint venture after the supersonic cruise missile BrahMos.
In October 2007, India and Russia signed the FGFA agreement under which keeping in view the Indian Air Force’s specific requirements a lighter version would be developed for India.
Indian experts will take part in all the developmental stages, including the development of new generation weapon systems for the combat aircraft.
In the fifth generation fighter aircraft, Russia and Indian would invest 50% each. Though yet no final cost figures have been made public, the joint venture project is estimated to cost over $5 billions.


http://www.livemint.com/2009/02/09171719/Sukhoi-opens-office-in-New-Del.html

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:54 AM
TCS to design Jet for Saab

10 Feb 2009, 1047 hrs IST, IANS

Print (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/4104043.cms?prtpage=1) EMail (http://javascript%3cb%3e%3c/b%3E:openWindowmail1%28%27/mail/4104043.cms%27,410,500%29;) Discuss Share (http://javascript%3cb%3e%3c/b%3E:void%280%29) Save (http://javascript%3cb%3e%3c/b%3E:showdivlayer%284104043,%27topdiv%27%29;) Comment (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Infotech/TCS_to_design_Jet_for_Saab_/articleshow/4104043.cms#write) Text:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?photoid=3549042

BANGALORE: Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) will design and develop the next-generation fighter jet Gripen for the Swedish aerospace major Saab, a
senior official of the IT bellwether said.

Saab, whose strike fighter Gripen is in race for the Indian Air Force (IAF) order to induct 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) in its fleet, has set up an aeronautical design and development centre with TCS in Bangalore for the multi-million, multi-year contract.

"As part of the contract, we will transfer technology and competencies in the aerospace sector to the TCS centre, which will play a key role in the development of the next-generation Gripen and other products," Saab vice-president Kjell Moller told reporters here.

Besides providing engineering services and solutions, the centre will explore market opportunities in structures, systems and avionics. About 100 TCS engineers will work at the centre in the first year of operations.

"The contract will continue irrespective of us getting the IAF order, which envisages technology transfer and production license to state-run Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd for manufacturing about 100 of the 126 aircraft," Moller told said.

TCS vice-president for engineering and industrial services Regu Ayyaswamy said the centre would also target the global and Indian aerospace markets for similar contracts to leverage its technology resources and exceptional talent pool.

"The centre will function as part of TCS and not as a joint venture with equity participation either by Saab or us. We will, however, invest in setting up advanced simulator from Saab, in developing aerospace structures and simulating software for avionics," Ayyaswamy said.

If Saab wins the IAF order for its Gripen, the TCS centre will benefit from the defence offsets clause that mandates the manufacturer to reinvest 30 percent of the contract in the country for outsourcing components and sub-systems.

The centre will also enable Saab to get a foothold in India to grab opportunities emerging in the aerospace and defence sector.

"The partnership is not limited to Gripen, but is aimed towards building joint capability to leverage collective strengths the world over," Saab chief executive Ake Svensson said in a statement.

TCS chief executive and managing director S Ramadorai said the tie-up had a strong blend of Saab's technology solutions and the IT firm's global engineering model to address the emerging opportunities in aerospace and defence sector.

Saab officials declined to specify the timeframe for the development of the next-generation Gripen and its spin-offs to TCS subsequently.





http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Infotech/TCS_to_design_Jet_for_Saab_/articleshow/4104043.cms

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:59 AM
Security Industry (http://www.upi.com/Security_Industry/)

View archive (http://www.upi.com/Security_Industry/2009/) | RSS Feed (http://www.upi.com/rss/Security_Industry/) http://www.upi.com/img/feed_icndotpng (http://www.upi.com/rss/Security_Industry/)

France transfers more anti-tank missile technology to India


By LEANDER SCHAERLAECKENS, UPI Correspondent
Published: Feb. 9, 2009 at 1:51 PM

BRUSSELS, Feb. 9 (UPI) -- France transfers more anti-tank missile technology to India
Under a new license agreement, state-owned Bharat Dynamics Ltd. of India will produce at least 4,000 Milan 2T missiles developed by French company MBDA, Defense News reported last week.
The Milan 2T is an anti-tank guided missile that, unlike the standard Milan missile, has a tandem warhead, making it effective against special armor for explosives on tanks.
The Indian army already has ordered its first batch of Milan 2Ts at a bargain-basement price of about $14,000 per unit. The missile will be manufactured at factories in India, just as the regular Milan has been since 1983.
The Indian army will use the new Milan 2Ts for infantry and anti-tank operations. The Indian air force is also said to be interested in the advanced Milan technology and its possible adaptations.

Reports say MBDA and Bharat Dynamics are allegedly also in talks about technology transfer of the Milan[/URL] Extended Range version.



[URL]http://www.upi.com/Security_Industry/2009/02/09/France_transfers_more_anti-tank_missile_technology_to_India/UPI-79501234205469/ (http://www.upi.com/Security_Industry/2009/02/09/France_transfers_more_anti-tank_missile_technology_to_India/UPI-79501234205469/2/#)

Adux
02-10-2009, 03:02 AM
EUROJET’S EJ200 at Aero India Air Show 2009

EUROJET Turbo GmbH, the leading European military engine consortium, will be exhibiting the EJ200 engine at the Aero India Air Show 2009. Visitors to the Eurofighter stand (Hall C, No. 7) will have the opportunity to view the advanced technology of the EJ200 engine, which powers the Eurofighter Typhoon, and take a look inside the engine through an interactive engine monitor.

EUROJET is contracted to produce more than 1,500 EJ200 engines to power a total of 707 Eurofighter Typhoon multi-role combat aircraft ordered by six nations. The fleet of over 400 engines in service with Eurofighter Typhoon fleets operated by the Air Forces of Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain and Austria had amassed over 100,000 Engine Flying Hours at the end of 2008.

The EJ200 is also a potential alternative powerplant for the Indian Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). An exhaustive feasibility study was conducted by the Indian Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) in 2008, in which the suitability of the EJ200 engine for the Indian Light Combat Aircraft was confirmed and EUROJET was selected to be a recipient of the respective Request for Proposal (RFP) for the LCA. EUROJET is now in anticipation of this RFP to offer the EJ200 for the LCA. http://www.aerocontact.com/actualite...009~01924.html (http://www.aerocontact.com/actualite_aeronautique_spatiale/cp-eurojet-8217-s-ej200-at-aero-india-air-show-2009%7E01924.html)

Adux
02-10-2009, 04:34 AM
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Adux
02-10-2009, 04:39 AM
This is exercise is very very important, especially from the perspective of Pakistani Coast, India is building a doctrine for a Marine Expeditionary Force. Currently 3000-5000 strong, It will be further expanded to 50,000 in the future. This is being held near the Pakistani border

Adux
02-10-2009, 05:28 AM
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Gujarat coast becomes virtual war zone

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Posted: Feb 10, 2009 at 0255 hrs IST
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Madhavpur (Porbandar) Three wings of defence come together for biggest-ever joint amphibious exercise In the dead of night, two groups of Blue Nation’s marine commandos sailing on motorised rafts arrived at the Madhavpur beach of Green Nation, which had been taken over by terrorists of Islamic Red Nation. A madrasa nearby, which had been turned into a terrorist camp, was the target of Blue Nation’s armed forces. They responded to an SOS call by the hydrocarbon-rich Green Nation.
A fierce gun-battle ensued. The commandos, supported by fighter jets, captured the beach and sent a signal to the flotilla of Landing Platform Docks. Immediately, the vessels released tanks that reached the shore in no time and unleashed a three-****ged attack using armoured personnel carriers and infantry. Within an hour, terrorist camps were destroyed and Madhavpur was captured.
On Monday, Madhavpur beach in Porbandar district, which is located only a few miles from the International Maritime Border Line with Pakistan, became a war zone. The Indian Army, Navy and the Air Force conducted the largest-ever joint amphibious exercise in the country. Code-named Exercise Tropex-2009, the war games involved over 4,000 personnel of 9 Infantry Brigade, with tanks and BMPs, guns and engineering equipment. A huge fleet of nine ships, aircrafts, fighter jets and a submarine were also part of the exercise.
The most complex military manoeuvres involving coordination and synergy from conceptualisation to planning and execution, were demonstrated on the shores of Madhavpur. The Coast Guard was also a part of it. Joint capabilities of the three services to strike the enemy were demonstrated amply in the programme. This is for the first time the Joint Doctrine on Amphibious Warfare of Indian Armed Forces, formulated in 2008, was put into practice in its full scope.
The military top brass were all praise for the participants. It was hailed as a display of a very high degree of jointmanship between the three services.
“This was the largest exercise ever conducted. We have done what is considered a very complex exercise that calls for high level co-ordination and synergy between all three military wings,” said Vice-Admiral J S Bedi, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Western Naval Command.
Lieutenant General Pradeep Khanna, General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Command, said, “So far, this had been only a part of the classroom. For the first time, it has become a reality and that too on a large scale.”
“Correct sequence and time displayed during the exercise indicates good coordination between all the three wings,” said Air Marshal K D Singh, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, South Western Air Command.
The exercise has come at a time when tensions between India and Pakistan have been escalating. However, the officers denied any connection with the post 26/11 rhetoric between the two countries. Brigadier Cherish Mathose, commander of 91 Brigade, said terms like ‘militants from Islamic nations’ and ‘Madrasa’ were simply a part of the story and nothing else.
The pre-assault planning, and mobilisation having been achieved at Karwar in Goa on February 5, the troops landed on Madhavpur four days later using the newly inducted LPD INS Jalashwar, several landing ships, tanks, helicopters, shore-based aircraft, a submarine and hovercrafts.
The SWAC deployed its Jaguars that fired rockets with pin point accuracy on the target from an altitude of 200 feet, while Mig-29s marshalled the skies.



http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/gujarat-coast-becomes-virtual-war-zone/421478/

Adux
02-10-2009, 05:29 AM
BrahMos aerospace unit all set for second phase of expansion Thiruvananthapuram (PTI): BrahMos Aerospace's facility here is embarking on its second phase of expansion on Tuesday aiming to convert the unit into a fully capable Missile Integration Complex.
Defence Minister A K Antony will inaugurate the second phase of development tomorrow, less then a year after the Centre took over the state-run company to convert it into a major centre for production of defence and space-related component manufacturing centre, BrahMos Aerospace CEO and MD Dr A Sivathanu Pillai told reporters here.
After making it the second facility of BrahMos Aerospace after the Hyderabad centre, the unit had been concentrating on manufacture of components and sophisticated equipment needed by ISRO, Defence and Atomic energy Department, Pillai said.
For instance, the Robotic Arm developed by the unit had been used by Babha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai for handling nuclear material.
In the subsequent phase, the centre would be making the booster for the 'Sourya surface-to-surface nuclear capable missile,' which was an important mission in Indian missile development programme, Pillai said.
In the current phase of expansion, seven acres of land now in possession of Indian Air force adjacent to the main campus is expected to be handed over to BrahMos aerospace, Pillai said.
The state government had offered to hand over 50 acres of land in the city outskirts for the third phase of expansion.
The unit was expected to get AS 9001 certification by March end this year which would make the components made here internationally competent, he said.
National (http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/002hdline.htm)

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/002200902100332.htm

Adux
02-10-2009, 05:30 AM
[QUOTE]'BrahMos failure was due to software glitch' M.G. Radhakrishnan Thiruvanathapuram, February 9, 2009 http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/images/comment_icondotjpgComment (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&sectionid=22&issueid=31&id=27736&Itemid=1#insert_comment)http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/images/print_icondotgifPrint (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=27736&sectionid=22&issueid=31&Itemid=1#)http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/images/email_icondotgifEmail (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=27736&sectionid=22&issueid=31&Itemid=1#)http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/images/font_size_icondotjpgA (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php) A (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php)

Adux
02-10-2009, 08:59 AM
High-level Indian Navy delegation inspects Nerpa (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=27811&sectionid=4&issueid=92&Itemid=1)

Quote:
A high-level Indian naval delegation is currently inspecting the Russian Akula-II nuclear powered attack submarine-the Nerpa anchored at a Russian naval base near the far eastern city of Vladivostok.

The four-member delegation led by Vice Admiral K.N. Sushil, the navy's Inspector General Nuclear Safety left the capital on Sunday for a two-day fact finding mission to physically inspect the submarine and see whether it can actually be delivered to the navy this year.

The Nerpa (to be rechristened the INS Chakra) was set to arrive in India by August 15 this year but Russia's Amur shipyard, which built the Nerpa recently expressed doubts if it could be inducted in time following the November 8 accident last year which killed 20 crew. Sea trials of the submarine have been halted as the shipyard cited difficulties in reconstituting another pre-delivery trials team.

The Indian naval delegation is to present a report on the induction of the submarine following the accidental triggering off of a fire fighting system on board the submarine which killed 20 shipyard personnel and Russian crewmen during sea trials in November last year. The delegation will also lay flowers on the wreath of the dead shipyard workers and naval crew.
Navy chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta recently expressed confidence that the navy would induct the Nerpa on time. The submarine is being leased to the Indian Navy as the Chakra for a ten year lease under a $ 650 million deal signed in January 2004. The submarine was to be earlier inducted on August 15 last year but delayed due to technical glitches.



http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=27811&sectionid=4&issueid=92&Itemid=1

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:21 PM
U.S. defence major in deal with BEL for radar components New Delhi (PTI): U.S. defence manufacturer Northrop Grumman has entered into an agreement with defence PSU Bharat Electronics Limited and private company Dynamatic Technologies Limited (DTL) to manufacture components of the F-16 fire control radar.
Company officials said on Monday that the arrangement with Indian defence manufacturers was part of a broader initiative to engage Indian industry as strategic business partners.
"Following an extensive evaluation of the Indian defence electronic manufacturing base, we feel that these two companies are best positioned to offer the depth of capability required to meet our customers' demanding cost, schedule, and quality standards," Northrop Grumman's Global Sensor Solutions Business Unit vice president Katie Gray said from the U.S..
As part of a comprehensive co-production programme, Northrop Grumman engineers will work side-by-side with engineering teams from BEL and DTL to provide training and support to ensure a smooth transition to production.
"The engineering team will collaborate on all aspects of the manufacturing process, beginning with a formal Production Readiness Review (PRR), and concluding with First Article Inspection (FAI) and First Article Test (FAT) milestones," officials said.
Initial radar component deliveries from the Indian firms will begin by the second quarter of this year. http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/006200902091511.htm

Adux
02-10-2009, 02:24 PM
ISSUES (http://www.heritage.org/research/) > Asia and the Pacific (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/)
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http://www.heritage.org/ui/redesign/images/EmailThisLinkdotjpg (javascript:popSTF()) http://www.heritage.org/ui/redesign/images/greydottedline440dotjpg June 20, 2002
Responding to the Indo-Pakistani Crisis
by James Phillips, Jack Spencer, Dexter Ingram, and Dana Robert Dillon
Backgrounder #1562



Although tensions between India and Pakistan have subsided slightly following Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's visits to both countries, the situation in South Asia remains extremely volatile. The arch-rivals, who have fought three wars since 1947 (including two over Kashmir), continue to keep their military forces on high alert. Another terrorist attack against Indian targets in Kashmir or elsewhere could trigger a major clash, which could escalate rapidly into a nuclear exchange with horrendous humanitarian consequences for the region. Even if the conflict does not involve nuclear weapons, it could seriously affect the war on terrorism, radicalizing more Muslims, boosting the al-Qaeda network's efforts to provoke a "clash of civilizations," and undercutting the Bush Administration's attempts to persuade the governments of Muslim countries to purge radical Islamist terrorism from their lands.
Any attempt by Washington to resolve the contentious feud over Kashmir before the two sides are prepared to make substantive compromises will fail. Both India and Pakistan have taken firm and irreconcilable positions on Kashmir. Neither country is prepared to back down from its claims to sovereignty over Kashmir, despite the efforts of the United Nations over the years to separate the two sides and encourage resolution.
The United States should not try to insert itself into this conflict. It can only be resolved for the long term by India and Pakistan. But the likelihood that al-Qaeda terrorists will seek to inflame the dispute to destabilize the area and breed further Islamist radicalism means that the United States cannot remain uninvolved.
Washington should encourage the United Nations to continue its work to settle this dispute peacefully and strengthen the U.N. observer force monitoring the line of control. The United States also should actively encourage the establishment of democratic civil societies instead of states based purely on sectarian grounds. And it should avoid selling technology to either side that could be used to attack the other.
THE STRUGGLE OVER KASHMIR

Fighting in Kashmir has intensified since the 1948 U.N. resolution calling for a plebiscite in the predominantly Muslim territory to allow the people to determine whether they would be part of India or Pakistan, 2 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020855) and a 1949 cease-fire negotiated by the U.N. that gave Pakistan control of one-third of Kashmir and India control of the remainder. 3 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020858) The plebiscite has never been held, and both India and Pakistan are adamant that the issue must be settled through bilateral negotiations. Meanwhile, India's army has clashed repeatedly with Pakistan-supported separatist insurgents in its sector. The last U.N. resolution demanding a cease-fire was passed on December 21, 1971. 4 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020861)
Pakistan's sponsorship of insurgency in Kashmir has evolved from moral support for an indigenous uprising into military and logistical aid for Islamic terrorists and the al-Qaeda network. Originally, the Pakistani strategy was to keep the Kashmir issue alive by assisting Kashmiri "freedom fighters" to resist the often-brutal occupation of Kashmir by the Indian army. But its ambitions grew following the success in 1989 of the indigenous mujahideen (holy warriors) in neighboring Afghanistan, who with Pakistani, U.S., and other foreign support forced the Soviet Union to withdraw its troops. Islamabad sought to duplicate that military success on its western border by ratcheting up military support for the Kashmir insurgency on its eastern border.
The current uprising began in 1989 and has gotten steadily bloodier. Even though some Kashmiris grew tired of the struggle or resisted Pakistani control, Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI), which coordinated Islamabad's support for the insurgents, began recruiting foreign Islamic extremists to bolster the insurgency. Today, anywhere from 25 percent to 50 percent of the terrorists who infiltrate into India from Pakistan are not from Kashmir; they are motivated not by Kashmiri nationalism but rather by the spirit of jihad (Islamic holy war).

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Before the fall of the ultra-radical Taliban regime in Afghanistan, Muslim extremists from Kashmir and elsewhere were trained in camps inside Afghanistan and then moved across Pakistan to Kashmir to join the jihad. Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network played an important role in financing, training, equipping, and coordinating the movements of the foreign volunteers. 5 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020867) Al-Qaeda also is believed to have played a role in the December 13, 2001, terrorist attack on the Indian Parliament that killed nine people and set the stage for the current confrontation.
Following the al-Qaeda terrorist attacks in the United States in September 2001, Washington pressured Islamabad into withdrawing its support for the Taliban regime and to cooperate in breaking up bin Laden's terrorist network. However, Pakistan continued supporting the jihad in Kashmir. The Indian government, which saw the Islamic extremist threats in Afghanistan and Kashmir as two sides of the same coin, undoubtedly was encouraged by the U.S. military victory in Afghanistan. Some Indian security officials have indicated that they believe Washington's relations with Islamabad will inevitably deteriorate. 6 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020871) This mindset may lead New Delhi to miscalculate how much Washington would back Indian military action against Pakistan.
In view of the unrelenting and pernicious nature of the terrorist attacks against India, public opinion in India strongly favors military action against Pakistan. 7 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020875) Another significant terrorist attack against India could provoke New Delhi to take military action despite international pressure against it. Although Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf has pledged to halt the infiltration of Muslim extremists across the border, an estimated 2,500 militants already lurk in Indian-controlled Kashmir and could launch further attacks that could provoke a massive Indian military response. 8 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020878) The strategy of the Islamic extremists in Kashmir is to undermine Indian control, radicalize the Muslim population, and provoke a "clash of civilizations" between India and Pakistan. They also want to engineer the downfall of President Musharraf, who has acted against them, the Taliban, and al-Qaeda.
Over the past 50 years, many foreign governments, political figures, and the United Nations have offered to help resolve the Kashmir impasse. All efforts have been stymied because New Delhi strongly resists third-party negotiations. Its position is that Kashmir is a bilateral problem between Pakistan and India and that third parties would not contribute to the resolution of the problem.
Islamabad and New Delhi both view Kashmir as an integral part of their respective countries. India, which is over 80 percent Hindu, nevertheless has over 100 million Muslims--the third largest Muslim population in the world after Indonesia and Pakistan. For India, as a multiethnic, multi-religious country, Kashmir is no more alien to its secular federal system than any other ethnic group or religion. Nevertheless, India's ruling party, the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party), is unapologetically Hindu nationalistic, and often is pressured by party extremists to support Hindu causes at the expense of the country's Muslims. In the western state of Gujarat, Hindu and Muslim mobs massacre each other over Hindu extremist attempts to build a temple on the site of a destroyed mosque and show strength against Kashmir nationalism, and the firebombing of a train by a group of Muslims in February that killed almost 60 Hindus.
The BJP's hardline positions have weakened the standing of the governing coalition among the more secular general population. Consequently, the coalition has little political capital to resist calls for military action against Pakistan. 9 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020885)

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New Delhi clearly believes that it can fight and win a limited war in Kashmir, despite Musharraf's May 27, 2002, warning that Pakistan would use its "full might" (i.e., nuclear weapons) in a war. Musharraf subsequently softened his rhetoric and promised to crack down on Muslim militants. But if Musharraf fails to follow through on this pledge with a sustained effort to halt cross-border attacks by Muslim militants, then war probably is inevitable. Pulling the plug on the militants is very unpopular among Pakistani Islamists, nationalists, and the army. It could cost Musharraf his job and possibly his life.
A war with India would limit Pakistan's ability to root out the remnants of al-Qaeda and Taliban forces believed to have taken shelter with Pakistani supporters in the unruly tribal areas of the Northwest Frontier province. It would divert Pakistani troops from the western border with Afghanistan to the eastern border with India, which would severely affect the U.S. war on terrorism. Pakistan would be out-gunned by the much larger Indian army, air force, and navy, which could tempt Islamabad to use its nuclear weapons to avoid a military defeat. A military defeat or Pakistani back-down, meanwhile, could lead to the overthrow of the Musharraf government and the establishment of a government more supportive of the radical Islamic movements in Kashmir and Afghanistan.
Washington must continue to pressure Musharraf to end all Pakistani support for terrorism and to purge the ISI of officers sympathetic to Islamic extremism who could resist his order to halt support for Kashmir insurgents. Steps like this will demonstrate that Islamabad has learned that, after September 11, supporting terrorism is a losing strategy for which it would pay a heavy price.
The United Nations placed truce observers on the ground in Kashmir in January 1949. Since 1971, the United Nations Military Observer Group has attempted to monitor the cease-fire line between India and Pakistan. While New Delhi maintains that the mandate for this group lapsed following the 1972 India-Pakistan Simla Agreement, Pakistan disagrees. The group now consists of 44 military observers from nine countries and 64 civilian support personnel who monitor the 460-mile long line of control. This force could and should be strengthened without requiring a U.S. presence.

THE BALANCE OF POWER

The capabilities of the Indian and Pakistani armed forces are significant enough to raise grave concerns in the international community.
Ballistic Missiles

India
According to the unclassified Executive Summary of the 1998 report of the bipartisan Commission to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States, chaired by current Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, India is developing its nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and the means to deliver them. It has

a number of ballistic missiles from short range to those with ICBM class capabilities, along with a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and a short range, surface ship-launched system.... It is aggressively seeking technology from other states, particularly Russia. While it develops its long-range ballistic missiles, India's space-launched vehicles provide an option for an interim ICBM capability. 10 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020898) India's nuclear-capable missile tests in April and June 2000, January 2001, and January 2002 underscore its determination to become a missile and nuclear power. In 1999, it unveiled a proposed nuclear doctrine, stating that the Prime Minister is authorized to use nuclear force in retaliation for an attack by a nuclear state. 11 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020902)

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Today, India has well over 100 ballistic missiles. Its first test of a missile occurred in 1972 when it fired the two-stage Rohini-560. Since then, India has constructed a number of rocket systems, from short-range ballistic missiles to space launch vehicles (SLV). These systems rely on domestic technology as well as technology contributed by other states. India's Agni ballistic missile series is based largely on technology obtained from the United States as part of India's SLV program. India hopes that demonstrations of its ballistic missile and nuclear weapons capabilities put muscle behind its foreign policy.
India also is hoping that its newly achieved nuclear power status will bring global political recognition of its importance and win it a permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council as one of the world's largest democracies. But this would not be in the best interests of the United States. Adding more members to the Security Council only increases the complexity and difficulty that exist in negotiating agreements. Moreover, India historically has sided with the United States less than 22 percent of the time in votes in the U.N. General Assembly. 12 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020908) By contrast, Russia has sided with the United States 46 percent of the time. 13 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020911) Finally, rewarding India for becoming a nuclear power would undermine longstanding U.S. positions against the proliferation of nuclear weapons and missiles, encouraging other countries to seek nuclear capabilities.
Pakistan
Islamabad has made developing a potent ballistic missile force a top priority of its military modernization program. The Rumsfeld Commission reports that:

Pakistan's ballistic missile infrastructure... will support development of a missile of 2,500-km range.... [which] will give Pakistan the technical base for developing a much longer-range missile system. Through foreign acquisition, and beginning without an extensive domestic science and technology base, Pakistan has acquired these missile capabilities quite rapidly. 14 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1021009) Pakistan began its domestic missile program in the early 1980s and, within a decade, had tested two missiles (HATF 1 and HATF 2) that it claimed were produced domestically. Since then, Pakistan has established a relatively advanced production capacity in a relatively short period of time vis-à-vis other developing countries. Much of Pakistan's success stems from its cooperation with other countries. For example, China and North Korea provided Pakistan with missile systems, technology, and production facilities. Pakistan's Ghauri series of missiles is a copy of North Korea's Nodong missile.

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Pakistan probably has the ability to produce solid-fuel rocket engines and multi-stage boosters. According to the Rumsfeld Commission report, Pakistan's production capabilities are more advanced than North Korea's. On April 6, 1998, Pakistan tested the Ghauri-1 missile; the next month it conducted nuclear tests. In May 2002, Pakistan held three ballistic missile tests over three days, sending clear political signals to its rival.

Nuclear Scenarios

Both India and Pakistan possess nuclear weapons and the capability to deploy them. 15 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1021152) A computer model simulation of a nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan shows that, even in the simplest scenario, the initial blast alone would kill thousands instantly and radioactive fallout would affect hundreds of thousands.
Heritage analysts employed the U.S. Department of Defense's Consequences Assessment Tool Set (CATS) software to analyze such scenarios. Factoring in weather conditions, the size of the nuclear missile, the population of the target area in 1998, and the delivery method, the analysis provided detailed tallies of the likely casualties. 16 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020926)

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The first scenario involves conventional ground forces from India invading possible Pakistan terrorist training camps, such as the one Indian intelligence says is in Muzaffarabad. In an effort to fight off the attacking Indian troops in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan explodes a 10-kiloton nuclear bomb. The model shows more than 3,400 civilian deaths in Pakistan and approximately 5,000 Indian military deaths. The radiation fallout would affect about 29,000 residents of Kashmir. Due to the easterly winds in the area, much of the fallout would continue into India, affecting tens of thousands more people.
The second scenario shows India and Pakistan escalating their conflict to a nuclear exchange against border cities. A single 12-kiloton strike by India on Lahore, Pakistan's second largest city, would result in about 122,000 immediate deaths across the 1.75-mile initial blast zone, with an additional 150,000 to 300,000 people exposed to high levels of lethal radiation outside of that zone. A 10-kiloton retaliatory strike against Amritsar, a leading city in the Indian border province of Punjab, would result in about 112,000 deaths with almost twice that number affected by lethal fallout.
The final scenario examines a nuclear exchange against each of the capital cities. In Islamabad, with a population of more than 900,000, a 12 kiloton fission bomb would immediately kill 115,000 civilians, with another 195,000 deaths attributed to the fallout. Similarly, a 12 kiloton fission bomb in New Delhi, India's capital, would have an immediate death toll of 125,000 and an estimated 365,000 civilian deaths from the fallout.
The Pentagon has estimated that an all-out nuclear exchange by both countries would result in a death toll of 12 million people, with millions more falling victim to major health problems resulting from the radioactive fallout and contaminated food and water supplies. 17 (http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm#pgfId=1020933)


THE U.S. ROLE

Before tragedy or terrorism can strike again, the United States should continue to use its diplomatic good offices to encourage both sides to reduce the tensions. However, the United States government must avoid trying to act as the mediator between these two intractable foes. Past history shows that U.N. resolutions are ineffective unless the governments of India and Pakistan choose to abide by them, implement their mandates, and cease fighting.
Nevertheless, the United States has a strong interest in making sure that they do so. The intensity of the conflict provides fertile ground for the radical Islamist terrorists who seek to bring down any government that is not in line with their extreme fundamentalism. They are a threat not just to peace and stability in South Asia, but to every region in the world.
To help India and Pakistan settle the dispute before it escalates into a nuclear conflict, the United States should offer the continuing use of its diplomatic good offices and:


Encourage the U.N. to strengthen its observer force on the line of control (the United States must not provide that force). The United States also should actively encourage the establishment of democratic civil societies instead of states based purely on sectarian grounds.
Restrict the selling of technologies to either side to those that further peace. For example, selling India or Pakistan monitoring technology that detects breaches of the line of control is good policy. But selling long-range surveillance equipment that would permit either side to more effectively or accurately attack each other is bad policy.
Resist India's calls to become a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. Such a step would hinder effective negotiations within the council and reward India for policies the United States opposes, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction by becoming a nuclear state.


CONCLUSION

India and Pakistan have the capacity to settle this dispute over Kashmir themselves and to quell the terrorist activities that seek to inflame it. Both countries have shown themselves to be intractable. Mired in a territorial dispute that has been exacerbated by religious and ethnic tensions, they have gravely intensified the dispute by pursuing nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities.
Although the United States should continue to encourage India and Pakistan to settle this dispute themselves, it should not attempt to insert itself as the mediator or provide troops for a new U.N. military observer force. A bilateral agreement reached freely by India and Pakistan is the best means to allow the people of Kashmir to live a future in peace. In the long run, the people of Kashmir, India, and Pakistan would be far better off in resolving the crisis this way than in risking a dangerous slide into stubborn brinkmanship, which could trigger a nuclear war.

James Phillips (http://www.heritage.org/about/staff/JamesPhillips.cfm) is Research Fellow in Middle Eastern Affairs and Jack Spencer (http://www.heritage.org/about/staff/JackSpencer.cfm) is Defense and National Security Policy Analyst in the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies, Dexter Ingram (http://www.heritage.org/about/staff/DexterIngram.cfm) is Database Editor in the Center for Media and Public Policy, and Dana Robert Dillon (http://www.heritage.org/about/staff/DanaDillon.cfm) is Senior Policy Analyst in the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation.











http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg1562.cfm

Adux
02-10-2009, 03:40 PM
Quote:
The Light Combat Aircraft tests its teeth

Ajai Shukla / Bangalore February 11, 2009, 0:48 IST

Officially named Tejas, the aircraft has undergone over 1,000 hours of test flights. At 3 pm on February 7, 2009, it was “all systems go” at the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) in Bangalore, the organisation developing India’s Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). I sat by the runway, watching two Tejas fighters, as the LCA is named, carrying out pre-flight checks before leaving for a crucial mission.

After over 1,000 hours of test flights over several years, the Tejas was checking out its teeth and claws by dropping bombs on a ground target. Business Standard was granted exclusive rights to witness the event.

Group Captain R Tyagi, in the lead Tejas, was to fly several hundred kilometres and attack a ground target. The tarmac outside his air-conditioned cockpit was blistering, as his onboard health-monitoring systems conducted self-checks, a crucial six-minute operation to ensure that his engines, controls and electronics were functioning normally.

Just metres away, naval test pilot Captain Jaideep Maolankar, sat in another Tejas fighter, carrying out the same checks. Jaideep would perform the role of “chase aircraft”, flying alongside Tyagi’s aircraft and observing every step of the mission. In addition, a high-speed camera was tracking Tyagi’s bomb pod, clicking hundreds of frames every second.

With a surprising lack of fuss, the two aircraft revved up their engines and taxied out to the runway. I put my hands over my ears as the fighter engines roared into a crescendo and both the aircraft took off, first Tyagi and then Maolankar in quick succession, banking to the right and then quickly out of sight.

The pilots were now physically alone in their cockpits, but they had lots of company over the radio. At the end of the runway was the Telemetry Centre of the National Flight Test Centre (NFTC), tracking every moment of the mission. Each aircraft, from the time it started up, was being monitored in detail, the data transmitting live from the aircraft over a high-speed data link.

Eleven critical aircraft systems, such as the fuel system, hydraulics and flight controls, were being watched by eleven engineers, each responsible for one particular system. There was a senior flight test engineer, designated the test director, watching each of the two aircraft; beside him sat another test pilot, called the safety pilot, continuously monitored what the aircraft pilot was seeing. Anything went wrong and the test director would alert the pilot. In a serious emergency, he made the split-second decisions that could spell life or death.

“It’s a bit like Formula One racing,” explained Wing Commander Aslam Khan, the test director. “The driver, or in this case the pilot, is concentrating too hard on his mission to worry about how the aircraft systems are doing, or about what is happening outside. So we watch those and tell the pilot over radio.”

As the two Tejas aircraft approached the range, the Telemetry Centre cleared Group Captain Tyagi to release his weapons. Flying just 70 metres away, Captain Maolankar watched carefully as Tyagi’s bombs were released; it was easy for him to see the white-coloured bombs as they headed down towards the target. Back at the Telemetry Centre, they replayed the live footage from the high-speed camera to check that the bombs had been released cleanly.

The data would be examined in detail over days, but for now it was a successful test; the aircraft headed back to the base. One more phase of the LCA test flight programme was proceeding smoothly.

The NTFC is reputed to be among the best test flight centres in the world. So far, not a single accident has marred the LCA programme, a perfect record compared to fighter development programmes in most other countries.

“This centre has been set up entirely indigenously,” explains Air Commodore Rohit Varma, who heads the LCA flight testing. “Also, unlike other countries where test pilots are retired airmen, our test pilots are all serving pilots, bringing in contemporary experience of our operating environment.”


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.business-standard.com/india/ ... 06/348680/ (http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/the-light-combat-aircraft-tests-its-teeth/00/06/348680/)

Adux
02-10-2009, 03:40 PM
Quote:
Tejas to take part in flypast at Aero India 2009

Ravi Sharma


BANGALORE: Four indigenously built Tejas, the Light Combat Aircraft, will be performing a flypast during the Aero India 2009 air show starting at Yelahanka Air Force Station here from Wednesday.

One aircraft will perform aerobatics to demonstrate its handling capabilities. Much maligned over the years, the Rs. 6,000-crore indigenous Tejas is meant to replace the Indian Air Force’s ageing warhorse, the MiG-21. Tejas is the world’s smallest frontline, delta wing, multi-mission combat fighter. Pilots, headed by the Director of the National Flight Test Centre Air Commodore Rohit Verma, will be in the cockpit.

Tejas had its moments last week when the aircraft dropped its first bomb, flying to a nearby test facility and returning without a hitch. Speaking to The Hindu, Project Director of the LCA programme, P.S. Subramanyam, said that at the moment six Tejas were on the flight line. “We have six aircraft — Technical Demonstrator-2, Prototypes 1, 2 and 3, and Limited Series Production 1 and 2 — that are ready for flight.

Two have already landed at Yelahanka, while the other four are parked at HAL Airport,” he said.

Officials said that the handling and manoeuvrability of the aircraft was so good that the chase aircraft (Jaguar and MiG-21 trainers) found it difficult to keep pace or catch up with the Tejas after take off. While the Tejas attained an air speed of 850 kph in just 15 seconds, the chase aircraft were able to do so in 20 seconds.
http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/10/stories ... 230200.htm (http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/10/stories/2009021050230200.htm)

Adux
02-10-2009, 03:41 PM
Antony calls for self-reliance in defence production

10 Feb 2009, 1845 hrs IST, Joe A Scaria, ET Bureau

Print (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/4107423.cms?prtpage=1) EMail (javascript:openWindowmail1('/mail/4107423.cms',410,500);) Discuss Share (javascript:void(0)) Save (javascript:showdivlayer(4107423,'topdiv');) Comment (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/News/PoliticsNation/Antony_calls_for_self-reliance_in_defence_production/articleshow/4107423.cms#write) Text:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?photoid=3549042

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Defence minister A K Antony has called for achieving self-reliance in defence production, stating it was of importance to
ensure security of the nation and economic progress.

Launching the missile integration complex of the BrahMos Aerospace Thiruvananthapuram (BATL) here today, Mr Antony said the country presently relied on foreign suppliers for 70% of its defence equipment and arms, pointing out that there was great scope to substantially increase the indigenous capability in this area.

He said the country stood to benefit from indigenous production of defence supplies, because it would free us from bottlenecks related to internal policies of the countries that supply us arms.

The BrahMos unit here is expecting revenues of Rs 26 crore for this fiscal, up from Rs 17 crore last year. BrahMos Aerospace CEO and managing director A Sivathanu Pillai said BATL expected to receive the AS 9100 certification by the end of March, and that component production volumes were expected to increase substantially as ISRO's space launches increased in frequency.






http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/News/PoliticsNation/Antony_calls_for_self-reliance_in_defence_production/articleshow/4107423.cms

Adux
02-10-2009, 04:14 PM
India to propose new end-user pact to US (http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/politics/india-to-propose-new-end-user-pact-to-us_100153534.html)
Quote:
“India is going to propose new draft for the end user agreement. My feeling is that we are very close,” deputy chief of the US mission in New Delhi Steven J. White told reporters here. White is in Bangalore for the seventh edition of the Aero India international air show Feb 11-15.

“India also wants a blanket understanding on the issue instead of matters being decided on a case-to-case basis as it causes a lot of delay,” White added.

Two cases in point are the purchases of three Boeing Business Jets for transporting the president, the prime minister and other dignitaries and the troop carrier INS Jalashwa (formerly the USS Trenton), for which end-use agreements have yet to be signed. This is because India is wary of their annual physical inspections as mandated by the pact.

White confirmed that Defence Minister A.K. Antony had raised the issue during his visit to the US last year .

“I was there at the meeting of (Robert) Gates (who continues as US defence secretary) and Antony. The US was delighted at the stand Antony took at the meeting,” White said, without divulging details.

White also asserted that the absence of an end-user agreement will not affect sales of military equipment and hardware to India, pointing out that “no significant issue had arisen” though the pact was not in place when INS Jalashwa was purchased.

I have said this before, Indians will not allow anybody to inspect anything. Americans will have to talk to Indians as equals.

Adux
02-10-2009, 11:30 PM
Aviation majors go all out to hardsell fighters
11 Feb 2009, 0000 hrs IST, Rajat Pandit, TNN

Print (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/msid-4108024,prtpage-1.cms) Email (javascript:openWindowmail('/mail/4108024.cms');) Discuss Share (javascript:void(0)) Save (javascript:showdivlayer('4108024','t','close');) Comment (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms#write) Text:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?photoid=3549042

BANGALORE (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms#): From joyrides to celebrities to high-voltage marketing campaigns, global aviation giants have pressed the full throttle in the
bruising battle to grab India's gigantic Rs 42,000-crore project for acquiring 126 multi-role combat aircraft for IAF.

With IAF planning to begin field trials for the six fighter jets in contention for this "mother of all defence deals'' in April-May after evaluation of their technical bids, it's all about grabbing eyeballs of the decision-makers as well as the public at large at the `Aero India-2009' show here.

The six contenders -- the American F/A-18 `Super Hornet' (Boeing) and F-16IN `Super Viper' (Lockheed Martin), French Rafale (Dassualt), Eurofighter Typhoon, Swedish Gripen (Saab) and Russian MiG-35 (RAC MiG) -- are leaving nothing to chance.

Though the Rafale and Gripen jets have not been able to make it for the airshow, the other four fighters are tearing into the skies here to display their lethality and super-maneuverability to all and sundry, interspersed with joyrides to celebs and IAF top-gun pilots (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms#) as an effective marketing tool.

The Americans, of course, are in the forefront to hardsell their flying machines. If it was Ratan Tata last time around, the aviation majors are trying to rope in Olympic gold medalist Abhinav Bhindra, cricketer Yuvraj Singh, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra and industrialist Sunil Bharti Mittal, among others, to fly on the rear seat of the fighters this time. Even journalists have been co-opted to enjoy rides on specific fighters and tell the country what "awesome'' machines they are.

The IAF, on its part, is watching the `gimmickry' with quiet amusement from the sidelines. "This is just the window-dressing. The real test will be when the year-long trials begin, wherein our test pilots will examine each nut and bolt of the jets on offer. It will be a comprehensive affair," said a top IAF officer.

Defence production secretary Pradeep Kumar, on his part, said, "As far as we are concerned, the defence ministry does not invite celebrities. The companies do it on their own.''

IAF, of course, is in a hurry to seal the mammoth contract because of its fast-depleting fighter squadron (each has 14 to 18 jets) strength, down to just 32 from the "sanctioned'' number of 39.5. But it knows the contract for the 126 fighters will be more of a marathon than a 100-metre sprint.

It is estimated that the first lot of the new fighters -- 18 jets will be bought off the shelf, while the rest will be manufactured in India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms#) under transfer of technology -- will arrive only by 2012 at the earliest.

"It's not buying a fridge or a TV. It's an extremely complex project, with life-cycle costs for operating the fighters over a 40-year period and 6,000 hours of flying (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms#), among other factors, being taken into account. We hope to sign the contract before the end of 2010 if all goes well,'' said an officer.









http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Aviation_majors_go_all_out_to_hardsell_fighters/articleshow/4108024.cms

Adux
02-10-2009, 11:30 PM
Lockheed, Boeing $11 Billion Order Snags on U.S.-India Talks
Email (?Subject=Bloomberg%20news:%20%20Lockheed,%20Boeing%20$11%20Billion%20Order%20Snags%20on%20U.S.-India%20Talks%20&body=%20Lockheed,%20Boeing%20$11%20Billion%20Order%20Snags%20on%20U.S.-India%20Talks%20%0D%0A%0D%0A%20http%3A//www.bloomberg.com/apps/news%3Fpid%3Demail_en%26refer=india%26sid%3Dafwy.3Q4ytcw) | Print (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=afwy.3Q4ytcw&refer=india#) | A (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=afwy.3Q4ytcw&refer=india#) A (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=afwy.3Q4ytcw&refer=india#) A (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=afwy.3Q4ytcw&refer=india#)


By Gopal Ratnam and Vipin V. Nair
Feb. 11 (Bloomberg) -- Efforts by Lockheed Martin Corp. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=LMT%3AUS) and rival Boeing Co. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=BA%3AUS) to win India’s $11 billion fighter-jet order, the largest military contest in play worldwide, hinge on whether the South Asian nation will allow U.S. officials to monitor the use of American-made defense equipment.
Lockheed and Boeing, the largest U.S. defense contractors, made their first military sales to India only within the past 12 months. Until the U.S. lifted sanctions in September 2001 that were imposed after 1998 nuclear tests, India had relied on the former Soviet Union and later Russia and European suppliers for weapons for more than five decades.
The relationship now faces its biggest test as the U.S. contractors prepare to compete against each other and suppliers from Russia, France, Sweden and Europe for the 126-aircraft order that may come in 2010. Lockheed and Boeing have an additional hurdle, as India has yet to agree to U.S. efforts to enforce a law requiring inspections of exported weapons.
“There are challenges,” Amer Latif (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Amer+Latif&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), director of South Asian affairs at the U.S. Department of Defense, said in an interview. “We need to come to agreement on end-use monitoring.” More than 80 countries already have signed accords accepting U.S. physical verification of weapons sold to them, he said.
Indian officials (http://mod.nic.in/) are trying to grasp the types of inspections the U.S. will seek in a major aircraft sale, Rahul Roy-Chaudhury (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Rahul%0ARoy-Chaudhury&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), a South Asia analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, said in an interview. “For the Indian military bureaucracy, the U.S. is a relatively unknown quantity,” he said.
Sovereignty Issues
Indian Defense Minister A.K. Antony (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=A.K.+Antony&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), who speaks today in Bangalore at the seventh Aero India (http://www.aeroindia.in/) air show, has said the country must speed up procurement. India’s purchase of 66 Hawk trainer jets from London-based BAE Systems Plc. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=BA%2F%3ALN), for $1.7 billion in 2003, took 18 years to conclude.
Under the U.S. Arms Export Control Act of 1996, which requires monitoring of defense equipment and technology sold to other countries, the State Department conducted 705 checks in fiscal 2007 and found 143 violations, it said in a report to Congress (http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/reports/enduse_reports.html) last year.
Indian officials bristle at that requirement. “There are certain things we can’t agree to,” Admiral Sureesh Mehta, chairman of India’s Chiefs of Staff Committee, said last year, ExpressIndia.com reported (http://www.expressindia.com/story.php?storyId=299036). “As a sovereign nation we can’t accept intrusiveness into our system.”
“The two countries are still discussing the issues,” Sitanshu Kar (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Sitanshu+Kar&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), a spokesman for India’s Ministry of Defence said in an interview. He declined to elaborate.
Other Suppliers
British, French and Russian suppliers do not face the constraints faced by U.S. firms. India’s state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. makes British Jaguars, and Russian MiGs and Sukhois under technology transfer (http://www.hal-india.com/products.asp) agreements with the companies.
Russia plans to export more than $8 billion of arms to India this year, and the country will remain Russia’s top export destination, Mikhail Dmitriev (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Mikhail+Dmitriev&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), head of the country’s Federal Service of Military and Technical Cooperation said in December.
India’s arms purchases may triple in five years to more than $35 billion, Roy-Chaudhury said. Imports may account for 70 percent of that, making it the largest arms importer after China.
Lockheed’s F-16 is competing in the fighter contest against Chicago-based Boeing’s F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet; Russia’s MiG-35; Saab AB (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=SAABB%3ASS)’s Gripen; France’s Rafale made by Dassault Aviation SA (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=AM%3AFP); and the Eurofighter Typhoon, a joint venture of Airbus SAS (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=EAD%3AFP), BAE and Italy’s Finmeccanica SpA (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=FIN%3AIM).
‘Latest Western Technology’
In India “there’s a desire to gain access to the latest Western technology,” Rick Kirkland (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Rick+Kirkland&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), president of South Asia for Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed, said in an interview. “The question is, how we are going to get there? There are still some issues to be looked at and worked on.”
U.S. officials are cautious because the countries “don’t have a long track record of transferring sensitive technology,” the Pentagon’s Latif said.
India wants all but 18 of the 126 fighter jets it buys to be made in India. It also wants the winner to reinvest some of the $11 billion for developing the country’s aerospace and defense sector in a requirement known as an offset. In their bids, Lockheed and Boeing have both proposed pacts with Indian companies.
“The offset requirement is a significant size,” Chris Raymond (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Chris%0ARaymond&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), vice president for business development at Boeing’s Integrated Defense Systems unit, said in an interview. Boeing has entered into agreements with Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. for manufacturing and assembly and with Tata Group for training, he said.
Doing Business Together
Boeing in January won a $2.1 billion order from India to supply eight P-8I long-range maritime reconnaissance and anti- submarine aircraft to the Indian Navy. In March Lockheed won a $596 million order to supply six C-130J transport planes.
Those transactions will help ease concern about monitoring agreements, said Lockheed’s Kirkland, likening it to the relationship a buyer and car dealer might form over time.
“If you and I have been doing business together for a while you’re going to get that keys to the car and drive off the lot in an hour,” Kirkland said. “If this is the first time you’ve ever bought a car,” negotiations will take longer, he said.
To contact the reporters on this story: Gopal Ratnam (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Gopal+Ratnam&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) in Washington at gratnam1@bloomberg.net. Vipin V. Nair (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Vipin+V.+Nair&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) in Mumbai at Vnair12@bloomberg.net.



http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=afwy.3Q4ytcw&refer=india

Adux
02-10-2009, 11:35 PM
The show is getting bigger and better (http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2009/02/11/stories/2009021151120300.htm)

The normally impregnable IAF base, some 30 km to the north of Bangalore, is on an alert level that is two to three times that for the 2007 event. The Ministry of Defence, which organises the two-yearly show, has deployed 140 CCTVs, almost five times that in 2007; 330 defence personnel, three BSF platoons, a Garud special team and 180 security personnel, apart from eight baggage screening machines. For the first time, entry passes are by RFID.

Aero India 2009 has grown to be bigger and better in two years and has come to be a major air show in the region, Mr Kumar said. From 7,000 sqm in 1998 and 30,000 sq.m in 2007, the exhibition space is 44,000 sq.m this time. There are 289 Indian exhibitors and 303 from overseas. Six countries have their own pavilions.


US to Participate in Aero India '09 (http://www.military.com/news/article/air-force-news/us-to-participate-in-aero-india-09.html?col=1186032369229)

HICKAM AIR FORCE BASE, Hawaii - The United States military will be represented at the Aero India 09 air show at Air Force Station Yelahanka in Bangalore, India, Feb. 11 to 15.

A cross-section of U.S. military aircraft and equipment will be present, including the C-17 Globemaster III, C-130J Hercules, F-16 Fighting Falcon, KC-135 Stratotanker, F/A-18 Hornet and Eagle Vision Ground Satellite System.


Bangalore air show gets unprecedented security cover (http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/story.aspx?id=NEWEN20090083167&ch=2/10/2009%2010:51:00%20PM)

An unprecedented three-tier security ring, including special commandos, has been thrown around Yelahanka Air Force Station, the venue of the air show in Bangalore.

"Security has been a major concern in the (current) environment", Defence Production Secretary Pradeep Kumar said a day before the commencement of the five-day air show, Aero India. He said the Defence Ministry, which is organising the show, has worked along with the Ministry of Home Affairs, Karnataka government and local police and tried to enhance the security significantly.

Pradeep Kumar said there would be three tiers of security -- outer, middle and inner. The number of CCTVs have been increased to 140 this time, compared with 30 in the last edition of the show in 2007.

X-ray machines to check baggage had been increased to eight from two in the last air show. Radio frequency identity cards have been introduced for the first time.

Personnel from Defence Security Force, three platoons of CRPF, and special commandos have been deployed. "The effort is to have a fool-proof system", he added

Adux
02-10-2009, 11:42 PM
The Light Combat Aircraft tests its teeth: a ringside account of an LCA bombing run (http://ajaishukla.blogspot.com/2009/02/light-combat-aircraft-tests-its-teeth.html)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI31yyJ85I/AAAAAAAAAgo/eZiJxMbvm-8/s200/LCA+pre+flightdotJPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI31yyJ85I/AAAAAAAAAgo/eZiJxMbvm-8/s1600-h/LCA+pre+flightdotJPG)
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI3SJS8WRI/AAAAAAAAAgg/X6M9_5c-iNM/s200/LCA+taxidotJPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI3SJS8WRI/AAAAAAAAAgg/X6M9_5c-iNM/s1600-h/LCA+taxidotJPG)
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI20cZideI/AAAAAAAAAgY/lDwGZtDjsS8/s200/LCA+takeoffdotJPG (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zUe7sq7m3h0/SZI20cZideI/AAAAAAAAAgY/lDwGZtDjsS8/s1600-h/LCA+takeoffdotJPG)



(Photos: copyright Ajai Shukla)



The first pictures of an LCA, fitted with bombs, fuel pods, dummy missile and a camera pod, taxiing out and taking off for a bombing test.

HAL, Bangalore
11th Feb 09

At 3 p.m. on 7th Feb 09, it was “all systems go” at the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) in Bangalore, the organisation that is developing India’s Light Combat Aircraft. I sat by the runway, watching two Tejas fighters, as the LCA is named, carrying out pre-flight checks before leaving for a crucial mission. After over 1000 hours of test flights over several years, the Tejas was checking out its teeth and claws by dropping bombs on a ground target. For the first time I was looking at a Tejas which had, other than its dummy R-73 missile and fuel pods, bomb pods as well. (see photograph)



Three days earlier, the first bombing run had been made; this test was to validate another method of bomb delivery.



Group Captain R Tyagi, in the lead Tejas, was to fly several hundred kilometres to a live range and deliver the bombs on a ground target. The tarmac outside his air-conditioned cockpit was blistering, as his onboard health-monitoring systems conducted self-checks, a crucial six-minute operation to ensure that his engines, controls and electronics were functioning normally. I could see the flaps and control surfaces lifting and dropping; all of this was a part of the testing process.



Just metres away, naval test pilot Captain Jaideep Maolankar, sat in another Tejas fighter, carrying out the same checks on his aircraft. Jaideep would perform the role of “chase aircraft”, flying alongside Tyagi’s aircraft and visually observing every step of the mission. In addition, a high-speed camera was tracking Tyagi’s bomb pod, clicking hundreds of frames every second.



With a surprising lack of fuss, the two aircraft revved up their engines and taxied out to the runway. I put my hands over my ears as the fighter engines roared into a crescendo and both aircraft took off, first Tyagi and then Maolankar in quick succession, banking to the right and then quickly out of sight.



The pilots were now physically alone in their cockpits, but they had lots of company over the radio. At the end of the runway was the high-security Telemetry Centre of the National Flight Test Centre (NFTC), tracking every moment of the mission. Each aircraft, from the time it started up, was being monitored in detail, the data transmitting live from the aircraft over a high-speed data link. Eleven critical aircraft systems, such as the fuel system, hydraulics and flight controls, were being watched by eleven engineers, each responsible for one particular system. In addition, a senior flight test engineer, designated the Test Director, oversaw each of the two aircraft; beside each Test Director sat another test pilot, called the Safety Pilot, continuously monitored what the aircraft pilot was seeing through his Head-Up Display (HUD). Anything going wrong and the Test Director would alert the pilot in his aircraft. In a serious emergency, he made the split second decisions that could spell life or death.



“It’s a bit like Formula One racing”, explained Wing Commander Aslam Khan, the Test Director. “The driver, or in this case the pilot, is concentrating too hard on his mission to worry about how the aircraft systems are doing, or about what is happening outside. So we watch those parameters and tell the pilot over radio.”



As the two Tejas aircraft approached the bombing range, the Telemetry Centre cleared Group Captain Tyagi to release his weapons. Flying just 70 metres away, Captain Maolankar watched carefully as Tyagi’s bombs were released; it was easy for him to see the white-coloured bombs as they headed down towards the target. Back at the Telemetry Centre, they replayed the live footage from the high-speed camera to check that the bombs had been released cleanly. I could see that they had.



The data --- including that relayed from ground cameras near the target --- would be examined in detail over days, but for now it was a successful test; the aircraft headed back to base. One more phase of the LCA test flight programme was proceeding smoothly.



The NTFC is reputed to be amongst the best test flight centres in the world. So far, not a single accident has marred the LCA programme, a perfect record compared to fighter development programmes in most other countries. In the Gripen programme, two aircraft went down in the first year of testing. In the F-104 programme in the US, 13-14 test pilots were killed in just two years of testing. (The aircraft was dubbed “the widow maker”.



“This centre has been set up entirely indigenously”, explains Air Commodore Rohit Varma, who heads the LCA flight testing. “Also, unlike other countries where test pilots are retired airmen, our test pilots are all serving pilots, bringing in contemporary experience of our operating environment.”



Amongst the ADA’s five test pilots (that I had the pleasure of having lunch with… a delicious meal!) were officers who had recently commanded a Su-30MKI squadron; a Harrier squadron; a MiG-21 squadron and a fighter base. All top guns, fresh from the field. Clearly user input counts for something!!

Adux
02-10-2009, 11:47 PM
Honeywell to bid for IAF’s Jaguar upgrades (http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2009/02/11/stories/2009021151160300.htm)

Honeywell International said on Tuesday that it will bid for the Indian Air Force Jaguar re-engine programme.

An official with Honeywell told newspersons that its F125 IN engine was a better product than the Rolls Royce 811 engine, which are currently part of the Jaguars. Honeywell Vice-President for military aircraft, Mr Vicki Panhuise, said that its F125IN engine can save up to Rs 7,000 crore for the Indian Air Force in life cycle costs compared with other upgrade options being currently considered.

He said his company will apply for the RFP which is expected to be floated during the second quarter of the current calendar year. The deal is expected to be closed by the fourth quarter of 2010.

Mr Panhuise said the Honeywell’s engines are at least 500 pounds lighter and more powerful than the others. It has unique features such as dual full – authority digital engine control system, modular construction and integrated engine health monitoring system.

The F125IN is the designation of the F125 engine for the Jaguar application, benefitting more than 540,000 hours of operational experience on the F125.

VAMAN
02-11-2009, 12:17 AM
This thread is back to life. Very good job Adux.

Adux
02-11-2009, 12:33 AM
Thank You Vaman


EADS to help with LCA programme
Ravi Sharma ADA will be assisted in areas of difficulty Cost of the assistance will be around $20 million
Help will mainly deal with flight test programme


BANGALORE: The Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) has sought the assistance of the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) for the indigenous Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas programme, which is behind schedule.
A senior ADA official said that EADS will help in fast-tracking issues that the Indian laboratory has had difficulty with. The cost is around $20 million.
According to Chief Controller (Research and Development), Defence Research and Development Organisation Prahlada, the help will primarily be on the LCA’s fledgling flight test programme. “EADS will advise us on which points of the flight envelope to focus. They will help us reduce the number of flights that are needed. This will help us achieve initial operational clearance (IOC) according to schedule.” ADA hopes to get IOC for the LCA by December 2010.

Problem areas

Some of the problem areas include brake management, overweight undercarriage, and redesigning of the wheels and tyres to reduce wear and tear. Also, the aircraft, in the words of its Programme Director, P.S. Subramanyam, is 1.5 tonnes heavier than what it should be. ADA has set up a subcommittee to suggest ways to reduce the weight, but it has hardly made headway, suggesting a shaving off of hardly 250 kg.
Officials also point to the LCA’s overweight undercarriage as an area of concern, especially that of the naval variant, which has to withstand higher Gs during landing on a ship’s deck. The naval variant’s undercarriage is almost 400 kg overweight.
Officials explained that the Indian Defence laboratory’s first choice for providing the assistance had been Boeing. But Boeing was unable to get — under U.S. laws — clearance from the American State Department. Boeing thereafter insisted that ADA sign a Technical Assistance Agreement (TAA). The TAA would have included precluding India from selling or using the LCA abroad. This was not acceptable to ADA or India.

http://www.hindu.com/2009/02/11/stories/2009021153360400.htm

Adux
02-11-2009, 09:39 AM
'India Offset Policy Attract Global Attention' http://machinist.in/templates/rhuk_solarflare_ii/images/printButtondotpng (http://machinist.in/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1919&pop=1&page=0&Itemid=2) http://machinist.in/templates/rhuk_solarflare_ii/images/emailButtondotpng (http://machinist.in/index2.php?option=com_content&task=emailform&id=1919&itemid=2) Written by Viswanath Wednesday, 11 February 2009 DPP 2008 improves domestic industrial supply and encourage investments in the Defence Sector

New Delhi : Reflecting industry aspirations, the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) 2008 broadly incorporates measures to improve domestic industrial supply, apart from encouraging FDI and intensifying R&D in Defence industry. The policy has been revised four times since its inception in 2002. The industry should remain hopeful that shortfalls in the policy will be accordingly reformed, said Mr. Shashikant Sharma, Director General-Acquisition, Ministry of Defence. He was speaking at the 2nd India Regional Offsets Conference organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) in association with The Defence Manufacturing Association (DMA) of UK and Global Offsets and Countertrade Association (GOCA) of USA. The conference witnessed over 300 participants including 130 international offset professionals, officers from Indian Government, Ministry of Defence (MoD), Armed Forces and Industry.

He specifically mentioned operational and policy challenges in defence offset. Pointing out the need for universality of offset credit transaction; policy issues with technology transfers; desire for the development; growth of indigenous defence manufacturing capabilities and the likes, Mr. Sharma's address reaffirmed that the Government is considering a more dynamic defence procurement policy structure.

Mr. Sharma added, an offsets partner is now not required to hold licence anymore to associate with Ministry of Defence. This has increased the scope manifolds from 37 to 2,000 industries, which can now consider associating with the offset programmes. He further stated 'for the establishment of a framework to develop in-house credit systems; monetary cell has been created in the Department of Defence production. The Ministry of defence is also studying the offset policy of global economies to gather provisions for inclusion in India.

The conference saw a clear understating of India targeting the global defence market. The Ministry of Defence, Government of India envisages spending over US$ 30 billion for acquisition of military hardware and software during the eleventh five year plan. These developments will intensify new acquisitions, adoption of futuristic projects, upgradation of equipments, support services, and joint venture friendly environment amongst others. The overseas companies will be required to fulfil mandatory offsets obligation to the tune of 30-50 percent of such procurements.

Major General Mrinal Suman (Retd), AVSM, VSM, Project Director, Defence Technical Assessment & Advisory Services, CII, presented an insightful observation on business opportunities in Indian Defence sector. He said, 'India is observing exciting times in defence market with a huge shopping list. An ideal proportion of military equipment balance observed in the developed world is 30-40-30 which is spread over state-of-the-art technology; mature technology; and obsolete technology. Whilst India's military equipment balance proportion is 15-35-50. Attempting to match up its defence infrastructure to world, India will be spending US$ 100 billion by 2020.'

Rear Admiral Rees Ward, Director General, DMA UK, said, 'like most policy DPP 2008 is an initial phase of the policy which will evolve with time. He said we have to overcome disagreements as challenges occur when we get into details of some understanding. We expect that the conference will help the international delegates understand on how to reach a meaningful dialogue with the Indian Government, and possible modes for technological transfers.'

Mr. Neil Rutter, President, GOCA said, the delegates should use this as an platform to facilitate B2B interaction. The assembly gathered here is a valid proof of professionalism and corporation shared by the industry body CII towards the cause of Indian defence industry modernisation.

Mr. Atul C Kirloskar, Chairman CII National Committee on Defence & CMD, Kirloskar Oil Engines Limited, said, 'Agenda of the conference is to help international OEMs learn about defence procedures and offsets industry in India. On the other hand Indian industry can generate a better understanding on working with OEMs and integrate with the global supply chain


http://machinist.in/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1919&Itemid=2

Adux
02-11-2009, 09:39 AM
BAE Says India May Buy 57 More Hawk Trainer Jets


Wednesday February 11st, 2009 / 11h28
http://www.easybourse.com/Images/imagesSite/espaceurdotgif
(Adds more comments from BAE executive, background on Indian orders and ventures.)
By Rumman Ahmed and Nitin Luthra
Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
BANGALORE -(Dow Jones)- U.K. defense contractor BAE Systems PLC (BAESY) said Wednesday the Indian government may order 57 more Hawk trainer jets for its navy and air force.
India's state-run Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. is in talks with the federal government to study the possibility of placing a follow-on order with BAE for the aircraft, Julian Scopes, president of BAE Systems India, told Dow Jones Newswires in an interview.
"Negotiations have started on a follow-on buying of the Hawk, which will be for 57 aircraft of which 17 will be for the Indian Navy and the remainder for the Indian Air Force," Scopes said on the sidelines of the Aero India show.
India had ordered 66 Hawk jets in 2004 for $1.45 billion for its air force. The country wants to buy more Hawk trainers to better train its pilots for flying supersonic combat jets such as the Sukhoi-30MKI and Jaguar.
As per the 2004 contract, 24 aircraft were ordered in flyaway condition, of which 23 have been delivered by BAE, Scopes said.
The remaining aircraft will be produced by Hindustan Aeronautics under license from BAE.
Earlier in the day, a senior Indian defense ministry official said the federal government is likely to order up to 100 Hawk jets for the air force and navy.
"There was always a plan for about 160 Hawks, so we are looking to fulfill that," the official, who asked not to be named, said. "The new order could be announced soon, perhaps at Aero India too."
Scopes said BAE is also in discussions with Indian companies to form partnerships for meeting potential demand for its homeland security and naval products.
The company is considering jointly producing its radar, body armor, command and control systems and also naval security equipment in India, he added.
Scopes sought an increase in India's foreign direct investment, or FDI, limit for joint ventures in the defense sector from the current 26%.
"To build a business in India, we and others will argue that the government needs to lift the cap on FDI from 26% initially to 49% and then completely."
He said a joint venture with Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd. (500520.BY), India's biggest sport-utility vehicle maker by sales, to produce land-based defense equipment will start operations in the second quarter of this year.
Mahindra will hold the majority 74% stake in the venture as per the Indian norms.
"The joint venture will initially focus on existing M&M businesses," Scopes said.
BAE is also considering expanding its partnership with Wipro Ltd. (WIP), India's third-biggest software exporter by sales, Scopes said.
BAE and Wipro had announced in November 2007 that they would jointly work on commercial aerospace projects.
Scopes also said the Indian government may call bids for the supply of an additional 1,000 towed howitzers. BAE has already bid for supplying 400 towed howitzers to India.
"The bids for these (400) howitzers are currently under technical evaluation and the company expects to be called for trials sometime in 2009," he said.
BAE is also in talks with India's defense ministry for supplying ultra-light weight howitzers, he added.
-By Rumman Ahmed and Nitin Luthra, Dow Jones Newswires: +91-11-4356-3305; santanu.choudhury@dowjones.com
Click here to go to Dow Jones NewsPlus, a web front page of today's most important business and market news, analysis and commentary: http://www.djnewsplus.com/access/al?rnd=xToKjQttMjb9dViypWm77w%3D%3D. You can use this link on the day this article is published and the following day.

Wednesday February 11st, 2009 / 11h28 Source : Dowjones Business News


http://www.easybourse.com/bourse-actualite/marches/update-bae-says-india-may-buy-57-more-hawk-trainer-jets-614404

Adux
02-11-2009, 09:48 AM
Combat Helicopter prototype will fly in 2009: HAL design chief. (http://www.domain-b.com/aero/aeroindia2009/20090211_combat_helicopter.html)


The prototype of India's Light Combat Helicopter (LCH) is presently being built and will fly by the end of the year, said HAL Rotor Wing Research & Development Centre (RWRDC) Design Chief Dr Prasad Sampath. He was speaking on 'Development of Helicopters in India – An Overview' today, at the Aero India 2009 International Seminar on 'Aerospace – Perspectives and Trends in Technologies', being held in Bengaluru from 9 to 12 February.

He said that the cockpit and fuselage design for LCH was complete, and the mock up trials were over last year. All dynamic systems of the LCH are identical to HAL's Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH) and only the fuselage and the landing gear have been designed afresh for the fighting version of the chopper.

After considerable design analysis, the weight class of the LCH has been maintained the same as the ALH, and therefore there should be little difficulty in the prototype successfully flying, he said.

The HAL RWRDC has also developed a helicopter simulator called the Hats-Off Simulator, which can be fitted with all the different cockpit mockups of the different choppers that HAL makes, he said.

Lala_Peace
02-11-2009, 11:29 AM
Its a great news that LCA is up an running with flying colors. Hopefully we will see a large number of squadrons of LCA with Kaveri Engines and then MCA.

cardriver
02-11-2009, 11:39 AM
we have all this, and will have some more. so what?

Adux
02-11-2009, 12:58 PM
France offers technology to India to build 'desi' missile

http://www.ptinews.com/icons/ecblankdotgif http://www.ptinews.com/icons/ecblankdotgifhttp://www.ptinews.com/icons/ecblankdotgif Bangalore, Feb 11 (PTI) France is ready to transfer technology of its surface-to-air missile to Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) of India so that this country can build its own version, French Minister of State for Defence Jean-Marie Bockel said today.
Speaking to reporters on the sidelines of air show, Aero India 2009, he said the offer is currently under discussions with Indian authorities.

On the absence of Rafale, made by France's Dassault Aviation, one of the contenders for India's 126 fighter jets contract, from the show, he said Rafale is on display back in France and is available for those who want to test it.

"All the Rafale that could have been sent to India for this air show...Are presently in (combat) operation in Afghanistan", he said.

"Rafale will be present at all stages of evaluation (in India in its bid for the contract) and we believe it's the best plane available", Bockel said.

Asked if France would stop sales of weapons to Pakistan in the wake of Mumbai terror attacks blamed on elements within that neighbouring country, he said "France wants Pakistan to act very concretely and fully against terrorism at all the levels of the State".

"We say that to Pakistan, we will continue to say it to Pakistan", Bockel added. PTI



http://www.ptinews.com/pti%5C%5Cptisite.nsf/0/CD1C46492187669F6525755A005947F6?OpenDocument

Adux
02-11-2009, 01:07 PM
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Indi ... latestnews (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Indias_nuke_submarine_is_in_final_stages_Antony/articleshow/4114292.cms?TOI_latestnews)


Quote:

India's nuke submarine is in final stages: Antony
11 Feb 2009, 2113 hrs IST, PTI


BANGALORE: India's indigenous nuclear submarine is in its "final stages" of completion, Defence A K Antony said on Wednesday.

"Things are in final stages," Antony told reporters on the sidelines of the Aero India show here when asked about the progress of the Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) project.

He said there were certain "bottlenecks" in the project earlier, but now these have been resolved.

The ATV is India's first venture into nuclear submarine design and development and it is expected to be armed with ballistic missiles such as the 750-km range Sagarika carrying nuclear warheads.

The warship is expected to be launched for sea trials in April this year.

Asked about the Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier additional price negotiations, Antony said the Cabinet had already given its consent for discussing the fresh cost of the warship with the Russians and the two sides were holding frequent talks to arrive at a mutually agreeable price.

India had signed a USD 1.5 billion deal with Russia in 2004 for Gorshkov and rechristened the ship as INS Vikramaditya. The aircraft carrier's refit and refurbishing programme is currently in progress at the Sevmash shipyard in Russia.

Since 2007, Russians have been demanding an additional USD 1.5 billion for the warship, citing escalating refit costs

Adux
02-11-2009, 02:03 PM
http://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r3406604456dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r3753520894dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r3947783583dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r4237645582dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r565918155dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r1912719960dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r240044458dotjpghttp://i524.photobucket.com/albums/cc328/Adux1982/r2912894271dotjpg

Adux
02-11-2009, 03:15 PM
http://www.business-standard.com/india/ ... 06/348804/ (http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/eads-flyinglca-into-indian-market/00/06/348804/)


Quote:
EADS flying the LCA into Indian market

Ajai Shukla / Yelahanka February 12, 2009, 0:45 IST



The contract with the company is expected to be signed shortly.

A the opening of the Aero India 2009 defence exposition today, Defence Minister AK Antony clearly enjoyed what must have seemed like a wild-west style shootout. One after another, four contenders for India's purchase of 126 medium fighters — the Eurofighter Typhoon, the F/A-18, the F-16 and the MiG-35 — took to the skies in a fiesta of aerobatics clearly aimed at impressing the decision-makers who must decide which aircraft will win the $12 billion contract.

But the performance that evoked Antony's praise was that of the Indian-built Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). Although more cautious than the all-out performances of the established fighters, the Tejas went far beyond anything it had ever displayed before, surprising the spectators with steep climbs, an inverted pass, high-gravity turns and loops.

Addressing the press, Antony remarked, "I was very excited to see the LCA. After many years we could see the LCA doing manoeuvres… I was excited to see the Indian-made LCA in Indian skies."

But even amidst success, the Tejas is struggling to overcome major development hurdles. Its maker, Bangalore-based Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) has taken the crucial decision to bring in a design consultant, a global aerospace major that would assist Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) to overcome persistent design glitches that dog the LCA, including fuel distribution, uneven braking, flight controls, environment controls and testing.

And while US-based Boeing has declined to supply such know-how, German-Spanish consortium, EADS, one of the makers of the Eurofighter, has aggressively pursued the consultancy as a way of flying into the Indian market.

In multiple interviews with senior Indian and EADS officials, who requested anonymity, Business Standard has pieced together the EADS strategy. The company has decided to supply India with high technology for Indian products that are not directly competing with an EADS product. The Tejas is not in the same category as the heavier Eurofighter.

Having established its presence in the Tejas programme, EADS is confident that it would be well positioned to get its Eurojet EJ200 engine accepted for the Tejas. India is currently deciding between the EJ200 and the GE-414 engine for powering future squadrons of the Tejas. And EADS believes that winning the contract for the EJ200 engine, and producing it in India, would position it perfectly for the lucrative medium fighter contract; twin EJ200 engines power the Eurofighter.

While willing to part with the technology assistance needed to get the LCA over its ****, EADS worries about the possibility of eventually being held responsible for a possible failure in the Tejas development.

“Let’s be clear that we are not underwriting the LCA programme," says a senior European official related with the contract. The contract with EADS is expected to be signed shortly.

Another likens EADS's role to helping someone in a dark room turn on the light switch. But EADS will do no more than indicate the direction of the switch.

The German and Spanish governments have already permitted EADS to part with the technology needed for the Tejas programme; the US government, in contrast, imposed stringent restrictions on Boeing. Explains a senior EADS official, "If we don't supply technology, India will develop it anyway, perhaps with some delay. So it is better for us to establish our presence here, partner India in the Tejas, and perhaps even market it together.”

D-Mitch
02-11-2009, 03:33 PM
14:30 | 11/ 02/ 2009
BANGALORE (India), February 11 (RIA Novosti) - Russia will deliver the first of 80 Mi-171 transport helicopters to India under a recent contract in 2010, an official from Russia's state arms exporter said on Wednesday.
The Mi-171 is an export version of the Mi-8 Hip helicopter. Currently in production at two factories in the Russian Volga area city of Kazan and the East Siberian city of Ulan-Ude, it features more powerful turboshaft engines and can transport up to 37 passengers.
"We hope that the first helicopter will be delivered to India at the start of 2010," a deputy director of Rosoboronexport, Viktor Komardin, said.
He previously said the first helicopter would be delivered to India before the end of the year.
Some sources estimate the new deal is worth around $662 million.
India already has 150 Russian-made Mi-8 and Mi-17 medium-lift helicopters deployed in at least 12 squadrons.
The Indian Air Force used Mi-17 helicopters in a commando assault on the Nariman House Jewish center in November last year, which killed some of the 10 terrorists involved in a three-day bloody rampage in Mumbai.
Russia started this year deliveries of Mi-171 helicopters to another customer, Iran, under a $45 million contract. They will be used by Iran's Red Crescent for rescue missions and the evacuation of people injured in natural disasters.
Russia also hopes to win a tender to provide India with six Il-78MD-90 fuel tankers, the head of the United Aircraft Corporation said at an air show in the southern city of Bangalore.
Aero India-2009 is one the largest aerospace shows in the Asia-Pacific region, hosting leading manufacturers, vendors and suppliers from 35 countries.
The existing Russian-Indian military cooperation program through 2010 features up to 200 projects worth about $18 billion.
India is a key buyer of Russian weaponry, with contracts including the delivery of the Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier with at least 16 MiG-29K Fulcrum-D carrier fighters, the Smerch MLRS, and licensed production of T-90 tanks in India.

http://www.patricksaviation.com/videos/Paja/1667

Here is some photos of Mil Mi 171 helicopter

http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/Mi-171ShIMGP0674dotjpghttp://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/mi17_02largedotjpghttp://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/mi17_05largedotjpghttp://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/mi17_07largedotjpg

Adux
02-11-2009, 11:41 PM
Indian Air Force: What lies ahead
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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854446_1dotjpg Back to the future?View Text only version (http://sify.com/news/columns/fullstory.php?id=14854461)
Air Marshal BK Pandey
Planning for the future has always been a daunting task, especially when it concerns the military of a nation. As the military is a vital component and, in fact, the ultimate instrument of national security, improper assessment or gross miscalculation of its pattern of development can have catastrophic ramifications. The task of forward planning is rendered particularly difficult in a scenario where long-term plans need to be evolved in a coordinated fashion amongst the three wings of the Armed Forces — the Army, the Navy and the Air Force. Also, for any long-term planning to be meaningful, two inputs are prerequisites for military planners — a clear long-term strategic vision for the nation, and assured availability of resources commensurate with national security imperatives, in that order.
However, in the Indian context, the lofty and fiery rhetoric on both these aspects emanating from the highest levels of governance have rarely crystallised into reality. Over the last six decades since Independence, there has been piecemeal acquisition of hardware in the Indian Air Force (IAF) as cleared by the civilian bureaucracy to be sanctioned by the political leadership on the basis of stand-alone case-by-case justification and not in conformity with any long-term national plan. http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/nov2008/News/14800160_indian_defence_100dotjpg (http://www.indiandefencereview.com/)
Possibly there has been none. The process of acquisition of new equipment has generally followed a pattern of one-to-one replacement with equipment procured from a source that is either the cheapest, politically expedient or both. Acquisition of hardware has often been contingent not on the availability of resources but on allocation of funds.
Image: IAF`s old P-19 Russian radars which are on the verge of being phased out. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.




The `offset` clause
For decades, the IAF had largely been tethered to a single non-western source for its acquisitions. Much of the inventory acquired from this source has now been rendered ineffective, thanks to obsolescence. As a result, in recent years, there has been an alarming erosion in combat power and other capabilities.
Even after prolonged and reportedly vigorous efforts, the indigenous research and development organisations and the aerospace industry have not been able to provide a respectable degree of self-reliance to the IAF. The near total dependence on foreign sources for cutting-edge technology and frontline equipment is potentially perhaps the most debilitating factor that often threatens to seriously undermine the capability of the IAF.
Despite these limitations, the IAF has managed to attain and project an image of a potent force capable of preserving the sovereignty of the Indian skies and in more recent times, to project power, albeit limited in quantum and reach. And even in the future, there appears to be no option but to procure advanced technology and hardware from abroad.
There is however an attempt to indigenise products through co-development, co-production and the difficult, but innovative, concept of “offsets”. Though not the best, this route is the most expedient under the circumstances to accord sophisticated military hardware a semblance of Indian character.
The life of a modern weapon system is in the region of 30 years, which is normally extendable by another 10 to 15 years after a mid-life upgrade. New equipment procured for the IAF over the next decade will remain operational up to 2050 at the very least, and possibly up to 2060.
As the nature of warfare itself undergoes transformation, it is necessary to make a comprehensive reassessment of the contours of the operational scenario that the IAF will have to contend with and reconfigure its inventory accordingly. To do this at this point in time, the IAF needs to take note of India’s regional power status in the emerging world order and assess its possible role and responsibility in the new geo-political and geo-strategic environment.
Image: A Mirage 2000H (KF127), from No.1 Squadron (Tigers), flies over the backdrop of Gwalior Fort. The fighter jet sports a centreline drop tank, a medium-range Super 530D air-to-air missile and a close-combat Magic-II air-to-air missile. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.




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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854450_3dotjpg Closing the gapsIn view of the asymmetry, Pakistan is unlikely to take the initiative for large-scale conventional military operations against India. While it will continue to retain the capability to put up stout defence against any assault, as indications are, it is more likely to engage in clandestine warfare against India in a variety of ways, some of which were amply demonstrated by way of the December 2001 attack on Parliament House or the November 2008 raid on Mumbai.
Such operations should no longer be seen as purely internal security problems. Our land and sea borders are extensive and quite impossible to seal through mere ground measures — such as erection of physical barriers or through the deployment of paramilitary forces/civil police that are riddled with porosity on account of corruption.
In the present scenario, it is relatively easy for well-trained enemy agents or commandos, collectively described by India as “terrorists”, to penetrate unsecured borders and inflict disproportionately high levels of damage and human casualties.
It should therefore not come as a surprise if the various religious, political and social divides that afflict the nation, actively facilitate such operations by the enemy.
Despite the perceived success in the recently held elections in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, the end to the turmoil is not in sight. There is no doubt that Pakistan will continue its campaign in the state, in all likelihood, with renewed vigour and intensity to turn the tide against India. The techniques of warfare and tactics adopted by Pakistan in J&K will be similar to those employed in other regions in India and possibly with an enhanced level of support from the local populace.
The induction of nuclear weapons in South Asia has added a new dimension to the Indo-Pak military confrontation. Pakistan is believed to have unknown quantity of Chinese-supplied nuclear weapons and has the capability to deliver these using surface-to-surface missiles with adequate range to cover most of India’s important cities and targets of strategic value.
Conversely, India, too, has nuclear weapons and has one advantage over Pakistan wherein the latter lacks strategic depth. In order to neutralise the Pakistani nuclear threat and raise its threshold substantially, India needs to enlarge her own nuclear ****nal and diversify her delivery capability with bias towards surface-to-surface missiles, complemented by combat aircraft in the ratio 75:25.
The nuclear warfare capability needs to be developed to the extent necessary to obliterate most cities in Pakistan in a single strike and this capability must be clearly made known to them through direct or indirect means. With such a capability in being, there would be a high probability that Pakistan would be deterred from first use of nuclear weapons. Although Asif Ali Zardari, the President of Pakistan, has proclaimed a “no first use” policy, it would not be prudent to take this assurance at face value and neglect or delay the build up of our own capability. We need to bear in mind the principle that nuclear weapons are not meant to win but to prevent wars.
Against a traditional enemy with whom India has fought three major conventional wars since Independence and who is now engaged in aggressive subversion in different parts of the country, it should be clear that in future, the traditional military posture will progressively become less relevant as clandestine warfare of the future will have no clearly defined fronts.
This would necessitate redefined doctrines and a restructured inventory. First and foremost, there has to be a profound qualitative change in the capability of surveillance and communication intelligence through extensive employment of aerial platforms. Surveillance platforms parked at medium-to-high altitudes must be capable of providing resolution of a few centimetres with all-weather capability through cameras in the optical and infrared frequency range, Synthetic Aperture Radar or other new generation sensors to be introduced in the future. These advanced sensors need to be mounted on new generation Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) with continental range and high endurance capable of being controlled and operated thousands of miles away from parent base through satellite based data link.
Such a system can provide round-the-clock cover of any part of land and sea frontiers as also inland areas of the nation. This will obviate the need to reposition the bulky control infrastructure in different parts of the country. The airborne platforms must also carry powerful and agile sensors to record, identify and pinpoint the source of all radio transmissions on a wide range of frequency bands.
Intelligence gathering through UAVs on continuous patrol would have to be supported by high speed, possibly automated intelligence data processing and analysis systems, which should include capability of integration with intelligence inputs from other agencies. Threats thus analysed must be available in the shortest possible time to security agencies to initiate response. For swift response, an effective method is vertical envelopment through a heli-borne force with the helicopter fleet dedicated to this task, data linked with the UAV to get a real time view of the objective.
The ever-increasing cost of fixed wing combat aircraft and their weapons, as also substantially enhanced lethality of enemy air defence weapon systems, would render employment of such aircraft both in the deep strike role and in the tactical battle areas, less and less cost effective in the future. It would be necessary, therefore, to place greater reliance on surface-to-surface missiles for deep strike against heavily defended targets in depth such as airfields. In the tactical battle area, the fixed wing combat aircraft would have to be replaced by Unmanned Aerial Combat Vehicles (UCAV) and rotary wing platforms with stand-off weapons, both integrated with ground forces.
Fixed wing aircraft when employed would have to be effectively protected through versatile electronic warfare capability. Strategic air defence capability of the IAF would have to be augmented through the enlargement of the fleet of AWACS and AEW aircraft. These systems would effectively close the prevalent gaps in the low-level surveillance capability of the IAF. Simultaneously, it would be necessary to induct new air defence missile systems for area and point defence and revamp electronic warfare capability across the board.
Image: A Su-30MKI heads out for the runway for a mission. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.




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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854452_4dotjpg Enter the DragonRiding the wave of stupendous economic growth, China has emerged as a major regional power and has clear aspirations to be a global power in the not too distant future. Despite prolonged dialogue, there has been no progress in the settlement of the Sino-Indian border dispute and none is likely in the foreseeable future. China is a nuclear power and is currently embarked on a major upgrade of its somewhat outdated military machine. She has enlarged her sphere of influence in Asia and has effectively thrown a cordon around India through political, economic and military support to all her immediate neighbours.
India’s growing proximity with and subservience to the US consequent to the Indo-US nuclear deal has clearly pushed India on to the opposite side of the international political divide. With this development, the possibility of rapprochement with the emerging superpower has practically receded into oblivion. In the long-term perspective, China is potentially a greater military threat to India than Pakistan is.
Thus it would be unwise for India to depend solely on diplomacy or support of the US to secure the nation against the awakening giant in the north. The limitations of diplomacy without the backing of military power have so clearly been exposed in the confrontation with Pakistan in the wake of 26/11. If India’s diplomatic demarche has not succeeded against Pakistan, which is relatively a weak state, it would be naive to assume that it will be effective against China. The character and level of threat from China is qualitatively different and the nation’s armed forces must be geared to meet the long-term threat beginning to loom over the horizon. Finally it would be the armed forces that would have to face the consequences of diplomatic failure and bear the brunt of a Chinese offensive in any form.
First and foremost, the IAF must have the capability to counter China’s nuclear capability through a missile-based credible nuclear deterrence. Simultaneously, the Sino-Indian borders need to be kept under surveillance through satellites and unmanned platforms. The IAF must also acquire the capability to launch precision attacks in mountainous areas from high altitude using advanced precision-guided munitions. In addition, it must have the capability to neutralise targets with mobile units of surface-to-surface missiles with conventional warheads in coordination with target data obtained from UAVs.
Image: KH2001, The Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) developed as a replacement of the old Soviet Mig-21 series of aircrafts, is the smallest and lightest multirole aircraft in the world. It is seen in the skies over Bangalore on its maiden flight on January 04, 2001. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854454_5dotjpg The last frontierA completely new dimension in future wars would be the employment of space-based assets for reconnaissance, surveillance and communication. There has been some progress in this area but much more needs to be done. However, the new problem that is emerging is the security of the space-based assets.
There appears to be no clear solution at this point in time except for multiple redundancy which may be expensive and impractical. In addition to space-based assets, the IAF needs to acquire the capability to neutralise space-based capability of the enemy through hard or soft kill techniques with weapon systems located on the ground or mounted on airborne platforms.


Image: In 1996, an agreement between Israel and India saw the procurement of nearly 32 UAVs of the Searcher-II Variant manufactured by IAI-Malat. These were inducted into the Indian Army as well as the Indian Air Force. Subsequently some IAI Herons were procured too. This IAI Heron was displayed on Air Force Day 2003, which was its first public appearance. It has a retractable undercarriage and an optical pod closer to the nose of the aircraft. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.


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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854456_6dotjpg Defensive no moreA major responsibility of the IAF in the future would be in the area of strategic airlift. Internal security compulsions will place growing demand for the movement of quick reaction as also regular security forces within the country on short notice.
Given its emerging regional power status and the newly forged strategic partnership with the US if not abrogated by the incoming administration, India may be called upon to project her power in the region which may involve airlifting of large military forces to areas of interest of either of the partners in the region outside our borders and to provide sustained logistic support. The strategic airlift capability of the IAF would therefore need to be built up practically from scratch as the existing fleet is fast approaching the end of its technical life.
At the tactical level, the IAF should be equipped with a fleet of medium tactical transport aircraft and helicopters capable of speedy response with special forces over shorter ranges.
The IAF has taken some baby steps towards acquiring the capability of projecting combat power in the region. At this point in time, that capability is limited to a token force and cannot be described as significant. However, while steps are in hand to augment the existing fleet of long-range combat aircraft as also to acquire a new fleet, the capability of power projection would in the ultimate analysis be limited by the size of the fleet of in-flight refuelling aircraft. This fleet would have to be suitably enlarged for any meaningful power projection that is capable of making an impact.
Image: Fuselage of an armed MiG-29. The jet sports training acquisition rounds of the close-range R-73RDM2 (AA-11 Archer) air-to-air missile. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.




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http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854460_7dotjpg Solution: More power To summarise, the IAF needs to enhance some of the force multipliers already on the inventory as also to develop a range of new capabilities both in the strategic and tactical regimes. At the strategic level, the IAF must be able to provide the nation with credible nuclear deterrence against Pakistan and China. Also, it should be capable of power projection in its perceived area of national security interests and those of our ally in the region beyond the national borders with combat aircraft, in-flight refuelling and strategic airlift capability. These forces should be geared to provide swift response to a crisis situation and be able to provide logistic support to sustain forces for significant length of time. For strategic strikes deep into enemy territory, the IAF needs to have a combination of missile-based and airborne platforms, the latter with powerful electronic warfare equipment to suppress and defeat enemy air defence systems. Tactical roles may be transferred to UCAVs and helicopters.
To provide effective air defence of the homeland, the IAF needs to acquire a fleet of AWACS and AEW aircraft over and above the few already on order to enhance surveillance capability at low level. New generation area and point defence missile systems need to be inducted to replace the ageing and obsolete systems currently deployed. For strategic and tactical intelligence, the IAF must have its own satellite systems and a fleet of UAVs with a range of advanced sensors to provide all weather day and night capability. The fleet of UAVs should be adequately supported by appropriate ground infrastructure for automated and speedy processing of intelligence information, and fleet of tactical transport aircraft and helicopters for quick response with special forces.
It goes without saying that in future wars, the IAF must be geared to operate in a network-centric environment. But perhaps most important of all, there is the imperative need for the IAF to shed the defensive mindset.
Image: A Su-30K of No. 24 Squadron (Hawks) takes off from Kalaikunda during Exercise Cope India 2006. The Su-30Ks have updated electronic warfare suites, PGM (Precision Guided Munitions) capability and possibly updated radar. Image copyright bharat-rakshshak.com. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.
Also read: IAF pilots set new world record in microlight flight (http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14512679) | Indian Army, foreign hand (http://sify.com/news/imagegallery/galleryDetail.php?hgallery=14735791)
http://im.sify.com/sifycmsimg/feb2009/News/14854480_BK_Pandey150dotjpgAir Marshal BK Pandey is a former Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Training Command, IAF.
Courtesy: Indian Defence Review (http://www.indiandefencereview.com/)


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Adux
02-11-2009, 11:45 PM
Aerospace Industry In India


(Source: Aero India; undated)



Indian industry today is on the threshold of entering into a new era where it will assume greater responsibility in making the nation self-reliant in Defence Production. The resurgence of India’s manufacturing sector has been remarkable. Not only are the profits soaring, the sector is also making its presence felt abroad as many Indian firms are becoming transnational companies.

The Indian manufacturing sector is internationally competitive with international quality standards, efficiency and manufacturing facilities. India is fast developing into a manufacturing hub for world corporations wanting to leverage the sector’s proven skills in product design, reconfiguration and customization with creativity, assured quality and value addition.

India, also keen to strengthen its own aerospace industry and has asked major weapon exporting countries to transfer technology to India.

Indian Aerospace Industry
The Indian Aerospace Industry is witnessing an unprecedented growth. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), which is fully owned by the Government of India, is the premier aerospace company in the country. HAL has played a major role in the Defence aviation of India through design, manufacture and overhaul of fighters, trainers, helicopters, transport aircraft, engines, avionics and system equipment. HAL is now ranked 34th in the list of world’s top 100 defence companies.

HAL is a major partner for the Space programmes of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) and manufactures structures and assemblies for the launch vehicles and satellites at its dedicated Aerospace Division in Bangalore.

The civil aviation sector in India is growing rapidly. It has recorded annual growth of over 41% in passenger traffic during in the last two years. In fact, it has contributed significantly to the growth of international civil aviation sector. The rapid growth of civil aviation has put extreme pressure on the existing civil aviation infrastructure. As a result, the thrust is now on modernization of airports, communications, navigation and surveillance systems for air traffic management, radars and facilities for Maintenance Repair and Overhaul of aircraft and sub systems.

There is thus enormous potential and huge opportunities for collaboration and creation of joint ventures in the aerospace sector in India for establishing Maintenance Repair Overhaul (MRO) facilities for civil and military aircraft, overhaul and maintenance of aero engines and production of avionics, components and accessories both in the civil and military aviation sectors. Major global aviation industry are already eyeing the local market in India and scouting for outsourcing aerospace and defence products as India is fast emerging as a center for engineering and design services.

1. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (Hal)
HAL, a Defence PSU, is a major player in the global aviation arena. It has built up comprehensive skills in design, manufacture and overhaul of fighters, trainers, helicopters, transport aircraft, engines, avionics and system equipment. Its product track record consists of 12 types of aircraft from in-house R&D and 14 types by licence production inclusive of 8 types of aero engines and over 1000 items of aircraft system equipment (avionics, mechanical, electrical).

HAL has produced over 3550 aircraft, 3650 aero-engines and overhauled around 8750 aircraft & 28400 engines besides manufacture/overhaul of related accessories and avionics. The Company has the requisite core competence base with a demonstrated potential to become a global player.

HAL has 19 production divisions for manufacture and overhaul of aircraft, helicopters, engine and accessories. It has also 9 R&D Centres to give a thrust to research & development.

HAL’s major supplies/services are to Indian Air Force, Indian Navy, Indian Army, Coast Guard and Border Security Force. Transport aircraft and Helicopters have been supplied to Airlines as well as State Governments. The Company has also achieved a foothold in export in more than 20 countries, having demonstrated its quality and price competitiveness. HAL is a major partner for the Space Vehicle programmes of the Indian Space Research Organisation. It has also diversified into the fields of industrial & marine gas turbine business and real-time software business.

HAL is now ranked 34th in the list of world’s top 100 defence companies. HAL continues its growth with a sales turnover of 2.1 Billion US Dollars during the financial year 2007-08. It has doubled its turnover in 3 years. It has declared profit before tax of 538 Million US Dollars. The company has made supplies to almost all the major aerospace companies in the World like Airbus, Boeing, IAI, IRKUT, Honeywell and Ruag etc.

All the production Divisions of HAL have ISO 9001-2000 accreditation and sixteen divisions have ISO-14001-2004 environment management system (EMS) certification. Six divisions have also implemented the aerospace sector quality management system requirements stated in As 9100 standard and obtained certification. Four of these divisions have also obtained NADCAP certification (National Aerospace Defence Contractors Accreditation programme –USA) for special processes such as NDT, heat treatment, welding etc.

In order to meet with the challenges in the 21st Century, the Company has redefined its mission as follows:

“To become a globally competitive aerospace industry while working as an instrument for achieving self-reliance in design, manufacture and maintenance of aerospace equipment, Civil Transport Aircraft, helicopter & missiles and diversifying to related areas, managing the business on commercial lines in a climate of growing professional competence.”

HAL has successfully designed & developed the Advanced Light Helicopter, which is currently being operated by the Defence Services of India and private Companies. The Advanced Light Helicopter also has great export potential. Apart from licence production of front line fighters like Su-30 MKI, HAL is also developing the following products through design and development:
-- Intermediate Jet Trainer (IJT)
-- Light combat helicopter (LCH)
-- Weaponization of Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH)
-- Tejas-Light Combat Aircraft

2. Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)
Government of India established the Department of Space in 1972 to promote development and application of space science and technology in the country for the socio-economic benefits. Indian Space Research organization (ISRO) is the primary agency under the Department of Space for executing space programmes. During the early seventies, India undertook demonstration of space applications for communication, television broadcasting and remote sensing building experimental satellites namely, APPLE, Bhaskara – and experimental satellite launch vehicles, SLV-3 and ASLV.

Today, India has an impressive array of achievements with the largest constellation of domestic communication satellites called Indian National Satellite System (INSAT) in the Asia pacific region with about 210 transponders in orbit. And, India has plans to augment the capacity with the launching of INSAT satellites and increase it to about 500 in 4-5 years to meet its growing needs.

India also has the largest constellation of earth observation satellites called Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellites with better than one meter resolution. IRS data is being used for a variety of applications such as crop yield estimation, drinking water missions, waste land development, forest cover mapping and a host of other applications benefiting the common man. Using INSATs, besides TV Broadcasting, telecommunications and meteorological applications societal applications such as tele-education, telemedicine applications have been operationalised. Village Resource Centers (VRCs) combining the services of IRS and INSAT satellites for providing an array of services have been established. India, today is considered as a leader in the application of space technology. INSAT and IRS satellites are also providing invaluable services in disaster management.

To put the IRS and INSAT satellites into orbit, India has developed two work horse launch vehicles namely the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) and Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV). PSLV weighing about 300 tons at lift off has the capability to put 1500 kg satellite in polar sun-synchronous orbit. PSLV with eleven consecutively successful launches has demonstrated its high reliability. PSLV has launched eight satellites for various customers from abroad. GSLV with four successful flights is capable of launching 2200 kg satellites into geo-stationary Transfer Orbit. India has also created world class facilities at its space port in Sriharikota near Chennai with launch pads besides a host of test facilities for testing satellites and launch vehicle systems.

3. Defence Research Development Organization (DRDO)
DRDO is a network of 52 Defence Laboratories in India which are deeply engaged in developing critical defence technologies covering various disciplines like aeronautics, armaments, electronics, combat vehicles, engineering system, instrumentation, missiles, advanced computing and simulation, special materials, naval systems, life sciences, information systems and agriculture.

Presently over 5000 scientists and about 25000 other scientific technical and supporting personnel back the organization. Several major projects for the development of missiles, armaments, light combat aircrafts, radars, electronic warfare systems etc are on hand and significant achievements have already been made in several such technologies.

4. Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)
BEL was established in 1954 to meet the specialized electronic needs of the country’s defence services, is a multi-product, multi-technology, multi-unit company. It serves the needs of domestic and foreign customers with the products/services manufactured in its nine state-of-the-art ISO 9001/2 and ISO 14000 certified manufacturing plants in India.

BEL manufactures a wide repertoire of products in the field of Radars, Naval systems, Defence Communication, Telecommunication and Broadcasting, Electronic Warfare, Opto Electronics, Tank Electronics and Electronic Components. With the expertise developed over the years, the company also provides turnkey systems solutions and Electronic Manufacturing Services (EMS) on “Build to Print” and “Build to Spec” basis. BEL has become a US $ 1 Billion company in the financial year 2007-08.

5. Bharat Dynamics Limited (BDL)
BDL is fully owned by the Government of India, was established in 1970. BDL manufactures guided weapons & related test equipment, Launchers, under water weapon systems and decoys for the Indian Defence Services. BDL is the nominated Production Agency for the indigenous Integrated Missile Development Programme.

Starting with production of 1st Generation Anti tank Guided missiles, the Company has grown into a multi technology and multi product organization. Collaborative association with DRDO and world leaders in missile manufacturing has enabled BDL assimilate critical technologies and emerge as a globally competitive and reliable defence equipment manufacturer.

6. Bharat Earth Movers Limited (BEML Limited)
BEML Limited, Government of India Company, is one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of earthmoving, construction and mining equipment in Asia. With over 42 years of experience, BEML is one of the premier engineering companies in India and plays a significant role in providing vital inputs to the core sectors of the economy, apart from manufacturing a wide range of tailor-made equipment for the Indian Defence sector.

BEML manufactures a wide range of sophisticated hi-tech equipment like bulldozers, rear dump truck, front-end loaders, hydraulic excavators, rope shovels, motor graders, walking draglines, pipe layers, tyre handling equipment, aircraft towing tractor, heavy duty transportation trailers, heavy duty trucks and its prime movers, rail coaches including day coaches, sleeper coaches, postal vans, track-laying equipment, overhead Inspection cars, diesel engines and gensets.

7. Ordnance Factory Board (OFB)
The Indian Ordnance Factories possess the unique distinction of more than 200 years of experience in Defence production. Under the aegis of its corporate headquarters the Ordnance Factory Board, the organization is currently engaged in production, logistics, research & development and trade in the field of defence.

Ordnance Factory Board offers comprehensive range in the areas of land, naval and air defence systems. These include small, medium and large caliber weapons & ammunition, mortars, explosives, pyrotechnics, armoured & soft skin vehicles, optical & night vision devices, parachutes and troop comfort items.

8. Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited (MIDHANI)
MIDHANI – an ISO 9002 company - caters to domestic and international customers with modern metallurgical facilities and high degree of technical competence for manufacturing its diverse product mix of superalloys, titanium alloys, special purpose steels, electrical resistance & softmagnetic alloys, molybedenum and other alloys meeting the stringent requirements of the strategic sectors like defence, aerospace, power and general engineering etc.

MIDHANI employs its highly integrated and flexible manufacturing facilities to produce a wide variety of special metals and alloys in various mill forms such as ingots, forged bars, hot rolled steels and bar, cold rolled sheets, *****s and foils, wires, castings and tubes.

9. BrahMos Aerospace
BRAHMOS-supersonic cruise missile is designed for use in multiple platforms- ships, silos, mobile launchers, aircrafts and submarines against land and sea targets. BRAHMOS is the World leader flying all through supersonic with maneuverable trajectories ensuring no reaction time to the enemy and a lethal punch owing to huge kinetic energy of impact.

BRAHMOS has attained 100% success rates in all flight trials proving the adequacy of the missile system to a maximum range of 290 km with high accuracy and lethality establishing the reliability of the system in all weather conditions. Indian Navy & army have started the induction of the weapon system. The system will also be exported to a few friendly countries.




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Adux
02-11-2009, 11:49 PM
India-Somalia pirate patrol: The Asian Age reported the government has decided to return the guided missile frigate INS Tabar to the Somali patrol to join the guided missile frigate INS Beas already there. INS Tabar was last in the Gulf of Aden in October 2008.


It’s not clear what prompted the augmentation. However, the same announcement denied a Chinese report from last week that a Chinese destroyer had an encounter with an Indian Navy submarine and forced it to surface. The Indian Navy denied it had any submarines on patrol in the Gulf of Aden. There is no obvious connection between these developments, but the Indians are matching the Chinese task group, minus a support ship.

The Piracy efforts

Adux
02-11-2009, 11:50 PM
'India's secret N-submarine project nearing completion'
12 Feb 2009, 0346 hrs IST, Rajat Pandit, TNN

Bangalore: In a boost to India's long-standing aim to have "a nuclear weapon triad", defence minister A K Antony on Wednesday said the secretive
programme to construct indigenous nuclear submarines was on the verge of completion now.

"Things are in the final stage now in the ATV (advanced technology vessel) project. There were bottlenecks earlier...they are over now," said Antony, during the ongoing Aero India-2009 here.

The hush-hush ATV project, a euphemism for the three nuclear-powered submarines being constructed at the Visakhapatnam naval dockyard, has been dogged by a series of technical hiccups since it was formally launched as far back as 1983.

The main problem has revolved around the design of miniature PWRs (pressurised water reactors) and their containment plans for the submarine's propulsion system but sources said such technical problems are a thing of the past now, with a little help from countries like Russia and France.

Sources said there had been some delay in "launching" the first prototype of the nuclear-powered guided-missile attack submarine for sea trials but it would happen soon. Antony, on his part, said, "We will announce it when it is ready."

The Navy hopes to get the first such operational submarine by 2012 or so. Concurrently, DRDO is also working on the K-15 submarine-launched ballistic missile, which will later be integrated with the submarine.

In all, five ATVs are planned under the programme, whose cost is touching around Rs 14,000 crore now, by around 2025.

The entire aim behind the ATV programme is to have nuclear-powered submarines, armed with nuclear-tipped cruise or ballistic missiles, to ensure "credible" second-strike capabilities in consonance with India's "no-first use" nuclear doctrine.

Nuclear-powered submarines have higher speeds and can stay submerged much longer than conventional diesel-electric submarines -- which have to surface or snorkel frequently to get oxygen to recharge batteries -- and thereby provide a much more invulnerable launch pad for nuclear weapons.

Though India already has nuclear-capable aircraft and mobile land-based missiles like the 700-km Agni-I and 2,500-km Agni-II being inducted into the armed forces now, it's hoped the ATV project will finally provide it with the third leg of the nuclear triad.

India, of course, is also trying to sort out the remaining few hitches in leasing the K-152 Nerpa Akula-II class nuclear submarine from Russia for a 10-year period, as reported by TOI earlier.

India and Russia had secretly signed the deal for the Akula lease in January 2004, along with the $1.5 billion package deal for the refit of aircraft carrier Admiral Gorshkov and 16 MiG-29K fighters to operate from it.

With the two nations now negotiating the around $2 billion jump in the Gorshkov contract, there is a feeling that Russia is trying to extract more money for the Akula lease also. "We will get the Akula since we have paid money for it. We will use it to train our sailors for the eventual ATVs," said a senior Navy officer.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Indias_nuke_submarine_is_in_final_stages_Antony/articleshow/4114292.cms

D-Mitch
02-12-2009, 07:51 AM
13:44 | 12/ 02/ 2009
(http://en.rian.ru/world/20090212/120103711-print.html)
BANGALORE (India), February 12 (RIA Novosti) - The BrahMos supersonic cruise missile will be commissioned by the Indian air force in 2012, the head of the BrahMos Aerospace company said on Thursday.
Established in 1998, BrahMos Aerospace, a joint Indian-Russian venture, produces and markets BrahMos supersonic missiles, whose sea-based and land-based versions have been successfully tested and put into service with the Indian army and navy.
"The [BrahMos] missile will be put in service in 2012," the company's CEO, Sivathanu Pillai said, presenting the airborne version of the missile at the Aero India-2009 air show in India.
The BrahMos missile (http://en.rian.ru/infographics/20071011/83467144.html) has a range of 290 km (180 miles) and can carry a conventional warhead of up to 300 kg (660 pounds). It can effectively engage ground targets from an altitude as low as 10 meters (30 feet) and has a top speed of Mach 2.8, which is about three times faster than the U.S.-made subsonic Tomahawk cruise missile.
"For the airborne version...we had to reduce the mass of the missile and to ensure aerodynamic stability after its separation from the aircraft. The air-launched platform has its own initial speed during the launch of the missile, so we have reduced the size of the booster. Now the missile is ready," Pillai told RIA Novosti in an exclusive interview last year.
The Indian Air Force had chosen Russian-made SU-30 MKI Flanker-H multirole fighter as a trial platform for the missile, but it will take up to four years to complete the upgrade of the aircraft so that it can carry and launch BrahMos missiles, the official added.
India is planning to produce at least 140 Su-30MKI fighters by 2014 under a Russian license with full technology transfer rights.
Analysts estimate that India could purchase up to 1,000 BrahMos missiles for its armed forces in the next decade, and export 2,000 to other countries during the same period.
During a visit by Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov to India last year, the two sides agreed to develop a hypersonic version of the missile, to be known as BrahMos-2.

http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/800px-Brahmos_imdsdotjpghttp://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/BrahMosdotgif

TR1
02-12-2009, 06:47 PM
http://en.rian.ru/world/20090212/120111325.html

raavan
07-30-2009, 11:20 AM
DRDO's development of AEW&CS system to result in low-cost offshoot

http://www.domain-b.com/aero/mil_avi/mil_aircraft/images/aewcs_domain-bdotjpg



Bangalore: The Centre for Airborne Systems (CABS) at Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) has revealed that it has developed a low-cost, indigenous radar system, which will match and even surpass the Israeli Phalcon Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS).

''DRDO is equipped to develop an indigenous radar system at substantially low-cost by using technologies developed for indigenous AEW&CS,'' said a CABS official.

An indigenous airborne early warning and control system (AEW&CS), to be based on Embraer-145 platforms, is being readied for delivery by 2011. The system will be developed at a cost of Rs 1,800-crore.

This CABS- developed indigenous system alone is capable of creating business opportunities worth Rs500-600 crore for SMEs in the country. CABS officials said its various work centres at DRDO are already tapping around 50-60 SMEs and PSUs to develop the indigenous system.

Some of these SMEs include Astra Microwave, Alligator Designs, Mistral Solutions, CMC, BEL, BDL, Chaturvedi Tools, SM Creative, Cornett, Data Patterns and Ayur.

http://www.domain-b.com/aero/mil_avi/mil_aircraft/20090730_drdo_development.html

khalsa1699
07-30-2009, 03:44 PM
Navy chief defends Gorshkov deal after CAG raps govt

NEW DELHI: With the CAG slamming the government for buying the second-hand Admiral Gorshkov at the price of a new aircraft carrier, Navy Chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta on Thursday defended the price being paid by India for the warship.

"I can't comment on the CAG. But you all are defence analysts, can you get me an aircraft carrier for less than two billion dollars? If you can, I am going to sign a cheque right now," Mehta told reporters on the sidelines of the 'Naval Self Reliance Seminar' organised by CII.

In its report, the CAG had noted that till 2008 the escalated cost of the aircraft carrier was about $1.82 billion and another $522 million for the sea trials, which was originally pegged at $27 million in the 2004 contract.

India had bought the 45,000-tonne Gorshkov from Russia in January 2004 at a total cost of $974 million, which included its refit and repair.

The Russians have thrice revised the price of the Admiral Gorshkov since 2007 and have made a final demand of additional $2.9 billion this February. India is carrying out final price negotiations with Moscow and is willing to pay around $2.2 billion for the ship.

During the Question Hour in Rajya Sabha on Wednesday, defence minister A K Antony had said that the government would agree to a fresh price for the warship only after going through the audit report.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/NEWS/India/Navy-chief-defends-Gorshkov-deal-after-CAG-raps-govt/articleshow/4837892.cms

pg_ord
07-31-2009, 11:30 PM
India plans to build 100 warships (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/16de2e94-7d22-11de-b8ee-00144feabdc0.html?nclick_check=1)

By James Lamont in New Delhi and Varun Sood in Mumbai


India has plans to add about 100 warships to its navy over the next decade as it seeks to modernise its armed forces, and develop its low-cost shipbuilding capabilities. Captain Alok Bhatnagar, director of naval plans at India’s ministry of defence, said on Thursday that 32 warships and submarines were under construction in the country’s shipyards. Work on 75 more ships, including aircraft carriers, destroyers, frigates and amphibious vessels, would begin over 10 years.

New Delhi is sensitive to lagging behind Beijing's naval might in the region. China has three times the number of combat vessels as India and five times the personnel. Officials are wary of port developments in neighbouring Pakistan and Sri Lanka that offer Chinese warships anchorages and potentially greater control of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea.

However, India has one of the fastest growing navies in the world. Its fleet of about 120 vessels is the fifth largest. At the weekend, it launched a locally built nuclear-powered submarine (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/af9a4f8a-6bcc-11de-9320-00144feabdc0.html), based on a Russian design, to join only a few countries with the technical prowess to produce such a war machine.

Speaking at a seminar on naval self-reliance in New Delhi, Capt Bhatnagar said it was a “strategic necessity” for India to develop its own naval shipyard capabilities to avoid “being held hostage to foreign countries in a crisis situation”.

Since the end of British rule 62 years ago, India has relied heavily on Russia to supply its fleet. Capt Bhatnagar identified its maritime priorities as energy security, protecting sea lanes, combating Islamic fundamentalism and responding to China’s aggressive modernisation plans.“China is developing its navy at a great rate. Its ambitions in the Indian Ocean are quite clear.”
Admiral Sureesh Mehta, chief of naval staff, said the navy would spend more than Rs200bn ($4bn, €3bn, £2.5bn) a year on new capabilities, with about 60 per cent devoted to acquisitions of naval hardware. He stressed the need to develop the indigenous defence industry with a view to becoming an exporter of technology to Middle East and south-east Asian countries. He advocated the creation of a business framework that encouraged international defence companies to “set up shop” in locally-based shipyards.

India has partnered Italy’s Fincantieri in the design of the aircraft carrier, and Thales (http://markets.ft.com/tearsheets/performance.asp?s=fr:HO), the French defence company, to build six Scorpene submarines in Mumbai. L****n & Toubro (http://markets.ft.com/tearsheets/performance.asp?s=in:LT), the listed Indian engineering company, is building a Rupees 30bn shipyard near Chennai and supplies weapons and steering systems.

A Mumbai-based defence contractor said the government was considering raising the foreign direct investment cap in the defence industry to 49 per cent from 26 per cent.

VAMAN
08-01-2009, 04:28 AM
If there is a capability of building 100+ warships in India itself. Then it exceeds the expectations of the Navy. It is a very good development.

VAMAN
08-01-2009, 02:57 PM
India rising, and flexing military muscles



http://images.smh.com.au/2009/07/31/658890/420india-420x0dotjpg
A step up... a light regiment goes through its paces as India’s military capacity swells. Photo: AFP

Matt Wade Herald Correspondent in New Delhi
August 1, 2009

NO CHAMPAGNE bottles were broken at the launch of India’s first homemade nuclear submarine this week.

Instead, the political and military elite gathered in the port city of Vishakapatnam to watch Gursharan Kaur, the wife of the Prime Minister, Manmohan Singh, crack an auspicious coconut on the new boat to mark the occasion.

The submarine – named Arihant, meaning destroyer of enemies in Sanskrit – will not be fully operational for several years but it is symbolic of India’s strategic aspirations.

Military spending has doubled over the past decade to about $US30 billion ($36 million) a year and if military outlays keep up with the country’s anticipated economic growth, analysts say it will be the world’s third largest military power in two decades.

As its military capacity swells, India’s potential to project its growing military might in the Indian Ocean – a region of great strategic importance to Australia – could be relatively unimpeded.

Deba Ranjan Mohanty, a strategic analyst at Delhi’s Observer Research Foundation, says that by about 2025 India is likely to have three to four aircraft carrier battle groups, a fleet of nuclear submarines, an air force with 35 squadrons and sophisticated land-based weapon systems to go with its huge army.

‘‘There is no doubt that India will be a comprehensive military power in the region,’’ he said. ‘‘The larger aspiration is to play a constructive role in the global arena.’’

India is the biggest importer of military hardware in the developing world and its recent acquisitions are a guide to its ambitions. It is purchasing more military hardware that can operate a long way from home, such as aircraft carriers, giant transport planes and airborne refuelling tankers.

‘‘A lot of this new equipment is about power projection,’’ says Rahul Bedi, a Delhi-based correspondent for Jane’s Defence Weekly. ‘‘As India’s economy grows, India’s ability to extend and display its power away from home is going to increase. It’s entering the big league.’’

Another factor in India’s military build-up is New Delhi’s concern about growing Chinese influence in the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal.

On Thursday a senior naval official revealed plans to add almost 100 warships to the navy over the next decade. Captain Alok Bhatnagar, the director of naval plans at the ministry of defence, said 32 warships and submarines were under construction, the Financial Times reported.

However, India will have to overcome some obstacles before it can claim to be the caretaker of the Indian Ocean and beyond.

A lot of its military hardware has reached obsolescence and Mr Mohanty says it will be difficult for India to rapidly acquire and manage the sophisticated weapons systems it wants.

It is also hampered by many perceived threats on its doorstep.

ANU strategic specialist, Professor Sandy Gordon, says India will eventually emerge as a major force in the Indian Ocean but for now it is constrained by internal security challenges and threatening neighbours, such as Pakistan and China.

‘‘India’s strategic attention is still demanded by these continental imperatives,’’ Professor Gordon said.

Because of the perceived threat from its nuclear-armed arch-rival Pakistan, India maintains a huge land force. Its regular army numbers about 1.3 million with a further part-time reserve force of about 1.2 million. In addition, India’s paramilitary forces number about 1.1 million. Only China has more security personnel under arms.

India has also devoted huge resources to developing its nuclear ****nal estimated at about 60 to 70 operational nuclear weapons.

Uday Bhaskar, a former naval commander and director of the National Maritime Foundation, said India’s military had one of the most skewed army-to-navy ratios in the world.

‘‘The navy only gets about 15 per cent of the defence budget while the army gets about 60 per cent,’’ he said.

Rory Medcalf, the international security program director at the Lowy Institute, said India would have to devote far more resources to its navy to achieve its strategic aspirations.

‘‘It may not do that until it feels more secure in its own neighbourhood,’’ he said.

The US has encouraged India’s naval expansion and there has been a dramatic increase in joint exercises involving the US and Indian fleets.

Australia and India share interests in stability in the Indian Ocean region, but that has not always guaranteed close co-operation on defence.

In 1998 Australia’s defence attache in New Delhi was thrown out of the country in retaliation for Australia’s strong condemnation of India’s decision to conducted a nuclear weapon test.

Once ties were revived two years later, the Australian Government worked hard to strengthen military engagement with India.

‘‘There is three times as much activity between the two armed services as there was four of five years ago; joint exercise, high-level visits and so on,’’ Australia’s high commissioner to India, John McCarthy, told the Herald.

Mr Medcalf said the rapid improvement in the defence relationship was welcome but believes ‘‘it could still be much better’’.

Strategic analysts in New Delhi agree. Mr Mohanty said the military relationship had a long way to go.

‘‘Australia doesn’t pose a direct threat to India and it makes sense for India to engage countries like Australia to maintain stability in the India Ocean region,’’ he said.

‘‘The scope for further military co-operation is vast.’’SOURCE (http://www.smh.com.au/world/india-rising-and-flexing-military-muscles-20090731-e4ga.html?page=-1)

CS1.6
08-02-2009, 03:03 AM
Chinese belive that in 2020 Indian Navy would be the secound largest in this globe.

VAMAN
08-03-2009, 04:01 PM
Times Of India Delhi; Date: Jun 25, 2009

http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/2221/dpuniform.thdotjpg (http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/2221/dpuniformdotjpg)
(click on image to enlarge)

Article on upgrading police clothing, uniforms and basic equipment.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:16 AM
Indian Air Force to modernize on fast track: air force chief (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-10/21/content_12290457.htm)


NEW DELHI, Oct. 21 (Xinhua) -- In a bid to maintain its supremacy in the skies, the Indian Air Force (IAF) Wednesday said that it would modernize its fleet by upgrading and improving the equipment as well as procuring the new acquisitions on a fast track basis.

"The modernization process would include preserving, maintaining, upgrading and improving the current assets, as well as processing the cases for acquisitions and replacements on a fast track. The IAF has made rapid strides towards attaining net centricity and has to be capable of dominating the entire spectrum of information, cyberspace and air space," Head of Indian Air Force Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik said in the national capital.

In fact, the Indian Air Force has planned an ambitious modernization drive which will see a quantum jump in its force levels, capabilities.

"We will be completing 77 years of existence. And as the spectrum of capability gets wider we need to modernize to have capability edge over most of the air forces in the world," the IAF chief had said recently.

With strength of approximately 170,000 personnel and 1,700 aircraft, including 852 combat aircraft in active service, the Indian Air Force is the world's fourth largest.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:19 AM
Boeing Submits Proposals to India to Sell Helicopters (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125628675685503485.html?mod=googlenews_wsj#articleTabs%3Darticle)


NEW DELHI – Boeing Co. said Friday it has submitted initial bids to the Indian Air Force offering the AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter and the CH-47F Chinook heavy-lift, twin-rotor helicopter.

The proposals, submitted this week, are in response to bids sought by India from global helicopter makers to supply its air force with 22 combat helicopters and 15 heavy-lift helicopters. The total cost of the acquisition is estimated at $2 billion.

Boeing said India is yet to give a date for announcing the winning proposals.

India plans to buy new combat jets and helicopters to modernize its fleet of mainly Soviet-vintage planes as Pakistan and China expand their military capabilities. The Indian Air Force has about 1,700 aircraft, including helicopters and transport planes, according to its Web site.

It is estimated India will buy $31 billion worth of military equipment in the next 10 years, Boeing said last February.

"If selected, Boeing will build the Apache helicopters at its rotorcraft facility in Mesa, Ariz. and the Chinook helicopters at its rotorcraft center in Ridley Park, Pa.," the company said. "Suggested production rates and delivery schedules have not been announced."

Attack helicopter makers such as Russia's Kamov and Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant, Italy's AgustaWestland, a unit of Finmeccanica SpA, and Textron Inc.'s Bell Helicopter unit earlier expressed interest in the deal.

Eurocopter, the helicopter manufacturing unit of European Aeronautic Defence & Space Co., had pitched its Tiger attack helicopter for the tender.

This is the second time India has issued a tender for attack helicopters. The first tender--issued in May 2008--was scrapped in March by the government.

Both Boeing and Bell helicopter had pulled out of the original tender as the Indian Air Force wanted to buy directly from the manufacturer, but the U.S. wanted it to be a government-to-government deal, defense ministry officials had said earlier.

Sikorsky Aircraft, a unit of United Technologies Corp., also plans to bid to sell heavy-lift helicopters, its India and South Asia managing director, A.J.S. Walia, said in February.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:30 AM
Exercise Eastern Bridge update : IAF pilots fly unhindered over Oman sky (http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=53429)


Far removed is the terrain at Oman that IAF pilots of ‘Flaming Arrows’ and ‘Cobras’, the two Jaguar Squadrons, normally fly around their airbase - Gorakhpur, in India. Poor visibility, birds, obstructions and other restrictions usually make flying pretty much daunting. But for Jaguar pilots, low- flying remains raison d’être of their lethality.

At Oman, the local flying area around Royal Air Force of Oman (RAFO) Thumrait airbase is a terrain of a flatbed desert with hardened surface with unlimited visibility. Birds, if sighted, would normally be a welcome sight here unlike elsewhere, but is rarely encountered by the pilots.

All sixteen IAF pilots participating in exercise ‘Eastern Bridge’ with RAFO completed their local familiarization sorties ahead of the tactical part of the air exercise. To sum up, their low-flying experience at the very start of the exercise was simply, as most put it -exhilarating. Flying 500 feet above ground level seemed like flying almost mid-level felt some pilots, having done unhindered low -flying.

IAF pilots usually have their desert-flying experience around Jaisalmer and other airbases in Rajasthan. In many ways, the flying environment at Oman is not too different. But visibility is certainly markedly superior here felt the IAF pilots. However, at Oman the landscape changes rapidly from small mountains in the north, to flat terrain around Thumrait that changes over to coastal landscape in the south near Salalah, about 65 Kms south of Thumrait.

The sprawling flying infrastructure at RAFO Thumrait also impressed the IAF contingent. “It has just been three weeks since we got the runway resurfaced before your arrival,” informed a senior RAFO officer, reinforcing their commitment to the first-ever joint air exercise with IAF. Flight safety, however, remains paramount for both sides.

Thumrait is base to the only two RAFO Jaguar squadrons. RAFO pilots periodically visit the IAF airbase at Gorakhpur in India for simulator training and are familiar with some of their Indian counterparts. The camaraderie between the IAF- RAFO pilots in the crew room is all too palpable with both sides keen to switch over to their professional excellence in the air in the remaining days of Ex- Eastern Bridge.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:34 AM
MiG 27 fighter jet crash near Jalpaiguri, pilot safe (http://sify.com/news/MiG-27-fighter-jet-crash-near-Jalpaiguri-pilot-safe-news-jkxs4hfcecf.html)


An Indian Air Force (IAF) MiG 27 aircraft crashed near New Jalpaiguri about 16 kilometers West of the Hashimara Air Force Base on Friday.

According to a Defence Ministry press release, the pilot of the aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Gautam, ejected safely before the aircraft crashed.

This is the ninth IAF aircraft and the second MiG 27 crash this year. Earlier in May a MiG 27 crashed in Jodhpur, Rajasthan.

The fighter jet was on a routine sortie when it crashed.

There was no reported damage to property or life.

The IAF has ordered a court of inquiry to investigate the cause of the accident.

Since January this year, the IAF lost three MiG-21s at Jodhpur, Chabua in Assam and Baliana in Punjab.

One IAF pilot was also killed when a SU-30MKI, was crashed in Jaisalmer in April. (ANI)

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:38 AM
Mauritius, indian navy in joint anti-piracy patrol (http://www.apanews.net/apa.php?page=show_article_eng&id_article=109780)


APA - Port Louis (Mauritius) The Mauritius National Coast Mauritius (MNCG) and two warships of the Indian Navy has set up a Joint Anti-Piracy Patrol (JAPP) to reinforce security in the Indian Ocean region, APA learns in the Mauritian capital Port Louis on Sunday.

The release from the Mauritian government here indicates that as the waters of Seychelles border the Northern Boundary of the Mauritius Maritime Zone, the local authorities have become very apprehensive following several recent piracy attacks in Seychelles territorial waters.

The release adds that the Mauritian government has asked for the help of friendly states and in this context the JAPP has been organised.

The military operations aim at giving the assurance to merchant ships and fishing vessels that adequate measures are being put in place by the Government of Mauritius to enhance military presence in the region, added the release.

The cooperation with the two Indian warships, namely the Indian Naval Ship (INS) Shardul and the INS Varuna will also include training members of the MNCG on such military operations as "Visit, Board Search, Seizure" of suspicious vessels navigating in the region and "Fire Fighting and Damage and Pollution Control" on board ships.

The the two Indian naval ships together with members of the MNCG have been patrolling in the vicinity of the outer island of Agalega and have already controlled five merchant ships which were in the region, said the release.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:41 AM
New satellite for Indian Navy - ISRO to launch facility to boost naval links next year (http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091023/jsp/northeast/story_11646792.jsp)


New Delhi, Oct. 22: The Indian Navy is set to get its own satellite with a footprint across the Indian Ocean region. The satellite will be launched next year.

The Naval Communications Satellite figured in discussions of the Indian Navy senior officers’ conference here today when defence minister A.K. Antony said “it will significantly improve connectivity”.

Dedicated satellites for the Indian Air Force and the Indian Army are to follow.

The military satellite programme was first mentioned by the then defence minister Pranab Mukherjee in Parliament in 2005 when he said in reply to a question that the programme was in “advanced stages of development” and would get operational by 2007.

An Indian Navy officer said the service was looking at it “not as a military satellite but as a communications satellite”. India uses a1-meter resolution Technology Experiment Satellite (TES) launched in 2001 for military purposes and has also bought time and images from American and French polar orbiting satellites.

The officer said all Indian naval platforms — ships, aircraft and shore establishments — would be data-linked through the satellite.

The satellite will be launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation.

Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Verma told his senior commanders today that “network-centric operations”, induction of new technologies “to tighten the loop between training, technology and operational deployment” would be his priority areas.

The geo-stationary satellite will have a footprint between 600 nautical miles (1,110km approx.) and 1,000 nautical miles (1850km approx.).

In the commanders' conference it was noted that traffic in the Indian Ocean had increased markedly over the past year.

In the conference, defence minister A.K. Antony said the process of creating the post of maritime security advisor — a decision taken since the November 26 terrorist attack in Mumbai — was on.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 07:45 AM
Indian Army to respond to Taliban threat suitably: army chief (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-10/19/content_12270372.htm)


NEW DELHI, Oct. 19 (Xinhua) -- Just days after the Pakistan Taliban threatened to carry out attacks in India, the country's all-powerful army Monday vowed to deal with any such threat suitably.

"We will give an appropriate and strong response to any possible threat from Taliban," Indian Army Chief General Deepak Kapoor told the media in the national capital.

The Army chief's statement came in the wake of last week's threat by the new head of the Pakistan Taliban, Hakimullah Mehsud, that the militants will bring their war to India "after establishing an Islamic state in Pakistan."

The warning was issued in a footage aired by British TV channel Sky News.

In fact, words of worries have recently been making the rounds in New Delhi that the Islamist terrorists are virtually knocking on India's door after the Taliban carried out a series of attacks in Pakistan's cultural city Lahore last Thursday, particularly on an elite police academy in Bedia, which is 20 km from Wagah on the Indo-Pakistan international border.

Indian Home Ministry sources have claimed that the threat by the Pakistan Taliban is being taken seriously.

"But we are always prepared to deal with any such attack. The Mumbai terror attacks last November was an eye opener for the security forces. Now, they are always on alert," the Home Ministry sources said.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 08:08 AM
Astra air-to-air missile to make its first flight (http://ajaishukla.blogspot.com/2009/10/astra-air-to-air-missile-to-make-its.html)


Veteran fighter pilots lament the end of the dogfight, the evocative name for a twisty, sky-ripping, adrenaline-packed aerial duel, in which the winner gets behind his opponent and shoots him down with a burst of cannon fire.

Today, it is less about flying skill, cold nerve and highly-responsive aircraft; the modern-day dogfighting ace is an airborne video-game expert who uses radar to detect his foe at long ranges, and launch a beyond visual range (BVR) missile even before his victim realises that the engagement has begun.

Just days from now, a Sukhoi-30MKI fighter will take off from an Indian Air Force (IAF) base, an Astra missile fitted on its wing. This will be the first-ever flight of this indigenously developed BVR missile, which the IAF hopes will add punch to its fleet of Sukhoi-30MKI, Mig-29, Mirage-2000 and Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) fighters.

The Astra, built by the Defence R&D Laboratory (DRDL), Hyderabad, will allow IAF pilots to hit enemy aircraft up to 44 km away, at altitudes up to 20,000 metres. Improving on that will be the Astra Mk II, with a longer range of 80 km.

The Astra incorporates many cutting-edge technologies. Here is how an Astra would take on an enemy fighter: an IAF fighter’s radar picks up the target; the pilot launches an Astra missile. A high-energy propellant quickly boosts the missile to several times the speed of sound. At ranges beyond 15 km, the Astra cannot “see” its target, so the IAF fighter guides the missile, relaying the target’s continually changing position over a secure radio link. Once it is 15 km from the target, the Astra’s onboard seeker picks up the target; after that the Astra homes in on its own.

At this point, the target would start turning and diving to throw off the missile. But the Astra manoeuvres better, and moves much faster, than even the most agile fighters. A radio proximity fuse measures the distance to the target. When the target is within 5 metres, the Astra’s radio proximity fuse detonates its warhead, sending a volley of shrapnel ripping through the enemy fighter.

Most of these technologies have already been proven. The propulsion system, the data link between the aircraft and the Astra, the radio proximity fuse, the onboard computer, the inertial navigation system and other key technologies were developed at the DRDO’s missile complex in Hyderabad.

The Astra’s seeker is still imported from Russia, but the DRDO hopes to develop one.

The forthcoming test with a Sukhoi-30MKI is called a “captive flight trial”; it will evaluate whether the Astra can withstand the physical stresses of supersonic flying and high-speed manoeuvring. Early in 2010, a “captive-II flight trial” will check whether the Astra’s avionics are properly matched with those of the Sukhoi-30MKI. The fighter should receive the missile’s signals; and the Astra should receive the aircraft’s commands.

“Matching an Indian missile with a Russian fighter’s avionics has turned out to be a complex task”, explains Mukesh Chand, one of the Astra’s key developers, “But the Astra will be much better integrated with the Indian Tejas LCA.”

Only in October 2010, after all the Astra’s systems are certified airworthy, will a live Astra be fired from a fighter. But the project scientists are confident; in a September 2008 test in Balasore, Orissa, a ground-launched Astra shot down an electronic target, validating many of the most complex technologies.

A drawback in the Astra remains its high weight; even a heavy fighter like the Sukhoi-30MKI cannot carry the missile on its wingtip stations. In comparison with the Astra’s estimated 150 kg, other BVR missiles like the Israeli Derby weigh around 100 kg only.

Nevertheless, the IAF believes the Astra will usefully supplement India’s inventory of BVR missiles. The Russian R-77 Adder, which arms India’s Russian aircraft fleet, faces worrying questions about its reliability. And the R530D missile, carried by the Mirage-2000, is nearing obsolescence.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 08:16 AM
$11 billion MMRCA order set to become larger; Mirage-2000 upgrade negotiations stagger towards failure (http://ajaishukla.blogspot.com/2009/10/11-billion-mmrca-order-set-to-become.html)


The winner’s jackpot could soon become even bigger in what is already the world’s most lucrative fighter aircraft tender: India’s proposed purchase of 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) for an estimated Rs 51,000 crore ($11 billion).

The reason: a breakdown in India’s long-running negotiations with French aircraft manufacturer, Dassault Aviation, for upgrading 51 Indian Air Force Mirage-2000 fighters. According to senior IAF sources, Dassault has flatly refused to reduce its quote of Rs 10,000 crores (US $2.1 billion) for extending the service life of the IAF’s Mirage-2000 fleet by fitting new radars and avionics. The Ministry of Defence (MoD) considers this price --- Rs 196 crores (US $41 million) per aircraft --- unacceptably high, given that the airframes and engines will not be changed.

In comparison, each of the 126 brand-new, next-generation MMRCAs will cost some Rs 400 crores (US $87 million) per aircraft. That includes the cost of technology transfers, as well as capital costs for setting up a manufacturing line in India. Once those costs are amortised, additional MMRCAs would be significantly cheaper.

Dassault’s India head, Posina V Rao has not returned multiple phone calls from Business Standard. MoD sources say that Rao is engaged in last-ditch attempts to salvage the deal.

But, the MoD is veering around to the viewpoint that the Mirage-2000 fleet should continue service in its current form. After six squadrons (126 aircraft) of MMRCAs have entered IAF service, an additional two squadrons of MMRCAs would be built to replace the 51 Mirage-2000 fighters. That amounts to a 40% rise in the MMRCA’s numbers.

Israeli aerospace companies have reportedly entered the fray, offering to upgrade the Mirage-2000 for half the price being quoted by Dassault. The MoD, however, is not inclined to accept that offer.

Price negotiations for the Mirage-2000 upgrade have travelled a rocky road over the last two years. Initially, Dassault quoted Rs 13,500 crores (US $2.9 billion), which it brought down to the current level of Rs 10,000 crores (US $2.1 billion) after the IAF diluted its upgrade requirements. But the MoD believes Dassault’s reduced bid only reflects the diluted requirements, rather than any flexibility on the part of Dassault.

The IAF, traditionally a staunch supporter of Dassault and the Mirage-2000 fighter, is apparently changing its views. Dassault, say pilots, has badly damaged its credibility during the recent negotiations by arm-twisting the IAF over the supply of spares for the Mirage-2000 fleet.

The Gwalior-based IAF squadrons that currently fly the Mirage-2000 are Number 1 squadron (Tigers) and Number 7 squadron (Battle Axes).

Five of the six contenders for the MMRCA contract --- Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Eurofighter, Gripen and RAC MiG --- know they could reap handsome gains, through larger fighter orders, if India chooses not to upgrade the Mirage-2000. The sixth contender, Dassault Aviation, realises that failure to negotiate the Mirage-2000 upgrade contract could seriously damage the chances of its Rafale fighter in the MMRCA contract.

The fighters in contention for the MMRCA contract are sequentially undergoing flight trials and evaluation, which the IAF expects to complete by April 2010. It will take another six months to finalise the trial report and submit that to India’s MoD. The MoD will then announce the winner of the contract.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 12:32 PM
Eurocopter opts out of IAF's $2 billion chopper tender (http://www.domain-b.com/defence/air_space/iaf/20091024_eurocopter.html)


New Delhi: With Boeing Co confirming its participation in the tender for the supply of 22 attack and 15 heavy-lift helicopters to the Indian Air Force the surprising announcement is Eurocopter opting out of the race. Sources indicate that the Eurocopter's product, the Tigre ARH, may not be ready in time to participate in field trials next year as it is undergoing an upgrade.

Global manufacturers, such as Russia's Kamov and Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant, Italy's AgustaWestland, a unit of Finmeccanica SpA, Textron Inc.'s Bell Helicopter, Eurocopter, the helicopter manufacturing unit of European Aeronautic Defence & Space Co and Sikorsky Aircraft have expressed interest in the deal.

The IAF's attempt to boost its fleet of older Mi-35 attack helicopters has consistently run into problems with American companies, both Boeing and Bell Helicopters, earlier pulling out on a technicality. Both companies pulled out of the original tender as the Indian Air Force wanted to buy directly from the manufacturer, but the US wanted it to be a government-to-government deal.

Also, they are reportedly unhappy with the 50 per cent offset requirements that are apparently required in the tender.

European companies, in turn, have hinted that the tender is skewed in favour of US companies.

ante_climax
10-25-2009, 03:28 PM
THE AIR CHIEF URGES IAF COMMANDERS TO BUILD UP CAPABILITIES FOR CYBER SPACE (http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=53316)


The Indian Air Force Commanders’ Conference began at the Air Headquarters (Vayu Bhavan), in New Delhi today. The conference commenced with the inaugural address of the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal PV Naik.

Addressing the Commanders, the Air Chief brought forth his vision of the Indian Air Force in view of the enhanced capabilities being acquired and a three ****ged approach towards the modernization process of the IAF. A modernization process that would include preserving, maintaining, upgrading and improving the current assets as well as processing the cases for acquisitions and replacements on a fast track. The IAF has made rapid strides towards attaining net centricity and has to be capable of dominating the entire spectrum of information, cyberspace and air space, he said. He emphasized that the IAF besides continuing to air maintain troops and delivering more than 37,000 tons annually should continue to sharpen its core competencies to interface with the other services to generate the requisite capabilities.

The Commanders’ Conference would see the Air Officers Commanding-in-Chief of the IAF Commands carry out a data based review.

The Conference is attended by the top brass of the Indian Air Force comprising Air Officers Commanding-in-Chief of IAF Commands and the Principal Staff Officers of Air Headquarters. During the Commanders’ Conference the operational challenges before the IAF are discussed. Apart from this Flight Safety, Maintenance, Administrative and Logistical issues which impinge upon the operational effectiveness of Air Force would also taken up for discussions.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:42 AM
First Javelin Missile Launches in India As Part of YA09 (http://www.dvidshub.net/?script=news/news_show.php&id=40615)


CAMP BUNDELA, India – The early morning sun had already risen enough to bring the temperature to 88 degrees.

Not quite as hot as in the days prior to this one, but just right for a trip to the firing range for the Soldiers assigned to Troop B, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment, "Strykehorse," 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division.

The unit arrived at the range mid morning after a two hour delay. Their mission was to fire the Javelin missile as part of Exercise Yudh Abhyas 09, here, Oct. 23.

After arriving at the range no one was more anxious to get the show on the road than Sgt. Peter Bitter, cavalry scout team leader and Javelin/Stryker gunner, Troop B.

It had been four years since Bitter finished the Javelin course, and due to the enormous expense of the missile, Bitter said this was his first time firing a live missile.

"I've only fired dummy and simulation missiles," said Bitter.

Regardless of the significant time since taking the course, Bitter said he is still well aware of what his job was and perfect hit on target is the only answer.

"You have to make sure you find the target and get the right bracket targeting before you pull the trigger," he said.

The missile will do the rest, by penetrating a tank and detonating inside, he added.

"The Javelin can easily cover a 200 meter blast area," said Bitter. "If two vehicles are side by side the missile may destroy them both."

Indian Army soldiers were present to witness the highly anticipated missile firing. Their enthusiasm was obvious as the clamored to learn the specifications of the system. The Soldiers, who are assigned to the 31st Armored Division, said they had seen the Russian made Kynkurs system, but never the Javelin. The only contact they had with the Javelin was through videos

Thirty seconds before the launch, the assistant gunner announced the imminent firing. The rocket sound of the weapon was deafening.

"Yeah. Yes. Way to go Bitter," observers cheered.

Regardless of not firing in four years, Bitter was dead on target.

"That was outstanding, said Bitter. "Every combat related Soldier should be able to fire the Javelin at least once."

The other Soldiers in Troop B said they felt the same way and had confidence in Bitter the whole time.

"This is the best training possible, no training is better than live training," said Sgt. 1st Class William Drussell, platoon sergeant, Troop B. "You would think if a Soldier hasn't fired in more than four years his skills would be a perishable, this proves they're not."

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:47 AM
India building up border defences to face China's continuing provocations (http://www.8ak.in/8ak_india_defence_news/2009/10/india-building-up-border-defences-to-face-chinas-continued-provocations.html)


China's hostile attitude towards India and its continuing supply of advanced weaponry to Pakistan (most recently the Z9EC anti-submarine helicopter (http://www.8ak.in/8ak_india_defence_news/2009/10/chinese-z9ec-antisubmarine-helicopters-inducted-in-to-pak-navy.html)) is driving India in to a weapons acquisition and modernisation spree. Just in the last week, Indian media reported that China has been issuing loose-sheet visas (http://www.8ak.in/8ak_india_defence_news/2009/10/india-lodges-strong-protest-against-china-issuing-looseleaf-visas-for-jk-residents.html) to Indian citizens from the state of Jammu & Kashmir (J&K), in effect, saying for the first time that China does not recognise J&K as Indian territory. Further, the impressive display of Chinese military power at its National Day parade on Oct 1 has not gone unnoticed in India.


India is responding by building roads, railways and infrastructure on the Chinese border. Last week it was reported that 5 civil airports in forward areas will be transferred directly to the armed forces. In September, a Russian An-32 transport aircraft made its first landing (http://www.8ak.in/8ak_india_defence_news/2009/09/feature-facing-the-chinese-threat-an32-in-nyoma-and-fast-interceptor-boats-in-pangong.html) in Nyoma and 50 more Sukhois (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/IAF-wants-50-more-Sukhois-to-counter-China-Pakistan/articleshow/5079417.cms) may be purchased in addition to the 230 already ordered and the 126 to be ordered as per the MMRCA tender. Israel is already building the second AEW plane (http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2009/10/02/332943/israel-prepares-second-il-76-aew-platform-for-india.html) on the Ilyushin platform and the reported $100m deal for IAI's Harop UCAV which will be inducted by 2011 (http://www.indianexpress.com/news/iaf-plans-to-induct-lethal-killer-drones-by-2011/523326/). India is also planning to deploy various radars (http://indiatoday.intoday.in/index.php?issueid=&id=63629&option=com_content&task=view&sectionid=4) along the entire border with both China and Pakistan. This includes Low level light weight radars and 30 indigenous Rohini radars (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/09/iaf-orders-30-more-rohini-radars.html) are expected to be ordered at a cost of about US$400m. Other jinxed but significant acquisitions will be the 22 attack helicopters and 400 howitzers which will be worth another US$3 billion. The development of the Agni-V missile is also being pushed and additional land to develop the BrahMos II is being acquired.



On Sep 24 the Indian Ministry of Defence also issued a Request for Information (RFI) for 300 Light Tanks of which 200 will be wheeled and 100 will be tracked. The diesel-engine tanks will be deployed in High Altitude Areas above 3,000m and will be capable of operating in mountainous, semi-developed terrain. The amphibious tanks are expected to be capable of destroying bunkers and "soft-skin vehicles" at ranges up to 3km and also against attack helicopters and low flying fixed wing aircrafts.
Even after all these acquisitions India will be no match for China and with only 1/3rd of China's economy this gap is expected to widen further. The aim here is purely to have enough deterrence against a limited Chinese attack which some analysts feel is imminent. However, Indian officials will go out of their way to deny that the border-build-up is China-specific.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 10:31 AM
Indo-US air force exercise comes to a successful end (http://www.calcuttanews.net/story/557552)


Indo-US air force bilateral exercise, Cope India 2009, today came to a successful completion, with both the air forces working together, enhancing and understanding the employment philosophies of each other in joint venture operations.

The exercise ended with both the exercise directiors Group Captain Mathew Mammen of the Indian Air Force and Colonel Raymond Le Marche of the USAF expressing satisfaction in the way the exercises was conducted.

To amplify the importance of the exercise Air Vice Marshal M Bahadur, Assistant Chief of Air Staff Operations (Transport and Helicopter) of the IAF and Major General Darryll Wong of the USAF exchanged mementos to commemorate the successful completion of EX Cope India 2009.

The IAF and the USAF learnt about each other's joint planning and execution of missions.

The five-day joint exercise (from October 19 to 23) being held at Agra, which is one of the largest air base in Southeast Asia, was aimed at training personnel for joint planning and execution of missions in simulated hostile scenarios.

The Indian contingent was represented by five AN-32s, one IL-76 and one Chetak helicopter in the exercise, while the US Air Force (USAF) utilized personnel from Pacific Air Force and the Special Operation Command.

The Pacific Air Force comprises of three XC-130H from the 374th Airlift Wing, one XC-17 from the 15th Airlift Wing and one XC- 130 J from the 146th Airlift Wing.

In addition to that the IAF also fielded its Rapid Action Medical Team and the Special Forces Garuds in the joint exercise.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:14 PM
Navy proposes to build an Airport in Karwar (http://www.sahilonline.org/english/news.php?catID=coastalnews&nid=6638&viewed=0)


Karwar: While Karwar already has a rail, road and port connection; another thing that will be added into this list is the airport. The Indian Navy has proposed to build an airport near Karwar which could be used for civilian and military purposes. The airport would enhance the commercial prospectus in and around Karwar, said Rajiv Jaiswal, Commodore, INS Kadamba, Karwar.

While addressing the presspersons at the naval base on Friday, he asserted that the required land for the airport has been identified and the State Gavernment would have to get hold of more land for this purpose. He requested the local people and State Government to cooperate with this regard.

Mr. Jaiswal notified that Karwar received 230 mm of unprecedented rainfall in just three hours on 2nd October, 2009. At this time, few had claimed that the walls built by the naval authorities led to flash flood around the naval base area. While clearing these claims, he averred that the wall in question had actually blocked the water and prevented loss of more lives and property. He further affirmed that the navy authorities would be more prepared to tackle such situation in future.

The *******ial rains and floods that occurred in the beginning of the month this year caused the 700 metres of the wall built by the navy to collapse. Roads in the naval base had been washed away in the floods. Among all these losses, many of the navy personnel's houses were also inundated.

Capt. Manohar Nambiar, Chief Public Relations Officer (Defence), Mumbai, denied allegation that illegal quarrying was being carried out in the navy land.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:17 PM
US would welcome `profesional' Indian Army in Iraq and Afghanistan (http://www.littleabout.com/news/41400,us-profesional-indian-army-iraq-afghanistan.html)


Babina (UP), Oct. 26 - ANI: A senior commander of the U.S. Army on Monday said that having a professional force like the Indian Army at its disposal, especially in highly aggressive war zones like Iraq and Afghanistan, would always be welcome.

The Indian Army is a professional force and the US Army will be comfortable with it anywhere, Lt. Gen. Benjamin R. Mixon, Commander, Pacific Command, said in reply to a question on whetherthe US Army is ready to seek Indias help in Iraq and Afghanistan in a counter terror and insurgency operation.

Lt. Gen. Mixon, who was addressing accompanying media on the sidelines of the first ever Indo-US joint mechanized forces exercise in Babina, Uttar Pradesh, further went on to say: We want to work together as militaries to establish peace in Asia-Pacific region. If any eventuality occurs in future, we are better prepared to work together.

He also claimed that the exercise had so far been a wonderful and worthwhile experience, and had gone a long way in raising the level of understanding between the two armies.

The counter insurgency/terror exercise with India has been absolutely fantastic and it has helped the US soldiers to understand India in a better way, Lt. Gen. Mixon said.

From the Indian side, Lt. General A.S. Sekhon, Director General, Military Operations, said: This is a training exercise and it is not aimed at anybody. We are trying to know each others procedures. The is all about training with the US Army to enhance our understanding and capability.

A significant aspect of the 17-day exercise that commenced on October 17 and concludes on October 29, is that for the first timethe US Army has deployed the Javelin Missile and Stryker armoured vehicles to act as force multipliers in a third country other than Iraq andAfghanistan.

Another first is that of the Indian mechanized battalion participating along with Strykers Squadron in a joint exercise under overall command of an Indian Brigade headquarters.

So far, the achievements of the joint exercise called Yudh Abhyas2009 are:

- Both sides have achieved interoperability and capability to function alongside for operations under an UN mandate and - The US troops were exposed to rich culture and tradition of India.The Indian troops gained exposure to contemporary weapons systems used by US troops. The overall aim of the exercise is to conduct a joint Indo-UStraining exercise under the framework of an agreed joint training program for sharing useful experience in peacekeeping operations, humanitarian and disaster managements and relief operations.

Two hundred and ninety five personnel are representing the US Army, while 700 personnel are representing the Indian Army.

Yudh Abhyas is a regularly scheduled bilateral exercise hosted by the Indian Army.

The exercise is designed to promote cooperation between the two militaries while sharing training, cultural exchanges, and building joint operating skills.

This years Yudh Abhyas features 17 Stryker vehicles the largest deployment of the vehicles outside of Iraq and Afghanistan for the U.S. Pacific Rim forces.

Along with the 17 Strykers, the U.S. will showcase the Javelin Anti-Tank Missile system, employed to defeat current and future threat armored combat vehicles.

The YA 2009 constitutes the largest troop exchange since the YA partnership exercise commenced in 2004.

Indian Army soldiers from the 31st Armored Division are working with U.S. soldiers from the 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry regiment, Strykehorse, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

This years exercise includes a multi-echelon, full spectrum combined operation focusing on a United Nations peacekeeping operation scenario, while executing a maneuver live-fire exercise.

During the exercise, participants will engage in a variety of missions, from joint planning and maneuver execution, a variety of artillery ranges, to cordon and search operations as well as search and rescue training.

raavan
10-26-2009, 04:23 PM
US would welcome `profesional' Indian Army in Iraq and Afghanistan (http://www.littleabout.com/news/41400,us-profesional-indian-army-iraq-afghanistan.html)

hmmm should see how pakistanis feel abt it.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:31 PM
hmmm should see how pakistanis feel abt it.

Its probably his personal opinion, I don't think Obama would invite us in.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 04:38 PM
Air-launched BrahMos to be test-fired in Dec 2010 (http://www.ptinews.com/news/346910_Air-launched-BrahMos-to-be-test-fired-in-Dec-2010)


New Delhi, Oct 25 (PTI) India and Russia are planning to test-fire the air-launched version of their jointly-developed BrahMos supersonic cruise missile from a Sukhoi-30 fighter aircraft in December next year.

Work on the air-launched version of the missile is in the final stages and BrahMos scientists are now waiting for the Su-30MKI aircraft from India to act as a platform for test launch of the missile, Defence Ministry sources told PTI here.

The air-launched version, they said, will be lighter and smaller than the land-based version of the missile so that it can be fitted to the aircraft.

One of the two speed boosters in the missile has been removed for the air version of the weapon system as after being launched from an aircraft moving at a speed of more than 1.5 mach, the missile will automatically gain its momentum and maintain its speed of 2.

WingCommander
10-26-2009, 06:26 PM
Its probably his personal opinion, I don't think Obama would invite us in.

We should not interfere in iraq and afghanistan even if they invite us or beg us. They are there only for there national interests...they dont care about us.

ante_climax
10-26-2009, 06:34 PM
We should not interfere in iraq and afghanistan even if they invite us or beg us. They are there only for there national interests...they dont care about us.

I agree with Iraq, Afghanistan is a totally different matter.

WingCommander
10-26-2009, 07:19 PM
I agree with Iraq, Afghanistan is a totally different matter.

Afghanistan prefers India thats why pak supported the taliban to rule over there. Only country that our soldiers should go into is pak.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 04:53 AM
Russia setting, US rising in Indian air force (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_russia-setting-us-rising-in-indian-air-force_1303530)


New Delhi: Russia's eclipse and the US' rise in the Indian militarywill soon stand out in the air force's transport division.
Sources said the government is moving in to seal yet another government-to-government deal with the US for a military purchase. They are ordering ten C-17 Globemaster transport aircraft.

The deal is worth over $2 billion (Rs10,000 crore). When inducted, C-17 Globemaster would replace the Russian-made IL-76 as the biggest transport aircraft of India. C-17, a Boeing product, can carry almost 80,000 kg, against IL-76's 50,000 kg.
Sources said the C-17 deal was discussed and "almost finalised" at a recent meeting of the Defence Acquisition Council, under the defence minister, and the deal could be signed in a few months.

Globemaster can be operated by just two pilots and another crew, whereas the much smaller IL-76 needs a crew of six. Comfort levels, too, are dramatic. The deal finalisation comes even as the air force readies to induce six C-130J Super Hercules transport planes, that can carry a payload of 20,000 kg, in 2011.

Presently, the IAF's fixed-wing fleet comprises 20 Russian made IL-76 and over a 100 AN-32s. The Globemaster and C-130J are set to significantly alter Russian dominance.
Meanwhile, US firms are making an aggressive pitch to corner contracts for transport helicopters, dominated by Russians all these decades. Boeing today said it submitted two proposals to the IAF this week -- the AH-64D Apache and the CH-47F Chinook for attack and heavy-lift helicopter operations.

Air force is enthusiastic about the Chinooks.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 05:08 AM
Now, Navy joins the war on pirates (http://www.timesnow.tv/Now-Navy-joins-the-war-on-pirates/articleshow/4330544.cms)


The Navy has decided that it is time India did something to curb piracy in the Indian Ocean. The Indian Navy has commissioned two warships to counter the Somali threat. More than a hundred Indians have been held hostage by Somali pirates in the last one year. Following this, the Indian Navy is slated to deploy two warships near Mauritius and the Seychelles. The mission is to join forces with neighbouring nations and eradicate piracy.

Captain Manohar Nambiar, Chief PRO, Defence (Western Region) said, "We can confirm to you that the Indian Navy now has a presence in that region. We can not speak much about operations there but yes, our ships are into surveillance activities. This is apart from our ship already patrolling the Gulf of Aden."

The INS Tabar, a warship sent last year to counter the pirates of Somalia, will be deployed. Joining the Tabar will be the INS Shardul, a fully armed amphibious ship which can carry more than 500 troops, and the ICGS Varuna, an offshore patrol vessel armed to the teeth. The Varuna can travel 4000 nautical miles at a stretch, enough to go around the world.

TIMES NOW's Correspondent Jugal Purohit reports, "With the Somalian pirates opening up a new front and growing increasingly belligerent towards Indian interests, navy sources tell us, these warships will remain in the region for as long as is required. Not just that, the aim of these ships is to completely disrupt the newly formed theatre of the Somalian pirates with the active assistance of navies of Mauritius and Seychelles."

The Navy is gearing for war against the pirates and not without reason. The government may have been slow in reacting to the Somalian threat, but with this strategic move, the Navy hopes to counter the piracy menace with an iron fist.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 05:14 AM
Army is all set to induct 124 Arjun tanks (http://www.sakaaltimes.com/2009/10/27134236/Army-is-all-set-to-induct-124.html)


PUNE: After repeated trials and a huge budget overrun, a total of 124 Arjun Main Battle Tanks (MBT) are all set to be inducted into the armoury of the Indian Army by April next year, said Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) scientist and chief controller (R&D) Dr W Selvamurthy.

He was speaking at the valedictory ceremony of the 13th Post Induction Training School (POINTS-13) programme held at the Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DIAT) here on Monday.

Outlining the contribution of the DRDO in shaping various aspects of the weaponry of the Indian armed forces, he said, “The Arjun MBT is a state-of-the-art battle tank designed and developed by the Combat Vehicles Research & Development Establishment (CVRDE), Avadi in Tamil Nadu. Besides, the ordered tanks are in various stages of production at the moment and would be inducted in a phased manner.”

Urging new scientists to undertake path breaking research in the defence sector, Dr Selvemurthy said, “You need to go for out-of-the-box thinking to scale new heights in defence research and innovation. As the vision of the DRDO is to empower India with superior technology in the field of strategic defence, which the nation has seen from time to time.”

Delivering the valedictory address, chief guest and director, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Professor Samir K Brahmachari said that defence scientists should develop technologies that can be used for civilian purpose.

He further said, “Scientists in India are categorised as strategic scientists and those for civilian applications. Hence, how to utilise strategic technology for civilian purpose would be a challenge for the budding DRDO scientists.” He said that DRDO has risen on several occasions by providing vital expertise in the field of ballistic missiles and propellant technology, which speaks volumes about the contribution it made in the cause of nation building.

sepheronx
10-27-2009, 05:16 AM
Russia setting, US rising in Indian air force (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_russia-setting-us-rising-in-indian-air-force_1303530)

Cool that India is looking elsewhere. But wasnt it the US who placed equipment sanctions against India? Also, why have such a diverse airforce on the same field of transport, when the production just to upkeep will be massivly expensive?

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 06:22 AM
New Indian Defence Procurement Procedure To Supposedly "Revolutionize" Weapons Buying (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/10/new-indian-defence-procurement.html)


MoD Statement: In a move that has the potential to revolutionize the Indian Defence Industry, the Ministry of Defence is adding a new provision in its procurement procedure which will allow issue of Request For Proposal (RFP) to Indian industries having requisite financial and technical capabilities to absorb technology and undertake indigenous manufacture under a new category ‘Buy and Make (Indian)’. Under the current procedure in ‘Buy and Make’ cases RFP is issued only to foreign vendors, who are required to transfer technology to Indian Defence Industry, called Production Agency. This does not promote setting up of Joint Ventures or Co-production arrangements in India by big foreign Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs).

The new procedure, to be effective from November 01, 2009 will be akin to the existing ‘Make Procedure’ with a vital difference that the production and development by Indian industry will be through transfer of technology and not through Research and Development. Announcing this at a National Seminar on Defence Acquisition, organized by the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses, here today, Defence Minister AK Antony said the move is primarily aimed at encouraging pro-active participation by the Indian industry who could establish JV/Production arrangements with any foreign manufacturer. The needs of the Services will be shared with capable Indian firms who in turn would submit a roadmap for development and production of a particular item over its life-cycle.

Antony said the twin objectives of DPP-2009 aim at promoting and facilitating wide participation of Defence Industry, while enabling transparency and integrity in all acquisitions.


The Defence Minister said to ensure transparency and enhanced awareness in the Indian industry, the Government will prepare a public version of the fifteen years Long Term Acquisition Plan of the Armed Forces. This will be placed on the MoD website and shared with industry associations to create requisite awareness amongst them.


“This would help Indian Industry to work out the technological requirements and build in-house capabilities in order to meet the future defence requirements. I am sure that the industry will respond positively to this proposal”, he said.


Another important feature of DPP-2009 would be mandatory issue of Request for Information (RFI) on the MoD website in all acquisition cases. To enable participation of industry in Defence Acquisition Planning, the Ministry will henceforth invite their representatives for consultations and presentations in high-level procurement meetings before a decision is taken on the source and methodology for procurement of Defence weapons and equipment.


Further, to enhance probity in Defence procurement deals, DPP-2009 proposes to enhance the role of Independent Monitors, to scrutinize complaints with regard to violations of Integrity Pact which prohibits corruption in Defence deals.


In order to facilitate discharge of Offset obligations, an enabling clause has also been incorporated to permit change of offset partners in exceptional cases. The Offset provisions for the option clause has been amplified to state that the Offsets will not be applicable in cases where the same was not included in the original contract. Shri Antony expressed the hope that these changes will bring in greater degree of probity in the procedure and also encourage domestic defence industry to develop.

Shri Antony asked Defence personnel to ensure that the Qualitative Requirements (QRs) formulation is done in a manner that fulfils the end user’s basic requirements while at the same time it should encourage the widest possible competition. “It is only through competition that we can ensure the maximum value for our money. It is important to have broad-based and realistic QRs that would lead to multivendor competition”, he said. Noting that the occasional changes in QRs by the Services also led to delays in Defence Acquisitions, Shri Antony said that acquisitions once approved by the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC), changes to RFP and QRs should be avoided and exercised only exceptionally.

Referring to the technical and commercial aspects of evaluation, Shri Antony said we need to ensure these vital stages are completed not only in a fair, objective and transparent manner, but within the stipulated time frame.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 06:28 AM
Cool that India is looking elsewhere. But wasnt it the US who placed equipment sanctions against India? Also, why have such a diverse airforce on the same field of transport, when the production just to upkeep will be massivly expensive?

In many things there are simply no Russian equipment that meets the same criteria. For example the C-17 carries a lot more than the IL-76 offers easier operation and requires a smaller crew. The C 130 and P 8 I also has no Russian equals. India is upgrading its AN-32s mainly because there is no suitable replacements. But like it says we are not forgetting Russia, the Indo-Russian MTA will be the backbone of IAF transport fleet in the future.

The IAF needs to maintain a qualitative edge over China and Pakistan and I don't believe it can do that just by inducting indigenous and Russian equipments.

Sanctions may well be a thing of the past, India is closer to the West now and the United States also has more use with India than it had in 1998.

Good to see people discussing on news items. :)

sepheronx
10-27-2009, 06:36 AM
In many things there are simply no Russian equipment that meets the same criteria. For example the C-17 carries a lot more than the IL-76 offers easier operation and requires a smaller crew. The C 130 and P 8 I also has no Russian equals. India is upgrading its AN-32s mainly because there is no suitable replacements. But like it says we are not forgetting Russia, the Indo-Russian MTA will be the backbone of IAF transport fleet in the future.

The IAF needs to maintain a qualitative edge over China and Pakistan and I don't believe it can do that just by inducting indigenous and Russian equipments.

Sanctions may well be a thing of the past, India is closer to the West now and the United States also has more use with India than it had in 1998.

Good to see people discussing on news items. :)

In a way, yes. India does have closer ties. But things change in a heartbeat (as much as us humans do in a couple of years), and USA still hold a strategic roll with Pakistan, making confrontations even less viable for India if their defense relies on USA vs Pakistan and US.

And I do agree, US has its counterparts that does not meet equal that of Russia, but with Russia's help, India can aqcuire such equipment through co-development.

If you can provide further information on the MTA development, please, I would love to know more.

Thanks for the info friend.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 06:42 AM
In a way, yes. India does have closer ties. But things change in a heartbeat (as much as us humans do in a couple of years), and USA still hold a strategic roll with Pakistan, making confrontations even less viable for India if their defense relies on USA vs Pakistan and US.

And I do agree, US has its counterparts that does not meet equal that of Russia, but with Russia's help, India can aqcuire such equipment through co-development.

If you can provide further information on the MTA development, please, I would love to know more.

Thanks for the info friend.

I think this will help you a bit. It has the project in a nutshell.

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/hal-and-irkuts-joint-tactical-transport-project-02931/

http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/08/uac-hals-multirole-transport-aircraft.html

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/jsp_includes/articlePrint.jsp?storyID=news/LIFT060509.xml&headLine=Options%20Expand%20in%20Heavy%20Lift,

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/India-Russia-enter-into-600m-JV-to-develop-new-aircraft/articleshow/4116944.cms

raavan
10-27-2009, 10:58 AM
The IAF needs to maintain a qualitative edge over China and Pakistan and I don't believe it can do that just by inducting indigenous and Russian equipments.

Sanctions may well be a thing of the past, India is closer to the West now and the United States also has more use with India than it had in 1998.

Good to see people discussing on news items. :)

USA is still unreliable.In noway it can be compared to Russia.Buying transport planes is not a big issue but if MMRCA goes to USA then we are going to have huge problem.But u can clearly US lobbying.Hmmm guys in MoD are getting paid.

raavan
10-27-2009, 11:07 AM
AoA: The Dollars And Cents Of Yudh Abhyas


There's suddenly silence over the spectator's pavilion at the Camp Bundela range in Babina. All eyes trained on two US soldiers 50 feet away, the shape of a portable launcher unmistakable at this proximity. Then with a dull whoosh, a Javelin anti-tank missile not so much blasts as pops out of the launcher. For the most fleeting of moments, the missile falls -- at this moment, the missile is perfectly distinct. You can make out the fins, the shape, everything. Then, before you know it, the missile's motor kicks in and converts the up-until-then discernible missile shape, into a blinding point of light that careens in a flat arc towards its target, a retired Indian tank two kilometers away. About halfway through its trajectory, the missile pops up into a steeper flightpath and comes smashing down on its target. It's always fun waiting for the dull smack of the explosion that reaches you a couple of seconds in waves after you see the blast. It's an impressive demonstration. And just so you never forget the sight, the soldiers fire two more Javelins. Both bang on. No mistakes. A lot of work goes into stuff like this.

Moments after the launch, a US officer, Major Bhatti, starts handing out CDs with photographs and B-roll footage of Javelin launches conducted over the week gone by at Babina. While there's a mad rush for sound-bytes from the US soldiers, I notice two fellows skulking about with the US contingent, who don't look like soldiers from any stretch of imagination. I mean one of them has an enormous belly, and is finding it killing hauling himself up and down the pavilion hillock in the blazing Central Indian sun. He's a guy from Raytheon. There are two others. A guy from Lockheed-Martin, and a third -- who appears to be bossing these two around -- is a senior chap from the Pentagon's Close Combat Project Office, a department that contains, among other things, the Javelin Product Office. As the three executives assist a pair of US soldiers to assemble a Javelin photo-op mount, a young Indian officer asks the Raytheon guy if he has any literature on the missile. Out of his black knapsack comes a stack of custom folders with brochures, a DVD, the stuff you get a expos. If that's not getting into the heart of a sales pitch, I don't know what is. I'd heard that this sort of thing happens, but had never seen it for myself. Come to think of it, I don't remember seeing a Boeing person in Agra at Cope India, but then again, when you've got Ambassador Tim Roemer making an embarrassingly unabashed pitch (in a ceremonial speech no less), you've pretty much got it covered.

Are Indo-US exercises simply about selling weapons? Not entirely, but here's what I suspect. If Washington had to choose between achieving such lofty ideals as "perfect interoperability" with the Indian military on the one hand, and getting the Indians impressed enough to sign on the dotted lines for a gazillion tank-killing missiles on the other, they'd choose the latter any day of the week and twice on Sunday. Ironically, that's precisely what they're probably going to get as far as the C-17 and Javelin are concerned.

As my friend Vishal Thapar of CNN-IBN said in his camera stand-up, "I hate to be the spoilsport, but the possibility of India and the US conducting joint operations under a UN mandate is too remote to consider." That's darn true. So what was Yudh Abhyas all about then? A message to the Chinese maybe? Anything else? Something to think about for sure. The one thing that isn't ambiguous in the slightest is the wheeling-dealing part of it.

I'll end with something that has stuck with me. It's what one Indian Army major, who seemed surprisingly aloof to the general euphoria at Babina on Monday, said to me while the Javelins were being fired. "They are seducing us with their weapons," he said, his eyes carefully following the missile as it whooshed perfectly towards its quarry.

BY SHIV AROOR

http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/10/aoa-dollars-and-cents-of-military.html

JBH22
10-27-2009, 11:10 AM
USA is still unreliable.In noway it can be compared to Russia.Buying transport planes is not a big issue but if MMRCA goes to USA then we are going to have huge problem.But u can clearly US lobbying.Hmmm guys in MoD are getting paid.

completely agree with you. US has no friends only interest btw ARIHANT came into existence only with RUSSIAN help no other country would have helped.

raavan
10-27-2009, 11:13 AM
completely agree with you. US has no friends only interest btw ARIHANT came into existence only with RUSSIAN help no other country would have helped.

Arihant is just one of them Russians helped us in many ways.As the younger generation we should choose freinds or buisnessmen.Old politicians ruling us still want to get rich........:bash:

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 11:14 AM
The Gripen is a good bet for the MRCA with good avionics, AESA radar with Source Code on offer, Integration with customer choice weapons, cheapest maitnenace cost etc.

To me it will be either the Gripen or the F-16 especially if the news of MRCA replacing the Mirage is true. I doubt that the twin engined contenders bar the MIG 35 will be affordable in terms of a large order. And if you get the MIG as the MRCA and replace the Mirage with it as well, your fighter fleet is practically all Russian apart from Jaguar, Tejas and some trainers. I do not think the IAF want this to happen either.

JBH22
10-27-2009, 11:15 AM
The Gripen is a good bet for the MRCA with good avionics, AESA radar with Source Code on offer, Integration with customer choice weapons, cheapest maitnenace cost etc.

To me it will be either the Gripen or the F-16 especially if the news of MRCA replacing the Mirage is true. I doubt that the twin engined contenders bar the MIG 35 will be affordable in terms of a large order. And if you get the MIG as the MRCA and replace the Mirage with it as well, your fighter fleet is practically all Russian apart from Jaguar, Tejas and some trainers. I do not think the IAF want this to happen either.

hmm so better go with the RAFALE or the MIG-35 other aircraft not worth

raavan
10-27-2009, 11:18 AM
The Gripen is a good bet for the MRCA with good avionics, AESA radar with Source Code on offer, Integration with customer choice weapons, cheapest maitnenace cost etc.

To me it will be either the Gripen or the F-16 especially if the news of MRCA replacing the Mirage is true. I doubt that the twin engined contenders bar the MIG 35 will be affordable in terms of a large order. And if you get the MIG as the MRCA and replace the Mirage with it as well, your fighter fleet is practically all Russian apart from Jaguar, Tejas and some trainers. I do not think the IAF want this to happen either.

Well even in the past except for jaguars and mirages all other aircrafts were russian.Its just a reason to choose other vendor.Even with Gripen comes American sanctions.Look how america arm twisted Israel saying sensistive technologies will be handed over to Indians then wat are they planning to do.

JBH22
10-27-2009, 12:03 PM
indian wants to buy heavy choppers i don,t understand why a new tender is being floated better buy the MI-26 its in the inventory and much better than ch-47

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 02:16 PM
India should be front-runner in space technology: Air chief (http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/uncategorized/india-should-be-front-runner-in-space-technology-air-chief_100266442.html)


New Delhi, Oct 27 (IANS) Without mentioning China by name, Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik Tuesday said India was against “militarisation” of space but the country should aim to be the front-runner in the field of space technology.

“We are against militarisation of space. In fact, the entire world is against this,” Naik told reporters when asked about China’s future plans to launch a space station.

“Our aim should be to be a front runner in everything, including in space,” he added.

Asked about field evaluation trials of the medium multi-role combat aircraft, Naik said: “We have finished the trials of F-16, F/A-18, Rafale and the MiG-35. All (aircraft) are going neck and neck”.

India is scheduled to buy 126 multi-role combat aircraft for an estimated $11 billion to strengthen its depleting squadrons of fighter aircraft. Five companies, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Eurofighter, Gripen and RAC MiG are in the fray for this fourth generation fighter aircraft’s sales to India.

ante_climax
10-27-2009, 02:22 PM
indian wants to buy heavy choppers i don,t understand why a new tender is being floated better buy the MI-26 its in the inventory and much better than ch-47

Much better ? It can carry more load yes but Ch-47 is better in many other areas.

http://i35.*******.com/2uf8uw0dotjpg

http://i38.*******.com/10sc8yudotjpg

http://i38.*******.com/245wkszdotjpg

http://i37.*******.com/fn4guqdotjpg

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dredger14
10-27-2009, 09:00 PM
Chennai, Oct. 27: After its maiden moon mission, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is hoping to cross another milestone in December: take India into the exclusive club of countries that have developed their own cryogenic engines to power satellites in space.
Isro is hoping to end 2009 in style with the take-off of its fully indigenous geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV) carrying an experimental satellite GSAT
4 in mid-December.
The GSLV-D3 will have an indigenously built cryogenic engine that will be used for the first time in the rocket's upper stage. The GSLV-D3 is slated to be launched from Isro's spaceport Sriharikota, about 80 km northeast of Chennai, to carry the GSAT-4 communication satellite into a geo-stationary orbit, about 36,000 km above the earth. The 49-metre-tall rocket will have a lift-off weight of 414 tonnes.
Only a few countries like the US, Russia, France, Japan and China have developed their own cryogenic engines and India is expected to join this club.
For all the five earlier GSLV missions, ISRO had used Russian cryogenic engines.
"The cryogenic engine reached Sriharikota early this month from ISRO's facility in Mahendragiri in Tamil Nadu. The GSAT 4 communication satellite is expected to reach here by the middle of next month. Final tests are being done at Bangalore where it was built," M.Y.S. Prasad, associate director, Satish Dhawan Space Centre, said on phone from ISRO's launch centre at Sriharikota.
He said the physical inspection of the cryogenic stage is on and the engine's sensors are to be calibrated. It will be fuelled by liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen.
While GSLVs with Russian cryogenic engines have been designated as operational rockets after two developmental flights, the one that will go up in December is called 'developmental flight 3' (GSLV D3) as it will be fired by the ISRO-developed cryogenic engine.
The last GSLV went up on September 2, 2007, carrying the 2,130 kg INSAT-4CR satellite.
Speaking about how far the three-stage rocket had been assembled, Prasad said: "The first stage -- solid fuel booster and four strap-on motors -- has been assembled. The assembly of the second stage liquid engine is under progress and will be over in one and a half weeks. The last stage is the cryogenic stage."
Last December, the indigenously developed cryogenic upper stage engine passed the flight acceptance test with the engine tested for 200 seconds.
The development of cryogenic engines involves mastering materials technology, operating rotary pumps and turbines which run at 42,000 revolutions per minute (RPM).
The development of a cryogenic engine is crucial for Isro to build more powerful GSLV rockets that can carry four-tonne satellites.
Further, ISRO is lagging behind in launching its GSAT series for want of a cryogenic engine. GSAT 4 was supposed to have gone up two years back.
Weighing around two tonnes, GSAT 4 will carry a multi-beam Ka-band bent pipe and regenerative transponder and navigation payload in C, L1 and L5 bands. The satellite can guide civil and military aircraft.
GSAT 4 will also carry a scientific payload, TAUVEX, comprising three ultra violet band telescopes developed by Tel Aviv University and Israel space agency (ELOP) for surveying a large part of the sky in the 1,400-3,200 Angstrom wavelengths.
The GSLV rocket will place GSAT 4 in the geo transfer orbit (GTO) from where the satellite will be taken up to an altitude of 36,000 km and then positioned.
According to Prasad, ISRO is gearing up to launch six rockets per year and has created a huge liquid fuel storing facility for that purpose at Sriharikota.

http://www.deccanchronicle.com/gadgetology/india-set-join-cryogenic-club-653

ante_climax
10-28-2009, 02:32 AM
ALH Dhruv Crashes At Ecuador Military Parade (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/10/alh-dhruv-crashes-at-ecuador-military.html)



HAL spokesperson M Anantha Krishnan just provided a phone-in to Headlines Today, where, in answer to three questions, said, "It is too premature, I cannot provide any details at this moment." And to think the Ecuadorian President uses a Dhruv for VIP transport. Nightmare scenario. Eyewitness accounts suggest a fire broke out in the tail area. A ten-member HAL team stationed in Quito has reached the spot and is in possession of the CVR/FDR. Stay tuned for a detailed report.

dredger14
10-28-2009, 12:37 PM
Baramullah, Oct 28 (ANI): Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh will inaugurate Anantnag-Qadigund Railway line at Vanpooh Anantnag in Kashmir valley today.

He will be accompanied by UPA Chairperson Sonia Gandhi and Railway Minister Mamata Banerjee.

The Prime Minister is visiting Kashmir for the first time after Congress’ victory in the 2009 elections.

Tight security arrangements have been made in view of his two-day visit.

Meanwhile, the Centre has reportedly directed the Jammu and Kashmir Government and security forces in the state to step up vigil following intelligence inputs that Hizb-ul-Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin has asked his cadres to step up violence ahead of Dr. Singh’s visit to the region.

A senior Home Ministry official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told a private channel that intelligence agencies have intercepted communications between the Hizbul headquarters in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and cadres operating in Kashmir which suggested that Salahuddin was very upset over the killing of top Hizb militant Omer Maviya and wanted revenge.

According to the intercepts, Salahuddin has directed his cadres to step up violence ahead of the Prime Minister’s visit and disrupt his programmes. (ANI)
http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/india-news/pm-to-inaugurate-new-railway-line-in-kashmir-today_100266541.html

ante_climax
10-28-2009, 01:48 PM
Indian Ambassador, Air Force Observer visit Oman's Thumrait airbase
(http://sify.com/news/indian-ambassador-air-force-observer-visit-omans-thumrait-airbase-news-international-jk2s4cafacg.html)

Indian Ambassador to Oman, Anil Wadhwa, and Senior Indian Air Force Observer, Air Vice Marshal Ramesh Rai, visited the Thumrait airbase of Royal Air Force of Oman (RAFO) on Tuesday.

Earlier, Commander RAFO, Air Vice Marshal Yahya bin Rasheed Al-Juma, visited and interacted with the IAF team here.

The high-profile visits reinforce the commitment by both countries towards fostering defence cooperation during the ngoing joint air exercise 'Eastern Bridge', between the two air forces at Oman from October 22-29.

On the penultimate day, Exercise Eastern Bridge peaked with IAF and RAFO Jaguars mounting several low-level, two and four-aircraft strike missions, culminating with pounding of the nearby 'Aqzail' air-to-ground range with accurate intensity of practice bombs.

The marksmanship is brilliant with pilots on both sides scoring near-hundred percent direct hits on multiple targets in every mission.

With F-16s having joined-up for integrated missions, both in offensive and defensive roles, missions in Exercise Eastern Bridge are at par with any of the complex scenarios that air forces world over simulate.

Ex- Eastern Bridge - between IAF and RAFO is the first air exercise between the two air forces. (ANI)

ante_climax
10-28-2009, 01:55 PM
IAF Chief wants DPP 2009 to be streamlined, simplified
(http://sify.com/news/IAF-Chief-wants-DPP-2009-to-be-streamlined-simplified-news-jk1rafcgaha.html)

Chief of Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal PV Naik, today said that the current Defence Procurement Policy (DPP) has to be streamlined and simplified.
Efforts towards the revision of the present procurement policies are going on and the DPP 2009 is expected to be out by November 1, 2009, said Air Chief Marshal Naik.

He was speaking at a session organised jointly by the Centre for Air Power Studies and the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII). CM Naik stated that India has shown to the world that it has intellectual prowess to move forward.

"The Indian defence Industry still faces the challenges of developing core competencies and attaining self reliance. Therefore the government, PSUs and private players need to work together and interact in a more pragmatic and practical manner to achieve defence objectives," he added. e further stressed on the need for the industry to brainstorm for technology identification in the backdrop of short shelf life and rapid obsolesce.

ACM Naik listed need for strengthening the domestic industry, which can be engaged to contribute towards the need of defence in the domains of metallurgy, UAVs, NFDs, turbine blades, communication equipments, simple microchip, etc.

The Indian Air Force Chief also said that the Air force would like to sustain on a domestic industry for its entire shelf life. (ANI)

ante_climax
10-28-2009, 02:09 PM
India wants homegrown air sector (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/069f957c-c363-11de-8eca-00144feab49a.html)


India has strategic ambitions to develop selfreliance in military aviation manufacture as it seeks to modernise its air defence with a $10bn contract for jet fighters, the head of India's air force said yesterday.

Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik, the chief of staff of the Indian air force, said India had the intellectual prowess and industrial expertise to grow its own aircraft manufacturing sector. But he acknowledged that it would be a "Herculean task" to wean the country's military establishment off a heavy reliance on foreign expertise in some of its core competencies.

In the coming years, Chief Marshal Naik expected Indian metallurgy, turbine blades, communications, encryption technology and microchips to form a domestic industry that could supply the design, building and service of -aircraft.

India has traditionally turned to Russia for the needs of its air force. The country is seeking to buy 126 jet fighters and has begun year-long trials of the aircraft. Boeing's F/A-18 Super Hornet, France's Dassault Rafale, Lockheed Martin's F-16, Russia's Mig-35, Sweden's Saab JAS-39 Gripen and the Eurofighter Typhoon are all vying for the prize contract.

India, one of the world's fastest-growing large economies, is also one of its biggest arms importers. The government plans to spend more than $30bn (€20bn, £18bn) over the next five years to overhaul its ****nal in the face of possible threats from Pakistan and China.
The comments by the head of the air force echo those of senior officers in the navy, which aims to add almost 100 warships to its fleet over the next decade, and to develop its own low-cost shipbuilding capabilities.

Air Commodore Jasjit Singh, the director of the Centre for Air Power Studies, told the Financial Times that he foresaw Indian participation in the upgrading of existing aircraft rising rapidly over the next 15 years to between 50 per cent to 70 per cent, with greater Indian design and joint research and development.

In 40 years, with the introduction of a new generation of aircraft, he said that could rise to 80 per cent.
In the meantime, India faced the choice of joining the US and Europe as a partner in defence manufacture or teaming up in an eastern triumvirate with China and Russia, Air Commodore Singh said.

Some analysts have been encouraged by the achievements of India's space programme as evidence that it has the ability to develop a larger aviation industry. Last year India sent a rocket to orbit the moon and has developed considerable expertise in satellite launches.
But some industry executives say the country is lagging far behind neighbouring China in its technological support for commercial and military aircraft in spite of sizeable orders from Air India, Jet Airways and Kingfisher for new fleets.

"The [Indian] aerospace industry is not at all energised. It is a bit [active] in space, but it's not energised in defence or commercial areas," Arunakar Mishra, the chief executive of Bangalore-based Genser Aerospace and Information Technologies, said.
"People coming out of the Indian air force help foreigners to sell equipment to India [and don't develop local capacity]."

ante_climax
10-28-2009, 02:16 PM
US Dept of Defense - U.S.-Indian Armies Wrap Up Historic Exercise (http://www.isria.com/pages/28_October_2009_119.php)


With a massive display of firepower and teamwork, the U.S. and Indian armies finished their largest joint military exercise to date yesterday.

The exercise is dubbed “Yudh Abhyas,” loosely translated as “war preparation.”

About 250 U.S. soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 14th Cavalry Squadron, based out of Hawaii brought 17 of their Stryker combat vehicles and paired with the Indian army’s 7th Mechanized Infantry Battalion here at one of India’s premier military training sites.

Since Oct. 12, the two armies have swapped soldiers, shared equipment and traded war stories, officials said.

“That’s the most important aspect of this whole exercise -- getting to know each other, getting to appreciate our cultures, and working together as a team,” said Army Lt. Gen. Benjamin R. Mixon, the commander of U.S. Army forces in the Pacific.

Mixon and a host of Indian army generals traveled here Oct. 26 to view a culminating demonstration of firepower that offered up both the conventional battlefield power of the Indian’s T-90 tanks with the high-technology precision of the U.S. military’s tank killer, the Javelin.

Both infantries brought out their vehicles and weapons for a live-fire demonstration, and Indian helicopters dropped soldiers from both armies to join in the live-fire assault.

This was the largest deployment of the Stryker vehicle outside of deployments for war, and the Indian soldiers were eager to get a peek at its firepower and technical capabilities. The only restrictions were that the Indian soldiers could not drive the Strykers or use the high-tech communications network that manages the crew’s weapons.

Both armies traded firing their big guns on the range, and U.S. soldiers rode alongside their Indian counterparts in their infantry vehicle. A handful of Indian troops were allowed to fire the Javelin, a treat that many U.S. troops in the infantry have yet to experience.

The training started two weeks ago with simple handshakes among the soldiers and a display of the each army’s equipment. It quickly escalated to the two nations’ armies working side by side on complex maneuvers, some scenarios strongly resembling the types of joint operations troops see in Iraq and Afghanistan.

As opposed to joint military operations in which U.S. technology and firepower clearly positions itself as the superior force, the Indian army proved itself a capable force, teaching as much as it was learning, U.S. commanders on the ground said. The Indian army has long been fighting an insurgency, and brought new tactics to the table.

“The Indian army is a professional military force,” Mixon said. “I would be comfortable going with the Indian army anywhere, any time.”

The 2-14th returned from Iraq six months ago, and is slated to return in about nine months. This exercise is a ramp-up in training, as the unit prepares for larger pre-deployment training exercises such as those at the National Training Facility in California.

But while the U.S. troops leave this week with training under their belts that prepares them for their next deployment, the value of the training was integrating successfully with the Indian army.

“At the end of the day, the important part of the exercise is the future cooperation and the understanding between the two armies,” Mixon said.

The United States has sought to increase its military relations with India in recent years. Until now, most of the exercises in that effort have been smaller troop exchanges or command-level exercises using only computer-driven scenarios. This is the first time that a large number of boots on the ground have acted out those scenarios together.

“This is all about training with the Indian army, to enhance relationships so that we gain a greater understanding of each other. That’s really what this is all about,” the general said.

U.S. Pacific Command works regularly with other militaries on large-scale military operations, especially maritime.

Yudh Abhyas started in 2004 as the first conventional army-to-army training in India since 1962. In 2005, U.S. troops came to train at India’s counter-insurgency and jungle warfare school. In 2006, Indian troops went to Hawaii for training, and in 2007, troops traveled to Alaska. The exercise shifted back to Hawaii last year.

“We want to be able to work together as militaries,” Mixon said. “By us training together and getting to know each other, if there were a contingency, we would be better prepared to respond to that contingency. You cannot do that training here at the last minute.”

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 02:09 AM
Armed forces last resort against Maoists: Antony (http://trak.in/news/armed-forces-last-resort-against-maoists-antony/18074/)


New Delhi, Oct 28 (IANS) Defence Minister A.K. Antony Wednesday urged Maoist guerrillas to abjure violence and said that involving armed forces in the ‘anti-naxal’ operations would be as a last resort.

‘What we are demanding is that they should abjure violence – whether in West Bengal or in other areas. In our view, deployment of armed forces for internal security is the last resort,’ Antony told reporters here.

Agreeing that Maoist violence had grown into a ’serious threat’, Antony said it had to be tackled by the paramilitary forces and the police.

‘I agree that Naxalism is a serious threat but it has to be mainly handled by paramilitary and police,’ the defence minister said.

Antony’s remarks come a day after Maoists held a train hostage in West Bengal and released it after several hours.

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 02:12 AM
India rules out deploying troops in Afghanistan, Iraq (http://trak.in/news/india-rules-out-deploying-troops-in-afghanistan-iraq/18004/)


New Delhi, Oct 28 (IANS) India Wednesday ruled out deploying its troops in Afghanistan and Iraq — either now or in the future.
Talking to reporters, Defence Minister A.K. Antony said that despite the enhanced military-to-military ties between India and the US, there was no possibility of deploying troops in the two countries.

‘I do not foresee such a situation, not now or in the future. As far as we are concerned we are helping Afghanistan for humanitarian purpose and for reconstruction and rehabilitation.

‘I am telling you categorically that there is no question of using the military in Afghanistan or other parts,’ Antony said when he was asked if Indian troops could be sent to these countries.

India and the US undertaken one of their largest-ever ground combat joint exercises at Babina in Uttar Pradesh.

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 02:14 AM
What Happened To The Dhruv In Ecuador? (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/10/what-happened-to-dhruv-in-ecuador.html)


The two Ecuadorian helicopter pilots Luis Armas and Ivan Abril who walked away almost unscathed from the dramatic crash of their Dhruv helicopter have been treated for minor injuries, and are to be discharged in a few days from a military hospital in Quito. They had a closer call than most do in helicopter accidents of this kind. While a very serious inquiry now stares HAL uncomfortably in the face, one fact is undeniable. The accident, like a previous one in November 2005 (http://www.indianexpress.com/oldStory/82743/) in which all six on board survived, establishes once again the remarkable crashworthiness of the ALH Dhruv. But that's not the point here. What's important is what went wrong at Quito's Mariscal Sucre airport. The facts as we know them right now are bare, notwithstanding the ready affirmation by Ecuadorian air force chief General Rodrigo Bohorquez, that the crash had taken place as a result of pilot error. Strangely, even Ecuador's defence minister Javier Ponce said in an interview to a local newspaper that all prima facie indications were that the pilot had "excessively manoeuvered" the chopper, leading to the accident. For starters, the helicopter is not serviceable -- it is beyond repair. It was the one of three Dhruvs flying in an arrow-head formation. Here's what we know so far, for the record:


Eyewitnesses, including some journalists, have testified to the Board of Inquiry that they saw a fire break out near the Dhruv's tail stem, after which the helicopter rolled abruptly to port 60-degrees and began losing altitude. At this point, the helicopter was about 300-metres from the airport's hangar area.
Ecuador's air chief General Rodrigo Bohorquez has been quoted as saying that the accident occured "because the turn was very long" and that the pilot "oversteered" the helicopter.
The pilot Luis Armas, who has 197 hours logged on the Dhruv, was trained in India in December 2008. Co-pilot Ivan Abril has logged 107 hours on the Dhruv so far.
According to an HAL official in Ecuador who spoke to me off the record, a few Ecuadorian newspapers have begun running opinion pieces questioning the Dhruv purchase from India. Some report that HAL was initially disqualified for not meeting certain technical requirements of Ecuador's air force. However, when General Rodrigo Bohorquez took charge of the service shortly thereafter, the decision was reportedly reversed despite the fact that the country's audit regulator had reportedly ordered the competition to be declared void and re-tendered, as the Dhruv had not met technical and financial requirements. They same reports suggest that the Indian government, through the Indian Ambassador in Quito, struck a deal with the country to be the launch customer in Latin America for the helicopter. The implicit suggestion in these reports appears to be that the Dhruv was unfairly chosen, and under the use of influence.
Both the air chief and defence minister of the country have said on record that the helicopters have been observed to have no technical faults.
The ten-member HAL team in Quito is assisting the Accident Investigation Board. HAL may send more engineers from its Rotory Wing Complex in Bangalore to Quito to assist the investigation.

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 02:16 AM
India, Maldives Hold Joint Anti-Terror Exercise (http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?668462)


Taking forward their defence cooperation, the armies of India and the Maldives are holding a joint counter-terrorism exercise at Belgaum.

The exercise, codenamed Ekuverin, began on October 19 and will conclude on November 1 when Maldivian Defence Minister Ameen Faisal and Indian Army's Southern Commander Lt Gen Pradeep Khanna would jointly witness the exercise.

Army sources said here said the fortnight-long exercise was aimed at achieving interoperability between the two countries for future joint counter-terrorism operations.

The Maldivian Army has deputed 44 of its personnel, including five officers, for the exercise and the Indian side 46 personnel.

The earlier joint exercise between the two countries' armies had taken place in May 2007.

The exercise comes close on the heels of India and Maldives signing a defence agreement, under which New Delhi took up the responsibility for security of the archipelago, when Defence Minister A K Antony had gone there on an official visit a couple of months ago.

India had in 1987 despatched its troops by air to Maldives to guard it against a coup attempt by a Sri Lankan Tamil militant group.

Recently, India had deployed warships in Maldivian waters, where Somali pirates were active, and has placed Naval aircraft there for patrolling its skies

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 02:26 AM
'India not averse to space militarisation' (http://www.timesnow.tv/India-not-averse-to-space-militarisation/articleshow/4330589.cms)


Air Chief PV Naik has spoken out about the issue of China's growing military might in outer space, saying that as a nation India is not against militarisation of space, adding that in a situation like this, India should aim to be the frontrunner.

"I don't think we are for militarisation of space. In fact the entire world is against this. We need to leave space alone militarily. (But) a sovereign country can do whatever it wants. Our aim should be to be the frontrunner in all the fields including space. We should aim towards that, we have the expertise, we've made a good beginning, why not?" said Air Chief Marshal Naik, stating the Indian position.

The Indian government maintains that it is not in favour of militarising space; unless another country goes forward with militarisation, in which case India will feel compelled to follow suit to restore the balance. If this should happen, India would strive to be the frontrunner in the new militaristic activity so as not to be left behind.

In this context, India's first dedicated military satellite, a naval communications one, will finally be up and running in the sky early next year. But India is nowhere close to having something like "star wars" capabilities, with the government even reluctant to establish a full-fledged Aerospace Command despite the armed forces demanding it for years.

At the same time New Delhi is concerned that countries like China have already been developing anti-satellite (ASAT) missiles, lasers and other offensive space capabilities. It is also wary of China's military build-up and modernization, including double-digit increases in Beijing's armed forces budget. China's military recently displayed new long-range and cruise missiles during a military parade in Beijing marking the 60th anniversary of communist rule. And it is thought that in January 2007 the Chinese used a ground-based medium-range ballistic missile to destroy a weather satellite that had been launched in 1999, underlining the growing capabilities of China's armed forces.

Given this knowledge whether India comes up with airspace doctrines and commands, and develops ASAT capabilities with "direct-ascent" missiles, hit-to-kill "kinetic" and directed-energy laser weapons, are things for the near future.

ante_climax
10-29-2009, 10:40 AM
[Vishnu Som] Update On Boeing Super Hornet Pitch (http://livefist.blogspot.com/2009/10/vishnu-som-update-on-boeing-super.html)



As far as the transfer of source codes for AESA is concerned, Boeing is still at the "can't discuss in an open forum, lets see how this plays out" mode. At the same time, the fact that India has agreed to the US end user agreement during Hillary Clinton's visit here means that the full-up Super Hornet IN, inclusive of the upgraded GE F414 engine, the APG-79 AESA and other key systems are cleared for transfer. So it's quite possible that the version of the AESA offered will be full-spec. In fact, I am sure, India would not accept anything less than that.

Secondly, February 2010 is the big date for the IAF and the next phase of the Hornet There will be an evaluation of the following: 1. Mission systems flight evaluation 2. AESA 3. FLIR 4. EW 5. Weapon delivery 6. Maintenance evaluation 7. Technical evaluation.

All this will be done at the Naval Air Station Lemoore in California, the same base from where I flew the second of my Super Hornet sorties. Boeing reps repeatedly state that the AESA will be evaluated in conjunction with other systems, ie, the data link, FLIR etc to showcase the full package.

As far as AESA is concerned, the Boeing-Raytheon team seemed to take on their European rivals who are still developing/integrating their product. They explained how it took eight years for the APG-79 to move from low rate initial production to first operational deployment. The dates are as follows: June 2003 Low rate initial production / December 2006 Operational evaluation completed / December 2007 Initial Operational clearance & Full scale production approval and May 2008 First operational deployment.

The APG-79 has 1,000-hours mean time between failures (MTBF), more than 75,000 operational flight hours, it's been approved for sale to India and will be sustained in US service beyond 2035. The proposed GE F414 EPE (Enhanced Performance Engine) for India offers a 20 per cent increase in thrust and a 1 per cent reduction in fuel burn. The F414 is itself in the 22,000-lb thrust class, 170 lb/second airflow. Engine change is done in under 30 minutes, interchangeable left and right engine installation. No need for a functional check flight after engine change. No throttle restrictions while in operation (I have personally witnessed this, it's amazing -- you can pretty much do what you want with the throttle, slam it to burner and take it back as much as you want ... nothing happens).

Boeing says it WILL offer the Indian Air Force an out and out 9G fighter -- this has been a promise made by the Boeing team. I was led to believe this involves changes in the flight control system, though the airframe itself is OK for 9G.

The pitch -- this is a rugged, proven, operational platform, which is now available to India at a cost NOT too much over its single engine competitors in the MMRCA race. As far as their performance in the trials in Bangalore are concerned, they say that they are satisfied with what they were able to demonstrate to the Indian Air Force but reiterate that its the IAF which has to be satisfied. Thats it for the moment folks.

dredger14
10-29-2009, 05:15 PM
The Indian Army has put out a request for information (RFI) for 200 wheeled and 100 tracked advanced light armoured vehicles for use in semi-mountainous and mountainous regions in the North and North East, developed and semi-developed terrain in the Western borders and in the island territories.

The Army has stipulated that it wants the wheeled light tanks configured 8x8 with a maximum weight not exceeding 22-tons (for the tracked version as well). More on the contenders soon.

From Shiv Aroor's Livefist

ante_climax
10-30-2009, 03:08 AM
Strykers :)

Kunal Biswas
10-30-2009, 10:06 AM
Numbers are not enough !!

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:00 AM
Four feared killed in IAF chopper crash (http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20091031/main3.htm)


An Indian Air Force (IAF) chopper crashed and plunged into the Chenab at Trungal in Doda district today. The rotors of the ill-fated chopper got entangled in the cable of a ropeway hung by the locals to cross the river. Although the authorities have yet not confirmed the total causalities in the tragic incident, all four crew members on board were feared killed, as the chopper was drowned into the reservoir of the Baglihar hydroelectric project. Only one body has been recovered so far and the rescue operation is going on.


MI 17 IV chopper is a Russian made helicopter with a good flying record. It is considered the life line for the residents of inaccessible areas of the region. A court of inquiry has been ordered into the incident.
Deepak Kumar, DIG, Doda-Ramban range, told The Tribune that the IAF chopper, which was on a regular sortie, was flying over the reservoir of the Baglihar hydroelectric project on the Chenab when it got entangled in the cable of a ropeway at Trungal village. It crashed and plunged into the Chenab.


Quoting the IAF authorities, the DIG further informed that four crew members were on board and only one body had been recovered. He said a team of divers from the Civil Defence had been pressed into service.
Rajdeep Singh, an eyewitness, said over the phone that he along with some locals was standing on the opposite side of Trungal village when the incident took place. “The chopper was coming from the Batote side when it crashed and plunged into the river with a big bang,” said Rajdeep, who ferries passengers on the Chenab from Trungal to Zangli. He said he along with five other villagers were the first to reach the spot. “A badly mutilated body was lying on the bank of the river,” he added. Although the authorities had not disclosed the identity of those who were on board, sources said the body of Wing Commander Garh had been recovered.
Although senior officers are tight-lipped over the incident, the sources said the ill-fated chopper was returning from the Nawapachi area of Kishtwar district. The IAF carries regular sorties to the mountain-locked Nawapachi area to transport ration, arms and ammunition for the troops stationed there. The IAF also provides assistance to the civil administration in supplying ration and other essential commodities in times of crisis.

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:02 AM
IAF signed contract for 5th generation fighter jet with Russia (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_iaf-signed-contract-for-5th-generation-fighter-jet-with-russia_1305159)


Pathankot: In a bid to add more teeth to its existing armoury, Indian Air Force has signed a contract with Russia recently to procure the fifth generation fighter aircraft under its modernisation programme.
click here

"As a modernisation programme of the IAF, we have recently signed an official agreement with Russia for procurement of fifth generation attack aircrafts," air chief marshal PV Naik told reporters on the concluding day of his two-day visit to Air Force Station, Pathankot today.

"This deal is a part of the modernisation plan under which 126 Medium Multi-role combat Aircrafts, which are coming will translate to 10 new squadrons," Naik said. He added that IAF is in the process of procuring MMRCAs, C-79 aircrafts, C001 aircrafts, new airborne early warning systems, attack helicopters, aerostat radars, VVIP helicopters, heavy load helicopters besides upgrading MIG-29, AN-32, Sukhois and Mirage fighter jets.

Referring to the upgradation programme, the COAS said, "What you cannot get from elsewhere needs to be upgraded. If there is residual life left in any system, you cannot throw it out, but upgrade it." Planning is done on four basic pillars of modernisation, Naik said adding that first is to develop systems including satellites and radars to see enemy movements first and communicate fast.

Second pillar is to have a "reach", he said adding,"When you see, you should reach the farthest place. So for this, we have fighter jets and air-to-air refuelling in place". The third is to "hit" at adversary and fourth is to save and safeguard the country, he said adding that this planning needs to be fool-proof and accurate.

On a question about his recent statement that India has one-third of China's airpower, Air Chief Marshal Naik said, "Why should we compare with China. We have nothing to do with it.I will focus on building my own capability." To another question about Chinese air-power, he said, "There is nothing to worry. We are capable."

"The Long-Term Perspective Planning will shape IAF in next 10 to 15 years. We have also focus on the space warfare, which is emerging as major sector of the defence security," he said.

On Pakistan getting new aircrafts and other defence systems in their existing fleet, he said,"Nobody should undermine IAF's capabilities. If our neighbours are purchasing new aircrafts from the US, India is also procuring MMRCAs, attack helicopters, radars, AEWSs."

"The IAF is constantly updating and evolving new techniques and training well. We should be well prepared to meet any external threat," he said and pointed out at IAF's special training exercises recently with the US and Oman.

"Currently one more exercise is going on," he said adding that the IAF has performed very well.Indian Air Force will complete technical evaluation of the six foreign fighter jets by April next year before procurement.

"The test trials and technical evaluation of the six fighter jets will be completed by April next year. They are being subjected to different terrain and weather conditions in Bangalore, Jaisalmer and Leh," Naik told reporters.

Naik said that test trial of the F-16, F-18(USA), Rafael (France) and MIG-35(Russia) has been completed and for the rest it is going on. Besides these, other fighter aircrafts under process of technical evaluation are Gripen(Sweden) and Eurofighter(UK). "After test evaluation is completed, we will move further for procurement," he said.

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:05 AM
President likely to fly in Su-30 MKI (http://www.ptinews.com/news/355032_President-likely-to-fly-in-Su-30-MKI)


New Delhi, Oct 30 (PTI) Following the footsteps of her predecessor, President Pratibha Patil is likely to fly in an Indian Air Force frontline fighter Su-30 MKI at its home-base in Lohegaon in Pune next month.

"The President is expected to fly in the Su-30 MKI on November 25," IAF officials told PTI.

Former President A P J Abdul Kalam had also flown in a Su-30 MKI from the same airbase in June 2006. Kalam was airborne for over 20 minutes in the aircraft belonging to the 20 squadron.

Before the flight, officials said, the 74-year old President will have to undergo medical check ups and would be allowed to fly only if she is found fully fit.

If this feat is achieved, Patil will join a small group of women including aviation doctors to have flown in a fighter aircraft.

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:10 AM
The Indian Airforce is Going Shopping (http://business.in.com/storyslide/briefing/the-indian-airforce-is-going-shopping/6542/1)


The Indian Air Force (IAF) is going shopping for aircraft. The budget is a cool $10 billion, and manufacturers across the world are racing to bag the contract. The aircraft in question are the Medium Multirole Combat Aircraft (MMRCA). Field trials for the contract, in which all the parameters that the manufactures have claimed are put to test, have begun in Bangalore and the action will soon shift to the deserts of Rajasthan and Leh, where the six contenders will be put through their paces.

The aircraft will beef up future strike capability of the force, whose fighter strength has been dwindling. Estimates are that fighter squadrons have gone down from about 39 (each with 12-18 aircraft) and may reach 27 in a few years, bringing it to the level of the Pakistani Air Force.


No matter which manufacturer bags the contract though, India is likely to benefit in more ways than one. The contract has a huge commercial implication for Indian industry. According to India’s offset policy, the manufacturer that wins the contract will have to either re-invest at least 50 percent of the contract value in India, or source the same amount through Indian industry.


The foreign vendors have already begun forming associations with 25 to 30 local manufacturers, who will get active as soon as the order is placed. Of the 126 aircraft order, only the first 18 or so will be made by the global supplier, the rest will be assembled and later built completely in India. Most like Boeing, Lockheed-Martin and Saab have begun forming joint ventures and incubating smaller ventures in preparation for the deal. The foreign vendors are also required to transfer technological knowledge to the Indian aerospace industry.


At the core, the six aircraft can be divided into two categories by weight. The light weight, flyaway single-engined aircraft and the heavier twin-engined machines. The Americans, Swedes, Russians and the French are all locked in a battle to sell India machines that cost between $55 million to $70 million. The big question really is: Will the Americans be able to storm the Indian defence business through this deal?

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:12 AM
Eastern Bridge concludes successfully, IAF team returns to India (http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=53736)


Exercise Eastern Bridge – the first joint air exercise between Indian Air Force (IAF) and Royal Air Force of Oman (RAFO) concluded on Thursday, successfully. The exercise was held from Oct 22-29, at RAFO’s Thumrait airbase in Oman.

All six IAF Jaguars that participated in the exercise landed safely at Jamnagar on Thursday. In a rare first, six fighters refueled from a single IL-78 MKI mid-air refueller during their overseas flight. The IL-76 carrying the remaining team members arrived at Gorakhpur via Jamnagar close to midnight on Thursday. The Jaguars also returned to their parent airbase Gorakhpur, today.

Before conclusion of the exercise, Chief of Staff of the Sultan of Oman’s Armed Forces, Lieutenant General Ahmed Harith Nasser visited the IAF delegation and interacted with the IAF team. His visit as the Head of the Sultan’s armed forces outlines the great importance and honour Oman extended to the visiting Indian delegation. He expressed great satisfaction with the conduct of the exercise.

RAFO Thumrait Commander, Air Commodore Mattar Al Obaidani in his closing address at the exercise debrief, praised the professional conduct of the IAF contingent. “You have really set an example for our youngsters and have shown how disciplined and professional you are,” he said.

“One of the objectives was to win friends, a friendship that was lost in a long time,” he said, apprising that it was for the first time that RAFO had looked east for an exercise. So far the only exercises RAFO have been participating are with the GCC countries and west. He conveyed that RAFO was keenly looking forward to bringing aircraft their aircraft to India in near future.

IAF Team Leader Group Captain VV Dedgaonkar also thanked RAFO for all the facilitations on behalf of the Indian contingent. Referring to consolidation of IAF-RAFO ties, he said, “Bridges are not built by machines but by each one of us and will be only consolidated in the future.”

Exercise Eastern Bridge was a platform for the airmen on both sides to show their professional mettle and learn from each other. Unlike IAF, seldom do RAFO pilots get an opportunity to change aircraft type once they begin to fly operationally. The exercise provided them the chance to assimilate some experience from their IAF counterparts who have flown both western and Russian aircraft.

ante_climax
10-31-2009, 06:33 AM
Super Hornet favourite in Indian and Brazilian tenders (http://www.janes.com/news/defence/jdw/jdw091030_2_n.shtml)


The Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet is well placed to fulfil both the Indian and Brazilian fighter requirements, the company and its industry partners said on 28 October.

Boeing and its Team Super Hornet partners – Raytheon and General Electric (GE) – presented a broad-ranging review of the F/A-18E/F's position in both the Indian Air Force's (IAF's) Medium-Multirole Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) programme for 163 aircraft plus 63 options and the Brazilian Air Force's F-X2 tender for the first 36 of what is projected to be a total of 120 fighters.

Boeing stated that two major factors make the Super Hornet competitive in both markets: the first one being that the economies of scale that result from both the aircraft and its major subsystems are still hot (active) production lines and hence have steadily reduced the unit cost of the aircraft; the other is that the modular nature of the aircraft's sensors and propulsion system permit technology insertion that dramatically increases performance at minimal expense.

"The history of the F/A-18E/F's development has now seen a negative slope in terms of cost and a positive slope in terms of capability. For this reason we feel for the first time we are competing on even terms with the [Lockheed Martin] F-16 in terms of price," stated Boeing Military Aircraft IDS President Chris Chadwick.

Raytheon representatives, who also briefed during the New Delhi conference, emphasised that "Raytheon provided the first AESA [active electronically scanned array] radar sets to both the USAF [US Air Force] and USN [US Navy]", and that the company continues to leverage technological improvements across its product lines in improving the Super Hornet's AN/APG-79 radar.

ATV
10-31-2009, 09:40 AM
http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae262/atv_photo/30_10_2009_006_006dotjpg

raavan
10-31-2009, 11:07 AM
Super Hornet favourite in Indian and Brazilian tenders (http://www.janes.com/news/defence/jdw/jdw091030_2_n.shtml)

This cant be happening............:-(

JBH22
10-31-2009, 11:12 AM
This cant be happening............:-(

And it is not good at all the favourites should be the Rafale or the Mig-35

hskywalker
10-31-2009, 11:55 AM
http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae262/atv_photo/30_10_2009_006_006dotjpg
So some indians did think clearly.
There were actually some indian soldiers killed by locals when they entered south tibet around 1950. Can't found the exact date and link now.

ante_climax
11-01-2009, 01:44 AM
And it is not good at all the favourites should be the Rafale or the Mig-35

The Rafale so that the French could demands the price of a few frontline squadrons for a future upgrade ? Like they are doing with the Mirage 2000 ?

MIG-35 is a decent fighter i now believe. all things considered, but i suspect the Russians will not be able to meet the delivery schedules.

The Super Hornet if like the arcticle says offered at a price point which is near the single engined contenders (Gripen and F 16) will be a deal that is hard to resist.

If there is significant price difference between the single engined, and twin engined fighters I think the IAF may be inclined to go for the former, as they may consider ordering the MRCA in the case of the Mirage 2000 upgrade negotiations breaking down and (God forbid) the LCA MK2 not making it.

JBH22
11-01-2009, 02:02 AM
The Rafale so that the French could demands the price of a few frontline squadrons for a future upgrade ? Like they are doing with the Mirage 2000 ?
the price tag is a matter of negociation btw the 2 parties

MIG-35 is a decent fighter i now believe. all things considered, but i suspect the Russians will not be able to meet the delivery schedules.
this is not new but atleast they are more reliable in terms of TOT compared to US.also this is INDIA each and every project is delayed ARJUN MBT,LCA you name it all are well behind schedule

The Super Hornet if like the arcticle says offered at a price point which is near the single engined contenders (Gripen and F 16) will be a deal that is hard to resist.
f-16 and gripen do not even contend as favourites in this competition so comparison is useless.

If there is significant price difference between the single engined, and twin engined fighters I think the IAF may be inclined to go for the former, as they may consider ordering the MRCA in the case of the Mirage 2000 upgrade negotiations breaking down and (God forbid) the LCA MK2 not making it.
HMM no comments

JBH22
11-01-2009, 02:33 AM
So some indians did think clearly.
There were actually some indian soldiers killed by locals when they entered south tibet around 1950. Can't found the exact date and link now.
when you get the link you talkrofl

VAMAN
11-01-2009, 02:41 AM
Super Hornet favourite in Indian and Brazilian tenders (http://www.janes.com/news/defence/jdw/jdw091030_2_n.shtml)
Super Hornet is a naval aircraft no? This is getting confusing.

Muzungu
11-01-2009, 03:03 AM
Any more terror attack from Pak will be retaliated: Chidambaram

MADURAI: Taking a tough stance, home minister P Chidambaram has warned Pakistan against meddling in India's affairs and said any more terror attack from that country will be retaliated "very strongly".

He said he has been warning Pakistan not to play with India and that the Mumbai attacks should be the "last game".

"We have been gaining strength day by day to counter terrorism from across the border. I have been warning Pakistan not to play games with us. (I have told them that) the last game should be Mumbai attacks. Stop it there," he told a public meeting here last night.

"If terrorists and militants from Pakistan try to carry out any attack in India, they will not only be defeated but will be retaliated very strongly," he said in his speech in Tamil.

Chidambaram said India would retaliate strongly against any attempt by Pakistan to send infiltrators into India and "we have strength to tackle any such infiltration".

He said he had been consistently warning Pakistan against meddling in India's affairs but if they continued to do so, "we will deal with them strongly".

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Any-more-terror-attack-from-Pak-will-be-retaliated-Chidambaram/articleshow/5185506.cms

looks like india is doing a carrot and stick policy with pakistan. PM offered a no condition peace talks with pak and now PC shows the stick to them!

good work guys!

raavan
11-01-2009, 06:01 AM
looks like india is doing a carrot and stick policy with pakistan. PM offered a no condition peace talks with pak and now PC shows the stick to them!

good work guys!

Pc is aggressive in the matter of terrorism and naxal threat.40,000 men deployed to fight naxals damn thats huge.Hope he maintains this aggressiveness all the time.

dredger14
11-01-2009, 03:57 PM
BALASORE: Amidst China’s concern over yet-to-be-tested longest range Agni-V missile, India is poised to test fire an Agni variant missile to further strengthen the technological know-how.
Preparations are on a war-footing in the integrated test range (ITR) off Orissa coast for launching of 2000-km plus range Agni-II missile shortly. “The missile is scheduled to be fired from the Wheelers Island based test range facilities any time in-between November 3 and 8,” a source at the ITR told ‘Express’ today. Recently, China expressed concern over the scheduled test of 5000-km range Agni-V missile in late 2010 or early 2011 as the missile has the capability to strike most of the Chinese cities.
“India is building its minimum nuclear deterrence and the missiles are not targeted towards any of its hostile neighbours, including China and Pakistan. The 700-km range Agni-I along with Agni-II and the 3000-km range Agni-III form the triad of the country’s minimum, credible nuclear deterrence,” said a defence scientist.
Defence sources said the Agni-II missile, which was first testfired in 1999, is 21-meter long and 1.3 meter in diameter. It weighs 19 tonne and is designed to carry “special weapons” nuclear payload of over 1,000 kg. It has already been inducted into the Indian army and will be used by 555th missile group of the army.
This missile is part of the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme (IGMDP). The other missiles include Prithvi, Trishul, Akash and Nag.
Agni-II has appropriate on-board thrusters fitted on the second stage of the missile. Both stages of Agni-II have a solid propulsion system which allows the missile to be mobile and flexible.
“Scientists are working hard as the last test of Agni-II missile was a failure. During the test, the missile instead of traveling on the pre-determined trajectory started wandering mid-way. So this time they don’t want to take any chances. The missiles will be tested by the Indian Army,” informed the source.
Agni-II is a ready-to-fire missile with a launch time of about 15 minutes. Experts said having South China as the main target, the missile is designed to carry a one-tonne weapon based on the “boosted fission device” exploded in Pokhran in 1998. “The hidden tie-up between China and Pakistan has provided enough reason for the defence and security strategists to doubt the intentions of both the countries, potential nuclear powered neighbours. And the tie-up will definitely boost the arms race in South East Asian region further endangering the already fragile security scenario,” said experts.

http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/stor ... %20and%20N

dredger14
11-01-2009, 04:03 PM
http://drdo.org/dpi/2009/oct09.pdf

dredger14
11-01-2009, 04:05 PM
India’s missile programme took a crucial step forward on Saturday with Indian Air Force test pilots carrying out the captive flight trials of the indigenously designed and developed Astra beyond visual range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM).

A Su-30MKI combat aircraft especially tasked for the trials took off from Air Force Station Lohegaon (Pune) for a 90-minute sortie with the Astra missile. Till Thursday, four sorties, including flying the missile to super sonic speeds and to 7Gs, had been accomplished. Captive trials are mandatory to actual firing of the missile from the aircraft.

The active, radar homing Astra -- India’s first air-to-air missile -- which, at its design altitude of 15 km, will enable fighter pilots to lock-on, evade radar and shoot down enemy aircraft about 80 km away, is part of India’s Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme and has been under development at a number of defence laboratories led by the Hyderabad-based Defence Research and Development Laboratory.

Astra can be compared to the U.S.’ AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile, or AMRAAM, France’s MICA (Missile d’interception et de combat aérien, “Interception and Aerial Combat Missile”) and Russia’s R77 (RVV-AE) missile.

The ground launch of Astra was successfully conducted at Chandipur-on-Sea, off the Orissa coast in September 2008.

Captive flight trials involve the Su-30MKI carrying under its wings at one of its six hard points (stations designated for the carrying of stores) an inert missile (with no explosives but simulating the real missile) which has not been electrically or electronically ‘connected’ to the aircraft’s on-board systems.

Captive or aero mechanical integrity tests allows a verification of aspects such as the mechanical, structural and electrical compatibility between the missile and the aircraft, and whether vibrations, strain, stress, etc. are within design levels.

Only after the missile is proven in captive flight trials can it be fired from an aircraft.

Disclosing news of Phase 1 of the captive flight trails which have come after about four years of planning and certification, senior officials said the trials would cover the entire flight envelope of the Su-30MKI, including attaining the fighter’s altitude ceiling of 18 km and a speed of 1.8 Mach, and undertaking the various complicated manoeuvres that the aircraft is designed for. The trials are likely to involve around 15 sorties.

Russian launcher

Though the missile has been indigenously developed, Astra currently depends on a Russian launcher and seeker head. The seeker is yet to be integrated with the missile’s radar, algorithms, etc.

Officials said Astra has been designed to pull a latax (lateral acceleration) of 40g. (40 times the acceleration due to gravity).

The second phase of the trials -- avionics integrity tests -- are expected early next year and will involve the integration of the missile’s avionics with that of the aircraft, and a dialoguing between the cockpit and the missile. Officials also disclosed that “some guided flights with a seeker to check for guidance will take place early next year.” The actual firing of Astra from the Su-30MKI is expected in July-August 2010.

Astra is to be initially fitted on the Su-30MKI and the Mirage 2000, with the Tejas Light Combat Aircraft and the MiG-29 scheduled to be equipped with it later.

http://beta.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/article41575.ece

dredger14
11-01-2009, 04:07 PM
BANGALORE: Scientists at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) along with Indian defence agencies are developing technology to build recoverable hypersonic missiles which will be half the size of the current missiles. This missile will have the potential of hitting a target over 5,000 km away at more than five times the speed of sound (Mach5) and can also be used to launch satellites at low cost, a top scientist working on the project told ET. No time frame has been announced as yet on when the missile work will be completed. This is of special significance as institutions like the Nasa is experimenting on unmanned projects where they will use hypersonic flights to conduct space exploration.

Missiles which fly at Mach 3-4 (three to four times the speed of sound) belong to the high supersonic class, while hypersonic missiles can fly at more than Mach 5. India’s longest-range missile, Agni III, is capable of hitting targets 3,500 km away and the forthcoming Agni V which has a range of about 5,000-6,000 km is expected to be test-fired in 2010.

“The missile will be much smaller than the current ones. It will be more like an aircraft which can come back to its base after dropping the weapon and need not be huge like the Chinese Dongfeng intercontinental ballistic missile,” a scientist who did not wish to be quoted said. “This technology is not yet available in any other country and it will help better access to space, reconnaissance-strike and global reach.”

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) on Friday admitted that they were developing this technology, but work was still at its preliminary stage. IISc is working on some parts of this intercontinental ballistic missile which will be made of materials like composites and Titanium. This will prevent it from being detected by enemy radars and observation systems. It is this innovation which has attracted the interest of several US aviation sector majors.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/News/Politics/Nation/IISc-working-towards-recoverable-hypersonic-missiles/articleshow/5185663.cms?curpg=1

dredger14
11-01-2009, 08:20 PM
http://i33.*******.com/244woeodotjpg

Here are some snippets of the discussion between Nixon and Kissinger, just after Indira Gandhi left:

Nixon: This is just the point when she is a *****.
Kissinger: Well, the Indians are ******** anyway. They are starting a war there. It’s—to them East Pakistan is no longer the issue. Now, I found it very interesting how she carried on to you yesterday about West Pakistan….

Kissinger: While she was a *****, we got what we wanted too. You very subtly—I mean, she will not be able to go home and say that the United States didn’t give her a warm reception and therefore, in despair, she’s got to go to war.

Nixon: We really slobbered over the old witch. [US State Department]

This wasn’t just about Indira Gandhi herself, they had a pretty low opinion of Indians in general:

Indians are “a slippery, treacherous people,” Nixon said.
“The Indians are ******** anyway,” Mr Kissinger replied. “They are the most aggressive goddamn people around.” [Guardian]

Nixon was also mad at his ambassador for ‘going native’ —

In a White House conversation with Mr Kissinger on 4 June, 1971, President Nixon berates his ambassador to India, Kenneth Keating, for wanting to, as Mr Kissinger puts it, “help India push the Pakistanis out”.
President Nixon says: “I don’t want him to come in with that kind of ******* thing with me… Keating, like every ambassador who goes over there, goes over there and gets sucked in.” [BBC]

US opposition to an independent Bangladesh was quite deep:

Mr Kissinger then says: “Those sons-of-*****es, who never have lifted a finger for us, why should we get involved in the morass of East Pakistan?
“If East Pakistan becomes independent, it is going to become a cesspool. It’s going be 100 million people, they have the lowest standard of living in Asia.”

President Nixon replies: “Yeah.”

Mr Kissinger: “They’re going to become a ripe field for communist infiltration.” [BBC]

Nixon even went to far as to encourage China to intervene on Pakistan’s behalf:

President Nixon then openly courted China to try to turn the tide of the war Pakistan’s way. With the Indian army and armed Bengali separatists winning, the US on 10 December 1971 urged Beijing to mobilise troops towards India, saying the US would back it if the Soviet Union became involved.
China declined and on 16 December the war ended with the Indian army and Bengali separatists taking Dhaka.
http://www.sepiamutiny.com/sepia/archives/001784.html

Muzungu
11-02-2009, 01:01 AM
http://i33.*******.com/244woeodotjpg

Here are some snippets of the discussion between Nixon and Kissinger, just after Indira Gandhi left:

Nixon: This is just the point when she is a *****.
Kissinger: Well, the Indians are ******** anyway. They are starting a war there. It’s—to them East Pakistan is no longer the issue. Now, I found it very interesting how she carried on to you yesterday about West Pakistan….

Kissinger: While she was a *****, we got what we wanted too. You very subtly—I mean, she will not be able to go home and say that the United States didn’t give her a warm reception and therefore, in despair, she’s got to go to war.

Nixon: We really slobbered over the old witch. [US State Department]

This wasn’t just about Indira Gandhi herself, they had a pretty low opinion of Indians in general:

Indians are “a slippery, treacherous people,” Nixon said.
“The Indians are ******** anyway,” Mr Kissinger replied. “They are the most aggressive goddamn people around.” [Guardian]

Nixon was also mad at his ambassador for ‘going native’ —

In a White House conversation with Mr Kissinger on 4 June, 1971, President Nixon berates his ambassador to India, Kenneth Keating, for wanting to, as Mr Kissinger puts it, “help India push the Pakistanis out”.
President Nixon says: “I don’t want him to come in with that kind of ******* thing with me… Keating, like every ambassador who goes over there, goes over there and gets sucked in.” [BBC]

US opposition to an independent Bangladesh was quite deep:

Mr Kissinger then says: “Those sons-of-*****es, who never have lifted a finger for us, why should we get involved in the morass of East Pakistan?
“If East Pakistan becomes independent, it is going to become a cesspool. It’s going be 100 million people, they have the lowest standard of living in Asia.”

President Nixon replies: “Yeah.”

Mr Kissinger: “They’re going to become a ripe field for communist infiltration.” [BBC]

Nixon even went to far as to encourage China to intervene on Pakistan’s behalf:

President Nixon then openly courted China to try to turn the tide of the war Pakistan’s way. With the Indian army and armed Bengali separatists winning, the US on 10 December 1971 urged Beijing to mobilise troops towards India, saying the US would back it if the Soviet Union became involved.
China declined and on 16 December the war ended with the Indian army and Bengali separatists taking Dhaka.
http://www.sepiamutiny.com/sepia/archives/001784.html

so how come NOW india becomes a favorite over chinese and pakistanis for Americans?

raavan
11-02-2009, 04:17 AM
so how come NOW india becomes a favorite over chinese and pakistanis for Americans?

Buisness .........

JBH22
11-02-2009, 04:31 AM
One more reason to beware of US they only have interest better continue our long friendship with Russia..

ante_climax
11-02-2009, 04:36 AM
For me it just shows the personal opinion of Nixon/Kissinger. Nixon has ****ed up big time anyway.

Indira Gandhi evokes mixed emotions in me an able leader but with terrible authoritarian tendencies. Even with all things considered I would say India was tainted for her being the Prime Minister.

ante_climax
11-02-2009, 04:49 AM
IAF's 48 sq completes 50 glorious years (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/IAFs-48-sq-completes-50-glorious-years/articleshow/5187656.cms)


CHANDIGARH: The city-based 48 squadron of the Indian Air Force, which flies Russian-built AN-32 medium lift tactical transport aircraft is
celebrating its golden jubilee for completing 50 commendable years.

The squadron has scripted several new chapters in the aviation sector by landing at various strategic locations at high altitudes and inaccessible places.

Famously called - Himalayan Lifeline or camel - the 48 squadron is familiar with each peak, valley, river, lake, and international borders with China and Pakistan.

The squadron was equipped with the Russian built AN-32 tactical transport aircraft for high altitude operations at Allahabad in 1985.

The following year, it moved to Chandigarh and since then, it has been the lifeline for all air maintenance activities in Jammu and Kashmir, para-dropping loads in the Siachen sector and landing at high altitude forward bases in Leh, Thoise, DBO, Fukche and Nyoma, in harsh conditions and inhospitable terrains, often beyond the aircraft maneuvering envelope.

The squadron was raised at Barrackpore, Srinagar, in 1959 and was initially equipped with six Dakotas, workhorse of the IAF at that time. During hostilities in 1962, the squadron operated in the Eastern Sector, airlifting troops and military hardware, besides evacuating civilians from forward locations.
In 1965, it was actively engaged in airlifting of troops and armament in both the western and eastern sectors and was also employed for the movement of fighter squadrons and their associated equipment to their operational locations.

During the 1971 Indo-Pak war, the camel squadron played a major role as they carried arms and ammunition to Agartala, evacuated displaced civilians and airlifted casualties.

The squadron aircraft led by the its commanding officer (CO) group captain SC Chafekar has undertaken several world records like landing at the highest advanced landing ground (short, high altitude, kutcha air*****) in the world at DBO at 16,200 feet, followed by trial landings at Fukche and Nyoma, both above 13,500 feet.

Driven by the motto - Sahasam Falati Sarvatraha, Shaurya Chakra awardee Gp Capt Chafekar told TOI, "We have achieved these feats because of the efforts put by our team."

The squadron was awarded the Presidents Colours in February 2007 for its contribution to the country.

The squadron has been involved in many military and civil operations - 1962, 1965, 1971, IPKF, CACTUS, Safed Sagar, Parakram, Bhuj and Tsunami relief etc. This is a great moment of pride for the squadron members.

ATV
11-02-2009, 11:46 AM
Army patents two varieties of camouflage


Jayanta Gupta, TNN 1 November 2009, 06:17am IST
KOLKATA: The army has finally patented its uniform. The Ordnance Factory, Avadi, in Chennai, has warned that legal steps would be taken against companies that continue to churn out clothing that resemble battle fatigues worn by soldiers.

For long, the army had been concerned about the use of camouflage clothing by civilians. Even militants in insurgency-hit areas use such clothing. This makes it difficult for troops to distinguish between the enemy and their comrades. Even Maoist leader Koteswar Rao alias Kishanji was seen wearing camouflage trousers on the night he released Atindranath Dutta, the abducted officer-in-charge of Sankrail police station.

"We have patented two varieties of camouflage. One is a jungle pattern in green and the other a desert pattern in brown. Both will have the logo of the Indian Army. Till now, we could do little against companies manufacturing such textile. Now, we can take legal action even if a product resembles our cloth in any way. Textile manufacturers, traders and even the general public have been asked to inform us of any misuse of the designs," a senior officer said.

In some parts of the country, like Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur and Assam, use of camouflage clothing by civilians is banned in principle. The use of jungle' shoes readily available across the counter at many stores is also discouraged. However, with no law to fall back on, the defence ministry could not take any legal steps against the offenders.

"In recent times, it has become fashionable among the youth to wear combat fatigues. It may be alright in peaceful locations, but there is immense confusion in insurgency-hit states. It is very difficult to distinguish between friend and foe during a crisis. The situation turns worse when there are civilians moving around in fatigues. In fact, we also strongly object to the use of combat fatigues by security agencies," the officer added.

But what about central paramilitary force units who use combat fatigues. Sources said the Ordnance Factory Board has already started selling the material to the ministry of home affairs.

"Some paramilitary units have even started using the material for their uniform. When the OFB can manufacture weapons and supplies for such organisations, why can't we supply uniforms. The uniforms may carry the Indian Army logo but this will not lead to problems. In fact, this will lead to solidarity," another officer said.

The officer added that action under the Copyright Act can also be taken against civilians continuing to wear camouflaged clothing. Such people may even be charged with wearing combat fatigues to confuse those actually entitled to wear them

SBL
11-02-2009, 11:52 AM
so how come NOW india becomes a favorite over chinese and pakistanis for Americans?
Because we recognize, as do the Indians, that neither wants to be playing second-fiddle to the Chinese.

ATV
11-02-2009, 12:02 PM
Indian Navy to procure five midget submarines


To strengthen its capabilities of carrying out special underwater operations, the Indian Navy is planning to procure five midget submarines for the Marine Commandos (MARCOS).Submarines weighing less than 150 tonnes are classified as midgets and are used by the Navies to carry out underwater covert operations and surveillance missions.

The Navy has already initiated the process of procuring these vessels and recently issued a Request for Proposal to Indian shipyards including Hindustan Shipyards Limited, ABG and Pipavav shipyards, Defence Ministry sources told.Initially, Navy is planning to get only five of these vessels but the inductions can be doubled later on.The induction of these midgets is part of the Navy's efforts to strengthen its operational capabilities after the 26/11 terror strikes in Mumbai last year, sources said.

ATV
11-02-2009, 12:34 PM
Asia bent on acquiring aircraft carriers

Font size:

New Delhi, India — Recent years have seen a flurry of orders for aircraft carriers by Japan, India, Australia, South Korea, Russia and China. The sudden focus on air capability at sea represents a paradigm change in the thinking of these states, and both communist and democratic governments appear to be on the same wavelength. Is this a harbinger of a new cold war in Asia?
Unresolved territorial disputes in East Asia, especially related to maritime boundaries, have resulted in the naval build-up by countries in the region. The discovery of oil and gas deposits in deep-sea locations around islands in the region has strengthened the importance of ownership claims.

The pursuit of aircraft carriers is also being fanned by recession-hit European economies largely funded by liberal government bailouts. Their high-tech exports have limited markets, but the rising economies of East and Southeast Asia have become prime candidates for military sales.

As the U.S. military withdraws from Iraq and perhaps Afghanistan, many think Asia could become the next flashpoint. Therefore Asian states are equipping their navies with the prime symbol of power – the aircraft carrier.

Equipping the Indian navy with aircraft carriers, as envisioned by former Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, has stood India in good stead. The country has been operating them for well over 40 years now, which has boosted its naval and air power both in times of war and peace.

For almost a decade India operated two aircraft carriers, since the commissioning of the INS Viraat in 1987, which enhanced its operational profile and service capabilities in the Indian Ocean. The INS Viraat has recently been refitted in India and should see active service till 2015, while the 45,000-ton INS Vikramaditya is being refitted in Severodvinsk, Russia and should commence trials in 2011.

The new Vikrant class aircraft carriers are the Indian Navy’s first to be fully designed and built in India by Cochin Shipyard. Work on the lead vessel commenced in 2008 and is scheduled for launch in 2010. All aircraft carriers are being fitted to support three types of aircraft: the Sea Harrier, MIG-29KUB, the naval version of the light combat aircraft LCA and the TEJAS twin-seater being manufactured at Hindustan Aeronautics in Bangalore.

Some countries view the rise of the Indian Navy as inimical to their military power and business interests in Asia. Old thought processes die hard, and so a vigorous, proactive maritime diplomacy must be pursued by the Indian government.

China’s strategy to acquire aircraft carriers was enunciated by Admiral Liu Huaqing, who studied under Admiral S.G. Gorshkov at the Naval War College in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). As with the Kremlin, the Chinese admiral had an uphill task to change the land-focused thinking of the Chinese Politburo. However, China’s recent naval review is a clear example of its “sea denial” strategy.

China is also pursuing an aircraft carrier acquisition strategy. Photographs have been taken of the unfinished Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag, purchased by China in 1998 and repainted in the colors of the PLA Navy, in a dockyard in the northeast port city of Dalian.

The Chinese story was that the ship would be used for a casino in the enclave of Macau. A chance meeting with the Macau delegation by the author indicated that they were from the PLA Navy. When asked for an opinion on the warship, I told them it would be very difficult to bring it up to its former Kuznetsov-class standards, but not impossible if money was available. The smiles of the officers said it all – finance is not a limitation for China. This indicates the seriousness with which China is pursuing its dream of an aircraft carrier.

Attempting to start aircraft carrier operations with a 60,000-ton hull is a leap into the unknown. It requires not only the acquisition of a mother ship, aircraft and helicopters, but the ability of 2,500 men and machines to operate at sea with clockwork precision and zero error, every day and in all weather conditions.

To work up the ship from its present refit state to combat status will take a minimum of 10 years. The learning curve will be very slow, difficult and full of hurdles to make the man and machine interface work smoothly. Intelligence reports indicate that China also plans to construct two new aircraft carriers in a shipyard in Shanghai. Apparently the ships will be similar to the Varyag, with nuclear propulsion.

Japan is building Hyuga-class helicopter destroyers, which are essentially 18,000-ton amphibious warfare ships that carry only helicopters. Japanese shipyards are more than capable of achieving the task, given their capability of operating aircraft carriers in the past.

Japan’s new government has recently stated that it will reexamine its past agreements with the U.S. military. The Japanese navy will have to scramble for additional units if the new dispensation is a “go it alone” strategy and the government asks the U.S. Navy to withdraw from its base in Okinawa.

The Australian government has also taken the bold decision to reacquire aircraft carriers and has placed orders for two Canberra-class ships. If hostilities develop in the Strait of Malacca and ships are rerouted into waters near northern Australia, protecting Australian waters will be imperative. Australia will need air power more than 500 miles from its coastline, and shore-based aircraft could not handle the task.

The Canberra-class ships, which are similar to India’s INS Viraat, are expected to be in service from 2014. They will be capable of operating 18 MRH-90 helicopters during hostilities. The navy’s biggest problem will be its ability to retain trained manpower. There are also reports of navy discussions on making Christmas Island an unsinkable aircraft carrier.

In 2007 South Korea commissioned an 18,600-ton “air warfare destroyer” equipped with the AEGIS system imported from the United States. This has amphibious capability and presently operates only helicopters. The South Korean Navy will reportedly acquire four of these Dokdo-class ships in the near future, primarily aimed at the North Korean navy.

Recently, this “interim aircraft carrier” has evoked a fair amount of interest from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. South Korea has very competent shipyards, and it is possible that after gaining valuable operating experience at sea, a larger variant may emerge in the decade beyond 2020.

Russia is the latest entrant to the aircraft carrier acquisition program, amid stirrings of national pride and a desire to reacquire old capabilities. Russia is reportedly purchasing a Mistral-class amphibious ship from France. It has been operating the aircraft carrier Kuznetsov for many years, and has deployed the ship and its fighter wing of SU-33 aircraft in European waters and the Mediterranean Sea. It also successfully tested the naval variant of the supersonic MIG-29 KUB from the Kuznetsov in 2009.

Media reports in Russia indicate that six new aircraft carriers are being sanctioned for operations in the Atlantic and Pacific seas by 2025. Russia could rebuild its naval power faster than anyone else in the Asia Pacific region, as it has its own manufacturing facilities, technology input and research and development facilities.

Modern nuclear-powered SSN submarines are based in Vladivostok to work in tandem with the aircraft carrier groups. The need to protect the oil- and gas-rich Siberian peninsula weighs heavily on the Russian government, as exports from this region to China and Europe are the mainstay of its economy.

The Pacific rim, from Vladivostok in the north to Australia in the south and across the Indian Ocean to the Suez Canal, is in the throes of economic rejuvenation. The two fastest growing economies, China and India, have generated massive commodity trade, virtually all seaborne. Maritime tourism is rising too, as large cruise liners from the West are porting in Singapore and Hong Kong, among other places.

Security issues are increasingly coming to the fore, as the forces of destabilization are also located in this region, unfortunately. Organic air power at sea, beyond littoral waters, can be effectively provided by aircraft carriers only. This requirement is a boon for the languishing shipyards of Europe, as Asia is presently bereft of crucial infrastructure and manufacturing skills.

The aircraft carrier programs of Asia Pacific countries will cost well over US$100 billion in this decade, while infrastructure to support the ships over the next 50 years will cost another US$100 billion. The acquisition of armaments, aircraft, helicopters and associated systems will cost more than US$100 billion in the next five decades.

Aircraft carriers for Asia are a perfect opportunity for the slumping economies of the West, as their military and industrial complexes are geared to supply them. This has made the industry in the West recession proof. Aircraft carriers seldom sail singly; the battle group in support costs a pretty sum too, as it consists of high-technology ships like cruisers, destroyers and frigates. These add-ons will transfer at least US$200 billion to Europe, Russia and the United States in the decade ahead.

ante_climax
11-02-2009, 02:50 PM
The officer added that action under the Copyright Act can also be taken against civilians continuing to wear camouflaged clothing. Such people may even be charged with wearing combat fatigues to confuse those actually entitled to wear them


I am very sure that legal action cannot be taken against civilians unless they are wearing Army badges/stars/insignia etc. Its akin to Nike and Reebok suing people wearing local copies of the same.

dredger14
11-02-2009, 09:14 PM
NEW DELHI: Indian defence companies will gain access to a potential $100 billion market over the next 10 years, following a new policy that

allows domestic firms to bid for large defence contracts, officials said on Friday.

India, one of the world's biggest arms importers, wants to increase the role of its private sector, which holds around 20 percent of the defence industry market but has the potential to grow significantly.

Under the new policy, the government will allow domestic companies to bid for key projects on their own.

Indian companies until the policy change were not invited by the government to bid for big government defence projects and were left to supplying locally made non-combative equipment for the defence forces.

With foreign countries reluctant to share advanced technology with India, the government wants to encourage private defence companies to enter the arms market, officials say.

"The field is now open for them to come and bid for any project along with the world's best. The government is giving them an opportunity to expand their capabilities," Sitanshu Kar, the defence ministry spokesman said.

Local companies are free to bid for projects involving tanks, artillery and aircrafts, Kar said.

"This move can also save costs and help us turn India into a major production hub in the near future," Kar said.

The new policy will provide more opportunities to Indian companies such as Tata Motors, Mahindra and Mahindra, Ashok Leyland and L****n and Toubro, defence experts and officials said.

"The current review is primarily focused on two essential areas of promoting and facilitating wide participation of defence industry and enabling transparency and integrity in all acquisitions," defence minister AK Antony said at a conference.

"Over the next five to six years, the total budgetary provision for capital acquisition is likely to reach $50 billion," Antony said. Defence and company officials say it will touch the $100 billion mark in 10 years.

India wants to upgrade its largely Soviet-era ****nal to counter potential threats from Pakistan and China. The government plans to spend more than $30 billion over the next five years to upgrade its defences.

Foreign defence companies have welcomed the government move.

"The government is very forward leaning and the steps we view as a sign of the government's confidence in the maturity of the Indian industry," Vivek Lall, India country head for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems said on Friday.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/5181231.cms

dredger14
11-02-2009, 09:16 PM
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091028/jsp/nation/story_11667839.jsp

New Delhi, Oct. 27: The Centre is set to come out with a new military goods purchase policy that is designed to end the monopoly of the government-run Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

The DRDO alone develops, patents, formulates and devises products for the army, navy and the air force.

Defence minister A.K. Antony said here today the latest defence procurement policy (DPP) to be issued on November 1 would allow tenders to be issued to Indian companies. These firms may then scout the world markets for joint ventures with multinational defence companies for transfer of technology and production.

This new proviso — being allowed in the DPP for the first time — is under a new category through which the government will procure military hardware. The category is called “Buy and Make (Indian)”.

“The move is primarily aimed at encouraging pro-active participation by the Indian industry, which could establish joint venture production arrangements with any foreign manufacturer,” the minister said.

The practice so far has been to issue requests for proposals (RFPs) to known international arms majors who would then seek to tie up with Indian companies if their offers were accepted under the offsets policy.

The offsets policy mandates that at least 30 per cent of the value of an order — of Rs 300 crore and above — from the armed forces should be re-invested in defence production or procurement by the vendor in India.

Indian defence purchases vary from year to year. The capital expenditure earmarked for purchases in the current budget for the army, navy and the air force is nearly Rs 50,000 crore.

Antony announced the policy amendment at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses. “This would help Indian industry to work out the technological requirements and build in-house capabilities in order to meet the future defence requirements. I am sure that the industry will respond positively to this proposal.”

Antony said the policy was being made more transparent. All requests for information (RFI) to companies will be put up on the defence ministry’s website. The ministry will also invite industry representatives to participate in meetings for defence acquisition planning.

In a separate meeting at the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik said the current defence procurement policy should be simplified.

ATV
11-03-2009, 01:42 AM
Bear kills two top Hizb militants in Kashmir



Encounters between militants and security forces are a common feature in Jammu and Kashmir, but this encounter, which resulted in death of two militant commanders, is perhaps the most “unusual”. In a first of the kind, two top Hizbul Mujahideen commanders have been killed in an encounter with wild bear in Shopian district of the South Kashmir.

According to the Srinagar based Defence spokesman, Col JS Brar, troops of the Shopian based 9 Rashtriya Rifles recovered two dead bodies from a cave hideout in Dandaloo Nar area of Shopian. On closer scrutiny, troops found that both of the dead men were armed with AK-47 rifles and rug sacks.

Col Brar added that “Both bodies were mauled badly by some wild animal, and apparently by a bear, as the area is inhabited by Himalayan Black bear.”

The cave that the militants were using as a hideout seems to have been the den of the wild animal. The animal might have returned to the cave and attacked the duo.

“The attack seems to have been so violent that both the militants got no chance to fire back at the wild animal” Col Brar added.

On body search of the belongings, troops recovered ID cards which identified the dead militants as Hizbul Mujahideen District commander, Siafullah and tehsil commander Kaiser. Both of the dead militants belonged to Pir Panjal Regiment of Hizbul Mujahideen and were active from more than 5 years in the area.

Saifullah, according to police had recently taken over as district commander after the death after the death of dreaded commander Sadaam in an encounter with security forces, in September, 2009.

Troops recovered two AK-47 rifles and other arms and ammunition from the hideout. And since the hideout is located deep in the forest area, troops are now trying to bring down the dead bodies of the militants from the forest area.

According to the statistics of the wildlife department, out of the 300 odd incidents of the man-animal conflict reported in J&K last year, 4 districts of south Kashmir - Shopian, Kulgam, Anantnag and Pulwama -reported the highest rate of incidents. But this is the first reported incident in which any militant has fallen to wild animals.




IMF sells 200 tonnes of gold to RBI



Washington: The International Monetary Fund said on Monday it sold 200 tonnes of gold to the Reserve Bank of India for $6.8 billion, quietly executing half of a long-planned bullion sale that had threatened to slow gold's rally.

While the IMF's plan to sell some of its gold holdings had been flagged for a year before it was formally approved in September, the speed of the deal and the buyer were a surprise for traders, who had expected China – not India – to be the leading contender as Beijing diversifies its vast reserves.

The sale, which an IMF official said was concluded at an average price of about $1,045 an ounce over a two-week period in the latter half of October, will relieve the market of some of uncertainty over how and when the fund would execute its plan to sell 403.3 tonnes of gold, about one-eighth of its total stock.

"This transaction is an important step toward achieving the objectives of the IMF's limited gold sales program, which are to help put the fund's finances on a sound long-term footing and enable us to step up much-needed concessional lending to the poorest countries," IMF Managing Director, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, said in a statement.

While the threat of IMF and central bank sales did not stop gold prices from soaring to a record high $1,070.40 last month, aided by a falling US dollar, traders said the IMF news could add to the market's upward momentum.

"The fact that they've sold the gold to India would suggest there's going to be fewer official sales by the IMF on the market. So that might be a positive theme for the gold price," said commodities strategist at Commonwealth Bank of Australia David Moore.

Gold rose about 0.4 per cent to $1,063 an ounce on Tuesday.

Although India is the world's biggest consumer of gold, primarily in the form of jewellery and investment among its billion-plus people, its central bank had given few indications of being a front-runner in the move to diversify into bullion.

India's foreign exchange reserves held at the central bank totalled $285.5 billion on October 23, of which gold comprised more than $10 billion. The latest purchase would appear to lift its share of gold holdings to an estimated 6 per cent or so, much less than most of the developed world but four times China's share.

No market disruption

A senior IMF official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told a conference call the gold sales were conducted daily over a two-week period from October 19-30, to "give some protection to short-term fluctuations in the market."

The official said India's central bank paid on average about $1,045 an ounce for the gold and the transaction would be paid in hard currency and not in IMF Special Drawing Rights, the IMF's internal unit of account.

The IMF official declined to say whether other central banks have expressed interest in buying the remaining 203.3 tonnes of gold on tap for sale.

He said if no other central banks came forward, the IMF would proceed as planned to sell the gold in the market, a move that traders say could put pressure on prices in a market where total global demand came to just under 4,000 tonnes last year.

He reiterated that the IMF would publicise its intentions before any open market sales to avoid market disruption.

The market's focus is now likely to shift to China, which has reportedly been in talks with the IMF about buying some of the fund's bullion as Beijing seeks to shift some of its more than $2 trillion in foreign exchange reserves away from the US dollar.

China, the world's biggest producer of gold, revealed earlier this year that it had quietly lifted its own government holdings of gold stocks to 1,054 tonnes from 400 tonnes when it last reported its holdings in 2003.

It is the first time since 2000 that the IMF has sold gold to a central bank. Between December 1999 and April 2000 in separate transactions, the IMF sold a total of 12.9 million ounces of gold to member countries Brazil and Mexico.

ATV
11-03-2009, 04:28 AM
Fatwa issued against 'Vande Mataram'


Jamait-e-Ulema Hind or the JEU on Tuesday issued a fatwa against singing national song 'Vande Mataram'. ( Watch Video

According to a resolution, Muslims should not sing 'Vande Mataram' as its reciting is against the Islam.

The resolution, which was passed at the Deoband national convention meet, says that Muslims should not sing 'Vande Mataram' as some verses of the patriotic song are against the tenets of Islam. The JEU leader said that the some of the line in the song is against Islam.

home minister P Chidambaram addressed a Jamait-e-Ulema Hind conference in Deoband today.

Meanwhile, the Muslim Law Board justified the decision .

Muzungu
11-03-2009, 04:58 AM
Fatwa issued against 'Vande Mataram'


Jamait-e-Ulema Hind or the JEU on Tuesday issued a fatwa against singing national song 'Vande Mataram'. ( Watch Video

According to a resolution, Muslims should not sing 'Vande Mataram' as its reciting is against the Islam.

The resolution, which was passed at the Deoband national convention meet, says that Muslims should not sing 'Vande Mataram' as some verses of the patriotic song are against the tenets of Islam. The JEU leader said that the some of the line in the song is against Islam.

home minister P Chidambaram addressed a Jamait-e-Ulema Hind conference in Deoband today.

Meanwhile, the Muslim Law Board justified the decision .

why dont these kinds of people just leave Bharat and go somewhere they can live peacefull?

they were given a choice in 1947, again in 1971...looks like they want more than that now!

Muzungu
11-03-2009, 04:59 AM
Army Chief Deepak Kapoor on Tuesday warned that 26/11-type Mumbai terror attacks were a possibility and that India has to take all steps to counter such strikes.

"We have to take all steps to prevent any Mumbai-type attacks. We cannot rule out apprehensions of such possibilities," Kapoor told reporters in New Delhi on the sidelines of an Army function.

To a question if there were any terror alerts in the recent times, he said the South Asian region is infested with terror groups. Be it India, Afghanistan or Pakistan, "we have to collectively battle such threats."
Noting that Pakistan too had come under terror attacks in recent times, he said both Defence Minister A K Antony and Home Minister P Chidambaram had asked us to be cautious against such threats.

To allegations from Pakistan Army that they have seized some Indian-made weapons from terrorists involved in recent attacks, the Army chief said India had no intention of causing trouble inside Pakistan and that it did not support any terror group in the region.

We want Pakistan to be stable and peaceful," he said.
On the naxal menace, Kapoor said the Army would continue to train paramilitary forces to fight against the naxals and it would be an ongoing process.

"The battle against Naxals will not be over in one day. To eradicate naxalism, it is going to take time. It is going to be a long drawn battle," he said, giving examples of counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir and the Northeast which had gone on for decades.

He said providing strategy and equipment to paramilitary forces in the fight against naxals would be a futuristic option.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Army-Chief-warns-of-26-11-type-terror-attacks/H1-Article1-472154.aspx

ante_climax
11-03-2009, 08:34 AM
Crash shadow on troops carrier (http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091103/jsp/nation/story_11692262.jsp)


New Delhi, Nov. 2: Indian Air Force headquarters was today thinking of grounding its Ilyushin 76 fleet and has asked the manufacturers for advice after Russia ordered the heavy transport planes back to hangars following a crash.

The IAF operates two squadrons of the aircraft (17) in its transport fleet that ferries troops from difficult terrain — Kashmir and the Northeast — almost daily, and was also used last month to move paramilitary forces for counter-Maoist operations in Maharashtra.

Grounding the aircraft will severely impact the air force’s daily maintenance operations. Hundreds of Indian Army soldiers are dependent on courier services run by the IAF on its IL-76 aircraft.

Variants of the aircraft are also the basic platforms for surveillance missions by the Aviation Research Centre — an intelligence agency — and are also operated as mid-air refuellers and for India’s only airborne early warning and command system.

IAF authorities told The Telegraph the transport directorate at air headquarters was in touch with the two makers of the aircraft — Ilyushin Aviation Complex Joint Stock Company, Moscow, and Tashkent Aircraft Production Corporation in Uzbekistan.

“We are waiting for communication from the companies. We are checking out what has happened,” an IAF source said.

Sources in air headquarters said the authorities were worried after the Russian Air Force reported two IL-76 mishaps in less than a month.

On October 7, one of the four huge D30KP turbofan engines of an IL-76 fell off as it was preparing to take off. There was no casualty. The Russian Air Force had grounded the IL-76 after that incident but the IAF did not.

But on Sunday, another IL-76 doing duty for the Russian interior ministry crashed in Siberia, killing all 11 crew and passengers (troops) on board.

News reports from Russia said the aircraft failed to gain height though it was being powered on full throttle.

ante_climax
11-03-2009, 08:36 AM
India strengthens military in Persian Gulf (http://www.upiasia.com/Security/2009/11/03/india_strengthens_military_in_persian_gulf/5811/)


Kolkata, India — Indian strategic planners often talk about the country’s area of privileged interests extending from the Persian Gulf to the Strait of Malacca. The Persian Gulf in particular is of crucial importance. India sources most of its oil from the potentially unstable region, and so has been raising its military profile there.

After successful anti-pirate patrols in the Horn of Africa by the Indian Navy, it was the turn of the Indian Air Force to mark its military reach in the region. In September 2008, India conducted its first joint air force exercise with the United Arab Emirates at the Al Dhafra base in Abu Dhabi.

This year it conducted a similar joint exercise with Oman from Oct. 22-29, codenamed Eastern Bridge, at the Royal Air Force of Oman base at Thumrait. The IAF fielded six single-seat Darin-I Jaguars alongside Omani Jaguars and F-16s. It also flew two IL-78 MKI air-to-air refueler aircraft for fuelling the Jaguars en route to Oman.

The exercise, though ostensibly conceived to increase interoperability between the RAFO and the IAF, also served to underline the strategic reach of the Indian Air Force.

India and Oman are the last remaining operators of the Jaguar strike aircraft, so it was felt in both quarters that cooperation between the two air forces would allow high serviceability rates. RAFO fighter pilots in any case have been training at the IAF’s Jaguar simulator training center in Gorakhpur in India’s Uttar Pradesh state for some time now.

Cooperation is the buzzword for India’s engagement in the Gulf region, and it has painstakingly convinced the Gulf countries that its intentions in their region extend only to its legitimate economic interests and preventing acts of terrorism against its soil. This diplomacy seems to have worked, as countries like Oman now view India as a force for enhancing stability in the region.

Oman, after all, also hosts over 550,000 Indian nationals in its territory and has received major investment in the vicinity of the Thumrait airbase from Indian majors such as L****n and Toubro, India's largest engineering and construction conglomerate, and Punj Llyod, which provides integrated design, engineering, procurement, construction and project management services in the energy and infrastructure sectors.

The Indo-Omani strategic undertaking is guided by a defense agreement signed by the two countries in 2006, which incidentally was the first of its kind signed by India with a Middle Eastern country. The agreement serves as a model for Indian defense engagement in the Persian Gulf region. As part of the agreement, Oman offered berthing facilities to Indian Navy warships patrolling the piracy-hit waters off the coast of Somalia.

Oman has also been seeking help from the Indian armed forces to set up credible supply systems for its military equipment. However, it must be said that much more progress needs to be made on this front.

Oman features on the IAF’s list of top-priority countries for defense cooperation. RAFO airbases such as Thumrait serve as refueling and maintenance points for transiting IAF aircraft. Apart from making its presence felt in the region, the IAF is also familiarizing itself with the terrain.

As the IAF vice chief, Air Marshal P.K. Barbora, told reporters a week prior to the Indo-Omani exercise, “The bilateral exercise would also be cost-effective in terms of benefit realization of operational and tactical preparedness over an unknown mixed terrain of land and desert."

Indeed, the exercise may also serve as a pathfinder to the IAF joining the Indian Navy in the anti-pirate fight. Specifically, "The IAF may be called upon to conduct aerial surveillance of the swathe of the Gulf of Aden region, where pirates are widening their area of operations fast," said Barbora.

However, the IAF is at pains to make it clear that it is not about to embark on an offensive against pirates but will essentially assist the navy to overcome speed and manpower constraints in their operations against the pirates, if called upon to do so.

It seems the IAF is keen to tell the navy that the anti-piracy fight will continue to be the navy’s show, while it will only play a supplementary role. The IAF and the Indian Navy have had tiffs in the past over the exercise of air power in the naval domain.

Almost a decade ago the navy was enraged when air headquarters proposed the induction of more land-based long-range Sukhoi flanker aircraft, backed by air-to-air refueling, as an alternative to building aircraft carriers for the purpose of providing air cover at sea.

However, at this juncture the navy will in all probability welcome the IAFs involvement, since both are undergoing development. India’s third carrier force is now 50 years old and has just undergone its fourth mid-service refit.

In any case it is absolutely important that the IAF and the navy remain committed to the mantra of “jointness” – a euphemism in the Indian military for joint operations by various wings of the Indian armed forces – if India is to become a significant player in the foreign arena in its declared zone of privileged interests.

ante_climax
11-03-2009, 08:42 AM
Viraat to be back in action in a week (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Viraat-to-be-back-in-action-in-a-week/articleshow/5184876.cms)


NEW DELHI: The ‘mother’ will be back in action soon. With power projection being the name of the game, India is
finally ready to once again
deploy its solitary aircraft carrier INS Viraat on the high seas after an almost two-year gap.

INS Viraat is now on the verge of completing its ‘sea-acceptance trials’ and ‘work-up phase’ off Mumbai after an 18-month-long comprehensive refit in Mumbai and Kochi to increase its longevity as well as upgrade its weapon and sensor packages.

Coincidentally enough, the 28,000-tonne old warhorse will also be completing its 50th year as an operational warship this November. Originally commissioned in the British Royal Navy as HMS Hermes in November 1959, it was inducted into the Indian Navy in May 1987.

‘‘Even British officers, who have served on her, are stunned we have managed to prolong its operational life so much. After this refit, it will serve us for at least five years more. It should be ‘full-ops’ in a week or so,’’ said a senior officer.

While Navy is justifiably proud of getting INS Viraat back in action, it’s a telling comment on the Indian defence establishment’s utter lack of long-term strategic planning to build military capabilities in tune with the country’s geopolitical objectives. An aircraft carrier prowling on the high seas, with its accompanying fighter jets tearing into the skies from the mobile air*****, after all, projects power like nothing else.

US, on its part, has 11 carrier strike groups deployed across the globe to rule the seas. China, in turn, is actively scrambling to get carriers of its own in keeping with its big superpower aspirations. Successive Indian governments, however, been quite apathetic to Navy’s quest to have three aircraft carriers — one each for the eastern and western seaboards, while the third undergoes repairs — to protect the country’s ‘primary area of geopolitical interest’ stretching from Hormuz Strait to Malacca Strait.

The long-delayed 40,000-tonne indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC) being built at Cochin Shipyard, for one, will be ready only by 2015. For another, India will get the refurbished 44,570-tonne Admiral Gorshkov, undergoing a refit at the Sevmash Shipyard in North Russia, only by early-2013 now. India and Russia, of course, are still bitterly negotiating Gorshkov’s final refit cost, with the price likely to settle upwards of $ 2.5-billion. There is another big worry for Navy. INS Viraat may be all set to resume duties but it’s left with only 11 Sea Harrier jump-jets to operate from its deck.

From 1983 onwards, Navy had inducted 30 of the British-origin Sea Harriers, which take off from the angled ski-jump on INS Viraat and land vertically on its deck, but has lost over half of them in accidents. Be that as it may, the 13-storey high INS Viraat will soldier on — with its motto of Jalamev Yasya, Balamev Tasya (he who controls the sea is all powerful) — for the foreseeable future.

ATV
11-03-2009, 09:32 AM
U S 7th Fleet heading for East Pakistan?
Gunboat Diplomacy by Nixon.

Dec 10 NEW DELHI: A signal intercepted in New Delhi at around 1730 Hours indicated that the United States would be sending ships to evacuate West Pakistani Military personnel from East Pakistan. craft on the ground. If true, then this signfies an open intervention by the United States Government in the Sub continental war. Top Officials in New Delhi have said that they have not expected the United states to show its "tilt" in Pakistani favour so brazenly.

If the reports are true then the likely ships that would be coming to the Bay of Bengal would be the US Seventh Fleet, now in the Gulf of Tonkin. The 7th Fleet has in its strenght the massive Nuclear Powered Aircraft Carrier, the USS Enterprise. Described as the world's largest warship, it was launched in 1961 and has a gross weight of 75,000 tons and carries an aircraft fleet of more than 70 modern fighting aircraft.

Compare this with our own INS Vikrant which is less than 20,000 tons in displacement and has less than 20 Obsolete aircraft which are no match for the F-4 Phantomjets that the USS Enterprise carries.

Also part of the US Fleet is the Amphibous Assault ship, USS Tripoli,

The USS Enterprise , the massive Aircraft Carrier of the US 7th fleet is believed to be heading to the Bay of Bengal.

The Guided Missile cruiser , USS King and the Guided Missile Destroyers, USS Decatur, Parsons and Tartar Sam. The USS Tripoli is a large Amphibous Assuault ship of more than 17000 Tons , and carries 24 Medium sized, 4 Heavy lift and 4 Observation Helicopters.

It is not known to what extent the US would take this limited intervention if it turns out to be true that the Seventh fleet is coming into the Bay of Bengal.

When asked if the Eastern Fleet of INS Vikrant would take on the 7th Fleet, the FOC in C , Vice Admiral Krishnan said "Bas, Hukum dena" (All the government needs to do is give the order), signfying the ever readiness of Indian Armed forces to take on any external enemy.

The IAF too is reported to be on alert on any possible intervention of the aircraft from the Enterprise in trying to evacuate or help the Pakistani Ground Troops

raavan
11-03-2009, 10:11 AM
U S 7th Fleet heading for East Pakistan?
Gunboat Diplomacy by Nixon.


When asked if the Eastern Fleet of INS Vikrant would take on the 7th Fleet, the FOC in C , Vice Admiral Krishnan said "Bas, Hukum dena" (All the government needs to do is give the order), signfying the ever readiness of Indian Armed forces to take on any external enemy.


Wonderful statement..............wootwoot

dredger14
11-03-2009, 10:23 AM
Wonderful statement..............wootwoot

Not really, they were going to fly bomb laden Sea Hawks(subsonic ground attack a/c) into the Bridge and Flight deck of the USS Enterprise.

A desperate suicide mission.. No one expected to survive if that failed and the Americans retaliated.
Thank god for the Russians and their alliance.

ATV
11-03-2009, 10:24 AM
Interesting Read


The Role of BSF in Bangladesh Liberation War (http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/LAND-FORCES/Army/History/1971War/PDF/1971Appendix.pdf)



The Mukti Bahini Comes of Age
(http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/LAND-FORCES/Army/History/1971War/PDF/1971Chapter05.pdf)


Pakistan Choose War : Op in J&K (http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/LAND-FORCES/Army/History/1971War/PDF/1971Chapter08.pdf)


Descent Into Danger - The Jaffna University Helidrop (http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/History/1987IPKF/Chapter3.html)



National Security Guards – Past, Present and Future
(http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/MONITOR/ISSUE5-5/Kasturi.html)



India-Pakistan A Shifting In The Military Calculus? (http://docs.google.com/gview?a=v&q=cache:2a6CMtTNktoJ:se2.isn.ch/serviceengine/Files/RESSpecNet/29146/ichaptersection_singledocument/602E80F7-06D6-439C-A56D-D1C15FA021D4/en/India_Pakistan_Shift_Military.pdf+Indian+Special+Forces:+Reorganising+for+an+Expanding+Role&hl=en&gl=in&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESg1sfAdEUR4FBLQsbhSq8DXdghe2jCCrWLEHW7vTPMDJMtZQqPB05WJsR5EaBcGno7XrG-y2gsg-jnQwXyzY3Cezpzg7rggvoSiaVLTAYzlY8lwuf5UdB3MxkEB9Gu_c4U0rz6k&sig=AFQjCNHUR5xCM2kvLNg56hwWA1vQF5Xkkg)



The Defense Intelligence Agency
(http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/MONITOR/ISSUE4-5/bellary.html)

raavan
11-03-2009, 10:28 AM
Not really, they were going to fly bomb laden Sea Hawks(subsonic ground attack a/c) into the Bridge and Flight deck of the USS Enterprise.

A desperate suicide mission.. No one expected to survive if that failed and the Americans retaliated.
Thank god for the Russians and their alliance.

Well i know they planned kamakazee type attack.But still it shows how tough our administration was then.

JBH22
11-03-2009, 10:44 AM
one of main reason i don't like the growing interest of USA in India.

raavan
11-03-2009, 10:47 AM
one of main reason i don't like the growing interest of USA in India.

I just want to see what kind of stringents are attached to Javelline missiles.Will they allow us to use those against pakistanis.

JBH22
11-03-2009, 10:50 AM
I just want to see what kind of stringents are attached to Javelline missiles.Will they allow us to use those against pakistanis.

IMO it'll be a costly decision to buy a Javelin $100000 each tough for India isn't it?
the Russians do not have its equivalent to offer.

raavan
11-03-2009, 11:00 AM
IMO it'll be a costly decision to buy a Javelin $100000 each tough for India isn't it?
the Russians do not have its equivalent to offer.

Well its very best weapon.It will be a great asset for special forces operating behind enemy lines.If ever hostilites break out between pakistan and India.If We are the one to attack first then i will bet USA will never allow us to use those weapons.

dredger14
11-03-2009, 11:20 AM
Up against rapidly modernizing Chinese military infrastructure along its northern border, India has decided to completely revamp its border posts at heights above 14,000-15,000 feet, using know-how from Scandinavian countries.The aim is to improve the conditions in which soldiers live in these high altitudes. The decision was taken after a military survey revealed that poor living conditions were adversely impacting the morale and combat preparedness of soldiers manning these posts.

The survey itself was prompted by former Foreign Secretary Shyam Saran’s report on improving infrastructure along the China border, in which he contrasted the sad state of affairs on the Indian side with that on the Chinese side.

The Defence Ministry has sanctioned Rs 250 crore for a pilot project to revamp 20 posts by next year. Six of these are in the eastern sector; the rest along the northern and middle sectors. Some posts on the Indo-Pak Line of Control have also been chosen for revamp, sources said.

The second phase of the project will be put before the Cabinet Committee on Security for approval soon. The Ministry plans to upgrade all posts by 2014, at a cost of Rs 3,000 crore.

The revamped posts, designed for a platoon strength of about 40 soldiers, will have a captive power supply facility, central heating, and a sewage and waste disposal mechanism. They will have kitchens and round-the-clock water supply, which will be a vast improvement over the current situation.

The Army survey showed that most soldiers manning these posts were underweight, and lacking in motivation as a result of their poor living conditions. “Compared to the Chinese side, which has state-of-the-art facilities in its posts, the Indian soldiers were demotivated because of the primitive conditions in which they were living at such high altitudes,” said a top official involved with the process.

Following Saran’s observations, Defence Minister AK Antony formed a committee under the Defence Secretary to study the issue, which in turn created a group under the Vice-Chief of Army Staff to carry out a detailed survey. The committee continues to monitor the implementation of this project.

The survey also pointed out that no significant technological upgradation had been attempted at these posts for many years now. The group concluded that this was largely responsible for the poorer-than-expected combat-worthiness of troops at high altitude posts.

This set alarm bells ringing and senior officials from the Corps of Engineers were sent to Norway to examine how posts were set up and manned in the Arctic region. The team returned with technical suggestions that are now being adopted. Equipment, where needed, is being imported.
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/moralelifting-revamp-of-posts-on-china-border/536130/0

ATV
11-03-2009, 02:00 PM
IMO it'll be a costly decision to buy a Javelin $100000 each tough for India isn't it?
the Russians do not have its equivalent to offer.

I think India will buy only100-200 such system
because India has already placed a order for 4100 Milan-2T . There are Total no of 30,000 + Millan AGTM in India.
Milan cost abt $30,000 (27kg ) while Jevelin (22-23kg with launcher) is abt $100,000 each missile although Jevelin is much more advance than Milan .

dredger14
11-03-2009, 04:25 PM
The first T-90 tank to be overhauled in India was flagged off last week in Delhi.
Two T-90 tanks were subjected to extensive accelerated user *** reliability trials by the Army and fed to 505 Army Base Workshop for overhaul in 2009. A team of three officers and 26 technicians trained in India and abroad completed the overhaul of the first tank in 214 days demonstrating the capability to undertake the complex task within the country. The overhaul carried out at a cost of Rs 4 Crores gives a life extension of about 15 years to the tank and saves the exchequer Rs 14 Crore.

Induction into the Indian Army started in Feb 2002 with 310 tanks in the first phase. Over the time the T-90 tanks will replace the 2400 odd T-72 tanks which currently form the mainstay of the armoured formations .

dredger14
11-03-2009, 04:50 PM
HYDERABAD: Mahindra Satyam on Tuesday said that it won an IT outsourcing contract from Swedish defence and aerospace firm, Saab, to develop its operations for the global defence and security market in India in a deal valued at around $300 million.

The contract, which spread over a period of five years encompasses engineering services and technology maintenance, will enable both the companies jointly address the Battlefield Management System (BMS) for the Indian Army, according to a release.

Mahindra Satyam said that it has already initiated the setting up of a centre of excellence for network centric warfare (CoE – NCW) which will offer comprehensive skills and a repository of tools, systems, middleware, integration platforms and system showcases in the field of NCW.

The company through the CoE hopes to tap the high potential market for nationwide security, for which the Indian government has large investment plans. “This relationship will jumpstart our foray in mission critical areas of defense. Our commitment in the domestic market will be reaffirmed by this collaboration and also set the stage to enter uncharted territories in the global arena,” said C P Gurnani, CEO, Mahindra Satyam.

The centre, which will be accessible to both the partners, is for mission critical applications and Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence solutions for global opportunities. The capabilities of the centre will also span areas of homeland security to provide end to end security solutions.

“We view this relationship with Mahindra Satyam as a strategic meeting of two highly skilled teams believing in technical and engineering excellence,” said Åke Svensson, President and CEO for Saab.
Mahindra Satyam, which counts Citigroup, GE, GlaxoSmithKline, Cisco Systems Inc and Nissan among its top five clients, has over 430 clients now. Over the last four months, the company, erstwhile Satyam Computers gained over 32 new customers including some large clients.

Satyam was acquired by Pune based IT services firm Tech Mahindra in April, after the firm’s defamed founder B Ramalinga Raju confessed to perpetrating India’s biggest corporate fraud. Customer confidence took a knock after Raju’s confession.

The company is attempting to regain contracts and enter into new strategic alliances to turn-around, even as its accounts are in the process of being re-stated.

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?p=4530297#post4530297

ante_climax
11-03-2009, 09:03 PM
'Security breach' minutes before Manmohan Singh's plane lands (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/Security-breach-minutes-before-Manmohan-Singhs-plane-lands/articleshow/5194326.cms)


CHANDIGARH: Despite best efforts of all agencies, the security for PM Manmohan Singh’s visit was ‘breached’ barely minutes before his plane was
to land at Chandigarh airport on Tuesday, leaving the line of dignitaries and top brass of security organisations with their heart in their mouth.

As they watched in horror, the four-legged threat bounded uncaring across the tarmac, near the dispersal area where the PM’s plane was to land. Though the ground crew swung into action, the animal was too swift for them. Fortunately for everybody, it scampered away without causing any damage.

Shrugging off any responsibility, an airport official said the Indian Air Force (IAF) was responsible for the security arrangements at the airport. No IAF official was, however, available for comments.

According to a retired defence officer, in case of such a happening, the air traffic controller warns his crew, who are supposed to shoo off the animal or even shoot it if required. And if the animal is right in the aircraft’s path, he is supposed to tell the pilot to not land.

This is also not the first instance of an animal streaking across the runway after crossing the airfield perimeter fence, with sambars and blue bulls being spotted several times in the past.

Such instances also don’t just occur in India. In February, Miami international airport?s security were involved in an hour-long pursuit on thetarmac of a German shepherd-chow mix, that entered the restricted area through a gate.

The canine jogged through a cargo area and under a jumbo jet, with at least one inbound 747 aircraft preparing to land amid the cat and mouse chase

What's the point posting Old News (Like the 1971 War ?) We May start an Indian Defence History thread for the purpose. :)

ATV
11-03-2009, 11:59 PM
'Security breach' minutes before Manmohan Singh's plane lands (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/Security-breach-minutes-before-Manmohan-Singhs-plane-lands/articleshow/5194326.cms)



What's the point posting Old News (Like the 1971 War ?) We May start an Indian Defence History thread for the purpose. :)

bad idea. i am sick of new threads ofcourse i am a Lazy person p-).

anyways

Mahindra Satyam bags Saab deal


HYDERABAD: Mahindra Satyam on Tuesday said that it won an IT outsourcing contract from Swedish defence and aerospace firm, Saab, to develop its

operations for the global defence and security market in India in a deal valued at around $300 million.


The contract, which spread over a period of five years encompasses engineering services and technology maintenance, will enable both the companies jointly address the Battlefield Management System (BMS) for the Indian Army, according to a release.


Mahindra Satyam said that it has already initiated the setting up of a centre of excellence for network centric warfare (CoE – NCW) which will offer comprehensive skills and a repository of tools, systems, middleware, integration platforms and system showcases in the field of NCW.


The company through the CoE hopes to tap the high potential market for nationwide security, for which the Indian government has large investment plans. “This relationship will jumpstart our foray in mission critical areas of defense. Our commitment in the domestic market will be reaffirmed by this collaboration and also set the stage to enter uncharted territories in the global arena,” said C P Gurnani, CEO, Mahindra Satyam.


The centre, which will be accessible to both the partners, is for mission critical applications and Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence solutions for global opportunities. The capabilities of the centre will also span areas of homeland security to provide end to end security solutions.


“We view this relationship with Mahindra Satyam as a strategic meeting of two highly skilled teams believing in technical and engineering excellence,” said Åke Svensson, President and CEO for Saab.

Mahindra Satyam, which counts Citigroup, GE, GlaxoSmithKline, Cisco Systems Inc and Nissan among its top five clients, has over 430 clients now. Over the last four months, the company, erstwhile Satyam Computers gained over 32 new customers including some large clients.


Satyam was acquired by Pune based IT services firm Tech Mahindra in April, after the firm’s defamed founder B Ramalinga Raju confessed to perpetrating India’s biggest corporate fraud. Customer confidence took a knock after Raju’s confession.


The company is attempting to regain contracts and enter into new strategic alliances to turn-around, even as its accounts are in the process of being re-stated.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/5194481.cms?prtpage=1

ATV
11-04-2009, 12:15 AM
Yoga, curry and a taste of India for US soldiers
BY :IANS
Up with the sun to sit cross-legged, finishing the day with curry and naan, the 250-odd US soldiers in India for a fortnight-long
joint exercise got more than what they expected — but they weren’t complaining.
Apart from the mechanized exercise, the men from 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division of the US Army, took off their running shoes and traded their standard physical training for yoga.
They rose with the sun, sat on a mat in the grass, cross-legged, eyes closed, fist closed and controlling their breathing. A qualified instructor was deputed from the Indian side to teach them yoga.
“It was a different experience for them. Besides swapping soldiers, sharing equipment and trading war stories we also gave a taste of Indian culture. The US troops were given yoga classes twice or thrice a week,” said a senior Indian Army official.
And at mealtimes, the hamburgers and fries were swapped for curry and naan.
US Army first Lt. Joseph Lewandowski, the squadron’s information operations officer, said: “Some troops were hesitant at first to try the food. Some even opted for field rations rather than give the spicy food a try. Two chow halls were setup, one offering American food and the other offering Indian cuisine. Eventually, most US soldiers tried the Indian specialties, and liked them.”
The US troops also celebrated Diwali with their Indian counterparts.
“The troops were treated to special dinners and dancing. They participated in the local Diwali celebration, the Hindu festival of lights. By the end of the training, troops were trading e-mails, and becoming friends on Facebook,” the US Army’s official website said after the conclusion of the exercise.
The first joint exercise of Indian and US mechanised forces was conducted recently at the Indian Army’s training range at Babina, near Jhansi, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.
The US Army website said: “The (US) soldiers were deployed here to train with the Indian army’s 7th Mechanised Infantry Battalion. The two armies soldiered side by side, firing weapons and trading equipment. But perhaps the most valuable lessons learned were not those on the battlefield.”
The Indian Army familiarized itself with the US Army’s Stryker combat vehicles which boast of an integrated computer network system. The US Army’s deployment of 17 Stryker armored vehicles was the largest number deployed outside Iraq and Afghanistan by the US.

ATV
11-04-2009, 12:16 AM
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Kunal Biswas
11-04-2009, 06:14 AM
Well i know they planned kamakazee type attack.But still it shows how tough our administration was then.

During 1971 India did have styx anti ship missiles !!

dredger14
11-04-2009, 11:27 PM
Every year, on October 30, scientists, engineers and other officials from the Department of Atomic Energy gather near the Central Complex Building, Trombay to celebrate the Founder’s Day. Being the Birth Centenary year of Dr. Homi Bhabha, this year’s celebration was unique. The stock taking of the research and development activities at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) covered compact reactor for Arihant (the nuclear submarine), improved gas centrifuges for uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication for fast reactors and work on innovative reactors among other areas in the cutting edge of technologies.

BARC designed, developed and built the steam generating unit of Arihant by facing many technical challenges

“The compact Pressurized Water Reactor was designed for this purpose with several features; such as very quick response for power ramping, extremely stable undership motions and resistance against exposure to very high acceleration resulting from eventual depth charges”, Dr Sukumar Banerjee, Director, BARC said in his Founder’s Day Address

“Since the nuclear reactor is fuelled with high fissile containing fuel, it can supply energy in the submerged condition for an extended period without refuelling”, he clarified. Details about the reactor are classified.

Generally, Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) power nuclear submarines. A PWR has a core of highly enriched uranium. When uranium nuclei undergo fission, the fission fragments carry enormous energy. They dissipate the energy in the core which gets heated up. The high pressure primary system with water as coolant removes the heat from the core continuously.

Water at high temperature enters the steam generators. In the steam generators, the heat from the water in the primary system is transferred to the secondary system to create steam. In the secondary system, the steam flows from the steam generators to drive the turbine generators, which supply the ship with electricity, and to the main propulsion turbines, which drive the propeller. After passing through the turbines, the steam condenses into water which is fed back to the steam generators by the feed pumps.

Naval reactors pitch and roll. Demands of power change rapidly. The manufacturing and quality assurance of reactor components must be of exceptionally high standard.

The reactor internals remain inaccessible for inspection or replacement throughout the long life of their core. They must be rugged and resilient. Reactor components and systems must withstand, harsh and hostile environment, long term effects of radiation, corrosion, high temperature and pressure.

As the reactor operates radiation level increases. Appropriate shields are built around the reactors to ensure radiation safety. A reactor may use over 100 tons of lead as shielding.

“Many systems and equipment designed and built were first of its kind in the country. The entire steam generating plant has been designed to give highly reliable offshore operation in a completely isolated environment”, Dr Banerjee noted.

“Control and instrumentation design is fault tolerant and requires minimum operator interventions. An elaborate diagnostic system enables a very high availability factor. Many new materials and technologies have been developed and new infrastructure has been created for this project”, he revealed.

Prototype system
The development of the steam generating plant of Arihant was preceded by setting up of the land based prototype system at Kalpakkam. The reactor which has been working for the past three years has served as a technology demonstrator.

“The entire plant with primary, secondary, electrical and propulsion system along with its integrated control was packed in the aft end of a land based submarine hull designed and built specifically for the purpose.

This protoype is serving as a training centre for the crew for the nuclear submarine”, Dr Banerjee said. The crew gets training with the help of an indigenously designed and built full scope simulator.

K.S. PARTHASARATHY

Raja Ramanna fellow, Department of Atomic Energy
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2009/11/05/stories/2009110551721200.htm

ante_climax
11-05-2009, 12:24 PM
BAE Systems completes Indian hawk aircraft deliveries (http://www.yourdefencenews.com/bae+systems+completes+indian+hawk+aircraft+deliveries_41397.html)


After completing a flight development contract for the Indian Air Force (IAF), BAE Systems has delivered the 24th and final UK built Indian Hawk.

Following a 3,000 mile journey across Europe, Africa and the Middle East, the aircraft, flown by BAE Systems test pilots, arrived safely at Air Force Station Bidar to join the rest of the Hawk fleet in delivering fast jet training to the IAF.

The aircraft, HT001, which was actually the first IAF Hawk to be built, has, for nearly three years served as a flight test platform and proving ground for the integration of new systems and capabilities onto the IAF Hawk fleet .

As well as development and acceptance flights, HT001 was also a key component in the programme which saw Indian Air Force flying instructors training to teach student pilots on the Hawk. This programme took place prior to the delivery of Hawks to India allowing the Indian training programme to start at the earliest opportunity.

Michael Christie, Senior Vice President, India for BAE Systems Military Air Solutions, said: “Hawk has brought a step change in pilot training capabilities for the IAF and this aircraft, which was the first India Hawk to be built, has been a key part of developing further capabilities for the Indian Air Force.

“During its time here at BAE Systems, HT001 has proven to be extremely reliable, delivering excellent service from its time as a training platform for Indian Air Force instructors, through to the on-time and to budget completion of the recent flight development programme.

“The first Hawk was delivered to the IAF in November 2007 and other than this final development aircraft, deliveries were completed in 2008. Whilst this marks the completion of aircraft deliveries by BAE Systems to the Indian Air Force, we continue to provide support services to the IAF, and work closely with our industrial partners, HAL, in meeting the fast jet training needs of the Indian Air Force.”

In arriving at Air Force Station Bidar, the home of the Indian Hawk fleet, HT001 becomes the 860th Hawk delivered across the globe.

dredger14
11-05-2009, 10:21 PM
http://idrw.org/?p=1528#more-1528

In a significant step that will give the Indian armed forces an indigenously designed and developed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a technological demonstrator (TD) of the Rustom will take to the Hosur skies this month.
Official sources at the Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE), the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) laboratory that is spearheading the Rs.1,000-crore Medium-Altitude Long-Endurance (MALE) Rustom UAV programme, told The?Hindu that with the high speed taxi trials of the TD almost over, the inaugural flight “could happen anytime soon.” The taxi trials are being conducted at the air***** belonging to Taneja Aerospace at Hosur.
The Rustom, which will have capabilities equal to, or even better than contemporary UAVs such as the Israeli Heron (currently in use by the armed forces), is derived from the National Aerospace Laboratories’ Light Canard Research Aircraft (LCRA), an aircraft developed by a team under the leadership of late Professor Rustom B. Damania in the 1980s. The ADE have taken the LCRA airframe and structurally modified it for unmanned flights.
Officials said that the TD, which has the same configuration as that of a full-fledged Rustom UAV, but is smaller in size, will undertake around 10 flights — taxiing, taking off and landing like a conventional aeroplane, the only difference being that there will be no pilot aboard. But being smaller than the full-fledged production standard Rustom, the TD will have an endurance of only 12 to 15 hours, approximately half of what the Rustom is being designed for. The ADE are using the TD as a stepping stone to proving the technologies that will go into the Rustom. The initial flights of the TD are being restricted to an altitude of around 500 metres. All three defence services have shown interest in acquiring the Rustom.
The Rustom programme will also marks a first for the DRDO. Traditionally, the DRDO laboratories develop a product or system, build a prototype, prove it in field trials and then transfer the technology to a production agency.
In the case of the Rustom, the DRDO are moving to a regime of concurrent engineering practices where initial design efforts also take into consideration production issues, with the production agency participating in the development of the system right from the design stage, and concurrently developing the necessary infrastructure and expertise for the product and product support. This approach could become a trendsetter for future DRDO projects.
A DRDO technical evaluation committee is examining the proposals of Tatas, L****n and Toubro, Godrej and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited-Bharat Electronics Limited (joint bid), one of whom will join the ADE as the production agency *** development partner (PADP). A price negotiating committee, headed by Defence Minister A.K. Antony, is looking into the commercial aspects of the proposals.
Both the PADP and the users (armed forces) will have a financial stake in the Rustom project.

dredger14
11-05-2009, 10:24 PM
http://www.hindu.com/2009/11/06/stories/2009110660131000.htm

NEW DELHI: The Indo-French Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement, signed by the two countries in Paris on September 30, 2008, explicitly allows for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from French nuclear reactors under safeguards, and gives an assurance of lifetime supply of nuclear fuel for these reactors.

Significantly, the agreement does not explicitly bar the transfer of enrichment and reprocessing technologies, the so-called ENR technologies or Sensitive Nuclear Technologies. Transfer of these to India from the United States requires a special amendment to the India-U.S. Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement (the 123 Agreement) and congressional approval of the same.

French nuclear supplier Areva has been allotted the nuclear project site at Jaitapur in Maharashtra to initially build two power plants based on Areva’s EPR1600 light water reactors. The India-specific waiver of the nuclear transfer guidelines of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was issued on September 6, 2008.

These aspects of the Indo-French agreement have now become clear after the document became public subsequent to its approval by the French Senate (the upper chamber) on October 15, 2009. The agreement still needs the approval of the Parliament’s lower chamber, the National Assembly, for its final ratification. The Assembly, according to the French Embassy’s press information officer Allen Perier, took up the review of the Agreement on October 28. It is hoped that this should happen by the end of November and the agreement should enter into force by the end of the year.

Now that India has unconditional reprocessing rights from both Russia and France — except for requiring that reprocessing be done under the safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) — the U.S. would seem to be at a disadvantage vis-À-vis these two. Under Article 6 (iii) of the 123 Agreement, reprocessing rights over spent fuel from a U.S. facility may be granted only after “subsequent arrangements and procedures” are worked out. These are at present under negotiations between the two countries.

It is, therefore, not clear as yet if such rights would be granted at all and, even if granted, whether they would be unconditional. Moreover, the 123 Agreement requires a new reprocessing facility under IAEA safeguards to be built, which is not the case for the Russian or French grant of reprocessing rights.

Article V (3) of the Indo-French agreement says: “Reprocessing and any other alteration in form or content of nuclear material transferred pursuant to this Agreement and nuclear material used in or produced through the use of material, nuclear material, equipment or technology so transferred shall be carried out in a national nuclear facility under IAEA safeguards. Any special fissionable material that may be separated thereby may be stored and utilised in national facilities in the recipient country under IAEA safeguards.”

Article I (2) that describes the ambit of cooperation includes the following: “…Full civil nuclear cooperation activities covering nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel supply and other aspects as agreed between the parties; nuclear fuel and nuclear fuel cycle management including through the development strategic reserve of nuclear fuel to guard against any disruption of supply over the lifetime of India’s safeguarded nuclear reactors.

Article V (1) elaborates on this as follows: “The party supplying nuclear power plant shall facilitate reliable uninterrupted and continued access… nuclear fuel supplies, reactor systems and components for the lifetime of the supplied nuclear power plant. In respect of supply of nuclear fuel for the lifetime of India’s safeguarded reactors, long term contracts… will be established between respective designated entities of the parties.

Article V (2) further adds: “To further safeguard against any disruption of supply over the lifetime of India’s safeguarded reactors, France will support an Indian effort to develop a strategic reserve of nuclear fuel. This support includes France convening a group of friendly countries or joining such a group convened by others to pursue such measures as would restore fuel supply to India in the event of fuel supplies to India.”

As regards technology or equipment transferred, Article I (3) says without any qualification: “Cooperation under the Agreement may take the following forms: …Supply of material, nuclear material, equipment, technology, facilities and services including setting up of nuclear power projects.” The Article significantly also includes “Nuclear cooperation projects in third countries.”

However, the Agreement requires the establishment of a civil nuclear liability regime, as has been insisted upon by the U.S. as well. Article VIII (2) says: “The Parties agree that, for the purpose of compensating for damage caused by a nuclear incident involving nuclear material, equipment, facilities and technology [transferred under the Agreement], each Party shall create a civil nuclear liability regime based on established international principles.” It is known that a draft Indian bill for a civil nuclear liability law is ready and is under inter-ministerial discussions before it comes up before the Parliament for its enactment.

ATV
11-06-2009, 01:53 AM
Army wants 9 mm semi automatic pistols for elite units



New Delhi In a bid to provide more firepower to its special forces for anti-terrorist and counter insurgency roles, the Army is considering procuring 9 mm semi automatic pistols and new General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMG)."From the experiences during various operations in urban areas and close combat, we have realised that weapons with 9mm calibre bullets are capable of bringing down the terrorists instantly due to their impact. That is why we are planning to procure more advanced pistols for our special forces and other para units," Army sources said in the capital.
The new pistols, they said, will be equipped with night-fighting equipment such as laser illumination and high intensity flash lights.
"This equipment will help in increasing the night-fighting capabilities of our troops in situations such as the Mumbai terror strikes where terrorist were holding up inside the Taj and Oberoi hotels and firing and operating taking cover of the darkness," they said.
At the moment, the Army units have Beretta 9 mm pistols, which were procured more than a decade ago. The Army, sources said, would like to procure pistols similar to the Glock-17s, which are in service with the National Security Guards and were used during the Operation Black Tornado in Mumbai.
On the lookout for new GPMGs for the SF units, the sources said the need for inducting a greater number of these guns has been felt after the success of these weapons by the US and NATO forces against the Al Qaeda and Taliban in Iraq and Afghanistan in the recent times.
"We have seen that in counter insurgency and hard-hitting operations in open areas, these guns have delivered the results for the Americans and their allies in recent past. So, we would also want to induct these guns in larger numbers as we have quite a limited number of them with us," they said.
GPMGs also known as Medium Machine Guns, have 7.62 mm calibre rounds and have a longer range. "We are looking to procure GPMGs, with a range of over 1200 metres and which are light and can be carried by our troops even during free fall from parachutes," they said.
After the attacks in Mumbai last year, Army's special forces have also been assigned the role of acting as anti-terror units along with the National Security Guards and they have been procuring equipment and systems for carrying out 26/11 type operations.


Army's units such as 10 Para (SF) and 2 Para (SF) have been carrying out the role of anti-terror units in their respective areas of responsibility since then. These units are also involved in training other infantry units in the urban centres to create a network of anti-terror units across the country.Early this year, the Army also appointed a Major General rank officer as Additional Director General (SF) to hasten the procurements for these elite units and also to define their roles and operations in the future.

http://static.expressindia.com/expressindia/images/zerodotgif

ATV
11-06-2009, 02:02 AM
India on way to become global military power: Experts
Agencies Posted: Nov 05, 2009 at 0844 hrs
Washington Moving itself from an era of "non-aligned" to "poly-alignment" India has emerged as a regional military power and is inching towards becoming a global one, a US military think-tank has said.
The paper "India's Strategic Defence Transformation: Expanding Global Relationship" by Brian Hedrick of Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) of US Army Department of Defence, was released on Thursday, takes a global view of India's rise as a regional and future global military power.
"India's defence establishment is undergoing an unprecedented transformation as it modernises its military, seeks strategic partnerships with the United States and other nations, and expands its influence in the Indian Ocean and beyond," writes Douglas Lovelace, Director SSI.
"This transformation includes a shift from an emphasis on the former Soviet Union as the primary supplier of defence articles to a western base of supply and an increasing emphasis on bilateral exercises and training with many of the global powers," he said.
Military Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia at the State Department, Hedrick, who has served earlier in the US missions in India and Bangladesh, said that India's interests have changed over the past decade or more, taking it from a path of nonalignment and non-commitment to having specific strategic interests on a path of "poly-alignment".
"Since 2000, India has increased the number of countries with which it has defence-specific agreements from seven to 26 by the end of 2008.
Bilateral and multilateral exercises are also an increasing feature of India's expanding defence relations as it seeks to find new technologies to transform its military from Cold War era weapons to 21st century capabilities through such opportunities.
Through this new policy, one of the goals of New Delhi is to become a regional power across the Indian Ocean basin and secure agreements from partners in this region that support this goal, while building up expeditionary capabilities in its navy and air force, it says.
"At the same time, it continues to modernize its army to deal with potential threats from its immediate neighbours and internal insurgency groups, and to fulfil its goal of being a global leader in UN peacekeeping," the paper says.
India is also developing "strategic partnerships" with countries perceived as leaders of a global, multipolar order and seeking modern military capabilities from many of those countries.
This includes modern weapon systems as well as the technology and licensed production associated with those weapon systems, it said.
New Delhi wants to secure or maintain ties with smaller countries globally, many of which are members of the NAM, that can provide support in international fora as well as provide potential markets for its own emerging defence industry, said Hedrick, a graduate of the Indian Defense Services Staff College and the US Army Command and General Staff College.
Hedrick said many of the recent changes in India's global defence relationships represent a vast departure from past policy and practices.
Given that the Congress Party and its United Progressive Alliance coalition received a strong electoral mandate on its re-election in May 2009, these changes are likely to continue and perhaps will see bold moves to further develop and deepen strategic relationships around the world, he noted.
The report says there is new opportunity for tens of billions of US dollars in defence-related sales to India.
"Because many of the US defence technologies have important applications in domestic counterterrorism, these sales also expand opportunities well beyond the two defence establishments into law enforcement and border control issues," it said.
However, the report cautioned that as an extension of its NAM policy, India will continue to view its relationship with the United States through the lens of multilateralism, preference for a multipolar global power structure, and the impact on its bilateral relations with other countries.
"India will continue to forge new defence relationships around the world, increasingly with a view to exporting defence material from its own developing industry.
However, it will likely begin to shift its energy towards deepening many of the relationships it has established to date," it said.
Also India will increasingly assert itself as a regional power in the Indian Ocean.
"Occasionally India's interests may diverge with US (such as Indian support to Mauritius' claim to Diego Garcia105), creating potential irritants in the relationship," it said.
Further, India will likely emphasise balance in its defence relations, especially with the larger powers of the United States, Russia, the EU, UK, and Israel.
This balance will often be reflected in defence procurement decisions, as these are enduring symbols of the bilateral relationship.
"Most bilateral and multilateral military exercises will not be affected with considerations of balance, with the exception of larger, more visible exercises," it said.
http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/India-on-way-to-become-global-military-power--Experts/537585/




Indian tank fights doubts over performance





NEW DELHI, Nov. 5 (UPI) -- The Indian army will take at least 124 of the controversial Indian-made Arjun tanks by April, according to media reports.

But the army still doubts its performance as the country's proposed main battle tank to replace hundreds of Russian-made T-90 tanks.

W. Selvamurthy, head of research and development at the Defense Research and Development Organization, made the announcement, saying many of the tanks are already being manufactured and getting readied for delivery.

"All of them will get inducted into the armed forces in March and April," Selvamurthy said in a report in the Times of India newspaper. "Other organizations are also giving us orders."

He was speaking at the valedictory function of a training course at the Defense Institute of Advanced Technology at Girinagar, near the city of Pune.

The DRDO project manages the Arjun, which has been designed and is being made by Combat Vehicles Research and Development Establishment at Avadi, in the state of Tamil Nadu.

But the project has been 35 years in the making, and getting the first batch operational has been a battle in itself, lasting a decade, according to a report in the Hindustan Times newspaper last May.

Around 45 examples are already being used by the army, said the report. Yet the vehicle faces extensive comparative trials with the T-90s to see just how much the military can depend on it.

The Hindustan Times article said the Arjun was plagued with a number of major problems concerning its fire control system, suspension and poor mobility due to its excessive weight, coming in at just under 60 tons. The T-90s weigh in at around 45 tons.

Performance issues rose as early as 2000 prompting the army to begin ordering the T-90s instead of waiting for improvements to, and delivery of, Arjun tanks.

More than 390 T-90s were ordered in 2001, and last November another 347 were ordered. Also, as part of the deal, the Avadi Heavy Vehicles Factory in India has begun the licensed manufacture of another 1,000 T-90S tanks. The army is also upgrading nearly 700 T-72 tanks.

In July 2008 the army said it needs nearly 1,800 dependable tanks to replace the older Russian T-55 and T-72 tanks. This will be met through the progressive induction of 1,657 Russian-origin T-90S tanks and 124 Arjuns.

The Arjun measures just under 33 feet long and 12 feet wide. Armor is a Kanchan steel-composite sandwich development. A 1,400hp diesel engine gives it an operational range of 280 miles with a speed of 45 mph on roads and 25 mph cross-country.

The 120mm rifled main turret gun can fire the LAHAT anti-tank missile. Secondary armaments are a MAG 7.62mm Tk715 coaxial machine gun and an HCB 12.7mm AA machine gun.

Indian media reported in May 2008 that the tank was found to have low accuracy, frequent breakdown of power packs and problems with the gun barrel. Details of failures during trials were embarrassingly noted in question-and-answer times by ministers and elected representatives in the nation's parliament, the Lok Sabha.

The DRDO said it needs to have up to 300 rolling off the production line in order to see where all the performance issues lie. It wants the army to eventually take at least 500 tanks before any serious upgrades can be considered.

The Arjun tank is named after one of the main characters of the Indian epic poem the Mahabharata. The discussion of life and karma is the longest epic poem in the world, being roughly 10 times the length of the Iliad and Odyssey combined.

The Arjun news comes just after the end of a joint exercise by the Singapore armed Forces and the Indian army in Devlali, India. Soldiers from the 23rd and 24th Battalion, Singapore Artillery, and the Indian army's 283 Field Regiment took part.

The exercise, which included live firing of the SAF's FH-88 Howitzer guns and 155mm Battery guns from the Indian army, was the fifth in the Agni Warrior series. It began on Oct. 9 and ended Oct. 26.
http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2009/11/05/Indian-tank-fights-doubts-over-performance/UPI-40991257436800/

ante_climax
11-06-2009, 09:37 AM
India Seeks To Bolster Transport With 10 C-17s (http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4361097&c=ASI&s=AIR)


NEW DELHI - The Indian Defence Ministry is negotiating the purchase of C-17 heavy-lift Globemaster aircraft from the United States through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) route, say ministry sources.

The U.S. Air Force flew the Globemaster in a joint air exercise between the air forces of the two countries held in India Oct. 19-23 at Agra to let the Indian military familiarize itself with the transport craft, said a senior Indian Air Force official.

India is negotiating the purchase of 10 C-17 aircraft made by U.S.-based Boeing, disregarding the Russian IL-76 transport even though the American aircraft is three times costlier, Defence Ministry sources said. The C-17's advantages include its easier handling (compared with the IL-76) and ability to operate from short and rough air*****s, added the sources.

The $1.7 billion deal, likely to be finalized by early 2010, would be Boeing's second-largest deal with India since New Delhi signed a $2.1 billion agreement in January to purchase eight P-8 maritime patrol aircraft.

The Indian military needs to do three things: augment its ability to quickly lift larger numbers of troops as it views possible threats on its border with China; strengthen its presence on the Pakistani border; and fight terrorism and low-intensity warfare, said a senior Defence Ministry official.

India needs to triple its lift capacity, said the official.

India already has contracted for six C-130J aircraft from the United States, the delivery of which is expected to begin by 2011.

The Air Force's current fixed-wing transport fleet comprises 40 Russian-made IL-76 and more than 100 AN-32s, which are being upgraded by Ukraine, and the U.S.-made C-130J transport aircraft.

In addition, the Indian Defence Forces are buying about 800 rotary-wing assets in the next seven years.

In July, India signed a $400 million contract with Ukrainian military export agency Ukrspetsexport to upgrade 100 Soviet-built AN-32 cargo aircraft for the Indian Air Force.

dredger14
11-06-2009, 09:41 AM
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/itbp-to-get-15-new-battalions/532633/2

The Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP), the force guarding the 3,488-km-long India-China border, is all set to get an addition of 18,000 men to its 55,000-odd workforce and a major strengthening of its border posts.

Union Home Minister P Chidambaram announced on Friday that his ministry was considering a restructuring plan for the ITBP which included “15 new service battalions, three recruit training centres, a counter-insurgency and jungle warfare school, a high-altitude medical training centre and measures to strengthen border posts”. “Added requirements for advanced communication systems, surveillance equipment, water craft, specialised vehicles and modern weaponry are also under consideration,” the Home Minister said, speaking at the 48th Raising Day of the force.

ITBP’s high-altitude medical training centre will be established at Leh and will impart specialised training to doctors and medical professionals. The force’s counter-insurgency and jungle warfare school will be set up in Uttarkashi. The three recruit training centres will impart training to ITBP men in advanced weapons, motor transport and communication, respectively.

“In order to keep the morale, motivation and efficiency levels of the jawans high, the government has recently raised various monetary allowances due to CPMF personnel, including the hardship-based allowance. Further, proposals for special rations and better high-altitude clothing, on par with those provided to the defence forces, have also been approved,” Chidambaram said.

He also said that the system of advances and withdrawals from the provident fund was a long-standing problem that the CPMF jawan faced. “Hence, a time limit of 26-30 days has been fixed and procedures streamlined so that unnecessary delays and obstacles are obliterated. Various bottlenecks in the process of procurement and acquisition of essential items have also been an impediment to the modernisation of the CPMFs. Therefore, the MHA has enhanced the delegation of financial powers to the DGs of the CPMFs,” he said.

The Home Minister also said that that the country was “going through a difficult phase” in terms of cross-border terror, situation in Jammu and Kashmir, insurgency in North-East and Left wing extremism in various states, but the government was confident of having the strength and capacity to overcome these challenges.

ATV
11-06-2009, 09:56 AM
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dredger14
11-06-2009, 12:52 PM
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Sukhoi-jets-in-NE-skies-from-next-week/articleshow/5202979.cms


TEZPUR: Sukhoi fighter jets will start flying in the skies of the northeastern region from next week.

According to defence officials, around six aircraft of the warplane's MKI variant have reached Tezpur air base in Assam a few days ago and a full complement of the warplanes is expected to arrive by the year end.

Flight training and operational sorties of the aircraft are likely to begin early next week and preparations were on in this regard, they said, adding that besides Tezpur, a full squadron of Sukhoi fighter jets would also be deployed at Chabua base in eastern Assam subsequently.

The IAF was also contemplating to deploy another squadron at Bagdogra air base in West Bengal, the officials said.

The Su-30s had operated from Tezpur air base when they were formally inducted in the base on June 15. Since then, the air base which has been upgraded to house the jets was also opened for civil aviation.

Four Su30s had landed at the base on June 12 for a symbolic induction and a fighter aircraft operated from the airbase after a gap of more than a year since MIG fighters were moved out of it, the officials said.

Having aerial refueling capability, the Su30 MKI multi-role combat jets have a combat radius of 1,500 km.

The MKI variant of the warplane which was inducted into the IAF in 2002 are said to have an impeccable safety record. The IAF already has three squadrons of Su-30 MKIs at Lohegaon and Bareilly.

dredger14
11-06-2009, 12:53 PM
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11823


PANNITHITTU, India -- In this seaside village, the children of farmers and fishermen aspire to become something that their impoverished parents never thought possible: astronauts.

Through community-based programs, India's space agency has been partnering with schools in remote areas such as this one, helping to teach students about space exploration and cutting-edge technology. The agency is also training thousands of young scientists and, in 2012, will open the nation's first astronaut-training center in the southern city of Bangalore.

"I want to be prepared in space sciences so I can go to the moon when India picks its astronauts," said Lakshmi Kannan, 15, pushing her long braids out of her face and clutching her science textbook.

Lakshmi's hopes are not unlike India's ambitions, writ small. For years, the country has focused its efforts in space on practical applications -- using satellites to collect information on natural disasters, for instance. But India is now moving beyond that traditional focus and has planned its first manned space mission in 2015.

The ambitions of the 46-year-old national space program could vastly expand India's international profile in space and catapult it into a space race with China. China, the only country besides the United States and Russia to have launched a manned spacecraft, did so six years ago.

"It's such an exciting time in the history of India's space program," said G. Madhavan Nair, a rocket scientist and the outgoing chairman of the national space agency, the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). "More and more bright young Indian scientists are calling us for jobs. We will look back on this as a turning point."

The ascendancy of India's space program highlights the country's rising ambitions on the world stage, as it grows economically and asserts itself in matters of diplomacy.

Politicians once dismissed the space program as a waste. Activists for India's legions of poor criticized additional funding for the program, saying it was needless decades after the American crew of Apollo 11 had landed on the moon. Now, however, the program is a source of prestige.

Last year, India reached a milestone, launching 10 satellites into space on a single rocket. Officials are positioning the country to become a leader in the business of launching satellites for others, having found paying clients in countries such as Israel and Italy. They even talk of a mission to Mars.

India's program is smaller in scope than China's and is thought to receive far less funding. It is also designed mostly for civilian purposes, whereas experts have suggested that China is more interested in military applications. (The Communist Party has said its goal is peaceful space exploration.)

"A human space flight with an eventual moon mission is a direct challenge to China's regional leadership," said John M. Logsdon, professor emeritus of political science and international affairs at George Washington University's Space Policy Institute. "China is still the leader. India has yet to diminish China's space stature. But India is indeed seeking a higher global profile."

India now has among the world's largest constellations of remote-sensing satellites. They are sophisticated enough to distinguish healthy coconuts from diseased ones in this region's thick palms. They can also zero in on deadly mosquitoes lurking in a patch of jungle.

In September, a NASA device aboard India's first lunar probe detected strong evidence of water on the moon -- a "holy grail for lunar scientists," as Jim Green, director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA headquarters in Washington, put it.

The partnership with Americans was particularly gratifying to Indians, given recent bilateral history. After New Delhi conducted nuclear tests in 1998, the United States imposed sanctions denying India access to certain technology in a bid to curb its ability to launch nuclear rockets, said Theresa Hitchens, a space expert who is director of the U.N. Institute for Disarmament Research in Geneva.

"Space launchers and ballistic missiles are quite similar from a technical perspective," she said.

Many of the sanctions have been lifted, and India and the United States last year signed a historic civilian nuclear agreement, lifting a 30-year ban on bilateral nuclear trade.

"The scientists at ISRO and NASA have always had deep respect for each other. But it was politics and bureaucracy that stood in the way of great science," said Pallava Bagla, co-author of "Destination Moon: India's Quest for the Moon, Mars and Beyond."

As India's space program barrels ahead, experts fear that NASA is losing ground. The space agency's human spaceflight program is facing budget cuts, as well as basic questions about where to go and how to get there.

After NASA's aging space shuttle retires in 2010, it will be five years before the United States will have another spacecraft that can reach the international space station.

The United States may have to buy a seat to the moon on an Indian spaceship, said Rakesh Sharma, India's first astronaut, who in 1984 was aboard the Soviet Union's Soyuz T-11 space shuttle. "Now that would be something," Sharma said. "Maybe budget cuts could usher in an era of more cooperation rather than competition and distrust."

dredger14
11-06-2009, 12:57 PM
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11815

NEW DELHI - Indian Defence Ministry sources say a road map is being drawn for a network-centric homeland security environment that will link all of the country's information and intelligence gathering systems.

Speaking at a seminar here, M.M. Pallam Raju, the minister of state for defense, said that new centers for rapid response are being set up in key cities all over the country. Equipment and weapon systems are being upgraded. Security parameters are being established. Critical infrastructure and industrial centers will receive special protection, and the capabilities of military, intelligence and paramilitary staffs are being enhanced.

Raju called for greater "synergy among the plethora of intelligence agencies to prevent another 26/11-Mumbai-like terror attack," referring to the Nov. 26, 2008, terrorist attacks on that Indian city.

The government is already building a unified technical intelligence-gathering center, the National Technical Research Organisation, under which all technical input from multiple sources, including the defense forces, will be integrated.

"There are significant opportunities for private industry to partner in the homeland security and sub-conventional warfare space," Raju said. "The allocation for India's homeland security agencies was increased by 25 percent in the 2009-2010 budget. Paramilitary forces under the Ministry of Home Affairs include about 1 million personnel and have a budget of $4.3 billion for the year 2009-10. The equipment and training of all these must be upgraded and modernized in order to have an effective counter-insurgency internal security force."

dredger14
11-06-2009, 12:58 PM
India has increased the number of satellites it has launched to compete with other space agencies and to help modernize poor villages. The satellites are used to monitor ground resources and farming conditions and to expand telecommunications.
http://i33.*******.com/2i77ccmdotgif

dredger14
11-06-2009, 11:22 PM
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India’s long-criticised Akash anti-aircraft missile is now blazing towards success. Its counterparts in the DRDO’s Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme, the Prithvi and Agni ballistic missiles, were on target from the start; the anti-tank Nag missile will also enter service shortly; the Trishul short-range anti-aircraft missile was abandoned unceremoniously. Now, after years of rejection from the military, the Akash is being accepted as a world-class missile.

The IAF’s order last year for two Akash squadrons — dismissed by sceptics as a face-saving burial for the Akash programme — has just been doubled with a fresh IAF order for 16 more launchers that will be stationed in northeast India. And now, Business Standard has accessed even better news for the Akash programme: the Indian Army is considering ordering several Akash squadrons for its ground forces.

The DRDO’s Chief Controller for R&D, Prahlada, has confirmed that the army is displaying fresh interest in the Akash. Asked for details, Prahlada told Business Standard, “I cannot say whether the army is interested in the Akash for its strike corps, or for another role. In any case, the Akash is a mobile system that is suitable for various roles.”

But protecting fast-moving tank columns from enemy fighters is what the Akash does best. For years the DRDO laboured to fit the entire Akash system — including radars, missile launchers and command centres — into T-72 tanks. This provided the Akash with the cross-country mobility to advance deep into enemy territory along with Indian Army strike corps, shooting down enemy fighters at ranges as far out as 25 kilometres.

Planned as a replacement for the army’s obsolescent Russian SAM-6 Kvadrat, the heart of an Akash missile battery is the Hyderabad-developed Rajendra phased-array radar that tracks up to 64 enemy fighter aircraft simultaneously, in a radius of 60 kilometres. The mobile command centre selects up to four of the most threatening air targets, and two Akash missiles are fired at each from the T-72 based Akash launchers, which move alongside. The Rajendra radar continuously guides the missiles, eventually “flying” them smack into the enemy fighters.

Theoretically, a “ripple” of two Akash missiles has a 99 per cent chance of shooting down a modern fighter aircraft. Practically, however, in 9 live Akash trials so far, all 9 missiles that were fired hit their targets. Videos of the firing trials, witnessed by Business Standard, show the Akash missiles smashing their targets into tiny fragments at ranges beyond 20 kilometres.

The DRDO has taken 20 years to develop the cross-country mobile, tank-mounted version of the Akash missile system that the army is now interested in. Criticism of this delay has been vocal, but the DRDO counters by pointing to the quality of its product: the Akash, says the DRDO, is the only system of its kind available globally.

A top DRDO scientist at the missile complex in Hyderabad points out, “Western countries like France, which make missiles in the technological league of the Akash, don’t mount the entire system on a tank, something that the Indian Army insists on. Only the Russians build tank-mounted missile systems, but their missile technology is far inferior to that of the Akash. All that the Russians can offer today is the next generation of the Kvadrat.”

The defence PSU, Bharat Electronics Limited, is the nodal production agency for the Akash missile system, supported by a broad consortium of Indian public and private sector manufacturers who contribute components and sub-systems. Bharat Dynamics Limited manufactures the solid-fuel, two-stage, ramjet Akash missile itself.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/army-warmsto-akash-missile/375634/

Muzungu
11-07-2009, 12:31 AM
im lovin it, ALL!

seeing so much coming to indian armed forces makes me proud.

dredger14
11-07-2009, 01:25 AM
High Mach number airbreathing propulsion is an area of research & development vital to India’s strategic needs. Propulsion is the most important pacing technology for the high speeds at which advanced aerospace vehicles such as, Access-to-Space Vehicles, Trans-atmospheric Vehicles and Missiles are to fly. From performance considerations, high-speed aerospace vehicles that fly at Mach numbers greater than 3 (speeds greater than 3 times the speed of sound) need to necessarily employ advanced airbreathing propulsion systems such as, ramjets, supersonic combustion ramjets (scramjets) and their complex derivative-the dual-mode ramjet/scramjet. Such critical engine technologies are closely guarded abroad.

The National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL), Bangalore have active R&D programmes for the development of advanced high-speed combustors for the High Speed Flight Technology Demonstrators of the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thiruvananthapuram and the Defence Research and Development Laboratory (DRDL), Hyderabad. To carry out the appropriate full-scale ground tests, a High-Speed Combustor Test Facility has been set-up at the Propulsion Division, CSIR-NAL, Nilakantan Wind Tunnel Centre, Bangalore with joint funding from ISRO, DRDO and CSIR. This versatile test facility was inaugurated on Wednesday 28th October by Dr.G. Madhavan Nair, Chairman, ISRO and Chairman, Research Council, NAL.

Dr. Madhavan Nair in his address complimented NAL for setting up such a complex test facility, which will allow the indigenous development of the critical advanced subsonic/supersonic combustor technologies for India’s futuristic high Mach number propulsion systems. He stressed that a comprehensive design data base should be quickly built up by carrying out extensive testing which, from now on, is possible in India. Dr. AR Upadhya, Director, NAL in his opening remarks said that ‘Supersonic Combustion’ is a thrust area activity of NAL and that, in fact, it was in the early nineties that this activity had been initiated in NAL jointly with DRDL by the then DRDL Director, Dr Abdul Kalam and the then NAL Director, Professor Roddam Narasimha.

This test facility can also be employed to carry out full-scale afterburner developmental tests for the aero-engine gas turbines being developed by the Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore, which has already funded a related programme.

http://www.nal.res.in/pages/ipoct09.htm#press

Kunal Biswas
11-07-2009, 05:17 AM
ASIA PACIFIC
Date Posted: 30-Oct-2009

Jane's Defence Weekly


Indian Army may turn to 1950s-vintage artillery

Rahul Bedi JDW Correspondent - New Delhi

Key Points
The Indian Army is looking to acquire 1950s-vintage Soviet artillery to plug a serious shortfall

Red tape and accusations of 'irregularities' have undermined successive Indian artillery upgrade plans


The Indian Army's artillery directorate is considering the acquisition of additional Soviet-designed 130 mm M-46 field guns, developed in the 1950s, from surplus stocks within the former Soviet republics to augment its severely depleted firepower.

Official sources said delays and constant postponement in acquiring new howitzers to replace and supplement the 410 Bofors 155 mm/39 cal guns procured in the late 1980s had promoted this possibility in a bid to plug the army's artillery shortfall.

India was the largest export customer for M-46 artillery pieces, with an estimated 800 purchased from the late 1960s onwards and employed during the 1971 war with Pakistan.

Thereafter, under the Field Artillery Rationalisation Plan finalised in the late 1980s, the army aimed by 2020-25 to acquire a mix of around 3,200 to 3,600 155 mm/52 cal and 155 mm/39 cal towed, wheeled, tracked and light howitzers for 180 of around 220 artillery regiments. The new guns were intended to replace the six different calibres the artillery currently deploys.

However, over the years all artillery acquisition attempts had been delayed by both the army and the Ministry of Defence (MoD) due to vacillation, complex procurement procedures and allegations of corruption involving overseas vendors.

Artillery officers told Jane's that under the "most optimistic scenario" it would take between six and nine years to begin executing the army's artillery plans. Until that time the army would remain largely dependent on around 390 Bofors FH-77B 155 mm/39 cal howitzers, many of which have been cannibalised to keep the rest operational.

The remaining firepower would be provided by the relatively small number of M-46 130 mm guns upgraded by Israel's Soltam to 155 mm/39 cal weapons, as well as various other guns that would remain in service.

The Soltam upgrade programme to retrofit 180 M-46s is mired in controversy, with the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) tasked to inquire into "alleged irregularities" in the award of the USD45.5 million contract by the Hindu nationalist BJP-led National Democratic Alliance government in 2001.

The outcome of the CBI inquiry is pending nearly five years after the investigation was ordered by the incoming Congress Party-led administration and military sources said the operational efficiency of the upgraded guns also remained "questionable".

Artillery sources said the principal problem with the upgraded 130 mm guns was their inability to hit targets at a distance of 40 to 41 km as agreed upon in negotiations.

A senior artillery officer said their range was "substantially less" than what had been promised by Soltam and that the entire upgrade programme was "over ambitious". The upgraded guns also have "obduration" problems with their barrels and breech block.

A proposal to upgrade the FH-77Bs is also in jeopardy, primarily due to the "over-ambitious" qualitative requirements drawn up by the artillery directorate for the retrofit. This includes replacing the gun barrel and breech block, strengthening the undercarriage and fitting it with a state-of-the-art sighting system to allow heavier rounds to be fired to register greater damage on the target.


Anyone have any info on present upgradation of Russian 130mm M-46 guns into soltam 155mm of 45cal !!

Indian need to upgrade 130mm into 155mm to fill the gaps in Artillery regt, The delay in purchasing of 155mm of 52cal is taking to much time !!

dredger14
11-07-2009, 04:40 PM
http://www.drdo.com/pub/techfocus/2009/oct09.pdf

dredger14
11-07-2009, 05:46 PM
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Hylas, a flexible, broadband Ka-band satellite, is steadily moving towards completion. The communications payload has been shipped from England to India for integration with the platform, marking a key milestone for the project.

This important step was completed in late October by Astrium UK, the prime contractor for the Hylas satellite, supported by Avanti Communications, the satellite customer and operator, and ESA, partner and co-funder of the project. The next phase involves the integration of payload and platform systems and the execution of the satellite-level test programme, prior to launch in 2010.

The Hylas mission will address the large demand for broadband services in Europe that cannot be met by terrestrial networks. It will provide capacity to serve hundreds of thousands of Internet users, and broadcast up to 30 standard-quality or 15 high-definition TV channels in Ku-band.

Astrium is leading the design and manufacture of Hylas and is responsible for developing the advanced Ku- and Ka-band payload. The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), in Bangalore, India, is providing the satellite platform. The communications payload and the platform will be integrated and tested in Bangalore, in preparation for the launch by Arianespace in 2010. Other European and Canadian companies, including TESAT, ComDev and CASA Espacio, are providing essential equipment for the payload.

“The Generic Flexible Payload technology, developed by Astrium, is at the heart of the communications module,” explains Andrew Murrell, Hylas Payload Engineer for ESA. “It is based on highly integrated equipment that provides in-orbit flexibility to adapt the satellite’s frequency plan and connectivity to match evolving market demands. The use of the newly developed, flexible travelling wave tube amplifier from TESAT enables further optimisation of satellite resources by allowing power to be reallocated between service regions according to changing needs.”

While broadband services for domestic and business customers form the core application for Hylas, the system has been designed to support the provision of other communications applications such as HDTV broadcasting and data contribution and distribution services.

A contract was signed between ESA and Avanti for the development of Hylas in 2006, providing support for the development of the most innovative elements of this new system. The satellite is designed to have a lifetime of 15 years, and will be positioned in geostationary orbit at 33.5°W.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMSFM5RN1G_index_0.html

dredger14
11-07-2009, 08:09 PM
In a significant step that will give the Indian armed forces an indigenously designed and developed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a technological demonstrator (TD) of the Rustom will take to the Hosur skies this month.

Official sources at the Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE), the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) laboratory that is spearheading the Rs.1,000-crore Medium-Altitude Long-Endurance (MALE) Rustom UAV programme, told The Hindu that with the high speed taxi trials of the TD almost over, the inaugural flight “could happen anytime soon.” The taxi trials are being conducted at the air***** belonging to Taneja Aerospace at Hosur.

The Rustom, which will have capabilities equal to, or even better than contemporary UAVs such as the Israeli Heron (currently in use by the armed forces), is derived from the National Aerospace Laboratories’ Light Canard Research Aircraft (LCRA), an aircraft developed by a team under the leadership of late Professor Rustom B. Damania in the 1980s. The ADE have taken the LCRA airframe and structurally modified it for unmanned flights.

Officials said that the TD, which has the same configuration as that of a full-fledged Rustom UAV, but is smaller in size, will undertake around 10 flights — taxiing, taking off and landing like a conventional aeroplane, the only difference being that there will be no pilot aboard. But being smaller than the full-fledged production standard Rustom, the TD will have an endurance of only 12 to 15 hours, approximately half of what the Rustom is being designed for. The ADE are using the TD as a stepping stone to proving the technologies that will go into the Rustom. The initial flights of the TD are being restricted to an altitude of around 500 metres. All three defence services have shown interest in acquiring the Rustom.

The Rustom programme will also marks a first for the DRDO. Traditionally, the DRDO laboratories develop a product or system, build a prototype, prove it in field trials and then transfer the technology to a production agency.

In the case of the Rustom, the DRDO are moving to a regime of concurrent engineering practices where initial design efforts also take into consideration production issues, with the production agency participating in the development of the system right from the design stage, and concurrently developing the necessary infrastructure and expertise for the product and product support. This approach could become a trendsetter for future DRDO projects.

A DRDO technical evaluation committee is examining the proposals of Tatas, L****n and Toubro, Godrej and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited-Bharat Electronics Limited (joint bid), one of whom will join the ADE as the production agency *** development partner (PADP). A price negotiating committee, headed by Defence Minister A.K. Antony, is looking into the commercial aspects of the proposals.

Both the PADP and the users (armed forces) will have a financial stake in the Rustom project.

http://beta.thehindu.com/news/national/article43328.ece

ATV
11-08-2009, 12:54 AM
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ATV
11-08-2009, 12:55 AM
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ATV
11-08-2009, 02:18 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2ehrcyAnXc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vSrDTTvZtQ

raavan
11-08-2009, 03:36 AM
[/FONT][/COLOR][/FONT][/COLOR]http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae262/atv_photo/06_11_2009_001_007dotjpg



Why the hell do we have to appease them???:bash:

dredger14
11-08-2009, 09:13 AM
^^Whats going on?? I cant see anything here...

ATV
11-08-2009, 11:07 AM
^^Whats going on?? I cant see anything here...

sorry fvking photobucket,I"ll fix it soon

ATV
11-08-2009, 01:22 PM
Force One commandos set to guard Mumbai

MUMBAI: Nearly a year after 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks, the city gets its first batch of Force One commandos, an elite force formed on the lines

of National Security Guards (NSG) for the state security.

"The city would have its own elite force, as the first batch of the Force One has been trained and soon they will become operational," Additional Chief Secretary (Home) Chandra Iyengar said.

Over 1,600 young policemen from the state had expressed their willingness to join the Force and were given rigorous training by Israeli and German trainers, Iyengar said.

The State Government has alloted land at Goregaon in western suburbs to the Force for training and easy access in emergency situation, she said.

The Home Department has also focused on upgradation of police force, coastal security, strengthening Intelligence and participation of local people in security.

Police Department has been provided with new weapons, vehicles and technologies, which would make them alert in case of any emergency situation, Iyengar said.

"Police personnel have been trained in such a way that they respond to any situation," she said.

The information would first go to the local police station and then a Quick Response Team (QRT) would deal with the situation and later, Force One would take charge.

The QRT is trained in such a way that it would reach a place within 20 minutes. It has also been provided bullet proof jackets and armed vehicles, Iyengar said.

For the coastal security, the Government has provided high speed boats for patrolling and 'Sagar Suraksha Dal', a group of local fishermen, has been formed to collect information.

"The fishermen have been provided mobile phones and SIM cards to keep coastal security and police updated if they notice something suspicious," she said, adding, about 40,000 fishermen have received identity cards from the Government.

The Intelligence structure has been streamlined and strengthened with recruitment of new people and giving them training, she said.

The department will soon submit a report on the work done to beef up security, a year after the terror attacks, to Chief Minister Ashok Chavan.

ATV
11-08-2009, 11:31 PM
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_htvjsmtPrmc/SvY6VwiD5VI/AAAAAAAAEDA/evlwQpvNEjY/s1600/06_11_2009_502_003dotjpg

JBH22
11-09-2009, 07:48 AM
IAF eyes to meet fighter plane deficit by 2022 (Lead)


Hindon (Uttar Pradesh), Oct 8 (IANS) The Indian Air Force (IAF) plans to bridge its fighter squadron deficit by 2022, Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik said Thursday as the force celebrated 77 years of its existence with an elaborate parade and aerobatics display here.
“I would like to share one thing - we do not have a small air force. We are on the low side of the sine curve and we are only going to go up,” said Naik said on the sidelights of the Air Force Day parade.
The IAF is set to acquire new fighter jets, helicopters, transport aircraft. The IAF is working towards increasing its strength to have a competitive edge in the region, he said.
“The strength (of the fighter squadrons) has to increase. By 2014, it will start increasing. By 2022, we expect to have requisite numbers,” Naik told reporters here.
The current strength of the IAF fighter squadrons is 33.5 well below the sanctioned strength of 39.5. By 2022, the IAF is expected to have 42 squadrons.
He noted that the IAF of the future will increasingly be called upon to secure India’s strategic interests from the Straits of Hormuz to the Straits of Malacca and the Central Asian region.
“Over the last year, our operational preparedness has remained at an all-time high. Numerous operational tasks, that stretched our resources, were successfully completed. Today, the prevailing situation is such that we have to maintain a certain level of constant readiness,” the IAF chief said.
The Israeli Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS), acquired to see beyond the enemy lines, was put on display at the Air Force Day parade Thursday. Escorted by two Sukhoi-30 jets, AWACS were received with applause from the spectators.
The event commenced with a hang glider show after which flag bearing sky divers of Akash Ganga team dropped out of an AN-32 transporter.
The parade involved three Mi-17 helicopters, three Mi-25/Mi-35 helicopters, a Dornier aircraft, two Avro and two AN-32 aircraft.
The fighter fly-past was led by three Jaguar combat jets in Vic formation closely followed by three Mig-21 Bison, Mig-29 Baaz, Mirage 2000 Vajra aircraft and a SU-30 MKI aircraft. One Sukhoi aircraft of the formation then carried out a Vertical Charlie manoeuvre.
The grand finale was marked by aerobatics by Sarang Advanced Light Helicopter team followed by synchronized low level manoeuvring by HJT-16 aircraft of the Surya Kiran Aerobatics Team (SKAT).

Muzungu
11-09-2009, 10:39 AM
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_htvjsmtPrmc/SvY6VwiD5VI/AAAAAAAAEDA/evlwQpvNEjY/s1600/06_11_2009_502_003dotjpg

the commando checklist is as funny as the sketch of the commando!

JBH22
11-09-2009, 11:13 AM
So basically what will happen if i understand the whole picture India will have NSG units alongside each state own raised counter terror units

dredger14
11-09-2009, 07:19 PM
No room to blink on Indo-Pak border as Taliban threat looms

By Syed Nazakat/Rak ki Haveli Post, LoC

In a mud-and-thatch-roof bunker on the mountain, Indian soldiers are getting ready for night patrol. A havildar peers over the sandbags of the machinegun pit. A Pakistani bunker can be seen on a hilltop. A muddy stretch of farmland lies divided into many fields. A few yards away is a Pakistani village where the only concrete building is the mosque. Soldiers at the bunker cannot see beyond the Haji Peer Pass of Pakistan.

It’s dark. The unit commander and eight soldiers set out on foot to patrol the border fence. “While on patrol don’t talk, don’t use torch, and don’t mess around,” he orders. Some soldiers use night-vision goggles, others their bare eyes. Pakistani snipers wearing night-vision glasses can see the glow of a cigarette a mile away. “They will watch as you lift the cigarette to your mouth and figure out where your head is. Then you are gone,” says the officer.

High on these mountains near the Line of Control in Jammu’s Poonch sector, the Army keeps round-the-clock vigil, braving daily confrontations with infiltrators, and the biting cold at night. A barbed wire fence that snakes through the mountains divides India and Pakistan. At some places, the mountain base belongs to India, with the peak in Pakistan’s control.

The patrol party takes a steep, slippery, narrow path cleared of mines towards the fence. Erected along steep mountainsides, the double-row concertina wire fence, 12ft high and 4-9ft wide, is connected to a network of thermal imaging devices and alarm systems. Sharp-edged metal tape and glass pieces on the ground make infiltration difficult; in some places the fence is electrified.

On the Jammu border, the Army uses dogs, which recognise soldiers and civilians and bark at intruders. “No fence in the world can prevent movement unless there is surveillance,” says Lt Col A.K. Gopi. The brief to his unit is to be vigilant 24x7.

Forward posts on both sides of the border have names laced with humour and hatred. Indian soldiers at Rak Ki Haveli Post call Pakistan’s post a ‘rat post’ because, as an officer said, they consider Pakistani soldiers tamed like a rat. Every border sector is divided into grids so that officers can be held accountable for movements in their designated areas. There are four to seven forward posts—each with five to eight soldiers—every kilometre.

Army sources say infiltration attempts have risen over the past year. An officer says infiltrators were trying to enter in small groups, using GPS, cutters, insulators and folding ladders. A 50m tunnel was found at Chapriyal on the Jammu border. “This is a kind of cat-and-mouse fight. The more difficult you make the fence to cross the more new ways they [militants] try to find to sneak in,” says a soldier. Besides, the passes and folds in the mountains help the infiltrators.

But senior military officers say the fence has reduced infiltration by 80 per cent. “Militants have become so desperate that, despite knowing it is almost impossible to cross the fence, they try it, only to get arrested or killed at the border or somewhere in the state. The average life of a militant once he enters the valley is less than a year,” says Lt Col Gopi.

With the fighting between the Pakistan army and the Taliban rages, vigil is the word for the Indian Army. As the patrolling team returns to the bunker, a whistle goes off. It’s the turn of another team of soldiers to go out patrolling.

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?sectionName=Current+Events&contentId=6220190&programId=1073754900&pageTypeId=1073754893&contentType=EDITORIAL&BV_ID=@@@

dredger14
11-09-2009, 08:26 PM
On May 24/07, a rollout and demonstration ceremony was held for the first 2 Su-30MKM fighters for the Royal Malaysan Airforce (RMAF) at Russia’s Irkutsk Aviation plant. Malaysia flies the F/A-18D Hornet, and was offered Boeing’s F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet, but chose the SU-30MKM instead. Their fighter fleet will now consist of R/F-5E/F Tiger IIs (to be phased out), F/A-18D Hornets, MiG-29 Fulcrums (until 2010), and SU-30MKMs. The results from their internal training air combat exercises would be interesting, to say the least.

The original $900 million contract was signed with Irkut Corp. in August 2003, and involves 18 SU-30MKMs. Canards, stabilizers and fins will be manufactured by India’s HAL Nasik under a $25-30 million value subcontract. According to the contracts in place, Irkut was to deliver all aircraft by the end of 2008, but that hasn’t happened yet. Delivery of the final batch is ongoing.

The SU-30MKM is an advanced variant, whose performance involves considerable improvements over SU-30MK/MKK fighters. Malaysia also hopes its maintenance will be an improvement over the MiG-29Ns it has to phase out – and may be about to turn to China for help… http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/malaysia-receives-first-2-su30mkms-03336/

Kunal Biswas
11-10-2009, 07:37 AM
So basically what will happen if i understand the whole picture India will have NSG units alongside each state own raised counter terror units


Then Army could spare its men ! .. And use them on C.I operation in Kashmir !

JBH22
11-10-2009, 09:26 AM
Pakistani snipers wearing night-vision glasses can see the glow of a cigarette a mile away. “They will watch as you lift the cigarette to your mouth and figure out where your head is. Then you are gone,” says the officer.

one more reason to quit smoking or we'll send you on the INDO-PAK border.

dredger14
11-10-2009, 07:29 PM
JAMMU : Two militants, including a top militant of Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT) outfit, were killed by the security forces in an encounter in the mountainous Reasi district of Jammu and Kashmir, official sources here today said.

"A joint operation was launched by police, 61 Rashtriya Rifles and the troops of Uniform Force on specific information in Kalwa area of Mahore tehsil about the presence of militants," official sources told.

On seeing a patrol party, the militants opened fire which was retaliated, in which a self-styled District Commander of LeT identified as Rafiq alias Noman and another militant Jabrar were gunned down, the sources added.

"This is the third killing of a LeT militant in one week in Reasi district, while one militant of the outfit also surrendered before the security forces yesterday,’’ the sources informed.

The slain militant Rafiq, was acting as a top commander after the killing of Abu Abdullah alias Romeo 8, the sources said, adding that he was active in Gool, Arnas areas of Reasi district.

"One Ak-47, two magazines, three hand grenades, one satellite phone and a radio set were recovered from the encounter site," they said. (UNI)

http://www.dailyexcelsior.com/web1/09nov10/newsupdate.htm#3

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:12 AM
Presidential Standards given to IAF combat unit (http://www.hindu.com/2009/11/11/stories/2009111155791100.htm)


NEW DELHI: President Pratibha Patil on Tuesday conferred the Presidential Standards on two premier combat units of the Indian Air Force, No. 47 Squadron and the Tactics and Air Combat Development Establishment (TACDE), at an impressive parade at the Gwalior airbase.

The Standards were received, in the presence of Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal P.V. Naik, by Commanding Officer of No. 47 Squadron (Black Archers) Wing Commander Vikas Sharma and Commodore Commandant Air Vice Marshal Arup Raha, and subsequently by TACDE Group Commandant Captain Surat Singh and Commodore Commandant Air Marshal S. Mukerji, an official release said.

The parade, presented by air warriors from both units and those from the Gwalior airbase, followed the presentation of the Standards. The President also released a First Day cover and a brochure.

Addressing journalists, the Air Chief formally announced that the President will fly a Su-30 MKI at the Pune airbase on November 25.

Madhya Pradesh Governor Rameshwar Thakur, Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chauhan, IAF Marshal Arjan Singh, and several senior serving and retired officers of the two units were present at the ceremony.

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:30 AM
Russian shipyard set to 'float out' Indian Navy frigate in November (http://www.domain-b.com/defence/sea/indian_navy/20091111_russian_shipyard.html)


Kaliningrad: The Yantar Shipyard in Russia's Baltic exclave of Kaliningrad has said it will float out the first of the three Krivak-IV class frigates being built for the Indian Navy at the end of November. The ships are a follow-on order to three Krivak-III class ships earlier constructed by the Baltiysky Zavod shipyard.

Yantar is building three Project 1135.6 modified, Krivak-IV class (also known as the 'Talwar' class) guided missile frigates for the Indian Navy under a $1.6 billion contract signed in July, 2006.

"The first frigate in the series is expected to float out at the end of November," company spokesman Sergei Mikhailov said.

"Floating out does not mean that the sea trials will start right away. We still have to carry out post-construction work. The trials will start in 2010," he added.

Mikhailov reaffirmed that the shipyard should be able to deliver all three vessels to the customer in 2011-2012.

Earlier, in August this year, the Yantar shipyard had confessed that it was negotiating a $60 million loan to enable it to complete construction of the three frigates. According to Igor Orlov, director of Yantar, the shipyard had previously taken out a $110 million loan from Russian national development bank Vnesheconombank (VEB) but was now forced to seek an additional $60 million loan due to "financial constraints."

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:31 AM
Navy shows coast might (http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091110/jsp/nation/story_11719407.jsp)


The nation’s harrowing experience on 26/11 continues to haunt its people, as was evident from the enthusiasm with which people watched and lauded a massive naval drill carried out in the Bay of Bengal, 100km off Paradip coast, yesterday.

As many as seven warships participated in the drill.

“The Indian Navy has to protect the country’s coasts at any cost,” said Rear Admiral P. Murugesan, the flag officer and commander of the Eastern Fleet, while talking to reporters on board from INS Jalaswa.

The Indian Navy, with a fleet strength of more than 140 warships, has been assigned to co-ordinate coastal security operations across the country following the 26/11.

“We are co-ordinating with the marine police of respective states and Indian Coast Guard to see that no more such incidents take place along the 4,700km coastline,” said the Rear Admiral. “The eastern coastline is as vulnerable as any other,” he added.

The Eastern Fleet, which has more than 60 ships under its disposal, displayed its firepower as a part of the Navy Week celebrations.

From the INS Jalaswa, the navy’s first landing platform dock and an amphibious assault ship capable of transporting 1,000 combat troops, tanks and artillery vehicles, Rear Admiral Murugesan guided missile destroyers, INS Rajput and five missile corvettes — INS Kora, INS Kulish, INS Kuthar, INS INS Khanjar and INS Kirpan.

Missiles were fired to the mid-sea from INS Kuthar and INS Khanjar with a speed of 40km-per-hour. The colours glowed red and green as the powerful bombs detonated far out into the water.

The display of underway replenishment showed how resources are exchanged under-water between ships travelling in the same speed. There were also close-range anti-aircraft firing exercises and simultaneous anti-aircraft firing display.

A Chetak helicopter, which took off from Visakhapatnam base, conducted a mock search and rescue operation displaying how the ships are used for landing and takeoffs from the helipads of ships on move. There was a breathtaking fly-past by the Chetak helicopter and Dornier aircraft.

Later talking to reporters, Rear Admiral Murugesan told reporters later that the navy had plans to set up a forward operating base at Paradip to provide logistic support such as fuel, water and ration to the ships.

“A request has been made to the government for allotting land,” he added.

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:34 AM
Army to procure 100 Armoured Personnel Carriers (http://www.ptinews.com/news/371838_Army-to-procure-100-Armoured-Personnel-Carriers)


New Delhi, Nov 11 (PTI) In an effort to strengthen its mechanised forces, the Indian Army is looking forward to procure over 100 Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs) for deployment in different kinds of terrains.

The Army has initiated the process of acquiring these APCs by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) recently.

As per the RFI issued by the Army, at least 100 APCs will be procured from the vendor chosen after the acquisition process and the rest would be licence-produced in India after a Transfer of Technology to an indigenous firm.

According to Defence Ministry officials, over a period of five years, the Indian army is looking to add over 500 new APCs to its existing fleet of around 1,500 Russian-origin BMP-I and BMP-IIs.

The Indian Army at present has 26 mechanised infantry battalions with its APCs having the capability to carry around 10 soldiers each.

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:36 AM
India to get anti-tank missiles from US (http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009%5C11%5C11%5Cstory_11-11-2009_pg20_3)


NEW DELHI: India is negotiating with the Untied States to acquire state of the art Javelin anti-tank missile worth several million dollars for large-scale induction. Earlier, India was planning to purchase the Israeli anti-tank missile, Spike. But the missile failed at the trials in Rajasthan deserts. Sources here said the negotiations with the Americans were at advances stage. Both sides may seal the deal by the end of this month coinciding the Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s visit to Washington. Media reports suggest that the induction of Javelin could affect India’s indigenously developed Nag anti-tank missiles, which were cleared for production this July after two decades of trials and research. The Indian Army has ordered 443 Nag missiles and 13 missile carriers. Since the Nag was on the drawing board for several years, the army started desperately looking for new generation anti-tank missiles to penetrate modern day tanks, reports said. The Indian Army currently has old Milan missiles, a European product, and the Russian Konkours, both of which are manufactured in India under licence at the Bharat Dynamics Limited.

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:37 AM
Indian Army chief of staff, Gen Deepak Kapoor, visits Israel news (http://www.domain-b.com/defence/general/20091110_indian_army.html)


ndian Army chief of general staff Gen Deepak Kapoor arrived in Israel on Saturday for talks with Israeli Army chief of general staff, Lt Gen Gabi Ashkenazi. Gen Deepak Kapoor makes the four day visit on the invitation of Lt Gen Ashkenazi.

The general was welcomed in a festive ceremony at the Kirya military base in Tel Aviv.

Israeli sources said the visit is intended to deepen security cooperation between Israel and India, including mutual updates regarding strategic issues. IDF spokesmen said Kapoor was invited as part of an effort to strengthen the military cooperation between Israel and India, with an emphasis on Middle East issues.

Apart from Gen Ashkenazi, Gen Deepak Kapoor is expected to hold meetings with other senior officials in the defence ministry and the Israeli Defence Forces, including deputy chief of general staff, Maj Gen Benny Gantz.

Gen Kapoor is also expected to tour the IDF Southern Command.

Gen. Kapoor will attend a special ceremony in the Yad Vashem memorial, where he will lay flowers in memory of Holocaust victims.

ante_climax
11-11-2009, 05:39 AM
Myanmar promise on flushout
- Assurance given at bi-annual liaison meet between armies (http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091111/jsp/northeast/story_11724149.jsp)


Myanmar today assured India that it would not allow militants from the Northeast to take shelter in the country and carry out subversive activities from its soil.

The assurance was given by a strong delegation of the Myanmarese army to the Indian army during a meeting at Leimakhong army cantonment, the headquarters of the 57 Mountain Division at Leimakhong in Sadar Hills this morning.

This is the 38th Indo-Myanmar bi-annual liaison meeting. A 15-member Myanmarese delegation led by Brig. Gen. Tin Maung Ohn attended the meeting.

The delegation arrived yesterday and will return tomorrow.

The Indian army delegation was headed by chief of staff of the 3 Corps, Maj. Gen. S.S. Pawar. The meeting reviewed the security scenario along the international border and cooperation and relationship between the two countries.

After the meeting Gen. Pawar termed the meeting fruitful, cordial and smooth. Both sides exchanged views on working on security measures required for controlling insurgency in both countries and to check cross-border movement of insurgents.

The meeting also discussed the need to flush out Northeast insurgents from Myanmar. “The Myanmarese delegation assured us that insurgents from the Northeast would not be allowed to work from their soil. They also assured us that they have started working on this,” Gen. Pawar said.

This is for the first time that the Myanmarese army has given a categorical assurance to India that the country would not allow militants from this side of the border to take shelter in the country and intends to flush them out.

Top army officers on this of the border have been complaining that militants from the Northeast set up camps in Myanmar and the country is not doing anything to flush them out.

Till today, the Myanmarese response was that it would oust the rebels if their camps existed in the country.

The assurance given by the Myanmarese delegation is being considered by the army here as an acceptance of the fact that Northeast insurgents were camping there. The Indian delegation also informed the Myanmarese delegation about construction of fences in the Moreh sector. In the first phase, the border fencing would be constructed from border pillars 71 to 81. The Myanmarese team said it was aware of the fencing plan.

The team visited Loktak lake this afternoon before witnessing an exhibition match of Manipuri polo, arambai (warfare) and tent pegging at Imphal pologround.

The event was sponsored by the GOC, 57 Mountain Division Maj. Gen. Shakti Gurung, and organised by Manipur Equestrian Association, All Manipur Arambai Association and Manipur Horse Riding and Polo Association.

raavan
11-11-2009, 06:18 AM
Mind your language, this is not 1962: India warns China


New Delhi, November 10:
Minister of State for External Affairs Shashi Tharoor reacted strongly against the provocative statements made by China in the wake of Dalai Lama’s visit to Arunachal Pradesh.

Responding to China’s comment that India should not forget the lesson of 1962, Tharoor said, “India has come a long way since 1962. History does not repeat itself that easily.”

"Chinese media report on repeat of 1962 and forgetting lessons is 'silly' and escalating the situation by the media there is irresponsible,” he said.

“W e were not that woefully prepared as we were in 1962," Tharoor added.

Earlier, China Govt mouthpiece has accused India of orchestrating Dalai Lama’s visit to Arunachal Pradesh.

http://publication.samachar.com/pub_article.php?id=6444883&nextids=6444883|6444884|6444885|6441017|6444886&nextIndex=1

Tough stance atlast.Days to come are going to be intresting.

Kunal Biswas
11-11-2009, 07:19 AM
^^ Only A war could decide the fate of Arunachal Pradesh !!!!

hulaku
11-11-2009, 07:20 AM
^^ Only A war could decide the fate of Arunachal Pradesh !!!!

What have you been smoking?

PS: This is a news and discussion thread. Dont rant here.

CS1.6
11-11-2009, 07:22 AM
Mind your language, this is not 1962: India warns China



http://publication.samachar.com/pub_article.php?id=6444883&nextids=6444883|6444884|6444885|6441017|6444886&nextIndex=1

Tough stance atlast.Days to come are going to be intresting.

we know you are not in the 1962, and we are not in 1962 neither.p-)

CS1.6
11-11-2009, 07:24 AM
^^ Only A war could decide the fate of Arunachal Pradesh !!!!

:cantbeli:

Kunal Biswas
11-11-2009, 07:33 AM
What have you been smoking?

Buddy cool down !!:) ....

Their are lot of threads were started by josh21x and the last result we can see is a war !!


http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=154205
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=160900


we know you are not in the 1962, and we are not in 1962 neither.p-)

:cantbeli:

We know that too !

Lets not start a flame war out here, coz every time we both start we hit the same wall again and again !! :)

CS1.6
11-11-2009, 07:44 AM
Lets not start a flame war out here, coz every time we both start we hit the same wall again and again !! :)

wow, firstly you said only a war would bla bla bla, then you tell me to shut up because i start a flame war.........

man, i have to tell you i love the way you are talking, that is, never lose and always right!!!!!

but it's 21st century now, let's have a hug rather than a war :hug:

Muzungu
11-11-2009, 07:53 AM
yes this is 21st century.

we mind our business and you mind your business and let all make profit and laugh all the way to the bank.

please stop this 'my dik is bigger than yours' war mongering!

Kunal Biswas
11-11-2009, 08:35 AM
http://static.manoramaonline.com/ranked/portal/The_Week/TheWeek_Current_Events/3435220433_A_soldier_at_Rak_Haveli_Posdotjpg

to relax: A soldier at Rak Ki Haveli Post

BORDER

No room to blink on Indo-Pak border as Taliban threat looms

By Syed Nazakat/Rak ki Haveli Post, LoC

In a mud-and-thatch-roof bunker on the mountain, Indian soldiers are getting ready for night patrol. A havildar peers over the sandbags of the machinegun pit. A Pakistani bunker can be seen on a hilltop. A muddy stretch of farmland lies divided into many fields. A few yards away is a Pakistani village where the only concrete building is the mosque. Soldiers at the bunker cannot see beyond the Haji Peer Pass of Pakistan.

It’s dark. The unit commander and eight soldiers set out on foot to patrol the border fence. “While on patrol don’t talk, don’t use torch, and don’t mess around,” he orders. Some soldiers use night-vision goggles, others their bare eyes. Pakistani snipers wearing night-vision glasses can see the glow of a cigarette a mile away. “They will watch as you lift the cigarette to your mouth and figure out where your head is. Then you are gone,” says the officer.

High on these mountains near the Line of Control in Jammu’s Poonch sector, the Army keeps round-the-clock vigil, braving daily confrontations with infiltrators, and the biting cold at night. A barbed wire fence that snakes through the mountains divides India and Pakistan. At some places, the mountain base belongs to India, with the peak in Pakistan’s control.

The patrol party takes a steep, slippery, narrow path cleared of mines towards the fence. Erected along steep mountainsides, the double-row concertina wire fence, 12ft high and 4-9ft wide, is connected to a network of thermal imaging devices and alarm systems. Sharp-edged metal tape and glass pieces on the ground make infiltration difficult; in some places the fence is electrified.

On the Jammu border, the Army uses dogs, which recognise soldiers and civilians and bark at intruders. “No fence in the world can prevent movement unless there is surveillance,” says Lt Col A.K. Gopi. The brief to his unit is to be vigilant 24x7.

Forward posts on both sides of the border have names laced with humour and hatred. Indian soldiers at Rak Ki Haveli Post call Pakistan’s post a ‘rat post’ because, as an officer said, they consider Pakistani soldiers tamed like a rat. Every border sector is divided into grids so that officers can be held accountable for movements in their designated areas. There are four to seven forward posts—each with five to eight soldiers—every kilometre.

Army sources say infiltration attempts have risen over the past year. An officer says infiltrators were trying to enter in small groups, using GPS, cutters, insulators and folding ladders. A 50m tunnel was found at Chapriyal on the Jammu border. “This is a kind of cat-and-mouse fight. The more difficult you make the fence to cross the more new ways they [militants] try to find to sneak in,” says a soldier. Besides, the passes and folds in the mountains help the infiltrators.

But senior military officers say the fence has reduced infiltration by 80 per cent. “Militants have become so desperate that, despite knowing it is almost impossible to cross the fence, they try it, only to get arrested or killed at the border or somewhere in the state. The average life of a militant once he enters the valley is less than a year,” says Lt Col Gopi.

With the fighting between the Pakistan army and the Taliban rages, vigil is the word for the Indian Army. As the patrolling team returns to the bunker, a whistle goes off. It’s the turn of another team of soldiers to go out patrolling.

http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11878

dredger14
11-11-2009, 09:24 AM
NEW DELHI: Dazzled by American eight-wheeled Stryker combat vehicles during last month's `Yudh Abhyas' Indo-US wargames, the Army has launched its own hunt for armoured personal carriers (APCs).

A global RFI (request for information) has been issued by Army's additional directorate general of weapons and equipment for procuring the wheeled APCs. The plan is to acquire at least 100 APCs, to be followed by indigenous production after transfer of technology to an Indian firm.

At present, Army operates over 1,500 APCs or infantry combat vehicles called BMP-I and BMP-II, which can carry around 10 soldiers each, in its 26 mechanised infantry battalions.

It wants the new APCs to be `air-portable' in IAF's heavy-lift aircraft and `sea-portable' in Navy's amphibious `landing ship tanks', apart from having advanced weaponry, night-fighting capabilities and NBC (nuclear, chemical and biological) protection.

Army's hunt for advanced APCs comes soon after the Yudh Abhyas wargames at Babina during which US, eager to grab a major chunk of the lucrative Indian arms market, showcased its high-tech weaponry like the Stryker APCs as well as the Javelin anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs).

Incidentally, as reported earlier, this was the largest overseas deployment of the Strykers after Iraq and Afghanistan, coming as the American soldiers did with 17 Stryker APCs.

Costing around $1.5 million apiece, the Strykers come equipped with advanced weapons, CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear) protection and C4I (command, control, communications, computers and intelligence) systems.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Army-looks-for-advanced-armoured-personnel-carriers-/articleshow/5216524.cms

JBH22
11-11-2009, 09:43 AM
how does the BTR-90 perform when compared to the stryker...

Kunal Biswas
11-11-2009, 09:49 AM
Indian Army to deploy more troops along Arunachal border





Arun Joshi (http://www.hindustantimes.com/Search/Arun-Joshi.aspx), Hindustan Times
Email Author
Jammu, November 12, 2009
First Published: 00:27 IST(12/11/2009)
Last Updated: 01:00 IST(12/11/2009)


India is quietly beefing up its defences along the China border in Arunachal Pradesh, even as it publicly downplays the growing diplomatic spat with Beijing over the Dalai Lama’s visit to the state.
The Indian Army will deploy its new 15,000-strong 56 Division in Arunachal, which China claims as its own, within four weeks, a senior defence official told HT, requesting anonymity.
Simultaneously, it has put out a Request for Information (RFI) for acquiring 300 lightweight tanks that can be deployed in the North East and Jammu & Kashmir.
The purpose is to leave nothing to chance, notwithstanding the show of bonhomie between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his Chinese counterpart Wen Jiabao at their October 25 meeting in Thailand.
A second division will be deployed in Arunachal Pradesh in the next 12-18 months, the official added.
The army’s RFI states the light tanks should be capable of destroying bunkers and soft-skin vehicles up to 3,000m away and should have armour-piercing anti-tank guided missiles and anti-aircraft machine guns.
The RFI, which is in HT’s possession, also stipulates these tanks should “have protection against nuclear, chemical and biological warfare”.
In recent months, India activated three airfields along the 646 km Line of Actual Control (LAC) with China, last used during the 1962 war with China. The army and the Indo-Tibetan Border Police have also stepped up patrolling along the LAC.
http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11884

dredger14
11-11-2009, 11:55 AM
I wonder how many people even know that this battle took place. Are we doing a disservice to the nation by NOT telling these battles to our children and youngsters and our people ?

I will never forget Op Rajeev. It happened on my Birthday when my CO was toasting me in the Officers mess and we heard that the Pakis attacked.

The battle as told here in the article below is pretty accurate and it surprised me as to the details. Being privy to some of the intercepts and the situation reports that came through it appears to have been told by an officer who was involved in the battle….and he does say that in the writeup. What I did hear later was that there were some GR soldiers who had to be taken / coaxed at gunpoint by a junior officer to join the battle. Such was the toll it takes on the minds of the soldiers fighting at this altitude. It is too easy to think and feel the futility & the sheer waste in human lives on both sides.

But all said and done…this is our Motherland and not an inch will be given…

Hence the saying in Siachen ” Quartered in snow…Silent we Remain…When the bugle calls..we will Stand up and fight again “

Here goes …

SIACHEN GLACIER – 23 SEPTEMBER 1987

23rd September 1987 is an important day in the history of Siachen when Pakistan’s No. 1 & No. 3 Commando Battalions of the Special Service Group (SSG), along with No 2 Northern Light Infantry (NLI) Battalion of the FCNA, attacked an Indian post, on the Northern shoulder of the Bilafond La pass. The post at an altitude of 19,000 feet, at the time of attack was occupied by only eight men. It was this section that successfully defeated an enemy brigade sized force, creating history of sorts in the annals of military warfare. The attack carried out from 23-25 September 1987, with temperatures dipping to a low of minus 30 degrees Celsius was repeatedly repulsed. The operation codenamed ‘OP QIADAT’ by the Pakistan Army and ‘OP VAJRASHAKTI’ by the Indian Army was a sequel to an earlier operation nicknamed ‘OP RAJIV’, launched three months earlier, when Pakistan lost their ‘Quaid Post’ located at the Southern shoulder of Bilafond La, at a height of 22,000 feet, to the troops of 8 Jammu and Kashmir Light Infantry (JAK LI) and the post was renamed ‘Bana Post’.

As per Pakistani reports and signal intercepts, the enemy suffered close to 300 soldiers dead. While Naib Subedar Bana Singh was awarded. the Param Vir Chakra (PVC) for ‘OP RAJIV’, Capt Iqbal of the Pakistan Army was awarded Hilal-i Jur’at (HJ), posthumously for ‘OP QIADAT’ There was wide media coverage of these operations in September and October 1987 but with the passage of time the sacrifices made have since been forgotten…

It was precisely at 5.55 a.m. on 23rd September, when the brave, young and courageous men of Pakistan’s elite SSG, launched their attack on the Indian posts of Ashok and U-Cut, referred to as Rana and Akbar Posts by the Pakistanis. They were appropriately welcomed by Nb Sub Lekh Raj along with seven other men. The numbers swelled, but brave Lekh Raj kept assuring that nothing would happen to the post as long as he was alive. It was not more than 15 minutes after he spoke to me over the radio set when a TOW missile fired from the enemy fire base established at ‘Rahber-II’ hit the bunker and killed the JCO instantaneously along with two other men. The situation became rather precarious with only five men left on the post but these brave men fought gallantly and the enemy wisely retraced their steps toward their Rahber and Tabish Posts in the rear. Capt Nazareth, the young Pakistani officer, who led the initial assault on the Indian post, was subsequently joined by Captains Rashid, Cheema, Akbar, Imran, Mohammad Iqbal seconded from the Army Service Corps to the Commando force and Naib Subedar Sher Bahadur. Captain Sartaj Wali, the Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) was moved forward to attend to the casualties.

As expected, the Pakistanis resumed their misadventure after darkness on 23rd. Their Company Commander Maj Rana was in touch with his battalion commander over the radio set. It was pitch dark, yet the enemy movement was noticed and accurate fire was brought down on them from the only mortar deployed just behind Ashok post and the aerial bursts of rocket launchers fired from Sonam were extremely effective. The attack developed a crescendo by 3.00 a.m. and suddenly there was a pause and I intercepted a message from Captain Rashid to some senior officer in the rear “We are waiting for two hours and the ropes have not fetched up yet, we will be day lighted. Cheema is dead and many are injured badly, please send reinforcements.” Their morale was low and we knew that they would not pursue the attack any further till at least the following night. On the Indian side Maj Chatterjee along with a mixed command of JAK LI and GR troops moved about the whole night motivating his men under heavy and accurate artillery fire The white sheet of ice was blackened with shelling and our pub tents and parachutes, on the ice surface were shredded with shrapnel and the mini camp at Sonam and Bana Top, where I was located, had craters all around. The sight, though scary, was spectacular with the pot holes making a distinct design on the whiteness around our abode.

The enemy resumed his attack on the night of 24th September, i.e. his third night of exposure. This time Captains Rashid and Iqbal led the assault and came very close to the top. The reinforcements promised by the Company and Battalion Commanders had not arrived and they had suffered very heavily and were tired and exhausted. It was close to midnight that I heard Rashid tell his superior officer, “Wherever I move the enemy fires at me” and prompt came the reply “The kafirs have got hold of our radio frequencies and are monitoring them, all troops switch to alternate frequencies.” There was a pause and then Rashid resumes his conversation, “Sir, we are not carrying our alternate frequencies and all are teams have left the base.” After a while there was another conversation intercepted “Rashid has been killed and the reinforcements have not reached, tell these seniors to come forward and see for them selves. They are safe in their bunkers and care little for us.” That was a good indicator, and we knew that the battle had been won.

Such was the story of the battle of Bilafond La, a battle of nerves and guts with no real winners but only losers. When will this fight end? The answer remains, till we shed our egos and ambitions.

Well fought red —Blue the winner.”

Note from Cosmicwarrior:

A few more interesting things about that battle:

a) the posts ran out of ammunition. The brave soldiers were actually throwing down emptied “dalda” (vegetable oil) cans filled with rock and ice on the enemy climbing the ropes.

b) Replenishment ammo came via a Mi-26 transport helicopter that landed in Base camp. This was a first for a helicopter of this size and weight to land there. Such was the power of this beast that most of the tents in a 300m vicinity were blown down. It couldn’t turn around within the Base, but had to fly to the widest part of the glacier to turn around and head back. Kudos to the pilots who even thought of flying this beast to 12,000 ft ASL. It’s ceiling is 15,000 but it cant carry anything leave alone ammo.

c) Some of the soldiers were evacuated at night by AirOP pilots flying daring missions with floodlights attached to the front of the helicopters. So many of them survived to tell the tale.

http://cosmicwarrior.wordpress.com/2007/09/18/op-rajiv-a-battle-that-broke-pakistans-adventurism-on-the-glacier/

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 06:09 AM
how does the BTR-90 perform when compared to the stryker...

BTR-90 outperforms it with light years. Lets compare them:

BTR-90:

Armament: 30mm Auto-cannon, 7.62 Coaxial, Konkurs ATGM and AGS-17 grenade launcher. All mounted on one turret.

Protection/Armour: It can resist 30mm auto-cannon fire and be invunrable for HMG/light auto-cannon fire.

Range: 800 KM.

Speed: 110 KpH (road) 50 KpH (off-road) / 9 KpH (water)

--------

Stryker:

Armament: M2 12.7mm HMG or 40mm grenade launcher on a non stabilised RWS.

Protection: 14mm max at front so its very vunrable to HMG fire.

Range: 500 KM.

Speed: 100 KpH. (road) (off-road speed varies.) (No Amphibious capabillity)


Result = Clean win from BTR-90. :)


Btw thanks to GTX-Typhoon !

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 06:24 AM
Indian Army to acquire 100 Armoured Personnel Carriers



New Delhi, Nov. 11 : The Indian Army is set to procure over 100 Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs), which would be deployed in different kinds of terrains.

The Army has initiated the process of acquiring these APCs by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) recently.

According to the RFI, at least 100 APCs will be procured from the vendor chosen after the acquisition process and the rest would be licence-produced in India after a Transfer of Technology to an indigenous firm.
Over a period of five years, the Indian Army is looking to add over 500 new APCs to its existing fleet of around 1,500 Russian-origin BMP-I and BMP-Iis, Defence Ministry sources said.

Currently, the Indian Army has 26 mechanised infantry battalions with its APCs having the capability to carry around 10 soldiers each.

Some of the APCs are equipped with missile launchers for firing Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM).

The Army wants its new APCs to be capable of being air-lifted in IAF heavylift aircraft such as the IL-76 and C-130Js to be procured from US in the near future.

The new APCs should also be capable of being carried in Navy's amphibious warships such as the INS Jalashwa and the INS Airavat.
http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11885

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 06:28 AM
Navy to be equipped with MiG-29K jets




Gautam Datt (http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/searchresult.aspx?AliasName=vHFMNkQxpRIujwfP3WTiGg==)
First Published : 12 Nov 2009 04:53:00 AM IST Last Updated : 12 Nov 2009 10:14:56 AM IST

NEW DELHI: The Indian Navy’s long wait to induct new MiG-29 K combat jets will finally be over later this month as the first batch of four fighters arrives. The jets, ordered in 2004, were meant to operate from the new aircraftcarrier INS Vikramaditya, earlier known as Admiral Gorshkov, undergoing refitment at a Russian shipyard.The carrier operations of MiG-29s will take some time to realise as INS Vikramaditya’s delivery has been delayed substantially owing to dispute over the price of the ship. Till then, the MiG-29 K/KUB fighter jets would operate from the Naval aviation base at Goa.The base already operates Sea Harriers. The ageing Sea Harriers had worked for long without a carrier.Navy’s sole aircraft carrier INS Viraat is undergoing routine maintenance. The ship is likely to be back in service soon.The Navy has already named the MiG-29 K squadron ‘Black Panther.’ The pilots of this squadron were trained in carrier operations in the US and also in Russia. The carrier operations are one of the most complicated and require comprehensive training of pilots.The Naval pilots learned deck landing in the US. They were further trained to fly MiG-29s in Russia. The training was held on a Russian carrier where all aspects of the new aircraft were tested before taking the delivery.India had ordered 16 jets in 2004 as part of the Gorshkov deal of around $1.2 billion. The price of the contract is expected to be doubled as the Russians are asking more for the ship. Out of the 16, four will be MiG-29 KUB, a twin seater trainer aircraft. The rest would be single-seater MiG-29 K.The aircraft is capable of performing multi-role functions of providing air defence cover to warships and also take part in attack and air space domination roles by taking on air to ground targets. They will be equipped with advanced weapon systems and avionics.The MiG- 29 Ks are the maritime version of the MiG-29s which are being flown by the Indian Air Force primarily for air defence purposes.The IAF’s MiG-29 fleet is undergoing upgrading. The aircraft is in the last leg of its life span and needs to undergo drastic changes.http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11882

dracon49
11-12-2009, 06:55 AM
BTR-90 outperforms it with light years. Lets compare them:

BTR-90:

Armament: 30mm Auto-cannon, 7.62 Coaxial, Konkurs ATGM and AGS-17 grenade launcher. All mounted on one turret.

Protection/Armour: It can resist 30mm auto-cannon fire and be invunrable for HMG/light auto-cannon fire.

Range: 800 KM.

Speed: 110 KpH (road) 50 KpH (off-road) / 9 KpH (water)

--------

Stryker:

Armament: M2 12.7mm HMG or 40mm grenade launcher on a non stabilised RWS.

Protection: 14mm max at front so its very vunrable to HMG fire.

Range: 500 KM.

Speed: 100 KpH. (road) (off-road speed varies.) (No Amphibious capabillity)


Result = Clean win from BTR-90. :)


Btw thanks to GTX-Typhoon !
You forgot to add the Namer:).

Oporto
11-12-2009, 07:17 AM
You forgot to add the Namer:).

Namer 8x8 ?????

ATV
11-12-2009, 07:23 AM
BTR-90 outperforms it with light years. Lets compare them:

BTR-90:

Armament: 30mm Auto-cannon, 7.62 Coaxial, Konkurs ATGM and AGS-17 grenade launcher. All mounted on one turret.

Protection/Armour: It can resist 30mm auto-cannon fire and be invunrable for HMG/light auto-cannon fire.

Range: 800 KM.

Speed: 110 KpH (road) 50 KpH (off-road) / 9 KpH (water)

--------

Stryker:

Armament: M2 12.7mm HMG or 40mm grenade launcher on a non stabilised RWS.

Protection: 14mm max at front so its very vunrable to HMG fire.

Range: 500 KM.

Speed: 100 KpH. (road) (off-road speed varies.) (No Amphibious capabillity)


Result = Clean win from BTR-90. :)


Btw thanks to GTX-Typhoon !

Indeed
BTR90 probably one of the best APC in the world .

Armament---

30mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon (500 rounds)
7.62mm PKT machine gun (2000 rounds),
1 AT-5 Spandrel ATGM,
one 30 mm automatic grenade launcher (400 rounds).

It has 2 side doors,It can be retrofitted with new technologies like trophy or Kanchan Armour
Stryker cost around 7.5 to 8 Crore RS while Upgraded(thermal imagers ,electronic gadgets etc) BTR90 cost 3.5-4 Crore RS

ATV
11-12-2009, 07:26 AM
Namer 8x8 ?????

well here the fixed version p-)

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 07:30 AM
You forgot to add the Namer:).


http://www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/vehicles/armored_personnel_carriers/namera/P3080021dotJPG

http://www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/vehicles/armored_personnel_carriers/namera/P1010351_3dotjpg

http://www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/vehicles/armored_personnel_carriers/namera/P1010352_3dotjpg

http://www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/vehicles/armored_personnel_carriers/namera/P1010354_2dotjpg

Namer is a heavy class APC !!

Indian army want a medium class APC !
http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/ne...p?newsid=11885 (http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11885)


Ps. I like the Namer APC :) !

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 07:33 AM
Indian Navy crewmen tackle boredom with DTH



Byomakesh Biswal (http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/searchresult.aspx?AliasName=RRw%7CQApg2O6/HIK8JC7ukScV6sXSQ2wg)
First Published : 11 Nov 2009 10:05:08 AM IST
Last Updated : 11 Nov 2009 01:45:23 PM IST

PARADIP: Boredom, sea sickness, work pressure and being incommunicado with near and dear ones for months can take its toll on sailors. But with the advent of Direct to Home Television (DTH), crew members of the Indian Navy have been able to increase their entertainment quotient and keep boredom at bay."DTH has turned into a prime mode of entertainment inside the warships. Earlier we used to spend our time watching movies though VCDs, DVDs. But after DTH, we now have a whole basket of channels to watch. One can watch a programme of one's choice," said Yuvraj Singh, a commander in the Indian Navy.DTH has added a new meaning to life inside the warships. Though other modes of entertainment were available earlier, the plethora of programmes available in different languages and the clarity of signals have turned DTH into a favoured mode of entertainment aboard."We stay away from shores for months together. We even remain incommunicado with family members for days in the absence of mobile signals till we touch the next shore. And during long days, DTH television is a favourite of mine," Singh added.In some select big warships, different facilities have been provided so that crew members can enjoy their leisure time. In some big ships there are gymnasiums and other indoor sports."During our leisure time we used to go to the gym, but they are only available on big ships. Now we can watch TV too. You can catch up on news and other affairs happening on land. We watch different types of programmes including regional programmes," Rajesh Vishnu, another commander in the Indian Navy, said.The television sets have been provided in different rooms inside the ship such as the living room and dining area. For sports buffs DTH has opened a new window of entertainment."Whenever I get time, the first thing I do is to catch up on cricket matches. Earlier watching cricket matches inside the ship was completely unimaginable. But now I can watch matches on board too. Though I can't afford to watch TV during duty hours, at least I can catch the match after that," said P. Swain, a crew member on board the Indian Navy ship Jalashwa.

http://www.bharatrakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=11883

Kunal Biswas
11-12-2009, 07:56 AM
Indeed
BTR90 probably one of the best APC in the world .

Armament---

30mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon (500 rounds)
7.62mm PKT machine gun (2000 rounds),
1 AT-5 Spandrel ATGM,
one 30 mm automatic grenade launcher (400 rounds).

It has 2 side doors,It can be retrofitted with new technologies like trophy or Kanchan Armour
Stryker cost around 7.5 to 8 Crore RS while Upgraded(thermal imagers ,electronic gadgets etc) BTR90 cost 3.5-4 Crore RS


Definatly BTR-90 comes first in all !!

Their is a version fitted with BMP-3 turret could be a good light tank !!
as 100 medium pressured gun can fire deadly anti - tank missile ( capable of penetration T-72 or type - 96 )... Plus its medium Pressure 100mm plus 30mm can rip out Enemy infantry infrastructures and light vehicles !!

Another variant of the BTR-90 was produced with a low pressured 125 mm, acquired from the 2S25 Sprut light tank


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/BTR-90_100mmdotjpg/648px-BTR-90_100mmdotjpg

JBH22
11-12-2009, 08:23 AM
SO better buy BTR-90 add it with israeli electronic and move on

ante_climax
11-12-2009, 09:43 AM
Suryakirans thrill Nagpurians (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Suryakirans-thrill-Nagpurians/articleshow/5220909.cms)


NAGPUR: Despite clouds playing spoilsport, the spectacular show by Indian Air Force aerobatic team Suryakiran and skydiving team Akash Ganga
still managed to thrill the visitors at Air Force station Sonegaon on Wednesday. Presence of clouds over the last two days did not allow the team to practice properly and even put a question mark on the show itself. But the truncated performance by Suryakirans, who avoided the vertical manoeuvres owing to cloud cover, left spectators wanting more.

The Air Force station was filled with spirit of patriotism. 'Maa tujhe salam' and 'Rang de basanti' playing in the background added to the atmosphere. Among the invitees were children from various city schools and also special children. Their eyes filled with pride and joy as the magnificent men in their flying machines took to air. They were joined by thousands of others on their terraces in localities around the airport.

The show began with the performance by the students of Bhosla military school who came with their drums and bagpipers. "This is the first time we are performing at an air show. It is an immense honour for us and a proud moment," said Shubham Banabakode, a student who played the bagpipe. This was followed by an aero-modelling show. The radio-controlled planes showed that even small things can create wonder. "I liked the small plane," gushed a kid present at the show.

Then the Suryakirans aerobatic team began to perform their manoeuvres. Led by Wing Commander Joy Thomas Kurien, the team began routines flying in 'diamond' formation. Then it went on to perform spectacular formations including the innovative 'Sukhoi'. Sometimes flying low, sometimes disappearing into clouds, and painting the sky in tricolour with each formation. "I was so proud that the country has such able men protecting it, that I almost cried," said an emotional Esha Lokre one of the invitees.

There was also some disappointment as low clouds prevented the high manoeuvres. It even made the pilots unhappy as the vertical profiles are more thrilling. Wg Cdr Kurien said, "We did the best we could. The show would have been better had the sky been clear. We were almost in two minds about performing as the weather had been bad in the last couple of days." Sqn Ldr Ajit Kulkarni said, "we would have been happier performing the barrel roll etc. but the cloud cover was bad." There was also an unexpected delay during one of the manoeuvres. Kurien clarified, "sometimes there is a risk, so it is better to be safe. We can't take a risk, especially with such a large gathering present."

The chief guest for the show was Air Marshal Pramod Vasant Athavle, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Head Quarters Maintenance Command, Nagpur, who came with his wife Neelima. The show was hosted by Air Commodore Kishor Dhami.

ante_climax
11-12-2009, 09:45 AM
Navy to be equipped with MiG-29K jets (http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/story.aspx?Title=Navy+to+be+equipped+with+MiG-29K+jets&artid=|5j9v|XqRQc=&SectionID=b7ziAYMenjw=&MainSectionID=b7ziAYMenjw=&SectionName=pWehHe7IsSU=&SEO=Indian%20Navy,MiG-29%20K%20combat%20jets)


NEW DELHI: The Indian Navy’s long wait to induct new MiG-29 K combat jets will finally be over later this month as the first batch of four fighters arrives. The jets, ordered in 2004, were meant to operate from the new aircraftcarrier INS Vikramaditya, earlier known as Admiral Gorshkov, undergoing refitment at a Russian shipyard.

The carrier operations of MiG-29s will take some time to realise as INS Vikramaditya’s delivery has been delayed substantially owing to dispute over the price of the ship. Till then, the MiG-29 K/KUB fighter jets would operate from the Naval aviation base at Goa.

The base already operates Sea Harriers. The ageing Sea Harriers had worked for long without a carrier.

Navy’s sole aircraft carrier INS Viraat is undergoing routine maintenance. The ship is likely to be back in service soon.

The Navy has already named the MiG-29 K squadron ‘Black Panther.’ The pilots of this squadron were trained in carrier operations in the US and also in Russia. The carrier operations are one of the most complicated and require comprehensive training of pilots.

The Naval pilots learned deck landing in the US. They were further trained to fly MiG-29s in Russia. The training was held on a Russian carrier where all aspects of the new aircraft were tested before taking the delivery.

India had ordered 16 jets in 2004 as part of the Gorshkov deal of around $1.2 billion. The price of the contract is expected to be doubled as the Russians are asking more for the ship. Out of the 16, four will be MiG-29 KUB, a twin seater trainer aircraft. The rest would be single-seater MiG-29 K.

The aircraft is capable of performing multi-role functions of providing air defence cover to warships and also take part in attack and air space domination roles by taking on air to ground targets. They will be equipped with advanced weapon systems and avionics.

The MiG- 29 Ks are the maritime version of the MiG-29s which are being flown by the Indian Air Force primarily for air defence purposes.

The IAF’s MiG-29 fleet is undergoing upgrading. The aircraft is in the last leg of its life span and needs to undergo drastic changes.

ante_climax
11-12-2009, 09:46 AM
WRT to the India-China issue, I am confident that there will be no full scale war.

Muzungu
11-12-2009, 11:27 AM
full scale or short border war is not in the interest of china and india.

but china is keep on flexing its muscles and wants to show who the boss is in asia.

latest is china calling Obama, the 'black' president and advised him not to meet Dalai Lama!

ATV
11-12-2009, 01:59 PM
Hindi-Chini: Bhai Bhai The great game ;)

India declares China's stapled visas policy invalid for travel

In a rebuff to China, India has made it clear that any paper visa 'stapled' to the passport in separate sheets rather than pasted will be treated as invalid for travel out of the country. The snub comes in the wake of the reports that some Kashmiris were issued visa by the Chinese embassy on a separate piece of paper, stapled to the passport. Hindi-Chini: The great game

dredger14
11-12-2009, 05:31 PM
NEW DELHI, Nov. 12 (UPI) -- The Indian army is set to order an unspecified number of Akash anti-aircraft missiles to replace its aging Russian SAM-6 Kvadrat air defense missile system.

The missile system is for the T-72 main battle tank and has a Hyderabad-developed Rajendra phased-array radar capable of tracking up to 64 aircraft simultaneously over a radius of just under 40 miles. It can shoot down aircraft within 15 miles, according to Indian media reports.

The Akash is part of India's Integrated Guided Missile Development Program. Its main target will be use against attacks from unmanned combat aerial vehicles including Cruise missiles and aircraft.

The order is another win for the BEL consortium set up in January 2008 by two Indian public sector companies -- Bharat Dynamics Ltd and Bharat Electronics Ltd. -- and which included private-sector firms specifically to manufacture the medium-range Akash missiles.

BEL tied up with L****n & Toubro, Tata Power, Walchand Industries and ECIL. But Bharat Dynamics is the actual manufacturer of the solid-fuel, two-stage, ramjet Akash missile.

BEL signed its first major order in January this year when the Indian air force placed an order for two squadrons of the missile, according to a report in the national newspaper The Hindu.

The newspaper also noted that the Indian air force had had performance reservations about the missile. Specifically, the air force wanted a smaller, lighter missile with a longer range and that was more maneuverable, according to The Hindu. The missile also does not have a seeker, but batch-by-batch improvements and enhancements are planned.

Analysts have said that one Akash missile has an 88 percent probability of kill. But two missiles fired five seconds apart raises this to 98.5 percent. The payload is reportedly around 140 pounds.

The Akash has been developed by the Defense Research and Development Laboratory, which will oversee the weapon system integration and provide support throughout the missile's 20-year lifecycle.

The missile is in the same class as the U.S. Patriot, Israel's Barak and the U.K. SAM system, the article said. It is around 19 feet long, weighs 1,550 pounds and travels at nearly 2,000 feet per second, according to India's Business Line newspaper.

The air force's missiles are being delivered over three years.

Development of an indigenous defense missile has taken around 20 years, and criticism of the project has been harsh at times because of this.

Similar criticism has been leveled at the Defense Research and Development Organization over development of the Arjun Tank, of which the army only recently agreed to take 124 examples to replace some of its older Russian-made T-90 tanks.

The Arjun has been 35 years in the making, and getting the first batch operational has been a battle in itself, lasting a decade, according to a report in the Hindustan Times newspaper last May.
http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2009/11/12/Indias-Akash-missile-gets-another-order/UPI-62791258041600/

ATV
11-12-2009, 11:59 PM
AKAsh is a very good system DRDO should work on new Akash 2 with extended ranges atleast 70-80 Km

JBH22
11-13-2009, 04:16 AM
Samtel cockpit displays for Sukhoi-30MKI



Samtel cockpit displays for Sukhoi-30MKIAjai Shukla / Ghaziabad November 12, 2009, 0:54 IST
The Indian Air Force’s Sukhoi-30MKI fighter is a beast that is tamed only by technology. The aircraft’s giant AL-31FP turbofan engines, which allow manoeuvres that no other fighter can dream of, are monitored by its pilots on high-tech computer screens called multi-function displays, or MFDs. A quick glance across the MFDs also provides information about on-board weapons and sensors, telling the pilots everything about how the aircraft is flying and fighting.

These avionics — or aviation electronics — are the most expensive part of a fighter, usually about 35 per cent of its overall cost. Superior avionics provide a combat edge, helping a pilot harness his engines, airframe, sensors and weapons towards victory in aerial duels.
This month, the Su-30MKI will reach a major avionics landmark when NCR-based Samtel Display Systems supplies indigenous MFDs for six Su-30MKIs.
So far, French giant Thales has supplied MFDs for the Su-30MKIs, which are manufactured by Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd in Nashik. Now Samtel Display Systems, a part of the Samtel Group, will supply these significantly cheaper than Thales.
Signalling its technological confidence, Samtel Display Systems has gone it alone in developing the Su-30MKI MFDs, despite having a JV with Thales. Starting with liquid crystal display (LCD) screens, commercially procured from Japan and Korea, Samtel has ruggedised them for use in military avionics. The display must be easily readable even in bright sunlight; it must be dim enough for the pilot to read at night without losing night vision; it must work at minus 40 degrees Centigrade when conventional LCD screens get frozen solid; and it must absorb the repeated violent impacts of landing on aircraft carriers.
It has taken Samtel five years to develop the MFDs and have them certified as “airworthy”, a mandatory evaluation for all military aviation systems, conducted by the DRDO’s Centre for Military Airworthiness and Certification (CEMILAC).
This success could garner more. Samtel Display Systems has joined hands with HAL, the country’s premier aircraft manufacturer, to form Samtel HAL Display Systems (SHDS), India’s first public-private venture in defence avionics. SHDS aims to indigenise cockpit display systems across the range of aircraft being built by HAL.
But cracking this high-risk market is difficult, even with the main buyer — HAL — as a JV partner. In response to SHDS’s offer to supply displays for HAL’s Intermediate Jet Trainer (IJT) at a price significantly cheaper than the current foreign suppliers, HAL has said: first show us how you perform in supplying MFDs for the Su-30MKI.
Interestingly, Samtel has leaped into cutting edge avionics from a relatively low-tech springboard. In 1998 Samtel — then a major supplier of Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) television displays — blundered in moving towards plasma display technology, rather than the LCD displays that many rivals chose. With global TV manufacturing majors backing LCD screens, plasma has been relegated to a sideshow.
Currently, TV sales worldwide are 200 million a year. Of these, LCD TVs comprise 105 million pieces, plasma TVs a mere 8 million pieces and the balance are CRT-based sets, which sell mainly in India and China because they are cheaper and can work on batteries. In the medium term and beyond, however, even CRT will dry up as a revenue stream.
But Samtel intends to be the last man standing in the CRT market, embracing a strategy of “obsolescence management”. As CRT production lines close down across the world, Samtel continues to manufacture the CRT displays that remain fitted on many weapons platforms worldwide.
When Sony closed down its Trinitron CRT line, its customer, US avionics major Honeywell, came to Samtel for CRT displays. A Samtel company in Ulm, Germany — purchased from Thales — produces monochrome CRT tubes for users across NATO militaries. And the Samtel Thales JV will now produce and support the Mirage-2000 video display cards, which was hitherto being done by Thales.
Samtel’s global strength in CRT comes from economy of scale and backward integration. It is the world’s only display company that manufactures its own glass. A Samtel group company in Rajasthan just buys sand for making glass for its display tubes. Even as CRT lines shut down across the world, Samtel’s CAGR remains 10-12 per cent, despite lowering its CRT prices 15 per cent annually.
Meanwhile, Samtel Display Systems has launched an ambitious technological leapfrog into Organic Light Emitting Diodes, or OLEDs, next-generation displays that are far more visible than LCDs. So far available only in sizes below 2 inches, they are already being employed on mobile phone screens and gaming controls.
“The OLED is the future of avionics displays,” says Puneet Kaura, executive director, Samtel Display Systems. “We have established a Centre of Excellence in IIT Kanpur, where we develop OLEDs in partnership with IIT Kanpur and the Department of Science and Technology. Some 20-30 per cent of R&D costs are borne by Samtel. ”

Kunal Biswas
11-13-2009, 09:23 AM
Don't be 'under confident' with respect to China: IAF chief



NEW DELHI: Indian Air Force (IAF) Air chief Marshal PV Naik Friday downplayed China's sale of fighter jets to Pakistan and said there was no need to be "under confident" with respect to China. "When two sovereign countries (in this case China and Pakistan) interact there is no scope for a third country. It is up to them (China) to sell it... Why are you so under confident? Our country is strong enough," Naik told reporters on the sidelines of the 49th Indian Aerospace Medicine Conference. China has signed a contract with Pakistan to sell at least 36 advanced J-10 fighter jets in a deal worth $1.4 billion. The J-10 is a multi-role fighter configured for air-to-air and air-to-ground missions. Aviation experts say the design is based on the cancelled Israeli Lavi lightweight fighter and that Israel provided the technology for the fighter's fly by wire controls. It is powered by a Russian engine. The J-10 entered service with the Chinese Air Force in 2003. "Your army, navy and air force will look after the interests of the country. You (media) do not worry about it and do not make others worry about it," Naik said.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Dont-be-under-confident-with-respect-to-China-IAF-chief/articleshow/5226208.cms


Ps. J-10s= Mirage and mig-29
J-17= Mig-21Bisons and Mirage-2000
J-10,SU-27,SU-30mkk= SU-30MKI

I am fine in my country, Even if their is war with China !