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beNder
08-13-2009, 08:08 PM
Medical care for the terminally ill is a controversial aspect of health care reform that hasn’t gotten much attention yet.

Pres. Obama raised the issue in an April interview when talking about his grandmother’s final days. He said his 86-year-old grandmother wound up having hip replacement surgery during the final weeks of her life, after already being diagnosed with terminal cancer.

The president said he didn’t know how much the surgery cost, and that he would have paid it out of pocket because it was his grandmother. He also said that if someone had told him she couldn’t have a hip replacement and had to suffer even more in the last days of her life “that would be pretty upsetting.”

But, the president added that’s where “you just get into some very difficult moral issues” when deciding what medical treatment to give to terminally ill patients. Pres. Obama suggested that the chronically ill and elderly account for as much as 80% of our health care costs.

It’s certainly a tricky moral question to say the least. On an intellectual level, it may be one thing to say it doesn’t make sense for the country to spend so much money on people who are dying. But on a personal level, when it’s your loved one suffering, it’s an entirely different issue.

SO HERE’S THE QUESTION: Should there be a limit on health care for elderly and terminally ill people?

Interested to know which ones made it on air?

Paul
I’m 48 years old, HIV+, and healthy, but I have given this a good deal of thought. My answer is “Yes”. I don’t understand all the money spent on the terminally ill. It appears to be primarily based on a fear of death. I’ve made my decision on this issue. My instructions for myself to my loved ones are: Provide necessary pain management, say “Good Bye”, and allow me to die naturally (preferably at home or in a natural setting).

Christine
My mother had a hip replacement 13 months before she died from cancer. My father’s insurance covered it, fortunately. Because of this, my mother was able to have a higher quality of life during her last year. She was able to regain her driver’s license and play on the floor with her infant granddaughter. This was a tremendous benefit to her quality of life. While on paper it makes no sense to do this, it needs to be done because it is the compassionate thing to do.

Jasmin
I am a registered ICU nurse. Far too many times – I have seen the useless, invasive procedures and tests that we do on patients that make no difference in their outcomes… All of us as health care workers see their suffering and the staggering cost. There has to be a better way of letting patients die in dignity and peace. As human beings, one thing we are certain of is death. Letting your doctor talk to you and your family about your choices is a good way to start.

Bill
No, there should not be a limit. We define ourselves as a civilization by the care and compassion that we offer to the least among us. I happen to be one of those people suffering from a condition classified as “terminal”. I’m in good health now and have a full-time job. I take great care of myself. However, if something were to happen to me (I’m 45), I would hope I would have the right to fight for my life with some form of available health care.

R.K.
Life is a terminal condition. At what point do we say enough is enough? When a doctor says you only have 10 years, 5 years or just a few months?


http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2009/08/13/limit-on-health-care-for-elderly-terminally-ill/


Check out all the responces by going to the link.
(http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2009/08/13/limit-on-health-care-for-elderly-terminally-ill/)

West Texican
08-13-2009, 09:16 PM
"SO HERE’S THE QUESTION: Should there be a limit on health care for elderly and terminally ill people?"

In the long term we all die, death is usually the final cutoff point for any further care.

Johnnyringo
08-13-2009, 11:18 PM
"SO HERE’S THE QUESTION: Should there be a limit on health care for elderly and terminally ill people?"

In the long term we all die, death is usually the final cutoff point for any further care.

No... so long as there is no family or legal document in place to speak as to the wishes of that person...

But every reasonable person should discuss with loved ones or provide in writing their guidelines for care to be given should they be unable to speak for themselves. I'd think most would agree a hip replacement for a bed ridden patient is just a way to milk more money out of the family/insurance companies.

XShipRider
08-13-2009, 11:24 PM
"SO HERE’S THE QUESTION: Should there be a limit on health care for elderly and terminally ill people?"

In the long term we all die, death is usually the final cutoff point for any further care.

There must be a limit based on condition. No worries, the government always makes the right decision. Trust them.

Ritual
08-14-2009, 12:07 AM
To what value is a human life, if saving me was to cost $200,000.00.

How many lives could that save in Africa with water treatment, medicine, etc?

I guess no one wants to look at it that way though.

Johnnyringo
08-14-2009, 12:11 AM
There must be a limit based on condition. No worries, the government always makes the right decision. Trust them.

Yes, Sarah Palin's death panel fears are strong with you... go forth and spread misinformation and fear... AHAHAHA FEAR!!!!!

59Diesel
08-14-2009, 12:22 AM
No Limit's. People are finding themselves ways to stay alive longer.

If Grandma needs a hip replacemnt I will get her one so she can enjoy her days. I do not believe in suffering.

Though should not be any need for reform if they would quit giving treatment to illegals and take care of the fraud in medicaid/medicare.

JJC
08-14-2009, 03:11 AM
In high school I worked in a HOSPICE at a large nursing home. What I observed over time made me question the doctors ordering all sorts of procedures and testing on some of these patients who looked so miserable and medicated. The medical industry does rake money on the elderly, but pulling the plug on grandma will always be a difficult moral question to answer.

oldsoak
08-14-2009, 07:19 AM
Will it stop at Grandma though ?
I'm never happy with this. Lets the indivdual/rellies decide and hang the costs.

2495
08-14-2009, 07:23 AM
Will it stop at Grandma though ?
I'm never happy with this. Lets the indivdual/rellies decide and hang the costs.

Agreed. If the individual wants to fight on, sod the expense. If they want a dignified exit though, well, that as well should be their decision, not the states / governments.

DaGreatRV
08-14-2009, 08:20 AM
If treatment is used to stretch someones life without regarding the quality of life afterwards is wrong, I'd rather have a quick exit than having to suffer for a few months.
Same goes for comatose patients, if they don't wake up in 8 weeks their chances of ever doing so will become very slim. Not to mention the brain damage. I hope people will pull my plug and let be over with.

As with all of these things it is usually a medical decision, at least over here. The Terry Shiavo case, which was unfortunatly world news, seems to imply that it can be a judicial or even political decision. Just leave it to the professionals is my opinion.


I for one am all for euthenasia, though it is still bound by a lot of rules and paperwork. Most of the time it is just a case of sedating a patient and tuning off life support, actively ending a life is rare, so is assisting with suicide.


Just being alive is not benificial if you don't have quality of life.

2495
08-14-2009, 08:26 AM
Just being alive is not benificial if you don't have quality of life.

Your arrogance is astounding - your perception of what 'quality of life' means is not the perception of those who are in need of help / care / assistance. Does your reasoning say Dr Stephen Hawkings should be put down because he doesn't have your 'quality of life'?

I suggest you read 'the Diving bell and the Butterfly' and get off your high horse. If your in health care, I pity your patients I really do.

DaGreatRV
08-14-2009, 08:45 AM
Your arrogance is astounding - your perception of what 'quality of life' means is not the perception of those who are in need of help / care / assistance. Does your reasoning say Dr Stephen Hawkings should be put down because he doesn't have your 'quality of life'?

I suggest you read 'the Diving bell and the Butterfly' and get off your high horse. If your in health care, I pity your patients I really do.

Yes I am most certainly arrogant, but that is a good thing.

What a sufficient quality of life is is not for me to decide, medical professionals will do that.
Ofcourse these decisions are not made overnight and not by a single person, there are a lot of procedures.


/trivia
Elderly people will often request a non resuscitation decleration, or a decleration that they don't want to be kept alive by machines.