PDA

View Full Version : The Dutch East Indies Military Forces



jackehammond
08-16-2009, 04:28 AM
Folks,

There is very little that you can find about the history of the Dutch military in the Dutch East Indies (DEI). Military History Quarterly about four months ago came out with an excellent article on the last campaign by the DEI army and navy against Ache in the late 1800s. But when it comes to WW2 and the four years after before Indonesia about the only thing is a book on air warfare during the first 6 months in the Pacific called A BLOODY SHAMBLES. What is astonishing about this book is that the majorty of the three volumes deals with Allied forces other than the USA.

Now with Google you can translate other webpages to English. Does anyone know of any Dutch webpages that cover the DEI, including the early part? Photos dealing with the DEI military forces?

A "WHAT IF?". The Dutch government in exile made the extremely brave decision not to ship oil to the Japanese. This was one of the main reasons Japan decided to go to all out war in the Pacific. Was there ever any consideration by the Dutch government to order the DEI government to totally destroy the oil installations in the DEI with days of Japan begining major war operations? It seems that the Dutch government knew that even if Singapore had held out, that the Japanese would have taken the oil fields. And a pre-emptive destruction of the oil fields would have really caused a strategic problem for the Japanese?

Finally, in advance of any help, etc. Thank You.

Jack E. Hammond

.

tercio67
08-16-2009, 05:45 AM
http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koninklijk_Nederlandsch-Indisch_Leger

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politionele_acties

http://members.chello.nl/pscheele/

http://members.chello.nl/pscheele/politioneleactie.html

http://images.google.nl/images?hl=nl&client=firefox-a&channel=s&rls=org.mozilla:nl:official&hs=rBx&resnum=1&q=politionele+acties&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=hNKHSpSBJcjB-QbSx5y7CQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=4

http://geschiedenis.vpro.nl/programmas/2899536/afleveringen/5837209/items/6046642/

http://www.verzetsmuseum.org/tweede-wereldoorlog/nl/KoninkrijkderNederlanden/nederlandsindie,politionele_acties

http://www.kunstbus.nl/cultuur/politionele-acties.html

http://www.dekolonisatie.com/3-5RI/politactie/inleidin.htm

http://proto4.thinkquest.nl/~lld529/1epoliact.htm

http://blogs.rnw.nl/haa/tag/politionele-acties

http://www.wazamar.org/gen-links/b-KNIL.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu9YspavVXw&hl=nl

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6GcGwxLtTs&feature=fvw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5-APHxW7-E&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlT2UTsDgkg&feature=related

http://www.collectie.legermuseum.nl/sites/strategion/contents/i004543/arma09%20het%20ontstaan%20van%20de%20militaire%20klewang.pdf

It's a start but most is in Dutch...
(And the last action in Aceh was in 1903-1913)

Regards,
Tercio67

TheKiwi
08-16-2009, 09:05 PM
... But when it comes to WW2 and the four years after before Indonesia about the only thing is a book on air warfare during the first 6 months in the Pacific called A BLOODY SHAMBLES.


Sorry I am of no help, but "A Bloody Shambles" is an excellent book.

jackehammond
08-17-2009, 02:39 AM
Dear Member,

Thank you for the information. I greatly appreciate it.

Jack E. Hammond

.

Niels
08-17-2009, 04:17 AM
Some more images and articles here.

http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/zoekresultaten/pagina/1/knil/%28%27knil%27%20%2A%29%20and%20%28type%20any%20%27image%20video%20audio%20text%27%29/&colcount=0&wst=knil

gvg
08-17-2009, 05:13 AM
You can also look here: http://www.afscheidvanindie.nl/

Intelligence reports from the Dutch National Archive can be found here on the website: http://www.afscheidvanindie.nl/archieven-inventaris-no-flash.aspx?bewaarplaats=Nationaal+Archief%2c+Nederland


One problem: the intelligence reports are scanned documents in Dutch only and sometimes 700+ pages.

tercio67
08-17-2009, 07:26 AM
You could contact Mirjam Kruize at the library of the KMA (military academy);

http://www.nlda.nl/content/php/index.php?id=53&cat_id=11&imgvar=kma

And there is the army museum library;
Startpage
http://www.collectie.legermuseum.nl/strategion/strategion/i004567.html
Netherlands East Indies
http://www.collectie.legermuseum.nl/strategion/strategion/i003559.html

hogdriver
08-17-2009, 07:02 PM
You can also visit Pasar Malam and ask "ouwe Indo's en Molukkers" about their experiences...:roll:

Engine Mech
08-17-2009, 08:31 PM
Those are some great clips on you tube. My dad did four years in the dutch army in indonesia and three of my great uncles fought the japanese in indonesia.

RSone
08-18-2009, 09:56 AM
Folks,



A "WHAT IF?". The Dutch government in exile made the extremely brave decision not to ship oil to the Japanese. This was one of the main reasons Japan decided to go to all out war in the Pacific. Was there ever any consideration by the Dutch government to order the DEI government to totally destroy the oil installations in the DEI with days of Japan begining major war operations? It seems that the Dutch government knew that even if Singapore had held out, that the Japanese would have taken the oil fields. And a pre-emptive destruction of the oil fields would have really caused a strategic problem for the Japanese?

Finally, in advance of any help, etc. Thank You.

Jack E. Hammond

.

Perhaps it was considered, but the oilfields and installations were of crucial strategical importance to the RNLN and her allies. Plans were made, but i think it eventually boiled down to the discretion of the district commander or the then person with highest command authority(in case of capture of the district commander)

http://www.geocities.com/dutcheastindies/balikpapan.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Tarakan_(1942) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Tarakan_%281942%29)

These page indicates that certain fields were 'garissoned' with demolition teams, for example those at Balikpapan and Tarakan.At the battle of Tarakan, The Tarakan Garrison commander did indeed order the demolition of the installations after a Dornier flying boat spotted a advancing INJ flotilla.

I've found a book about it, unfortunately it's only published in Dutch, but maybe exerpts of the text are floating around the internet(google books?)

FABRICIUS, JOHAN Brandende Aarde. De vernieling en de evacuatie van de olieterreinen in Nederlandsch-IndiŽ.
. 's-Gravenhage, N.V. De Bataafsche Petroleum Maatscappij, 1949. With illustrations by E.F. Doeve, maps om endpapers. 164 pp. Orig. cloth with d.wrs. History of the destruction of oil fields and raffineries in the Dutch East Indies (Borneo, Sumatra) just before the arrival of the Japanese in 1942. With a list of names of Shell-employees who died during the period 1942-1945.
€ (euro) 20.00 [Appr.: US$ 28.26 | £UK 17.25 | JP• 2690] Book number: 002482
Click here to order or inquire at Antiquariat Minerva (http://www.antiqbook.com/books/bookinfo.phtml?nr=303659791&Language=en).
Translates as: Burning Earth: The destruction and evacuation of oilfields in the Dutch Indies. By Johan Fabricus.
Was published first in The Hague by the Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij(a forerunner of Royal Shell) in 49. Pretty old by now.


Ultimately, while there was some scorched earth going on in regards to oil installations, the damage caused by retreating Dutch forces often wasn't extensive enough, so the Japanese could fairly easily refit and repair the installations. Sadly, the War in the Pacific could have been far shorter, if the DEI governors office and the home government had ordered the fields wiped out. The KNIL forces and the RNLN certainly had the means to do just that, prior to the main engagements(in some cases, forces in the Indies were better equipped than those in The Netherlands) Unfortunately the KNIL simply couldn't hold out in a protracted traditional campaign(they were outnumbered and outgunned, although resistance continued for a long time by individual formations that adopted a insurgency style of combat, together with Australian elements.) and the East Indies fleet of the RNLN virtually self destructed at the Java Sea battle. Either Lt.Adm. Helfrich or rear Adm. Doorman once said "The war could have gone a lot better, if we didn't have such powerful allies" The battle for the DEI basically turned into a giant holding operation, to give the Americans time to respond. Nevertheless, it was an important time for especially the RNLN who showed the world they weren't afraid to fight, even against overwhelming odds. They were sacrificed........

tercio67
08-18-2009, 10:02 AM
Additional information trough these museums of the military branches:

Army museums
http://www.defensie.nl/landmacht/cultureel/musea_en_verzamelingen

Marechaussee museum
http://www.defensie.nl/marechaussee/cultureel/marechausseemuseum

Navy museum
http://www.defensie.nl/marine/cultureel/marinemuseum

Marine museum
http://www.defensie.nl/marine/cultureel/mariniersmuseum

Military aviation museum
http://www.defensie.nl/luchtmacht/cultureel/militaire_luchtvaart_museum

Military retirement home and museum Bronbeek
http://www.defensie.nl/cdc/bronbeek
And
http://www.absofacts2.com/arnhem/museum-bronbeek-arnhem.htm

Sixpints
08-18-2009, 11:46 AM
Some rare (colour) footage about the East Indies was posted in this thread:

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=125503

Cheers,

Sixpints.

jackehammond
08-18-2009, 01:56 PM
Dear Rsone,

Thank you. There is so much hindsight about the first 6 months of the war in the Pacific by the Allies. Like MacArthur not reverting back to Plan Orange when his air force was destroyed and having the rice stocks transferred to Bataan. One of the biggest opportunities missed in the DEI that would have been so simple was that main oil field and installation that was accessed by a river. Just blocking that river would have set back the Japanese time table considerably.

One of the biggest damages to the Japanese effort to seize the DEI oil facilities according to the Japanese was the sinking by a Dutch submarine of small Japanese passenger ship carrying Japanese oil engineers to the DEI to get those oil fields and installation back into production.

The hard part about crippling the DEI oil fields was that fact that it was such a light crude that came out of the ground. For ships it require no refining at all.

Finally, their was a huge stock pile of refined oil for ships in Manila. One was owned by a US firm (Texaco I believe) and the other by a British firm (?). The US firm gave immediate permission to destroy their oil storage tanks. The British manager argued he would have to get permission. While he was arguing a young officer went out of the room and about an hour later their was a blast. The young officer took it upon himself to say that the manager had given permission.

Jack E. Hammond

.

jackehammond
08-18-2009, 02:02 PM
Some rare (colour) footage about the East Indies was posted in this thread:

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=125503

Cheers,

Sixpints.

Dear Member,

The footage says 1939, but it shows the Brewster Buffalo. Those aircraft were not delivered till 1941 I believe?

Jack E. Hammond

.

Sixpints
08-18-2009, 03:45 PM
The footage says 1939, but it shows the Brewster Buffalo. Those aircraft were not delivered till 1941 I believe?

Yes, according to this source:

http://www.warbirdforum.com/casius2.htm

the first Buffalo's entered Dutch service early June '41.


...On 1 June 1941 the 5th Vliegtuiggroep (Air Group) was established on Semplak [near Bogor] and Andir [near Bandung], to be equipped with the Brewster fighters....

Cheers,

Sixpints.

Engine Mech
08-19-2009, 03:40 AM
The Japanese posted notices stating that anyone caught destroying oil facilities would be executed. My great uncle stayed behind to damage the oil fields. His unit that were caught all had their heads cut off.

jackehammond
08-22-2009, 01:30 AM
The Japanese posted notices stating that anyone caught destroying oil facilities would be executed. My great uncle stayed behind to damage the oil fields. His unit that were caught all had their heads cut off.

Dear Member,

That is true. But the Japanese were going to execute about anyone -- ie whether they co-operated or not. But imagine that if the Dutch on the notice that war had begun had started destroying the oil fields immediately. In fact the could not defend those practically in Borneo so destroying them before December 7th would have been a good idea. Yes, the oil fields were valuable. But they were extremely vital (ie they could not fight a war) to the Japanese. There were other sources of oil to the Allies other than the DEI.

Jack E. Hammond

Note> The Japanese were smart on one item. Training air crews requires a lot of aviation fuel. So the Japanese Army (don't know about the Japanese Navy) moved a lot of their training aircraft to the DEI where they were relatively safe from attack and had an easy supply of aviation fuel.

.

RSone
08-22-2009, 04:50 PM
Dear Member,

That is true. But the Japanese were going to execute about anyone -- ie whether they co-operated or not. But imagine that if the Dutch on the notice that war had begun had started destroying the oil fields immediately. In fact the could not defend those practically in Borneo so destroying them before December 7th would have been a good idea. Yes, the oil fields were valuable. But they were extremely vital (ie they could not fight a war) to the Japanese. There were other sources of oil to the Allies other than the DEI.

Jack E. Hammond

Note> The Japanese were smart on one item. Training air crews requires a lot of aviation fuel. So the Japanese Army (don't know about the Japanese Navy) moved a lot of their training aircraft to the DEI where they were relatively safe from attack and had an easy supply of aviation fuel.

.

You have to consider that the DEI was the baseplate of the RNLN in the Pacific and SE Asia. Destroying the Oilfields after first notice of IJN hostile movements, would effectively destroy the navy's capacity to operate and counter the IJN, untill it'd had relocated.

Eventually, it all boils down to a giant What if?
What if Celebes had been built? (sistership to the Java), What if the De Ruyter class had been a real class(instead of a singular ship) and not undergunned?(apparently the RNLN had initially not expected to meet first rate IJN units in battle,and expected not to be alone in the engagement)? What if the RNLN had been able to relocate to Australia, or Midway and from there to Pearl Harbour? What if the Kruiserdoders(Cruiser Killers, in reference to the restricted cruisers built by the major powers under treaty,which the RNLN was not bound by) had been built?
What if the navy hadn't sourced the plans for those from the Germans and Italians?(who would two years later declare war on us, the new Battlecruisers were to be patterned after the Scharnhorst,with elements from italian ships.)
What if we hadn't been hit so hard by the the Great Depression?

At any rate, the RNLN put up one hell of a fight with everything they had in the Indies. Destroying the oilfield installations might ultimately have been the best choice, strategically speaking, but it would enslave the RNLN to a major ally(most likely the US) in regards to operational mobility. Like in the Homeland, we just weren't ready. Not for the Japanese, not for the Germans.

Engine Mech
09-07-2009, 01:51 AM
Here is a small piece out of a book one of my relatives has written." Uncle Peter Engels from Balikpapan in Borneo had been an officer. It was decided that he and his troops were to leave the town after destroying the oil installations and retreat towards Bandjermassin. However as they retreated along the Bandjermassin road they were ambushed by Japanese shock troops which had already cut Bandjermassin off from Balikpapan. He was taken prisoner and beheaded by the japanese. There were no survivers from his company. Civilians who had remained on Balikpapan were massacred while being used for rifle and bayonet practice on the beaches, the Japanese were furious at the dutch for having destroyed the valuable oil instalations." Reading the rest of the book it is obvious that due to the chaos and the lack of leadership it was up to the locals to do the best they could.

tercio67
09-27-2009, 06:04 AM
Link to site that lists the differend armoured cars/vehicles used in the DEI.
http://www.overvalwagen.com/