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View Full Version : J.P.SAUER & SON 9.3 x 74.R/12 gauge drilling gun



digrar
01-30-2009, 01:08 AM
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- On top of both shot gun barrels are the words KRUPP-LAUFSTAHL.
- Around the barrel J.P.SAUER & SON, SUHL.
- In between the shotgun barrels on top are the numbers 9.3 x 74.R.
- Behind the safety a stamp of a funny capital K.
- Under the K stamp is the letters W.St.
- Engraved on the underneath is a symbol, two capital S's on top of each other with a small u in the middle of the ss. This is also on the butt.
- Generally the gun has some lovely engraving on the metal.
-On the Stock burnt into the wood is a stamped swastika carried by an Eagle.
- On the Barrel is engraved a swastika carried by a eagle.

Shaun's grandfather was a pilot who flew the F4U-1A Corsairs. Based in San Fransisco for some time then went to Campbelltown in Scotland then the story gets a little foggy. He bought two of theses guns back from WWII. The guns came back via England and this is where we believe the hole was drilled in the barrel of the 9.3mm rifle.
He sold both of them to help with the running costs of a big station up North. A few years later he heard of one of the guns being up for sale and bought it.
Since then it has been used by Shaun's grandmother at duck shooting for years, as the shot gun part still works. From what I hear she was a pretty good shot.


I just had a look at the history of the Corsairs. I think they only flew in the Pacific, so the old boy must have changed air craft. How he got the weapons will remain a mystery, but my Brother in Law is now in possession of one of them.

The bluing has been rubbed off, as well as being a good shot, his Grandmother also liked shiny things, so she polished the rifle up to a high shine. The wood work looks in decent enough condition, but the rifle has been made inoperable.

From what I can gather they were issued to the Luftwaffe as a survival weapon. Does anyone know any more about this weapon?

T3ngu
01-30-2009, 01:13 AM
I like your stubbies and shoes.

But seriously, its worth a mint. That calibre can be shot for anywhere between $2 and $3 a round. The shotgun of course is cheaper. I expect Hollis to know much more.


Very scarce and highly desirable J.P. Sauer & Son Luftwaffe Survival Drilling. The 12 gauge by 9.3X74R combination shotgun rifle was issued in limited quantities to Luftwaffe air crews in the North African and the Mediterranean Theaters http://www.rockislandauction.com/view_item.aspx?aid=39&iid=192590

digrar
01-30-2009, 01:22 AM
The rifle is shagged though and hasn't been shot in 60 years. I think replacing it would detract from its value.

Seeing as that's my brother in law, I think the correct term is jandles... Bloody Kiwis. :|

trunk_munkey28
01-30-2009, 02:01 AM
Thats an extremely cool heirloom. Things like that transcend the dollar figure attached to them; just the history alone is priceless.

Indiana Jones
01-30-2009, 02:08 AM
From what I can gather they were issued to the Luftwaffe as a survival weapon. Does anyone know any more about this weapon?
Yep, that's indeed a Luftwaffendrilling. Very rare and potentially expensive. Produced in very limited quantities (2000-2500) from April '41 to September '42. They were issued in a case to LW bomber crews.

Basically its a civilian Sauer Modell 30/25 with Anson-Deeley locks. Be advised shotty barrels are 12/65, so it will not fire 3 inch shells, at least not without hiccup. Barrels are regulated for Brennecke slugs to 50 meters, as with virtually all old Drillings. 9,3x74R is a popular round in Europe for combination guns and doubles alike and is often employed on driven hunts. With heavy-for calibre bullets it is also capable of taking everything but the largest African game. That is actually what it was designed for, being the counterpart of the 9,3x62 for combination guns.

Do yourself and the shooting community at large a huge favour, and have that piece restored to its former glory. "Rendering it inoperable" amounts to nothing less than crimen majestatis. ;) In shooting condition, this is actually a very utilitarian rifle and well suited for its intended purpose.

Edit: If you want to read up on Drillings, this book here might prove interesting:
http://www.amazon.com/Drilling-Gun-History-Technology-Universal/dp/0764327496/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233300388&sr=8-2

JoaMei
01-30-2009, 03:31 AM
If that would be in fully operational condition it would be a VERY expensive collectors piece, with the holes drilled in the 9,3mm Im not sure how much it is.

James
01-30-2009, 04:55 AM
Wow, that's amazing.

Pidyon Shevuyim
01-30-2009, 01:47 PM
Very nice combination gun you have there. Im sure that rifle has alot of history to it. I would deffinitly talk to someone who could restore it.

The first Safari I went on as a kid, I used a combo gun in 12g/.375H&H for lion.

He219
01-30-2009, 02:04 PM
Very nice piece!

Son is 'Sohn' in German.
I take it that's what's written ...

Mike Keenan
01-30-2009, 02:18 PM
I just had a look at the history of the Corsairs. I think they only flew in the Pacific, so the old boy must have changed air craft. How he got the weapons will remain a mystery, but my Brother in Law in now in possession of one of them.

The bluing has been rubbed off, as well as being a good shot, his Grandmother also liked shiny things, so she polished the rifle up to a high shine. The wood work looks in decent enough condition, but the rifle has been made inoperable.

From what I can gather they were issued to the Luftwaffe as a survival weapon. Does anyone know any more about this weapon?

It looks really nice. Decommissioning a gun like that should be criminal.
BTW The Royal Navy used the Corsairs in the North Sea.

Viking
01-30-2009, 06:07 PM
http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/exceptional-wwii-j.p.-sauer-luftwaffe-m30-survival-0-s-vr23af9n4m

Engine Mech
01-30-2009, 09:17 PM
I have seen a mint one of those in NZ still in its aluminium box. A great survival weapon, you can shoot anything from Quail to Elephant with it

Jippo
01-31-2009, 04:30 AM
The bluing has been rubbed off, as well as being a good shot, his Grandmother also liked shiny things, so she polished the rifle up to a high shine.

Only the barrels and some smaller parts would have been blued in the first place. I have a later period restored Sauer u. Sohn which was in similar condition. Frame has been color case hardened.