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khalifah
12-03-2009, 08:50 PM
^
very nice.
whats that star on the overlap of the uniform under the US?

vor033
12-03-2009, 08:57 PM
I saw this Photo and then read the story and it just impressed me so much i had to post it !!! - Sorry if people have already seen or read it before.


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FORT BENNING, Ga. -- Ten months into his deployment with the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Peter Sprenger lost an eye when an improvised explosive device detonated near the forward operating base in Tal Afar, Iraq.

But he didn't lose his focus as an infantryman.

"I was a little irritated that I lost my eye," he said, "but I didn't want to quit."

During his rehabilitation, Sprenger wanted to remain in the Army, but he didn't want a desk job, so he contacted his former 101st commander, now the U.S. Central Command commander Gen. David Petraeus for assistance.

"Ordinarily such an injury would have resulted in a medical retirement," Petraeus said. "However, (then) Corporal Sprenger was no ordinary Soldier."

The most seriously wounded Soldier during the attack on his forward operating base, Petraeus said he tracked Sprenger's progress.

"He's taught me about sure determination, perseverance and strength in the way of diversity," Petraeus said. "The way he's responded has been truly inspirational."

After earning the Ranger tab in 2005, Sprenger again deployed to Iraq with the 101st for a second time. When the unit redeployed to Kentucky, he left the Army to complete his college degree.

But Sprenger missed the Army, Petraeus said.

"It was those with whom he used to serve and the important missions they all performed together and what individuals like him would term 'the brotherhood of the close fight,'" he said.

The four-star general told Sprenger's story to 152 newly commissioned officers who graduated from Officer Candidate School, Nov. 19.

Sprenger was one of them.

"Over the past 12 weeks, you've shown the ability to lead and to follow and displayed physical and mental toughness and you've been team players as well as team builders," Petraeus said.

"Of course, this is not the first time you have displayed such special qualities. After all, several of you are combat veterans and already proven your ability to lead Soldiers in challenging missions, under tough conditions. Each of you has your own story, and while your own personal story may not rival that of second lieutenant Sprenger, few do, the route you followed to earn your commission demonstrates your commitment to excellence, determination, leadership ability, a commendable work ethic, intelligence and sheer resolve. None of you is proud to be merely average."

Following the ceremony, Sprenger's father and Petraeus pinned the second lieutenant bars on the new officer.

His next assignment is again with the 101st Airborne Division, where a third combat deployment is in his future.

It's been six years since he lost his eye, but Sprenger said to judge him on his abilities, not his disabilities.

"I don't really like people calling it a disability because I think with training, and training yourself, I know I can do things just as well as a lot of the other guys I work with, and honestly, losing one eye is only 30 degrees of your vision. So it's not that bad really," he said.

kuttless
12-03-2009, 08:57 PM
Awesome thread.

vor033
12-03-2009, 09:33 PM
Colorful Afghan horizon

A U.S. Soldier stands against the Afghan skyline after securing a combat outpost in Rajankala in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, Nov. 26, 2009. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II

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vor033
12-03-2009, 10:39 PM
Paratroopers with 1st Platoon, Company B, 2nd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division (Advise and Assist Brigade), train using infrared lasers and night vision optics at Camp Ramadi, Iraq, Oct. 26. The paratroopers train constantly to maintain their fighting edge while standing ready to provide assistance to Iraqi security forces.

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LineDoggie
12-03-2009, 10:47 PM
^
very nice.
whats that star on the overlap of the uniform under the US?

http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Branches/General%20Staff.htm

General Staff

vor033
12-03-2009, 11:01 PM
U.S. Army and Air Force personnel assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, return fire at insurgent positions in the Korengal Valley's steep hillside in Afghanistan's Kunar province, Aug. 13. The 20-minute gun battle ended with 500-pound bombs, dropped by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter jets, destroying insurgent positions in the surrounding hills.

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vor033
12-03-2009, 11:11 PM
Combat Engineers with Company A, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, paddle with all their might during a half-mile, relay boat race held Sep. 24 in honor of the 65th anniversary of the famous "Crossing of the Waal" River by engineers and infantrymen during WWII. Engineers from the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., have commemorated the river crossing with a boat race competition for years.

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vor033
12-03-2009, 11:19 PM
BAGHDAD – A line of Soldiers stretches ahead as if they're preparing for a wave assault along the width of an immense palm grove tucked between a highway and the Tigris River. It's morning but the sun is already beating down as the Soldiers prepare to enter a wall of vegetation.

Military vehicles kicked up dust and helicopters beat the treetops from above as the Soldiers invaded the palm grove in an aggressive effort by the North Carolina National Guardsmen of the 30th "Old Hickory" Brigade Combat Team to search for weapons caches near the Doura neighbourhood, June 13.

"Insurgents like to hide caches and pre-wired EFPs [explosively formed penetrators] in palm groves so all they have to do is pick'em up and plug'em in and set'em up in town," said Staff Sgt. John Perry, a squad leader assigned to Company A, 252nd Combined Arms Battalion, 30th HBCT.

Once the Old Hickory Soldiers and their Iraqi National Police partners entered the palm grove, they fanned out and swept through thick underbrush along a rutted landscape. The effort was conducted to discourage insurgents from using the palm grove as a hiding place for weapons.

"We're trying to find caches so they can't go out there and hide weapons and then hit us with them," said Spc. William Felts of Mount Airy, N.C., an infantryman assigned to A Co., 252nd CAB, 30th HBCT.

Soldiers penetrating the palm grove soon found themselves neck-deep in brush and briers. The sound of radios crackled through the vegetation as the line of Soldiers soon lost sight of one another. Though out of sight, no Soldier was ever out of mind.

"In a sense it brought everybody closer together as a team because it made everybody check on each other, making sure everybody was hydrated," said Pfc. Larry Schafer of Leland, N.C., an infantryman also assigned to Co. A, 252nd CAB, 30th HBCT.

Other mission factors Perry said helped strengthen his Soldiers were navigation, communication, weapons discipline and endurance in the heat and rough terrain.

"It makes them more mentally tough. My point of view is the more they go out, the more they can handle it and the more they expect what's out there," said Perry, a native of Williamston, N.C. "It was kind of challenging and I think we did real well."

As the Soldiers trudged through the dense vegetaion, they gradually emerged on the other side of the grove, near the banks of the Tigris River. Each Soldier pulled security while waiting for their comrades to make it out of the palm grove.

Spc. Juan Gonzalez, a sniper from Asheville, N.C., said searches like the one in the palm grove make the neighborhood safer for everyone – Soldiers and the Iraqis.

"Their kids can at least go in their backyard because it's safe. The insurgents see us combing these places and hopefully won't come back," said Gonzalez, who is assigned to Co. A, 252nd CAB, 30th HBCT.

Though no weapons were found, the sight of Soldiers and the IP forcing their way through dense brush, alert and watchful, will mark the huge palm grove as one more place where insurgents can't claim ground.

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vor033
12-03-2009, 11:36 PM
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Colorado Army National Guard's newest infantry battalion conducted air assault training, at Fort Carson, Colo., with the help of 2nd Battalion, 135th Aviation Regiment.

Colorado National Guard's Company A, 1st Battalion, 157th Infantry Regiment was at Fort Carson for a three-day training event. Known as a "MUTA 6," the Soldiers arrived for duty Friday morning to begin training.

"The focus of our training this weekend is to occupy an assembly area and [conduct] squad patrols," said Infantry Squad Leader Staff Sgt. Robert Girard of Company A, 1st Battalion, 157th Infantry, who recently transferred to the Colorado Army National Guard from the active duty Army.

Arriving with three UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters Friday morning, the infantry Soldiers prepared themselves for air assault training with 2nd Battalion, 135th Aviation Regiment.

"We'll start off first phase which will be static load training. Then we'll conduct an air assault into a landing zone on the south side of Fort Carson," said Maj. Brey Hopkins of 1st Battalion, 157th Infantry. Once off the Black Hawk at the landing zone, the Soldiers will conduct squad patrol operations, he said.

Staff Sgt. Marc Belo, a Black Hawk crew chief assigned to 2nd Battalion, 135th Aviation Regiment, briefed the Infantrymen about getting on and off a Black Hawk helicopter with their weapon and gear in hand.

"Put [the ruck sack] on your knees," said Belo. "Then when we land and the doors open, throw the rucks right out. It doesn't matter who has what gear at that moment just to get out."

Belo also gave the infantrymen a thorough safety brief about air assault training in a Black Hawk.

The infantrymen were instructed to move a few feet out of the doors on either side of the Black Hawk without moving too far toward the front or rear of the aircraft. Belo explained why it was important for Soldiers to not block the front sides of the aircraft.

"During an air assault, for those few seconds while the aircraft is on the ground, [the Black Hawk gunner maintains] the biggest guns out here," said Belo emphasizing why it's important to not get in the gunner's way.

As with all Army training, the air assault training was done in phases - crawl, walk, run. The phases, starting at the slowest and moving to "combat" speed, help Soldiers train safely while learning a new task.

The battalion was converted earlier this year from field artillery.

"We don't have the experience in infantry so we are establishing the building blocks," said Girard. With relief, Girard added that the company is starting to do its job [as infantry] - light infantry tactics – versatile, mobile and disciplined.

Combining many training elements into one weekend, after the air assault training, the company will ruck march approximately four miles to their next objective.

Despite Colorado's winter weather and intermittent snow showers, the Soldiers will train until Sunday introducing infantry tactics to their newest members and reinforcing basic Soldiering skills to veteran members.


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vor033
12-03-2009, 11:39 PM
FORT BRAGG, N.C. – "I got blown up." That's how Spc. Andrew Cossette describes the incident that earned him his Combat Infantryman Badge, a prestigious award given to infantrymen who come under fire in combat. While patrolling through Baghdad in 2007, Cossette's Humvee hit an improvised explosive device, and the explosion knocked him briefly unconscious. Months later, after the paperwork was processed, Cossette had his CIB.

Though he is proud of what he accomplished during his 15-month deployment, Cossette said he realizes, in his case, it didn't take a lot of skill to get the CIB.

"All you have to do is be in the right place at the right time," Cossette said. "Or, the wrong place at the wrong time, depending on how you want to look at it."

By contrast, Cossette and 181 other infantrymen from 2nd Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division are currently competing for a badge that is unequivocally a measure of individual soldiering skills: the Expert Infantryman Badge.

"If you're in the right place at the right time, you can get a CIB. You have to show some motivation, some interest, and some knowledge to get the EIB," said Sgt. 1st Class Frederick Shinlever, of Indianapolis, the non-commissioned officer in charge of the 2nd BCT EIB site.

The EIB is awarded to infantrymen who score a "Go" at 24 graded skill stations testing their infantry knowledge and skills. Before they even get to the test site, candidates must have already completed a 12-mile road march, shot expert on the firing range, and scored well on a PT test. During the testing, candidates are evaluated on their ability to operate weapons systems such as the M249 squad automatic weapon, the M240 machine gun, and the AT4 rocket launcher; communicate over a radio; perform land navigation; apply first aid to a casualty; emplace a claymore mine and much more.

The EIB was first awarded in 1943, and although some of the tasks have changed, the basic concept has remained the same.

"It's just all the basic infantry tasks that a Soldier should know," said Sgt. 1st Class Paul Cottrell, a platoon sergeant with Company D, 1st Battalion, 325th A.I.R. Cottrell, who got his EIB in 2001, was running the M4 station during the testing.

While the EIB is typically held annually, this year marks the first time 2nd BCT has held EIB testing since 2006, due to deployments.

Shinlever said the pace of deployments in the modern era means infantrymen are almost guaranteed to see combat, making the EIB more important than ever.

"The skills they learn here is what saves lives," Shinlever said. "It's some of the best individual training these guys will ever get."

Out at the test site in the Fort Bragg woods, the candidates went through a grueling three-day train up and then two days of practice under real conditions prior to test day. On day two of the train up, Pfc. Carl Miller, of Big Rapids, Mich., sat in the shade taking a quick break between stations. Miller was tired and drenched in sweat, but he said he was still motivated. He was determined to get his EIB, he said.

"As an infantryman, it lets people realize that you're a professional in everything you do," Miller said.

Cossette, who earned his CIB without having to think about it, said he was looking forward to putting his skills to the test and earning his EIB.

"It will be nice to get it, just to say, 'yeah, I know my stuff,'" he said.

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vor033
12-03-2009, 11:47 PM
FORWARD OPERATING BASE KALSU, Iraq – Overnight rainfall and high winds boded ominously for the morning's mission but as the sun rose, clear skies greeted Soldiers of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

On Jan. 6, Soldiers of Company B, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, conducted Operation Mauser, to re-familiarize themselves with an area just two kilometers southwest of Patrol Base Hawkes.

Staff Sgt. David Springer, infantryman and squad leader with Company B, said he and his fellow Soldiers were going to an area where just a month prior they had received enemy contact.

Even with sunlight breaking through, morning temperatures were in the low 40s and the night's stormy weather turned the dirt roads to muck.

The mud made movement slow, but the pace was steady. First Lt. Jeno Giorgi, platoon leader for 2nd platoon, cleared the first house and met its owner, then took his Soldiers to the neighboring residence approximately 400 meters away.

As they approached the farm house, Giorgio's Soldiers reported the dilapidated home was abandoned and had been padlocked.

In an instant the morning's silence ended.

The familiar crack of AK-47 gun fire aimed in their direction forced the Soldiers to the nearest cover.

Immediately, the Soldiers nearest the contact side of the platoon located their adversaries 200 meters to the south and began exchanging rounds.

The suspected insurgents broke contact, but in an attempt to thwart their escape, Soldiers of Company B used a grenade launcher to discourage the enemy's movement.

Firing three grenades, Spc. Carlos Lopez, an infantryman and team leader for Company B, attempted to halt the enemy's retreat by denying them escape routes.

In another attempt at halting the enemy's getaway, Cpl. Keith McKern, a forward observer, said he called in the coordinates for mortars and delivered two high explosive 120 millimeter rounds on the opposite side of where the grenades had landed.

Believing they had pinned down their assailants, a squad of Soldiers maneuvered toward the enemy.

Moving quickly and carefully, the squad's caution paid off when they came across a suspected pressure plate improvised explosive device.

A common tactic for insurgents, the PPIED is used to kill, injure or slow Coalition Forces on the attack.

With the support of an explosive ordnance disposal team the obstacle was removed and the search continued.

After a thorough search of the area, they determined the insurgents had indeed fled.

"To me, it's just like any other day," Giorgi said. "It's not the first time we've been shot at."

Though their attackers had escaped, Giorgi said the tactics they use are a way for insurgents to harass Company B and prevent them from gaining a foothold as Coalition Forces move further south in Arab Jabour.

Since the 1-30th Inf. Regt. arrived in Arab Jabour and other nearby areas south of Baghdad, they have made steady progress in killing and capturing al-Qaida leaders, effectively disrupting the terrorists' organizational structure and pushing them further south.

Since the establishment of PB Hawkes in mid-September, the Soldiers of Company B have been at the forefront of 1-30th Inf. Regt.'s push south.

In addition to establishing security for their area, Giorgi said they are working to improve the quality of life for villages surrounding their patrol base through microgrants and access to clean water.

By holding close the sacrifices of their fellow Soldiers and with the knowledge they've gathered over the past seven months, Company B will continue to work at what they do best: hunt insurgents, diminish their resources and help ordinary Iraqis take a stand against al-Qaida extremists.

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vor033
12-04-2009, 12:03 AM
Shortly after the sun broke through the morning sky on January 7,2009 indirect fire infantrymen (mortar men) and fire support specialists from 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment started setting up outside Forward Operating Base (FOB) Warrior for an opportunity to advance their skills.

Rain fell sporadically, growing steady as the up-armored humvees rolled out to the range, leading the Soldiers to joke "if it ain't raining, we ain't training."

Knowing that an impact area can be full of unexploded ordinance, the forward observers immediately cleared their observation point; meanwhile the mortar men were busy positioning their 81 mm "guns."

More than 100 white phosphorus, illumination and high explosive (HE) rounds meant plenty of ordinance to launch down-range; filling the day, and much of the night, with countless explosions.

"Training exercises allow us to remain proficient at indirect firing, and forward observer skills," said Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Barton, the Battalion Fire Support Non-Commissioned Officer.

Back at Fort Campbell, Ky., the "No Slack" Battalion would conduct similar training exercises at least once every quarter. According to Sgt. 1st Class Jason Sager, the Battalion's Mortar Platoon Leader, they are trying to keep that pace while deployed.

In preparation, the Soldiers spent the week prior to the live-fire exercise conducting misfire rehearsals and gun preparation.

"They did well in rehearsals," Sager commented. "They were prepared today."

Soon after placed their targets, small foreign trucks so rusted that they blended in with vast dirt area, the first mission ripped over the radio.

After receiving the elevation and distance to the center of the impact area, the mortar men responded by adjusting their gun and sliding the first of many rounds to come down the mortar tube.

With the first blast, the forward observers closely watched for the familiar impact, knowing their mission also requires them to be the eyes of the firer, relaying their observations back.

Rain fell periodically throughout the exercise, but the dark clouds persistently hovered overhead, as rounds hurled through the gray sky, sending a cloud of dirt and smoke into the mix upon impact.

As the last round burst high in the night sky, and the dark yellow light slowly trailed off providing sight in the darkest of nights, the Soldiers packed up their gear and scraped sticky clay mud off their boots as they climbed into the trucks eagerly anticipating hot chow that would bring their day to close.

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Arnie100
12-04-2009, 12:10 AM
As usual, excellent pics, vor033! Thank you!

vor033
12-04-2009, 12:22 AM
As usual, excellent pics, vor033! Thank you!

Thank you and i am glad you like them :)

eluphant21
12-04-2009, 04:54 AM
It's interesting that non SOF guys wearing multic@m in Iraq.


http://www.army.mil/-news/2009/11/24/30878-joint-teamwork-keeps-foreign-fighters-from-crossing-borders/


The crews responsible for execution are pilots and aircrews of Task Force Desperados, consisting of the Tennessee Army National Guard's 1-230th Air Cavalry Squadron, and elements from 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade; the 3rd Iraqi Army commandos based in Al Kisuk, Iraq, and the Michigan Army National Guard's Company F, 425th Infantry (Airborne), Long Range Surveillance, attached to 6th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division.


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Soldiers from Company F, 425th Infantry (Airborne), Long Range Surveillance, Michigan National Guard and commandos from the 3rd Iraqi Army based in Al Kisuk, Iraq, await extraction just outside of Biyaj, Iraq, Nov. 7.

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Soldiers from Company F, 425th Infantry (Airborne), Long Range Surveillance, Michigan National Guard and commandos from the 3rd Iraqi Army based in Al Kisuk, Iraq, return from a mission and load one of two Hawaii-based UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters just outside of Biyaj, Iraq, near the Syrian border, Nov. 7.

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Soldiers from Company F, 425th Infantry (Airborne), Long Range Surveillance, Michigan National Guard and commandos from the 3rd Iraqi Army based in Al Kisuk, Iraq, await extraction just outside of Biyaj, Iraq, Nov. 7.

The Dane
12-04-2009, 01:15 PM
U.S. Army and Air Force personnel assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, return fire at insurgent positions in the Korengal Valley's steep hillside in Afghanistan's Kunar province, Aug. 13. The 20-minute gun battle ended with 500-pound bombs, dropped by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter jets, destroying insurgent positions in the surrounding hills.


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What kind of M4 is that??(that barrel)

Bro Jangles
12-04-2009, 01:18 PM
thats a Vortex Flash hider.

kinney_bmx
12-04-2009, 01:18 PM
Its a Vortex flash hider IIRC

Goddamn you BJ

The Dane
12-04-2009, 02:45 PM
Ahh.. i see.. thanks! :)

vor033
12-04-2009, 03:20 PM
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CAMP BUNDELA, India – Sgt. Charles Jobst, followed by Cpl Arthur Fread and other U.S. Soldiers, exit a helicopter flown by Indian army aviators during static load training as part of Yudh Abhyas, a bilateral training exercise designed to develop and expand upon the relationship between the two armies. The U.S. Soldiers are from 2nd platoon, Troop A, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment “Strykehorse,” 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The indian soliders are from the 201st Army Aviation Squadron. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Crista Yazzie)

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CAMP BUNDELA, India - U.S. Soldiers and Indian Army soldiers simulate a medical evacuation to an Indian Army Advanced Light Helicopter as part of Yudh Abhyas, a bilateral exercise involving the armies of India and the United States. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Crista Yazzie)

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CAMP BUNDELA, India - Sgt. Luke Hoffman guards the perimeter as an Indian Army Helicopter lifts off for a simulation of a medical evacuation during Yudh Abhyas, a bilateral exercise involving the Armies of India and the United States. Hoffman is assigned to Troop A, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment 'Strykehorse,' 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Crista Yazzie)

vor033
12-04-2009, 10:25 PM
CONTINGENCY OPERATING BASE SPEICHER, Iraq – Four, 10–ton MRAP's hum in the dark.

As motors idle, Soldiers with headlamps crawl in and around each metal beast, conducting oft-performed pre-combat checks and inspections.

Moments later, approximately 20 Tennessee Army National Guard Soldiers of Troop G, 1st Battalion, 230th Air Cavalry Squadron, Task Force Wings, gather around their convoy commander for safety and mission briefs. Some participate in a brief prayer.

Within the hour, additional vehicles join the mission as the troop embarks on another Combat Logistics Patrol, one of dozens conducted since their arrival in Iraq in July, 2009.

The CLPs provide food, water, fuel and fresh personnel to a small outpost near the Syrian border called FOB Nimur where other Troop G Soldiers are engaged in forward arming and refueling operations for the region's military helicopters.

Maj. Daniel F. Pugh, commander, Troop G, and a 20-year military veteran and native of Franklin, Tenn., explained that his Soldiers provide all necessary ground support for over 600 Soldiers of the Tennessee ANG's 1-230th ACS, currently deployed to northern Iraq.

"We are the squadron's forward support troop which includes a maintenance, distribution and headquarters platoon," said Pugh.

"Our maintenance platoon attends to the maintenance needs of all ground support equipment within the squadron, which includes everything from wheeled-vehicles to generators and pumps. Our distribution platoon is responsible for maintaining and operating our three forward arming and refueling points. Our headquarters platoon conducts the CLPs," he said.

Pugh's troop was constituted less than a year before the 1-230th ACS received orders to deploy to Iraq. It's a unit truly representative of his home state. Troop G consists of about 175 Soldiers who hail from various locations to include Smyrna, Alcoa and Jackson, Tenn., among other cities and towns. Ironically, Pugh's Soldiers now find themselves similarly spread throughout northern Iraq, with Soldiers living and working in Mosul at Forward Operating Base Diamond Back, Tall Afar at FOB Sykes and near the town of Sinjar at FOB Nimur.

"Our Soldiers come from all over the state of Tennessee," said 2nd Lt. Cibeles Ramirez-Rodriguez, platoon leader, Troop G, 1-230th ACS. 2nd Lt. Ramirez-Rodriguez is a resident of Clarksville, Tenn. In Iraq, she's both Troop G's maintenance platoon leader and production control officer, ensuring that the unit receives the necessary parts and equipment to repair and replace anything related to ground transportation.

"Perhaps [being from all over] explains why we have such a wonderful variety of necessary skills," said 2nd Lt. Ramirez-Rodriguez. "That variety has proven to be helpful given the fact that our support mission in Iraq is so substantial," she continued.

"Whether it's maintenance or refueling, everything starts with the forward support troop. When we fix a generator, for instance, that generator powers certain equipment that's used to fix a helicopter. When we fix a fuel truck, it becomes capable of pumping fuel into a helicopter. And quite frankly, we do it all very well. We do it well because we've really bonded as a team which is a reflection of the quality of our Soldiers."

Two of those Soldiers are Staff Sgt. Danny Woods and Sgt. David Roach. Staff Sgt. Woods, the 39 year-old father of two from Chattanooga, Tenn., is a Troop G's platoon sergeant. Roach, a 26 year-old native of Cookeville, Tenn., is a mechanic and truck driver.

Both have deployed before and both continue to serve in the Tennessee ANG for similar reasons.

"I do this out here for the love of duty," said Woods. "That idea was in me growing up and through high school JROTC," he said. "I think I just love serving my country, and being around other Tennessee National Guard Soldiers that I can help take care of and influence. I've been in this organization for awhile, and I can sympathize with the younger Soldier and they know it."

"I always wanted to be a Soldier, and I chose to stay in the Tennessee Guard because we're unique," said Roach. "We're tight, and maybe even tighter than your active duty units," he explained.

"We really know each other. We went to high school together; we know each other's families; our kids go to the same schools; we go to church together, and it isn't just for a year, it's a lifetime. That's unique and that's special. If you ask around you'll find that a lot of us feel the same way about the Guard."

The 1-230th ACS deployed with more than 600 soldiers from units in Smyrna, Alcoa and Jackson, Tenn., back in July, 2009. The squadron is task organized with a Headquarters, Headquarters Troop. Troops A, B and C are equipped with the unit's OH-58D Kiowa Warrior helicopters, whose primary missions are reconnaissance and security operations. Troop D is equipped with Blackhawk helicopters used to transport troops and supplies.

Troops E and F handle the squadron's first level, minor maintenance, and intermediate maintenance, component and specialty repair work, respectively. Finally, Troop G provides ground transportation, downed aircraft recovery capability and fuel and ammunition supply in addition to other forward support functions.

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vor033
12-04-2009, 10:32 PM
Soldiers from the 115th Military Police Company of the Rhode Island Army National Guard stand in formation during a transfer of authority ceremony at Joint Task Force Guantanamo, Nov. 12, 2009. The 115th Military Police Company will take over for the 480th Military Police Company of the Puerto Rico Army National Guard after a year-long deployment to U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in support of Joint Task Force Guantanamo.

JTF Guantanamo conducts safe, humane, legal and transparent care and custody of detainees, including those convicted by military commission and those ordered released by a court. The JTF conducts intelligence collection, analysis and dissemination for the protection of detainees and personnel working in JTF Guantanamo facilities and in support of the War on Terrorism. JTF Guantanamo provides support to the Office of Military Commissions, to law enforcement and to war crimes investigations. The JTF conducts planning for and, on order, responds to Caribbean mass migration operations.

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Navel Lint
12-04-2009, 10:46 PM
Guam National Guard

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Pfc. John Manibusan and Staff Sgt. Rodney Retuyan, both infantrymen assigned to the 1st Battalion, 294th infantry Regiment, Guam National Guard tend to a role player who was notionally shot during a peacekeeping scenario as part of Exercise Garuda Shield 09, at the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Darat, or Indonesian army, Infantry Training Center in Bandung Indonesia, June 22. Garuda Shield is a two week exercise brings together Soldiers and Marines from nine nations to train on the United Nations mandated ground-level tasks. GS09 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional peace and security. Training will focus on peace Support Operations and Global Peace Operation Initiative Certification, a Command Post Exercise, a Field Training exercise and Humanitarian and Civic Assistance Projects.

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Staff Sgt. Ronald Rios of the Guam Army National Guard's 1-294th Infantry Regiment introduces the four man litter carry exercise to his counter parts from the Tentara Nasional Indnesia-Angkatan Darat, or Indonesian Army, during Exercise Garuda Shield 09, at the Infantry Training Center in Bandung, Indonesia June 19. The two week exercise brings together Soldiers and Marines from nine nations to train on the UN mandated ground-level task. GS09 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional Peace and Security. Training will focus on peace support operations and Global Peace Operation Initiative certification, a Command Post Exercise, a Field Training exercise and Humanitarian and Civic Assistance Projects.


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Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadet Lee San Nicolas and 1st Lt. Shawn Meno, platoon leader assigned to the 1st Battalion, 294th Infantry Regiment, Guam National Guard try to help a role player who was robbed. The Soldiers were participating in a a peacekeeping scenario as part of Exercise Garuda Shield 09, at the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Darat, or Indonesian army, Infantry Training Center in Bandung Indonesia, June 22. Garuda Shield is a two week exercise brings together Soldiers and Marines from nine nations to train on the United Nations mandated ground-level tasks. GS09 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional peace and security. Training will focus on peace Support Operations and Global Peace Operation Initiative Certification, a Command Post Exercise, a Field Training exercise and Humanitarian and Civic Assistance Projects.

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Soldiers assigned to the 1st Battalion, 294th Infantry Regiment, Guam National Guard move past civilian role players blocking the road during a peacekeeping scenario as part of Exercise Garuda Shield 09, at the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Darat, or Indonesian army, Infantry Training Center in Bandung Indonesia, June 22. Garuda Shield is a two week exercise brings together Soldiers and Marines from nine nations to train on the United Nations mandated ground-level tasks. GS09 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional peace and security. Training will focus on peace Support Operations and Global Peace Operation Initiative Certification, a Command Post Exercise, a Field Training exercise and Humanitarian and Civic Assistance Projects.

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DJIBOUTI, Africa (Aug. 25, 2007) – Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Angela McLane fires an M-24 rifle while Sgt. 1st Class Ronald Brantley from Guam National Guard Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 294th Infantry, monitors her accuracy during a weapons qualification course for servicemembers attached to Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA). CJTF-HOA conducts unified action in the Combined Joint Operations Area-Horn of Africa to prevent conflict, promote regional stability and protect coalition interests in order to prevail against extremism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael R. McCormick
(RELEASED)

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Army Spc. Mark Angelo Deras from the Guam army national guard readiness, perform a communication check on top of a hill overlooking Godoria Range, Djibouti, Africa, Mar. 16, 2008. The Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa's U.S. and coalition personnel will be providing security and additional communication support for the Naval Service Fire Support Exercise under NAVCENT. The exercise is to help maintain the proficiency of the crew aboard the USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81) Guided Missile Destroyer.

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Djiboutian army soldiers try to detain U.S. Army Spc. Jonathan Cepeda, role-playing an opposing forces member, during Operation Able Dart 08-01 on Forward Operating Location Dikhil, Djibouti, March 6, 2008. U.S. Army Soldiers from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 249th Infantry Regiment (Light), Guam Army National Guard are teaching counterterrorism tactics to Djiboutian army soldiers during the 10-week Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock)(Released)

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U.S. Army Spc. Joaquin Castro, from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 249th Infantry Regiment (Light), Guam Army National Guard, simulates an attack on Djiboutian army soldiers during Operation Able Dart 08-01 on Forward Operating Location Ali Sabieh, Djibouti, March 4, 2008. The Soldiers are teaching counterterrorism tactics to Djiboutian army soldiers during the 10-week Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock) (Released)

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Djiboutian army soldiers conduct a patrol during Operation Able Dart 08-01 on Forward Operating Location Dikhil, Djibouti, March 6, 2008. U.S. Army Soldiers from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 249th Infantry Regiment (Light), Guam Army National Guard are teaching counterterrorism tactics to Djiboutian army soldiers during the 10-week Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock) (Released)

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A member of Team Alpha, a Guam National Guard Company attached to CJTF-HOA, conducts patrol training with the Ethiopian military.

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BANDUNG, Indonesia (June 22, 2009) – Staff Sgt. Ray Jay Aromin, an infantryman assigned to the 1st Battalion, 294th infantry Regiment, Guam National Guard, shields a role player from scenario-driven gunshots during a peacekeeping scenario as part of Exercise Garuda Shield 09, at the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Darat, or Indonesian Army, Infantry Training Center. Garuda Shield is a two week exercise brings together Soldiers and Marines from nine nations to train on United Nations-mandated ground-level tasks. GS09 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional peace and security. Training is focusing on peace support operations and Global Peace Operation Initiative Certification, and includes a command post exercise, a field training exercise and humanitarian and civic assistance projects. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Jesse Toves, 1st Bn. 294th Inf. Regt., Guam National Guard) 090622-A-2347T-261

Navel Lint
12-04-2009, 10:47 PM
U.S. Virgin Islands National Guard

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Sgt. Orville Colburne, a member of the 640th Quartermaster Company, fuels a water pump in southern Iraq. The 640th, a National Guard unit from St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island, is serving a year long tour out of Camp Cedar II.


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U.S. Army Nurse 1st Lt. Arnelle Lewis takes a Guatemalan boy's temperature during a medical readiness training exercise in Santa Cruz Balanya, Guatemala, on March 10, 2007. Lewis is a registered nurse attached to the U.S. Virgin Islands Army National Guard. DoD photo by Kaye Richey, U.S. Army.


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A local man offers Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Bailey, commander of the 640th Quartermaster Company, a freshly caught fish while Bailey and his team fueled a water pump in southern Iraq. During a year-long tour out of Camp Cedar II, members of the 640th act as coalition ambassadors to communities surrounding two major military posts in southern Iraq.

vor033
12-04-2009, 10:52 PM
FARAH PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Members of the Guam National Guard serving as the security force for the Farah Provincial Reconstruction Team conducted a presence patrol throughout the city of Farah, Farah province, Afghanistan, Nov. 9, 2009.

During the presence patrol, which is designed to project the power presence of local International Security Assistance Forces and to collect human intelligence from local citizens, the convoy stopped at a historic Citadel overlooking Farah City that is believed to have been built by Alexander the Great's forces as they made their way through Western Afghanistan around 330 B.C on their way to Kandahar and ultimately India.

The Citadel itself sits atop a large hill that provides a commanding view of the local area; a view that once projected the power of the Macedonian Kingdom and one that now is utilized to project the presence and the reach of the Guam National Guard of the Farah PRT.

During the presence patrol, the PRT member's not only took in the ambiance of the citadel but also met with local Afghans, discussed current issues, and handed out small items to the omnipresent hoards of children following ISAF members.

The goal of the Farah PRT is to promote conditions of Afghan self-sufficiency, enduring prosperity, and a secure, stable environment in Farah Province and throughout Afghanistan.


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vor033
12-04-2009, 11:03 PM
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The Battle of Long Island

Brooklyn, New York -- August 27, 1776 -- Colonel Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee, a hero of the Revolutionary War and father of Robert E. Lee, once commented that during the war "the state of Delaware furnished one regiment only; and certainly no regiment in the army surpassed it in soldiership." At the Battle of Long Island, the actions of the Delaware Regiment kept the American defeat from becoming a disaster. Fighting alongside the 1st Maryland Regiment, the soldiers from Delaware may well have prevented the capture of the majority of Washington's army - an event that might have ended the colonial rebellion. Organized in January 1776 by Colonel John Haslet, the Delaware Regiment was noted as the best uniformed and equipped regiment of the Continental Army. Delaware's blue jackets with red facings and white waistcoats and breeches would later become the uniform for all the Continental troops. During the Battle of Long Island, the Delaware and Maryland troops were positioned on the right of Washington's line. They defended the most direct route from the British landing site in south Brooklyn to the American fortifications in Brooklyn Heights. Though the troops faced the fiercest fighting of the day, they held their ground long enough to allow the remainder of Washington's army to safely retreat to the fortifications. However, the Delaware regiment was outflanked and forced to retreat, taking 23 prisoners with them, through marshland and across the Gow**** creek. Two nights later, Washington entrusted his Delaware and Maryland soldiers to be the rear guard as he secretly withdrew his army from Brooklyn to Manhattan. Today, the 175th Infantry Regiment, Maryland Army National Guard, preserves the legacy of the 1st Maryland Regiment. The 198th Signal Battalion, Delaware Army National Guard, perpetuates the proud lineage of the Delaware Regiment.


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On the Border

Arizona, August 1916 -- On March 9, 1916, Mexican rebels led by Pancho Villa attacked the U. S. Army garrison at Columbus, New Mexico. All available troops were rushed to the U. S. - Mexican border, but there were not enough regulars to patrol such a vast area. On May 9, the National Guard of Arizona, New Mexico and Texas was called into Federal service; on June 18, the entire National Guard, except for coast artillery units, was called. Within days the first of 158,664 National Guardsmen were on their way to camps in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. National Guard units began patrolling the border immediately and columns of Guardsmen soon dotted the desolate landscape from Arizona to Texas. Among the many units on the border was the 2nd Connecticut Infantry. On June 20, 1916, the regiment assembled and began preparations for the long rail journey to the border. Within a week they were on a troop train headed for Nogales, Arizona. Although their patrols along the border were important, the training that the Guardsmen received was invaluable. Guardsmen were physically toughened and officers and NCOs gained experience in handling troops in the field. The 2nd Connecticut mustered out of Federal service in November 1916, only to be mobilized again in February 1917. The training that the regiment received in Arizona would be important after the U. S. entered World War I two months later. Redesignated as the 102d Infantry and assigned to the famous 26th Yankee Division, the regiment fought in six World War I campaigns. The 102d Infantry, Connecticut Army National Guard continues its proud record of over 300 years of service to state and nation.


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Cuidado--Take Care--Bushmaster with Bolo!

Bicol Campaign, Luzon, Philippine Islands - April 3 and 4, 1945 -- Cries of Banzai rang through the snake infested jungles while the staccato of enemy machine guns, mortars and rifles rolled. The bayonet charges were suicidal but the 158th Regimental Combat Team, the Bushmasters, repulsed the enemy and advanced. It fought day after day, in critical battles to open the Visayan passages for allied shipping in the Pacific. The merciless campaign lasted two months in terrain laced with tank traps, wire, mines and bamboo thickets. This proud Arizona National Guard unit, organized as the Arizona Volunteer Infantry for the Indian campaigns in 1865, wore its motto, Cuidado, - Take Care - in jungles six years. Mustering in the great southwestern desert, the unit was mainly Mexican-American and North American Indian from twenty tribes. Expanded in Panama, it was one of World War II's few organizations to complete the trail from there to down under to Japan. Its shoulder insignia reflects familiarity with the deadly Panamanian Bushmaster snake and the Philippine machete--the bolo. Today, Headquarters Detachment, 158th Military Police Battalion, Tucson, holds the lineage and honors.


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Indiana Rangers: The Army Guard in Vietnam

South Vietnam 1969 -- On May 13, 1968, 12,234 Army National Guardsmen in 20 units from 17 states were mobilized for service during the Vietnam War. Eight units deployed to Vietnam and over 7,000 Army Guardsmen served in the war zone. Company D (Ranger), 151st Infantry, Indiana Army National Guard arrived in Vietnam in December 1968. As part of the II Field Force, the Indiana Rangers were assigned reconnaissance and intelligence-gathering missions. Operating deep in enemy territory, Ranger patrols engaged enemy units while conducting raids, ambushes and surveillance missions. "Delta Company" achieved an impressive combat record during its tour in Vietnam; unit members were awarded 510 medals for valor and service. The gallant record of Company D, 151st Infantry symbolizes the Army National Guard's performance in Vietnam.

Navel Lint
12-04-2009, 11:05 PM
Borinqueneers Open Doors to Peace and Security
Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa

Story by Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny
Date: 10.23.2009

ENTEBBE, Uganda—"Borinqueneers" from Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa opened the doors to its seventh Counter Terrorism Course for the Ugandan People's Defense Force, July 30, at the Kasenyi Military Training center.

The four-month course is being taught by "Borinqueneer" Soldiers from the 1/65th Infantry Battalion, Puerto Rico National Guard. According to historical records, the men of the 1/65th IN BN came up with the nickname "Borinqueneer" during a long sea voyager while serving in the Korean War. It is a combination of the words Buccaneers and Boriquen which is the name the Tainos Indians called the island (Puerto Rico) before the arrival of the Spaniards.

This is not the first time the 1/65th IN BN has been deployed to Africa. According to 1/65th IN BN historical documentation, they were deployed during WWII to North Africa in 1943. In 1944, they moved forward from Casablanca, Morocco to Italy and then France to join the 3rd Battalion and defeated Germany's 34th Infantry Division's 107th Infantry Regiment.

Sixty-six years later, the 1/65th IN BN is once again deployed to Africa. This time, they are deployed to Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti to support the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa's mission to foster regional stability, build security capacity, and forge relationships with our African partner nations.

In July, the 1/65th IN BN open the doors to teach the counter terrorism course for the first time in Africa. During the course the instructors and assistant instructors from the UPDF (soldiers who have graduated from previous courses) will partner to share their knowledge and skills with the UPDF student soldiers to help the UPDF develop counter terrorism practices to increase peace and security in Uganda, said Sgt. 1st Class Heriberto Crespo CJTF-HOA Counter Terrorism Course non-commissioned officer in charge.

Before deploying, most of the instructors received additional training in Puerto Rico to become instructors and some have experience mentoring Afghani soldiers during the unit's previous deployment to Afghanistan.

"It's a great experience to be able to mentor the UPDF students by giving them the knowledge I have as an infantryman," said Specialist Jose Alicea, 1st Platoon instructor. "It's a great feeling knowing you're able to help someone be more proficient at their job. I'm not only teaching them, I'm also learning from them as I see their progress."

The course is taught using UPDF equipment, supplies and weapons used by the Soldiers to perform their duties. The instructors received additional training on the AK-47 rifle used during the course. Private Kamba Boaz, UPDF soldier and 1st Platoon assistant instructor, works with the instructors and helps keep communication flowing during the classes.

"It's a very good opportunity for me because I am learning more and have the opportunity to bring my skills to the training," said Pvt. Boaz. "Working with the men from the 1/65th (IN BN) from Puerto Rico is the most wonderful thing. They are good friends. They are real professionals. Through our friendship, we are able to learn more from them and they are able to learn more from us."

Before the students start learning counter terrorism techniques, they will learn basic soldier skills during the first eight weeks of training. Some of the skills include individual movement, map reading, land navigation, first aid, search techniques, improvised explosive devices recognition, HIV prevention and human rights. Once these skills are mastered, the students will progress to squad operations and learn to work as a team.

Each squad is made up of nine soldiers. During this section of the training they will learn to move as a team to maneuver through danger areas and identify details as a group. Supervised by the instructors, the students practice these skills in training scenarios called training lanes. Using the standard operating procedures the students are evaluated to ensure they understand the basic skills before moving to the second phase of the course Military Operation Urbanized Terrain training.

"We train to standards not to time," said Crespo. "We will take as much time as needed until each student performs to standard. We move as fast as the slowest soldier and the training platoons move forward at the same time."

The course is divided up into four platoons of 40 students each having four to five instructors and an assistant instructor. The training is progressing at a steady pace as the UPDF students are fast learners and some have already faced combat in the Congo, said Crespo. Despite the language barriers and slow supply lines the students are motivated to learn.

"Both students and instructors face the challenge of English as a second language," said Crespo. "We all understand English, but we add different accents to the language. After about three weeks, we were able to understand each others accents and now we are sharing languages. Many of the students are learning our language, Spanish."

The instructors anticipate the MOUT training to start sometime in late October. The UPDF leaders have asked the CJTF-HOA to provide the students with realistic training. The 1/65th instructors have created a MOUT site to resemble an urban environment similar to a Ugandan village.

"Terrorist don't fight in the open with soldiers," said Crespo. "They attack cities, hospitals, churches, schools, urban areas with innocent people. That's where terrorists attack. We will build a MOUT site resembling a city in Uganda and train the UPDF students to detect and respond to terrorist attacks."

These instructors from the 1/65th are the tip of the spear for their unit. The course is expected to finish later this year and will end with a graduation ceremony attended by UPDF and CJTF-HOA military leaders. Successful completion of this course will open doors for similar training opportunities for the 1/65th IN BN with CJTF-HOA's African partners throughout the Horn of Africa, said Sergeant Crespo.


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ENTEBBE, Uganda -- Staff Sgt. Douglas Lamberty, 2nd Platoon instructor at the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa?s Counter Terrorism Course evaluates Ugandan People?s Defense Force students while they provide medical care under fire during a training scenario, called a training lane Sept. 23, 2009. (Photo/Released Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny)


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ENTEBBE, Uganda -- Staff Sgt. Douglas Lamberty, 1/65th Infantry Battalion, 2nd Platoon instructor evaluates Ugandan People?s Defense Force students as they maneuver as a group through dangerous terrain and take fire during a training scenario at the Combine Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa?s Counter Terrorism Course, Sept. 23, 2009. The Borinqueneer Soldiers from the 1/65th IN BN, Puerto Rico National Guard are instructing the 7th Counter Terrorism Course at the Kasenyi Military Training Center. (Photo/Release Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny)

http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/8663/4090013380f52dccec77dotjpg (http://img51.imageshack.us/i/4090013380f52dccec77dotjpg/)

ENTEBBE, Uganda -- Spec. Michael Delgado, 1/65th IN BN 2nd Platoon instructor demonstrates to Ugandan People?s Defense Force students how to continue firing while carrying a man to safety during a training scenario in the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa?s Counter Terrorism Course, Sept. 23, 2009. (Photo/Release Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny)

vor033
12-04-2009, 11:32 PM
Maryland National Guard Soldiers from C Troop 1/158th Cavalry Para jump out of CH-47 Maryland Chinook Helicopters during their Annual Training. Maryland National Guard Soldiers from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade join thousands of National Guard members, soldiers and airmen from all over the country to participate in military exercises at Volk Field and Fort McCoy, Wisc., The annual ‘Patriot Exercise’ brings in coalition forces from as far away as the Netherlands for combat training and a homeland defense scenario.

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vor033
12-04-2009, 11:43 PM
Maryland National Guard Soldiers from C Troop 1/158th Cavalry participate in Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction (SPIE) training. SPIE was developed to rapidly insert and/or extract a reconnaissance patrol from an area that does not permit a helicopter to land. Generally, the SPIE rope is lowered into the pickup area from a hovering helicopter. Patrol personnel, each wearing a harness with an attached carabineer, hook up to a D-ring inserted in the SPIE rope. The helicopter lifts vertically from an extract zone until the rope and personnel are clear of obstructions, then proceeds in forward flight to a secure insert zone. Maryland National Guard Soldiers from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade join thousands of National Guard members, soldiers and airmen from all over the country to participate in military exercises at Volk Field and Fort McCoy, Wisc., The annual ‘Patriot Exercise’ brings in coalition forces from as far away as the Netherlands for combat training and a homeland defense scenario.



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vor033
12-05-2009, 12:18 AM
Soldiers of The Old Guard during the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington.

The Old Guard, while performing primarily in a ceremonial role, is nonetheless an Infantry unit, which is required to maintain the same certifications of all Infantry units in the U.S. Army.

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Navel Lint
12-05-2009, 01:56 AM
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Bro Jangles
12-05-2009, 02:10 AM
love the picsd from basic. ill be there this summer!

TheCarLessDriven
12-05-2009, 02:12 AM
Is the later pics in the basic training set, where they are training with the Armour and the mock towns part of the AIT part of OSUT, after the initial phases?

Also, how did that kid get lucky enough to have a photographer follow him through basic? lol

I'm heading to basic this spring as well!

Navel Lint
12-05-2009, 02:26 AM
Is the later pics in the basic training set, where they are training with the Armour and the mock towns part of the AIT part of OSUT, after the initial phases?


I dont think so. June 19, 2007. 12:18 a.m. was his arrival at basic.


Nov. 28, 2007. 3:18 p.m. Ian, right, and Spec. Corey Snyder of Harrisburg, Pa., enter the shoot house with their team during a house-clearing exercise at Fort Carson. Alpha Company is going through Squad Battle Drill Training, four days running dry, blank then live-fire drills.



Also, how did that kid get lucky enough to have a photographer follow him through basic? lol





For 27 months, Ian Fisher, his parents and friends, and the U.S. Army allowed Denver Post reporters and a photographer to watch and chronicle his recruitment, induction, training, deployment, and, finally, his return from combat.

The story was written by Kevin Simpson with Michael Riley, Bruce Finley and Craig F. Walker. It was reported by Riley in Colorado and at Fort Benning, Ga., Finley at Fort Carson and in Iraq, and photographer Craig F. Walker throughout.

The multimedia project, including all the photos, video and special features, can be viewed at www.denverpost.com/americansoldier (http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2009/09/10/ian-fisher-american-soldier/www.denverpost.com/americansoldier).


You can also see all the pictures with a timeline here
http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2009/09/10/ian-fisher-american-soldier/

Bro Jangles
12-05-2009, 02:30 AM
this summer i got to basic, then i go to AIT to be a 19k

dudski
12-05-2009, 02:54 AM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/USArmyKorea1dotjpg
WTF? no forward assist werent the xm16 phased out in nam?!

Bro Jangles
12-05-2009, 02:57 AM
Linedoggie said he was USAF

dudski
12-05-2009, 03:07 AM
good point, but werent they unreliable? ive read countless stories on how they jammed up resulting in many deaths...

Bro Jangles
12-05-2009, 03:13 AM
good point, but werent they unreliable? ive read countless stories on how they jammed up resulting in many deaths...
the original required aloty of cleaning, but the original issues to the USAF in the 60s were very succesufull which helped lead to the mass adoption.

dudski
12-05-2009, 03:15 AM
was not aware of that thanks, then why did the army and marines switch to the newer one?

vor033
12-05-2009, 04:13 PM
Commanding General's Mounted Color Guard

Established in 1992, the Commanding General's Mounted Color Guard (formerly the Fort Riley Honor Guard) provides a link to Fort Riley's historic past. Troopers and horses of this unit are outfitted in the uniforms, accoutrements and equipment of the Civil War period. Soldiers are detailed from the ranks of units assigned to Fort Riley and receive instruction from manuals used by Civil War cavalrymen.


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Laconian
12-05-2009, 04:17 PM
That's cool!

vor033
12-05-2009, 04:33 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers from the 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team prepare to clear palm groves in Buhriz, Iraq. Soldiers from the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, are conducting operations in the Diyala province

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vor033
12-05-2009, 04:40 PM
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A formation of Bradley Fighting Vehicles safeguarding the perimeter during a search for the remains of a missing Soldier in western Baghdad, Iraq on Feb. 22, 2007

vor033
12-05-2009, 10:43 PM
U.S. Soldiers and Afghan national army soldiers conduct a joint patrol in, the Shabila Kalan and Hutul Areas of Zabul province, Afghanistan, Nov. 30, 2009

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vor033
12-05-2009, 11:08 PM
Date:11.06.2009

CLAY NATIONAL GUARD CENTER, Ga. - The Georgia Army National Guard's long range surveillance unit will again, "fill the boots" of their World War II predecessors and commemorate the 118-mile march from Toccoa to Atlanta by the Army's 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in December 1942.

About 17 Citizen-Soldiers of Atlanta's 3rd Squadron, 108th Cavalry, will begin the estimated 101-mile march at the Guard's armoury in Toccoa during the early morning hours of Nov. 4. Moving at an estimated 33-mile per day, they'll arrive two days later at Atlanta's Oglethorpe University. On the morning of Nov. 7, the Guardsmen will travel an additional six miles along Peachtree Street and join in the Atlanta Veteran's Day Parade scheduled for Nov. 7.

Among the locations the group, carrying 35-pound backpacks and M4 carbine "training rifles," will pass on their way out of Toccoa will be Col. Robert F. Sink Memorial Trail up Currahee Mountain, named for 506th regimental commander, and the memorial marking the original location of Camp Toccoa -now an industrial park- where the 506th and Easy Company of the 'Band of Brothers fame' came into being.

The last time 3rd Squadron, 108th Cavalry-formerly Company H, 121st Infantry re-enacted the march was in 2008. Previous re-enactments were conducted in 2002 and 2005. World events and deployments in 2003, 2004, 2006 and 2007 prohibited the Georgia Guardsmen re-enacting the march during those years.

In December 1942, shortly after having completing its basic training at Camp Toccoa, the 506th was about to move to Fort Benning in Columbus to begin its parachute training. Sink, who'd read a Reader's Digest story about a Japanese Army unit that had broken the world record for marching (about 100 miles in only a few days). Believing his men, including those of Easy Company, could do better, Sink ordered 2nd Battalion and its commander Maj. Robert L. Strayer 118 miles south to Atlanta.

The march was conducted over 75 hours and 15 minutes, with 33.5 hours per day being used for marching. When the battalion reached Atlanta's Five Points area, it was greeted by crowds of cheering civilians and news media who'd lined the streets in anticipation of the unit's arrival.




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vor033
12-05-2009, 11:37 PM
FORT CAMPBELL, KY – With the current focus on combat operations ongoing in Afghanistan, many units are preparing and training for battles across the Afghan front. Many battles are being fought at a larger scale, encompassing company-sized or larger elements. Such battles as Operation Anaconda, the Battle of Dahaneh, the Siege of Sangin and Operation Medusa incorporated large elements to defeat the opposing forces.

The reason for such tactics may be because of the Afghan landscape, which is designed with vast open land and rural terrain, unlike what most Coalition Forces saw during operations in Iraq. Now with greater land to cover, some missions are requiring a greater amount of force to defeat the enemy.

The 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), prepared its companies, troops and batteries for such operations during the brigade's Combined Arms Live Fire Exercise, Nov. 14-22.

A combined arms battle is an approach to warfare which integrates the different arms of the military to achieve mutually complementary effects. Gen. George S. Patton compared it to separate instruments playing together as a band, creating harmony instead of individually making noise. Combining arms integrates all facets available in defeating a common enemy.

"Combined Armed Live Fire Exercise, or CALFEX, trains the company commanders to integrate all resources he has available to him on the battlefield," said Command Sgt. Maj. Scott Schroeder, the brigade command sergeant major. "This also helps the Soldiers understand where they fit as far as the combined arms fight [goes]. They're not going to be in a team fight; they're not going to be in a squad fight; they're going to be in a platoon or company size battle in Afghanistan."

Though the Strike Brigade is currently not scheduled to deploy, they are focusing their efforts and resources to preparing for a possible fight in Afghanistan as they await further instructions and orders.

While readying all of the brigade's assets for their next rendezvous with destiny, Strike Soldiers fought a fierce enemy, utilizing its many resources to defeat the opposing threat during the exercise. Manoeuvring their mounted and dismounted elements, incorporating their indirect and direct fire systems, and utilizing artillery gun teams, sniper teams, human intelligence collection teams, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and aviators in the sky, the Soldiers on the ground were able to take the fight to the enemy.

According to the brigade's commander, Col. Arthur Kandarian, all Soldiers were able to see exactly what was in their "tool box" and utilize those tools and assets to the best of their abilities.

Soldiers tactfully trekked nearly 1,800 kilometres of variable terrain – consisting of open fields, dense wooded area, cold streams, hills and mounds of steep elevation – and fought off heavy enemy gunfire to reach a well guarded high-value target in a set of houses based off intelligence reports they received.

The HVT, according to Sgt. Maj. John White, was a Taliban insurgent. The troops needed to move quickly, but not too fast, to grab their targeted foe.

They were able to cut-off possible escape routes and chances for the enemies retreat. Commanders utilized their indirect fire capabilities, such as their mortarmen and field artillery brethren set off in a distance; they suppressed enemy fire and bounded forward, putting into use their .50-caliber Browning machine gun and squad automatic weapons. Above, high in the sky, aviators gave the men on the ground an extra set of eyes and put rounds on targets when directed to by the commander.

"CALFEX is an excellent opportunity to integrate the different assets of the battlefield, so we bring in aviation and we bring in indirect fire and utilize what is in our arsenal," said Capt. Brain Roberts, executive officer, Company B, 2nd Bn., 502nd Inf. Regt. "The aviation is an excellent tool for observation and also to support the troops on the ground with their fire asset. CALFEX builds the trust and confidence among the line units and all of its supporting units."

Confidence is a key ingredient when readying units for combat. Training in these conditions and settings allows Soldiers access to that needed assurance in their battle-buddies as well as themselves.

"The Soldiers are walking away with confidence in everyone around them, including themselves," said 1st Sgt. George Fitzke, the first sergeant of Company B, 2nd Bn., 502nd Inf. Regt. "The infantry, artillery and aviation walks away from this with confidence in each other and that is what we need to have when it's our turn to enter the fight. Synchronizing the dance that we call battle is not an easy task, but in order for success we all have to be confident with each other."

Due to the Strike Brigade's large role and heavy involvement on the front lines in the war in Iraq, the brigade has not conducted this type of training since prior to the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom; however, now with a longer dwell time between its last deployment, the 2nd BCT is able to conduct this large-scale training event.

"With the twelve month reset period we were previously seeing, CALFEX training was just not available," said Lt. Col. Joseph Krebs, the brigade deputy commanding officer. "Had we continued with that deployment pattern, we'd be deploying right now so this company CALFEX is the first time these company commanders have had the ability to synchronize all of the different assets this brigade has. The first time they should be seeing it is here in training, not while fighting in Afghanistan."

Since returning from their previous deployment in Iraq, the Strike Brigade has been preparing for this very exercise. It all began at the team and squad levels, as they had to first build their cohesive units from the lowest level.

"Right when we arrived back home from Iraq, we started with individual training like the Expert Infantryman Badge then to fire team training then to squad level manoeuvres and into platoon sized training and now here at the company level," said 1st Lt. Adam Devereux, the executive officer with Company D, 2nd Bn., 502nd Inf. Regt. "CALFEX is the culmination of all of our collective training."

The next step for the brigade will be at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La., which will be the final piece to readying the brigade for future combat operations.

"The overall framework was designed so that we as a brigade would be in a great position for going into our next fight, which is JRTC, and we now are in that great position," said Kandarian.

CALFEX teaches to fight an opposing force not by oneself, but with a slew of attacks. By combining all forms of engagement with proper synchronization, successful missions shall occur. By tactfully manoeuvring each unit as if they were a chess piece, the enemy is forced to be put on the defensive.

"Really and truly for any unit in the Army, you realize that you cannot rely on anything as an individual alone," said Fitzke. "Baring the full and complete force that is available to us is what will eliminate this enemy."
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vor033
12-05-2009, 11:52 PM
With an estimated population of 31 million, Iraqi cities are packed with civilians and the day-to-day commotion that goes along it. Afghanistan, to with its 28 million residents, has its cities and villages crammed with people congesting its streets and buildings, yet this is where the fight is.

Today's war no longer has the firing of missiles from naval ships a hundred miles away. No more are F-16 Pilots miles above in enemy skies dropping bombs on targets. Soldiers today are now engaging the enemy at a close and dangerous range where they are hidden within these foreign cities. However, Strike is prepared to engage the enemy in this environment.

Soldiers from Troop B, 1st Squadron, 75th Calvary Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), trained on close-quarter combat techniques Sept. 2. 2009

"Everything in this war is now urbanized combat," said Sgt. Joseph Hardin, a team leader within the troop.

"Long-range marksmanship is not completely over, but close-quarters combat is the daily occurrence during deployment," said Hardin.

Close-quarters combat is a very fast and aggressive approach to fighting. Training for it needs to be often and taken seriously. Preaching this factor and assisting with the training was the 5th Special Forces Group, an elite force with much experience in close-range combat.

"Fifth Group gave of a lot of insight based on their own personal experiences being in both Afghanistan and Iraq. Who better to explain how things should be done?" said Hardin.

They informed the Soldiers on many aspects while in close-range battles. They discussed the different stances and stacking techniques when entering buildings and clearing rooms. They also stressed that being quicker than the enemy, based on the importance of basic motion techniques and tactical reloading, will save time and told the troop, "The couple of seconds faster you are than the enemy means you survive and he doesn't."

"They helped us in many ways, but most importantly, they answered the whys," said Spc. Alan Cable, a former apache crew chief now with Bravo Troop.

"They not only answered our questions but gave reasons to the answers," said Cable. "They believe if you understand why something being done then it becomes part of your muscle memory."

Training the muscles must go along with training the brain. Muscle memory is quick and creates accurate reaction to certain situations, which is formed from repetitive training of the same activity.

They learned that entering buildings at a slow pace is more effective. One should not just dash into a room.

"When going slower you can focus on what you're doing and by being focused on what you're doing, you can do it right, and by doing it right, speed will naturally improve and muscle memory will be created," said Sgt. Daniel Shimmin, a team leader with the troop.

Rushing into a building can cause problems that can have dire affect. Running right in may cause mishandling of weapons, stumbling into teammates and being in the wrong positions in which can all cause avoidable casualties including non-combatants.

"Especially in Iraq, close-range combat is not just dealing with a straight enemy, civilians on battlefield and non-combatants are going to be involved," said Shimmin. "Making positive target identification a must, we would not be winning this war if we were shooting the innocent."

So many factors are quickly determined when a Soldier separates a combatant to a non-combatant.

"Seeing what are in people's hands, if someone has an aggressive of defensive posture all plays a role in defining a combatant to a non-combatant while engaging in close-quarter combat," said Spc. Edgar Rios, a driver with the Calvary Scouts.

"Rage, anger, adrenaline, excitement, nervous, scared, many things go through the mind, but as soon as you're at the door, the focus is only on the mission and that is why this training is so important, you're not thinking, you're just reacting," added Rios.

While in a six-room 'Shoot-house' at the range, the scouts used an addition to their weapons called Simunitions to enhance the training. Simunition is a line of training ammunition that can be fired through standard firearms, such as the M-4 Carbine, to provide more realistic training. It allows paint pellets to be fired through the weapon so accuracy is in play while training.

"We used to use blanks a lot but it is not realistic, you don't know if your hitting a target with a blank, but with a Simunition round you know exactly where you're hitting," said Hardin.

Close-combat training has been said to be the most vital training in the Army. Whether in an urban or a rural terrain, close-quarter combat is what finishes the fight. The only way to become an effective close-quarter combat Soldier is by training and training often creating this type of tactical muscle memory. It will make for fast and correct reactions while on missions and with more intense training such as this, Strike's Calvary Scouts will be ready for the fight.


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TheCarLessDriven
12-05-2009, 11:55 PM
Great stuff ^

PJ187
12-06-2009, 12:30 AM
[QUOTE=vor033;4606101]U.S. Soldiers and Afghan national army soldiers conduct a joint patrol in, the Shabila Kalan and Hutul Areas of Zabul province, Afghanistan, Nov. 30, 2009
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ACU tags should say best used while lying in a gravel pit at night

Sloppy Joe2
12-06-2009, 02:22 PM
ACU tags should say best used while lying in a gravel pit at night they work well in many environments

Alpha-17
12-06-2009, 02:34 PM
they work well in many environments

Yeah, gravel pits, and rock quarries, and unpainted cinder block MOUT Sites and Grandmas hideous couch...

Sloppy Joe2
12-06-2009, 02:50 PM
Yeah, gravel pits, and rock quarries, and unpainted cinder block MOUT Sites and Grandmas hideous couch...i guess we have different opinions but they worked well for me.

Bro Jangles
12-06-2009, 02:52 PM
they dont work so good in snowy Washington woods.

vor033
12-06-2009, 04:18 PM
FORT PICKETT, Va., – The Riverdale, Md., based 450th Civil Affairs Battalion traveled to Fort Pickett, Va., to participate in a four-day training exercise focusing on jump readiness and weapons qualifications Nov. 19 – 22.

The exercise, which culminated with a series of airborne jumps from a C-130 Hercules Nov. 20 and 21, was designed to simulate what 450th Company Commander Capt. Lance Jensen, called the last tactical mile of a civil affairs mission.

"When providing humanitarian aid, we have the capability of para-dropping relief supplies in, along with troops to protect those supplies. This training exercise simulates dropping supplies and troops by air, the road march to the town in need of the aid, and the civilian help needed for that town," Jenson said.

The exercise kicked off the afternoon of Nov. 19 with various briefings, including a basic airborne refresher course for Soldiers just out of airborne school and those who had not jumped in the past three months. Another briefing for non-commissioned officers and officers covered weapons-range safety procedures related to the weapons qualification portion of the exercise.

The next day brought a light rain and low clouds to south central Virginia that delayed a planned airborne jump for several hours. Shortly before noon Soldiers were finishing a lunch of Meals Ready to Eat when unit officials decided to proceed with the jump.

The jumpers donned their parachutes and boarded a Hercules C-130 through the aircraft's rear-cargo ramp. By 2 p.m., as the plane flew 1,000 feet above Pickett's Blackstone Army Airfield, jumpers began exiting the C-130's left-side door. Just before dusk, the C-130 completed its tenth and final pass over the airfield. A total of 70 Soldiers had made the jump.

After the jumpers regrouped in front of the airfield's hanger, the unit held a ceremony to mark a new tradition called "Keeper of the Wings," which commemorates the first airborne jump of the youngest Soldier in the unit. During the, 450th Commander Lt. Col. John P. Lawlor Jr., recognized Pfc. Michael Armstrong, 21, of Washington, as the unit's first "Keeper of the Wings."

Armstrong joined the unit in May 2009 after completing basic combat training at Fort Jackson and advanced individual training at Fort Lee. Prior to the jump, Armstrong said he was a little nervous. After the jump, Armstrong said it was one of his best landings. "I listened to Jumpmaster Dutch on exactly what to do," said Armstrong.

Because of the weather delayed jump, the road march and accompanying Military Operations and Urban Terrain training was canceled.

The next day, Fort Pickett's weapons ranges crackled with gunfire as the unit descended on ranges four, five and six to qualify on their 9 mm pistols and M16 rifles. The Soldiers who needed to complete 9mm weapons qualifications found themselves waiting an hour for the civilian-run range to open. After the safety briefing, Soldiers lined up on 15 lanes of fire as Brig. Gen. James Owens, Commander of the 352nd Civil Affairs Command, looked on. After everyone who was assigned a 9 mm had qualified, there were a few rounds left for those to try out the 9mm for the first time.

One of the first timers was Pfc. Stephen Peck, from Baltimore, Md., who joined the unit in February 2009. Prior to firing 12 live rounds, he was given a one-on-one coaching session on how to handle and fire the 9 mm by Maj. William T. Birch, the 450th planning officer. Birch said that if Peck was completing an actual qualification, "He would have qualified as expert, having only missed one target." Birch, a former federal agent firearms training officer, said, "I like providing leadership to the young Soldiers."

After the weapons qualifications, the jumpers met again at the hanger to prepare for the night jump.

Sgt. 1st Class Thomas E. Jannuzzio, training and operations non-commissioned officer, from Middletown, Del., completed his 131st jump with the night jump. He has been jumping since 1978 and has been with the 450th two separate times, the last time since 2000. He said he usually talks to Soldiers that are considering jump school and asks them two questions: does the job require airborne qualification and is the position a jump-ready position?

The exercise also prepared the unit for Operation Southbound Trooper, a training exercise planned for February 2010 with a Civil-Military Cooperation Unit of the Canadian army.
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vor033
12-06-2009, 05:04 PM
U.S. Soldiers, assigned to the 1st Aviation Cavalry Squadron, 230th Sustainment Brigade, Tennessee Army National Guard, meet a OH-58 Kiowa Warrior at the Forward Arming and Refuelling Point on forward operating base Diamondback, near Mosul, Iraq, Dec. 4, 2009.


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vor033
12-06-2009, 05:11 PM
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Snow covered mountains are shown just outside of Afghanistan's Salang tunnel in the Hindu Kush mountain range, Friday.

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Soldiers with Alpha Company, 101st Division Special Troop Battalion, 101st Airborne Division drive toward Afghanistan's Salang tunnel in the Hindu Kush mountain range, Friday. The A Co. "Slayer" Soldiers were checking on the security efforts for the tunnel.

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Soldiers with Alpha Company, 101st Division Special Troop Battalion, 101st Airborne Division rest at Afghanistan's Salang tunnel in the Hindu Kush mountain range, Friday. The A Co. "Slayer" Soldiers were checking on the security efforts for the tunnel. Earlier this month, an avalanche outside the south entrance of the tunnel killed at least 10 Afghans and trapping at least another 40.

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The entrance to Afghanistan's Salang tunnel inside the Hindu Kush mountain range. This tunnel is one of the highest vehicular tunnels in the world sitting at approximately 10,675ft.

vor033
12-06-2009, 05:30 PM
U.S. Soldiers from Alpha Company, 2-35 Infantry Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division communicate with other teams on the ground during Operation Cordon 2, in Samarra, Iraq, on Nov. 15, 2008.

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vor033
12-06-2009, 06:52 PM
FORWARD OPERATING BASE MAHMUDIYAH, Iraq – Iraqi army and Rakkasan soldiers carried out Operation Eagle North Point, a combined air assault in the Abu Osage Village of the Sa'id Abdullah Corridor, Oct. 8, 2008.

Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 25th Brigade, 17th IA Division were joined by Battery A, 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) for the operation.

"Combined missions have been eliminating the [criminal] threat," said 1st Lt. Arad Nurre Jabor Hlu Al Magdy, 25/17th IA. "We feel very comfortable working side by side with the coalition."

"We planned out the location," said 1st Lt. James Flaherty, 2nd Platoon leader, Btry. A, 3-320th FA Regt., from Tampa, Fla. "The IA appropriately planned their role in leading us to the location. They had the right personnel and the right equipment to make the mission successful."

During the course of the air assault, three suspected criminals were detained.

"The objective was to find and detain suspected criminals throughout the area," said Sgt. Christopher Armstrong, from Birmingham, Ala., 4th Platoon team leader, Btry. A, 3-320th FA Regt. "We had intelligence that there were [criminal] leaders and facilitators throughout the objective."

The intelligence proved to be accurate. When the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters flew inbound to insert IA and coalition soldiers at the objectives, two individuals fled the target houses forcing a foot chase for nearly 750 meters.

"This was a big hit on criminal activity," Lt. Al Magdy said.

While only one of the individuals who initially fled on foot was detained, Armstrong said he still felt the mission was an overall success.

"The IA was much more involved during this mission as opposed to other air assaults I have been on throughout the deployment," said Sgt. Joseph Mcrorie, native of Orlando, Fla., 2nd Plt., Btry. A, 3-320th FA, team leader. "We are working more side by side with them instead of being in the lead and they are doing a better job at being in the front."

Armstrong attributed the success of the mission to combined intelligence-gathering efforts from both IA and coalition forces.

"The IA [is] taking more initiative and disseminating their plans," Flaherty said. "They are definitely grasping the concept of being out front and actually leading missions."

IA-led operations in the Mahmudiyah Qada have become the order of the day.

"Now that many of the criminals have been caught it shows that we are establishing a strong presence throughout the area," Al Magdy said. "When the time comes, we will be ready to fully take over the security role."


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vor033
12-06-2009, 07:17 PM
BAYJI, Iraq – As security continues to improve across Iraq, insurgent networks are becoming desperate in their attempts at proliferating weapons and ammunition.

Because they have been marginalized within Iraqi society and are under constant pressure from Iraqi security forces and coalition soldiers, enemy fighters are frantically seeking to hide large quantities of weapons in the hinterlands of Iraq's north.

"Often the insurgency will attempt to utilize rural areas to hide weapons," said Capt. Michael Sykes, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment. "What they don't realize, is that we are highly mobile through the use of the Air Assault and are training the Iraqis to do the same," he said.

A recent Air Assault mission, conducted by Iraqi army soldiers and Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, aimed to track down enemy weapons caches being stored along the lush banks of the Tigris River.

"Our intent is to deny them a place to call home," said Capt. Jeffrey Rottenberg, whose 'Mad Dog' Company has been battling extremist fighters for more than a year. "The enemy here goes to sleep at night wondering if this is the night that the 101st will come to pay them a visit," he said.

The mission, dubbed Operation Deadbluff, was one of many operations carried out by the battalion in order to sever enemy weapons trafficking in the area. "The enemy doesn't just stick to cities," said Rottenberg, "so we don't either."

In utilizing the Air Assault, Rottenberg's 'Mad Dogs' have gained the upper hand. By taking the fight to the enemy, the Soldiers of the 327th go after them from all sides, said Rottenberg. "The major advantage gained through Air Assaults is the ability to move a lot of Soldiers quickly, with little warning to the enemy."

The element of surprise is one brick on the road to success here. Another is having the actual intelligence on enemy weapons locations from sources on the ground.

"The key to finding caches is the Iraqi people themselves," said Rottenberg. "Unless you have someone inform you about them, it becomes somewhat of a guessing game," he said.

For more than a year, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment has detained hundreds of suspected insurgents and has taken thousands of weapons out of the hands of the enemy here.

"Our guys have performed at a high level, under austere conditions," said Sykes. "While there has been some adversity, there has also been a great deal of success," he said. "Our barometer for success is the Iraqi people, and right now they are enjoying a sense of security and liberty that they have not known before."

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vor033
12-06-2009, 07:24 PM
KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – During 2009, troops from the 286th Combat Support Sustainment Battalion supported the first Afghan build-up by transporting equipment, supplies and building materials to numerous forward operating bases. Although planning to redeploy by January, they show no signs of stopping. An element of Joint Sustainment Command-Afghanistan, the 286th CSSB runs regular convoys to Forward Operating Base Leatherneck, Helmand province, in support of the U.S. Marines and westward expansion.

With President Obama's recent decision to send 30,000 more troops here, the 286th CSSB's current FOB Leatherneck missions, having started weeks ago, are timely.

Anticipating future growth, JSC-A senior-level leadership planned these missions based on strategic objectives of where U.S. forces should be, said Lt. Col. Diane Dunn, 286th CSSB commander.

"Additional troops may not go west," said Dunn. "But for troops who do go there, this will be important."

However, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, whose troops largely operate in Helmand, asserts Western Afghanistan is exactly where many additional service members will go. Up to 1,000 Marines could arrive by January.

Besides moving materials for tents, buildings and perimeter fortifications by military cargo trucks, called Palletized Load System vehicles, troops under the 286th CSSB also provide convoy security through armored gun trucks, called Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected vehicles.

Convoys face multiple dangers from roadside bombs, rocket-propelled grenades, small-arms fire and vehicle-born improvised explosive devices. The MRAPS and PLS trucks roll through Afghan towns and cities while local traffic races in and around the convoy.

With the summer arrival of the 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division Dunn noticed a decline in IED attacks on Highway 1, the country's main road from its second largest city, Kandahar, to its largest and capital, Kabul.

"There was a time that [troops] knew when they left, that they might very likely get hit," said Dunn.

The scarred route to FOB Leatherneck bears both old and fresh gouges and holes from roadside bombs. The 286th CSSB convoys bypass the charred vehicles and rubble, driving off-road, often up inclines through dirt and desert.

On any given day, the 286th CSSB could have more than 150 Soldiers on the road, said Dunn. The Leatherneck missions combine several transportation companies under the 286th CSSB, including the 737th and the 154th. One company supplies the PLS vehicles, while another provides the MRAPs.

Over the last nine months, these convoys have moved building and electrical materials needed to expand numerous FOBs, including Lagman, Spin Boldak, Tarin Kowt, Frontenac and Wolverine.

The 286th CSSB also convoyed water and food to FOB Dwyer, Helmand, when the Marines commenced operations there.

"We're making sure that stuff is out there where the war fighters are," said Dunn.

Maintenance is another aspect of frequent missions. When vehicles drive daily, they need constant upkeep to keep running.

"We all are contributing," said Sgt. Sean Tait, a 737th Transportation Company team leader from Tollhouse, Calif. "Our Soldiers and local nationals need their supplies, so we have a mission, and we all feel good about it."

While the 286th CSSB, a Maine National Guard unit, prepares to return to the U.S., they begin a new undertaking to help the 5-2 Stryker Brigade follow Gen. Stanley McChrystal's directives to protect population centers. As the 5-2 Stryker Brigade moves to new locations closer to Afghan cities and towns, the 286th CSSB will convoy their equipment and supplies to the new localities.

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vor033
12-06-2009, 07:26 PM
BAGHDAD – For cavalry troops, earning the coveted gold spurs, denoting combat service, is a pinnacle in their deployment.

West Virginia National Guard troopers presented the golden spurs for wartime service to Soldiers of Troop C, 150th Armored Reconnaissance Squadron, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat at Camp Stryker, Nov. 7.

The spurs, a legacy that dates back to knighthood, symbolizing entry into the ranks and fraternity of mounted warriors.

"It's a way to bring morale up towards the end," said Squadron Command Sgt. Maj. James Allen, of Paden City, W. Va. "We did the Non-commissioned Officers Induction Ceremony mid-way through the tour and we will have award ceremonies at the end. It's a constant positive spin for Soldiers to be recognized for what they are doing."

Historically, aspiring squires performed a mission on the battlefield to "win the spurs." The spurs were buckled on during a mass or ceremony symbolizing that the man had become a knight. Thereafter, only the spurs signified knighthood, not the sword or armor.

The U.S. military continued the tradition, inducting cavalry scouts into the "Order of the Spur." After troopers receive their spurs they are to be worn at all cavalry functions as directed by the commander.

Troops knelt on a red and white, the unit's colors, box as Allen and Squadron Commander, Lt. Col. Robbie Scarberry, of Milton, W.Va., pushed combat spurs down on the heel of their boots.

Troop Commander, Capt. Thomas Mills, of Winfield, W. Va., and 1st Sgt. Wanzer Reynolds, of Beckley, W. Va., gave troopers framed certificates and thanked them for accomplished cavalry trooper traits; cunning skills and defeating the enemy.

No one knows exactly when the U.S Cavalry began ceremonies awarding spurs for outstanding performance, but the ritual has now become an enduring practice of pride, honor and accomplishment for troops receiving spurs in Iraq for combat.

"I wasn't aware of its legacy before coming to this unit," said Spc. Jared Towner, of Parkersburg, W. Va., here on his third deployment. "The cavalry history is very interesting; it's embedded in U.S. history. It ranks up there with the history of the airborne espirit de corps."

Many Soldiers were proud to uphold the legacy of the spur. Spc. Brandon Ellison, of Green Briar, W. Va., said that he was anxious and proud to receive his spurs. Pfc. Travis Hughes, of Huntington, W. Va., said that he learned of its history when he was at Fort Knox, Ky., and it felt good to receive the spurs.

"Technically, the last time we were an armor unit so we didn't receive spurs for combat," said Staff Sgt. Paul Meadows, of Summerville, W. Va. "I was proud to receive them this time because it symbolizes the whole cavalry spur tradition."

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vor033
12-06-2009, 07:53 PM
CAMP AS SAYLIYAH, Qatar – Stryker armoured combat vehicles will soon receive a cosmetic makeover for better concealment in Iraq and Afghanistan. The current deep green colour will be phased out in favour of desert tan. The first to adopt the change was revealed inside the Stryker battle damage repair facility at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar, Oct. 5, an infantry carrier vehicle that had been restored after deterioration during enemy engagement in Iraq.

"Safeguarding soldiers is the primary purpose for this colour change," said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Peter Butts, 1st Battalion, 401st Army Field Support Brigade commander. "Strykers will blend into surroundings better. They're less likely to stand out like silhouettes." Produced by General Dynamics Land Systems, the eight-wheeled armoured combat vehicles have been painted a foliage green colour since their combat debut in 2003, supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

"Talks about changing the colour have been ongoing since 2004," said Butts. "Painting this first Stryker helped us understand the necessary man hours, material needs and unit coordination to finally make it happen – it's our proof of principle." Every Stryker vehicle sent to the Qatar repair site will depart desert tan, once administrative requirements are complete.

Tan 686A is a paint meant for desert camouflage. It's the same solid colour covering most military equipment throughout Southwest Asia, where encountering dust storms and sand dunes are far more common than thick jungles and rolling prairies. To lighten the current tint while in sandy terrain, Central Command war fighters have relied on dust collected in the abrasive texture of the vehicle's hull and slat armour.

The planned transition to desert tan represents the latest survivability retrofit since Stryker vehicles moved into Afghanistan this summer. Since then, GDLS welders and mechanics have installed mine protection kits, tire fire suppression kits, cameras, engine enhancements and software upgrades.

Stryker combat vehicles provide CENTCOM military operations with the following ten configurations: infantry carrier vehicle; command vehicle; fire support vehicle; engineer support vehicle; reconnaissance vehicle; medical evacuation vehicle; anti-tank guided missile vehicle; mortar carrier; nuclear, biological and chemical reconnaissance vehicle; and mobile gun system. Additional variants and improvement options are constantly explored by GDLS and U.S. government officials.

"This first tan vehicle is for soldiers in Afghanistan," said Rick Hunt, GDLS site manager at the battle damage repair facility in Qatar. "Soon, everything we receive from Iraq and Afghanistan for retrofit and repairs will leave here tan."


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vor033
12-06-2009, 10:39 PM
A number of Photo from Operation Anaconda from Afghanistan in 2002

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Sirkankel, Afghanistan-- A soldier with 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), takes a knee and watches for enemy movement during a pause in a road march during Operation Anaconda. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. David Marck Jr., 314th Press Camp Headquarters) Mar. 5, 2002

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Bagram, Afghanistan -- Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), practice changing barrels on their Squad Automatic Weapons prior to Operation Anaconda. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. David Marck Jr., 314th Press Camp Headquarters) March 2002

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Sirkankel, Afghanistan -- U.S. Army Soldiers with the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), scan the nearby ridgeline for enemy movement during Operation Anaconda. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. David Marck Jr., 314th Press Camp Headquarters)

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Sirkankel, Afghanistan -- Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), rest during a break from a march toward an objective. The Soldiers are participating in Operation Anaconda, which is part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. David Marck Jr Mar. 4, 2002

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Sirkankel, Afghanistan -- Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), scan the ridgeline for enemy forces during Operation Anaconda. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. David Marck Jr.,

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The passenger (PAX) terminal at the Ariel Point of Departure (APOD) Thrives with personnel; baggage and supply transport 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

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Extreme conditions during the winter months in Afghanistan can have an adverse effect on the health of service members. Leaders ensuring their troops are wearing the proper clothing, like this turret gunner, will help eliminate illnesses in the field.

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Spc. Dominic Hoyt, LRSD spotter, uses his spotter scope to see the impact of his snipers bullet.

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Spc. Joseph Crum, LRSD sniper, fires the M-24 sniper rifle during training at the Range. The training helps the snipers maintain accuracy for missions.

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Spc. Jonathan Low, a designated marksman for Co. C, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Rgt., uses the scope on his M14 rifle to scan the horizon from a hilltop in Khoday Nazar Kor during a December patrol.

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Cpl. Marcus Denny, a team leader from Co. C, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Rgt., patrols the desolate streets of Marjaneh

vor033
12-06-2009, 10:47 PM
Sorry guys I posted these photos back on page 16 :oops: That will teach me to try and do 2 things at once while at work !

Anyway, sorry about that :oops:

vor033
12-06-2009, 10:52 PM
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CAMP TAJI, Iraq - In the current combat environment, artillery cannons are often used as fixed pieces, conducting fire support missions from inside a stationary fire base.

For units armed with the versatile M109A6 "Paladin" howitzer, the ability to shoot, move and communicate on the battlefield is a valuable asset.

Soldiers from Battery B, 1st Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, traded the confines of their firebase for the streets of Taji, Nov. 17.2009

The tracks of the Paladins roared down the road as local residents stopped and stared, seeing these mammoth sized vehicles has become rare due to improvements to security in the area.

"It's good that we only have to exercise an emergency fire mission," said Colquitt, Ga. native, 1st Sgt. Jamie Crankfield. "It's a testament to the hard work of both U.S. and Iraqi Security Forces and the strides we've made in recent years."

"Generally in Iraq, batteries of artillery are limited to the [Forward Operating Base] or re-designated as maneuver elements," added Crankfield. "Conducting [an on the move] fire mission in a combat environment maintains the core competencies expected of us as artillerymen."

Amidst the stares and curiosity of the residents of Taji, the cannoneers still had a mission to execute.

"Fire mission!" echoed from the troopers in the Paladins as the onboard computers and radios relayed coordinates to the Soldiers in the gun.

Within a matter of seconds the giant cannons stopped on the road and located their target to provide the deadly and precise fires needed to support combat operations in Multi-National Division—Baghdad.

Smoke and dust filled the air with every flash from the tubes of the cannons. The deafening sound of artillery rang in the distance. Within minutes the Soldiers fired a total of thirty three rounds displaying the quick and awesome force of not only the M109A6, but of the proficient artillerymen on Camp Taji.

"On the battlefield every second matters," said Lt. Col. Eric Schwegler, the commander of the 1st Bn., 82nd FA Regt. "You can bet when Soldiers in MND-B need [artillery support], the Dragons will deliver."

vor033
12-06-2009, 11:07 PM
FORWARD OPERATING BASE WARRIOR, Kirkuk, Iraq—The concussion rattles the chest as flames erupt from the barrel of the M109A6 self-propelled 155-mm Howitzer, also known as a Paladin. The blasts could be heard around post, and it shook the nearby buildings.

Calibrating the Paladins is not a quiet task, but it is an important one for the Soldiers of Battery B, 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, who had the opportunity to adjust the Paladins to ensure their accuracy on Feb. 13 at Forward Operating Base Warrior, Kirkuk, Iraq.

We want to make sure we are going to be able to hit whatever we are aiming the Paladins at, said Bronx, N.Y., native 1st Sgt. Derrick Webb, the 1st Sgt. for Battery B.

There are quite a few factors involved in calibrating the Paladins, said Webb. According to Webb, the muzzle velocity of the rounds is checked as they depart the Paladins by testing how much gas escapes around the round when it is being fired. This gives the crew and fire direction controllers a better idea of how far the round will go; the more gas that escapes, the less distance that the round will travel. Knowing this enables the crews and FDC's to make adjustments to the Paladin to compensate for these factors. The computer on the Paladin records this data and includes it when it is calculating the correct flight, along with factors such as the type of round, weather conditions and the earth's rotation.

The calibration was also an opportunity for the artilleryman of Battery B to train with the weapons for the first time since arriving in Iraq.

This gives us a chance to get a little more familiar with Paladins, said East Peoria, Ill. native Pfc. Wesley Bernius, an artilleryman for Battery B. It's an opportunity for us to see where the rounds are hitting and what adjustments need to be made to ensure the accuracy of the Paladins.

The calibration was an opportunity for the Soldiers in the Paladins to keep up on their artillery skills, said Kansas City, Mo., native Staff Sgt. Timothy Thacker, the fire direction non-commissioned officer. It is a perishable skill and if the Soldiers don't use them they will lose them. A lot of the Soldiers from Battery B are currently tasked out to do patrols and convoys, but they need to be able to switch to firing artillery at any given moment.

After firing the rounds, adjustments were made to the Paladins, and the Soldiers of Battery B were able to have confidence in the fact that if they aim their artillery at a target, they can hit it.

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vor033
12-06-2009, 11:13 PM
BAQUBAH, Iraq – Boom ... Boom ... Boom.

The earth-shaking sound of artillery fire is nothing new to residents of Diyala province. It's practically a daily occurrence, with rounds fired at all hours of the day and night.

Whether or not those loud booms are comforting or scary depend on who hears them. For the enemies of peace and security, those sounds and the resultant explosions are an anathema, but to coalition and Iraqi security forces, along with civilians working for a stable Iraqi, the sounds of King Battery firing their M109A6 Paladin Self Propelled Howitzers are sweet music.

Battery K, 1st Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (King Battery) arrived in country in November, and immediately began providing artillery support to the 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, the coalition unit responsible for Diyala province. In the battery's first five months, they have already fired just under 5,000 rounds, on pace to decimate the record of most rounds fired by a battery in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In fact, they are only a few hundred shy of the record, one that was set by a battery who was in country for more than a year.

"We fire an average of 30 rounds a day, close to 1,000 rounds a month," said King Battery commander Cpt. John Fritz. "Pretty much every mission artillery does – terrain denial, troops in contact, counter fire, and illumination and smoke for coalition and Iraqi security forces – we do here in Diyala. We help shape the battlefield, deny escape routes to the enemy, and show we can get on top of the enemy in a hurry."

The unit's top non-commissioned officer, 1st Sgt. Theodore Durand, noted that all the firing his battery has done has helped his Soldiers improve their skills.

"For armored cavalry artillerymen, we don't often get to practice our prime artillery craft," he said. "Here in Diyala we are contributing to the big fight and are working side by side with Soldiers of an Infantry division. This has been a lethally effective reunion – a reunion of the King and Queen of Battle"

The unit already has 30 confirmed enemy kills under its belt; but as important as enemy kills are, King Battery provides much more than that.

"We often use terrain denial fires in the brigade to shape the spheres of influence and shape the way the brigade deals with the local communities," explained Maj. Jody Miller, 4-2 SBCT executive officer. "For example, FOB Warhorse was recently attacked by an AQI element that was shooting rockets at the FOB. They were not from the local community; however, they were given approval from the community to fire those rockets as well as cache their weapons and equipment. After we shot three nights of terrain denial fires of upwards of 100 rounds fired each night in vicinity of the rocket firing point of origin, all the villagers came forward and said 'enough' and said 'we don't support these guys,' and they actually turned over the AQI and their caches."

While lifting 100-pound rounds into the howitzers during 24-hour shifts is exhausting work, the artillerymen are happy they get to do their job as much as they do.

"I've been with this battery for three years and this is the first time we have actually done an artillery mission," said Staff Sgt. William Proctor, a King Battery section chief. "I haven't shot this many rounds ever in my 13 years in the military. Being able to shoot this many rounds in Iraq in combat is what we came in the Army to do."

"We are making history every time we fire," agreed Staff Sgt. Thomas Robinson, fire direction center chief. "We fire more rounds on a daily basis then any other artillery battery that has been here. The Soldiers in this unit are privileged to be able to do that every day, and it will help them in future operations because these Soldiers are the future of the Army, and it is important for them to be able to do their job in a combat zone."

The Soldiers of the battery are very competitive. Like a sports team that thrives on competition, not only against other teams but also against each, the Soldiers constantly push each other to excel.

"As a section chief, you train your guys to have a high rate of fire to compete against the other sections," Proctor said. "When we have two guns up, we compete to see who shot the most rounds ... and who got the gun laid the fastest. My section set a goal to shoot at least 1,200 rounds during the deployment, and we have already surpassed that. We've fired 1,300 at five months. That gives us bragging rights over the entire artillery community."

And while the Soldiers of King Battery are proud of their individual, section and battery accomplishments, they are even more proud of the positive effects those accomplishments have had on the battlefield.

"A lot of it is about how many kills we get and how many rounds we've fired – that's bragging rights, but for me its more about how many American lives we saved by destroying weapons caches or terrain denial taking out enemy positions," said Cpl. Christopher Rice, artillery gunner.

The media continues to call Diyala province "restive" and "volatile" or "the most dangerous province in Iraq," but those titles have become something of a misnomer. Since last summer, violence has decreased throughout the province by almost 80 percent, and while the enemy is still capable of carrying out headline-grabbing spectacular attacks like suicide bombings, those attacks are about all it has left. The enemy's former favorite weapon of choice, the improvised explosive device, has been rendered almost completely ineffective in Diyala province, and much of that success is directly due to the Soldiers of King battery and their loud, earth-shaking booms.

"They have been exceptionally effective," Miller concluded. "It's a fair statement to say that the brigade would not have done as well as it has without the fires and effects of King Battery. They have done an outstanding job."

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Alpheus
12-06-2009, 11:14 PM
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Is that the new M320 I see?

vor033
12-06-2009, 11:22 PM
Paladin Howitzers Fire Rounds in Support of Ground Troops

An M109A6 Paladin sits awaiting an early morning fire mission at Badoush Prison, just outside of Mosul, March 28. The Paladin is a self-propelled 155mm Howitzer capable of hitting targets up to 13 miles away. The vehicle that can be seen behind the Paladin is a field artillery ammunition supply vehicle, which holds munitions, equipment and sometimes personnel necessary to operate the 155 Howitzer mounted on the Paladin.

The Howitzers, belonging to Howitzer Battery, 3rd Armoured Cavalry Regiment from Fort Hood, Texas

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kinney_bmx
12-06-2009, 11:28 PM
Is that the new M320 I see?
Yes, 82nd received them a few months ago I think. It'd be nice to hear from somebody whos used it whether or not they like it.

I think Vor posted those photos on page 16 of this thread too but i'm not sure

vor033
12-06-2009, 11:33 PM
Some random Photos of the awesome M109A6 Paladin 155mm Howitzer

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vor033
12-06-2009, 11:52 PM
FORT IRWIN, Cailf. – Entrusted with the mission of training U.S. Forces to win the wars of tomorrow, Blackhorse Troopers draw on skills from the past.

Soldiers from Delta Company and Bravo Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, qualified as a Mechanized Infantry Battalion here Oct. 21-23 2009. The qualification is part of the National Training Center's on-going shift from strictly counter-insurgency training, to Hybrid Threat.

Hybrid Threat combines elements of counterinsurgency, with large force-on-force maneuvers to deliver high-intensity scenarios to the rotational training unit, or BLUFOR, said Capt. Martin E. Wakefield, the B Troop commander.

"What we are attempting to do is replicate various threats from around the world," Wakefield said.

"Our goal is to adapt to whatever the BLUFOR's needs are," said Spc. Stephen L. Perritt, a Flowermound, Texas, native, now a rifle team leader with B Troop. "This is one of our full-scale operations. We have anti-tank, Armor and Infantry running about. So, when the next unit comes, we can provide the best training possible for them."

The Mechanized Infantry Battalion, or MIBN, is comprised of three MICs, or Mechanized Infantry Companies. Each MIC consists of an Infantry platoon from B Troop, an Armor platoon from D Company and a recon section.

"We are the hunter in the hunter-killer team," Wakefield said of his Infantrymen. "We go out and fix the enemy, to allow our armored forces to maneuver on them. We also provide dismounted Infantry support as needed."

The qualification consisted of a 10-kilometer movement through the desert environment at the National Training Center. During the movement, the vehicles crewmembers search for enemy vehicles and defensive positions. When found the two units engage each other with the MILES laser training system. After a MIC goes through the lane, they switch roles with the Soldiers in the enemy positions, allowing for training on both defensive and offensive movements.

"We get to train on maneuvering through different terrain while on the tracks, attacking an objective, and defending an objective," said Pfc. Phillip D. Williams, a Miami, Fla., native, now a tank loader with 2nd Platoon, D Company.

The qualification not only tested the cohesion between the two units, but also required the Soldiers to learn a new skill set involving a combination of enemy tactics.

"We have had weeks of training on classic defenses and offenses," said 2nd Lt. Jeff S. Zingler, a Highland, Calif., native, now the platoon leader for 2nd Platoon, Delta Company. "We've trained all the way down to the drivers on specific formations and action drills. That's what we train on, and that's what we fight with."

The current tactics used by the 11th ACR Troopers, while operating as the opposing force, or OPFOR, provide a unique opportunity to see the world through the eyes of the insurgent, but Hybrid Threat allows them to train as they would fight.

"When we are insurgents, we get to see the battlefield from the enemy's point of view," Williams said. "You know where you would hide, where you would lead someone, or where you would put the improvised explosive device. This is more what we are geared towards, maneuvering tracked vehicles and firing big bullets."

Force-on-force training is something that the Soldiers at the National Training Center once took pride in. Blackhorse Troopers are looking to restore that pride.

"I know as a soldier, and leader, you come here expecting that sort of training," Zingler said. "Hybrid Threat will bring that skill set back here."


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vor033
12-07-2009, 12:06 AM
The CH-47 Chinook Helicopter circles the landing zone at Forward Operating Base Altimur like a hawk searching for a mouse. With each pass, the helicopter draws closer and the ground becomes a miniature vortex of pebbles and dust.

After deciding his angle of approach, the pilot skilfully guides the Chinook toward the loads awaiting hook up to the helicopter.

Barely audible over the rotator blades roar, Army Sgt. Alexander Correa, an infantryman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, yells, "Get Ready. He's coming in low!"

The sling load team leader is not exaggerating. The Chinook is only a foot or two above the sling loads. Forcing the three-man team to crouch as they quickly secure the sling loads to the helicopter.

The team attaches three palettes via hooks to the underside of the helicopter. The palettes are filled with much needed supplies for remote FOBs and Combat Outposts.

Correa, who is currently attached to 3rd Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment, and his team said they enjoy the rush of excitement and appreciate the effect they have on mission success and Soldiers' morale in the more rugged and remote areas of Afghanistan

"Sling loads go to troops in areas where it is too impractical or impossible to deliver the supplies by other means," said Spc. Christopher Hickey, a Bayonne, N.J., native and a supply representative for Troop C, 3-71 Cav. Reg.

Sling loads are often filled with essentials like water, food, fuel and ammunition, but loads can also be anything from construction equipment to care packages.

Spc. Xavier De Leon, a fire support specialist with Co. B, 1-32 Inf. Reg., takes pride in performing sling load operations.

"We definitely try to push out as many sling loads as we can," said the Los Angeles native. "Those guys really need them, because they probably haven't gotten mail or a real meal in a long time."

Correa agrees that sling loads are important for Soldiers on the front lines.

"It is very important to resupply our guys," Correa said. "When they need food, water, mail, ammo or whatever else, we do our best to get it to them."

Making sure Soldiers get their needed professional and personal supplies is a serious endeavor requiring most of the work to be completed before the helicopters arrive.

"We have to rig the load according to regulations," said Correa, a Boston, native. "We have to maintain proper weight and weight distribution, which can be tricky."

Though the sling loaders work hard to ensure the loads are safe to carry there are some elements affecting safety they cannot control.

If the weather is bad or if the pilots can't see us or the cargo, then it is too dangerous to attempt a sling load, Correa said.

In fact, elevation and air temperature affect how much a helicopter is able to ferry.

According to Correa, under optimal conditions a Chinook is able to carry about 45,000 pounds, but at FOB Altimur the maximum carrying capacity is around 12,000 pounds because the FOB is approximately 7,000 feet above sea level.

Correa continued to elaborate on the effect air temperature has on the Chinook's sling load capabilities.

"If it is too hot, (the helicopter) can't carry as much weight," he said. "If it is too cold, (the helicopter) can't carry as much because of the varying (air) densities. The air has to be just right."

With the gravity of such a duty, Correa and his team know how to appreciate the simple thrill of a Chinook hovering a few feet over head.

"It's a rush," Correa said. "You have a 50,000 pound aircraft hovering over you. It can be dangerous especially at night, but it's fun."


De Leon shares his teammate's sentiments.

"It is a mixture of fear and excitement," said De Leon. "Most of the adrenaline is coming from the fear, but it's not bad."

Even though he is mindful of his situation, De Leon's favorite part of the job is dealing with the helicopter.

"When the bird is right over head," said De Leon, "after you finish hooking up the sling loads, you run out from under it. Getting that extra push from the bird is my favorite part."

Even with the excitement sling load duty offers, these Soldiers never forget how important it is to help provide the supplies their battle buddies need to win the fight.


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TheCarLessDriven
12-08-2009, 02:57 AM
Wow! the tan Stryker looks crazy.

vor033
12-08-2009, 01:16 PM
AH-64D Apache attack helicopters from Company C, 4th Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, and Six UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters from 3rd Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, depart from the flightline at Camp Taji, Iraq, Dec. 3, on their way to al-Asad where Company C will become a detachment conducting aviation operations.

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vor033
12-08-2009, 01:38 PM
Stryker wheeled armoured vehicles operated by Soldiers with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment in Rajankala, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, Nov. 28. The U.S. Army operates from combat outposts to add flexibility to operations in their sectors.

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vor033
12-08-2009, 01:40 PM
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Soldiers assigned to Joint Task Force-Bravo, headquartered in Honduras,
secure a CH-47 Chinook helicopter for sea on the flight deck of the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Wasp as Sailors welcome the Soldiers aboard. The crew of the CH-47 Chinook helicopter along with the crews of two UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters will be performing deck-landing qualifications. Wasp is currently deployed on Southern Partnership Station-Amphib with Destroyer Squadron 40 and embarked Security Cooperation Marine Air-Ground Task Force. Southern Partnership Station is part of the Partnership of the Americas Maritime Strategy that focuses on building interoperability and cooperation in the region to meet common challenges. (U.S. Navy Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class David Smart/Released)

vor033
12-08-2009, 01:46 PM
CH-47 Chinooks on the flight line aboard Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, Dec. 1. Company B, 1st Battalion, 214th Aviation Regiment, flew all aircraft to Talil, Iraq, to deliver them to Company B, 5th Battalion, 159th Aviation Regiment, for support to Multi-National Division - South.

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TheCarLessDriven
12-10-2009, 03:39 PM
Bumpidy bump.

vor033
12-10-2009, 04:45 PM
TIKRIT, Iraq – Former Soldier and author, William Arthur Ward once said that, "Every person has the power to make others happy." He said that "Some leave trails of cynicism and pessimism; others, trails of faith and optimism. Some leave trails of criticism and resignation; others, trails of gratitude and hope," then he asked, "What kind of trails do you leave?"

The trails created in Iraq have led to a change that has fostered a long lasting partnership and friendship between the Iraqi and American military forces.

Five Soldiers of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division out of Fort Riley, Kan., chose the trail they would leave behind as their selfless service helped save the lives of their Iraqi counterparts, who they also consider close friends.

On the evening of Dec. 3, a bomb exploded in the city of Tikrit, killing Iraqi Lt. Col. Ahmed Subhi Al Fahal, commander of the riot dispersion unit in the area, and three members of his security detachment. Several others were wounded in the explosion.

The Iraqi army responded immediately. Soldiers of 2-32 FAR's Quick Reaction Force were on stand-by to assist, but the only assistance requested by the Iraqi army, was for medical aid to the casualties.

Seven of the wounded Iraqis were taken to the 47th Combat Support Hospital on Contingency Operating Base Speicher. As doctors fought feverishly to save their patients another threat faced them, the blood supply in the hospital began to run low, and that's when the 2-32 FAR Soldiers reacted.

"When we heard that it was our [Iraqi personal security detachment] counterparts," said Pfc. Christian Vasquez of Miami, Fla., and a field artillery meteorological crewmember with HHB, 2-32 FAR. "We just decided to jump and volunteer because they're our guys. They've always had our backs when we were out there."

Pfc. Philip A. Gertzel of Orlando, Fla., and a supply specialist with HHB, 2-32 FAR said that even though he didn't personally know the Iraqi PSD personnel who were injured, he still wanted to help.

"Blood isn't typed on who hates who or who likes who," said Gertzel. "It's only based on blood. So, my blood is as good as anybody else's so, [I said] use mine."

The selflessness and urgency to help someone is something that these five young "Proud Americans" say just came naturally.

For Pfc. Gerald Paige of Phildelphia, Pa., and a cannon crewmember with HHB, 2-32 FAR the incident wasn't something that changed him but says it did "redefine" who he is as a person.

"I'm the same person because I would have done it before, but seeing some of my friends get hurt – something just took over," said Paige.

"When you actually see firsthand what some people will do to others," said Spc. Ross L. Sedgwick of San Diego, Calif., and a signal support systems specialist with HHB, 2-32 FAR, "it will change your opinions on what you will do to make a difference – completely."

The Soldiers said they wish they could do more to help, but they also hope that their actions will continue to inspire change.

"I just hope that people realize that it doesn't take years to know who someone is because I consider everyone that I've met my friends and some my family," said Gertzel. "These people never leave my thoughts, and I hope that it makes an impact on this country. I didn't even know the [Iraqi] PSD personally, but I still [went] out to help because I knew one person [could] make a difference but a thousand people can make a change."


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vor033
12-10-2009, 04:47 PM
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A Soldier with the 1/309th Training Support Battalion, 72nd Field Artillery Brigade, guides a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle at Army Support Activity-Dix, Dec. 7.

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Sgt. 1st Class Stefoni Harrell, team leader in the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle Familiarization Course and member of the 1/309th Training Support Battalion, 72nd Field Artillery Brigade, ground guides one of the vehicles during training at Army Support Activity-Dix, Dec. 7.

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Staff Sgt. Byron May, left, and Sgt. 1st Class Stefoni Harrell, 1/309th Training Support Battalion, 72nd Field Artillery Brigade, inspect under the hood on a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle at Army Support Activity-Dix, Dec. 7.

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Spc. Terry Dreher, 1/309th Training Support Battalion, 72nd Field Artillery Brigade, inspects the winch on a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle at Army Support Activity-Dix, Dec. 7.

vor033
12-10-2009, 05:32 PM
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – Tradition is a long established custom or practice having the effect of precedent or a model to follow, something the Army prides itself in. Traditions within the Army are visible in many different aspects.

It could be in the color of a beret, akin to the Special Forces wearing green and airborne units donning those of maroon. It could be a tanker strapping on his distinctively different styled combat boot or it may even be in a phrase, like "Hooah!" or "Air Assault!" One valued group who may stand out more than most when it comes to tradition would be the Army's Cavalry Scouts.

The Cavalry Scouts hold dearly onto their traditions and honor the strong history of which they are made from. It could be seen with the wearing of their decorated Stetsons, decked with braid ends, acorns and sabers or their earned Spurs, shining with the colors of either silver for promotion or gold for combat. The Strike Brigade's Cavalry Scouts are no different. To them having such traditions are a privilege and an honor.

The 1st Squadron, 75th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), continued the Cavalry Scout's deep rooted heritage and traditions while conducting the squadron's first Spur Ride, Dec.1-3.

"This Spur program was created to recognize those warriors who have demonstrated the professional expertise required of a cavalry Soldier," said Command Sgt. Maj. William Hambrick, the squadron's command sergeant major. "The Spur program is an old tradition practiced by cavalry units to build esprit among the leaders of the organization. The Order of the Spur is as old as the cavalry organization itself."

The cavalry units were first created with the mounting of infantrymen onto horses and when new troopers reported to their cavalry assignments, they were assigned a horse with a shaved tail, hence the nickname for newly assigned, spur-less Soldiers, "Shave Tails."

Most recruits required extensive training, which would take the time for the horse to fully grow back its tail. At which time, upon completion of their training and proving their ability to perform with their horse and saber, they were awarded the Silver Spurs.

"This is a tradition we don't want to lose so we have updated the Spur Ride to fit the training needs of today," said Hambrick. "Spur Rides were once designed for the individual rider; our modern Spur Ride is updated to make stronger teams. Team building is critical to today's fight."

The squadron designed its Spur Ride with a combination of yester year's heritage and today's tactical training. The teams looking to earn their spurs gathered in the early hours of the morning with the moon still fully visible and started the event as should any team in an air assault division should – climbing ropes. They proceeded to climb walls, perform push-up, sit-up and pull-up events. While dressed in full combat gear, they conducted tire flips, liter carries, SKEDCO pulls and a favorite event around the brigade, "Ropes Gone Wild," all while ensuring each team member completed the events.

"This right-of-passage definitely proves one's physical toughness," said Sgt. Maj. Thomas Sparks, the operations sergeant major for the squadron. "In order to move on to the tactical portion of the Spur Ride, establishing that one is physically ready for battle is a must."

After confirming each Soldier met the requirements of the packing list inside their rucksack comprising of 40-pounds worth of equipment, the potential Silver Spur holders began the Spur Ride Stations, which challenged their tactical skills.

With the stations spread out over the span of three training ranges, each team had to maneuver through the elements conducting missions involving such tasks as radio operations, calling and adjusting for fire, moving under direct contact, grenade handling, evaluating casualties, reacting to an ambush, and hand-to-hand combats engagements. While maneuvering, they also had to properly conduct functions checks on their weapons, engage targets during urban operations, and tactically question opposing forces. All together, they trekked nearly 10 miles from station to station.

"The physical strength needed and the mental stress that is involved and the tactical know how that is needed to complete this Spur Ride will make Soldiers more combat-ready," said Staff Sgt. Christopher Porras, a Spur Holder within the squadron. "This does ready Soldiers for deployment."

Upon completion of all stations, the teams conducted a six-mile road march to the events starting point, the squadron headquarters. Exhausted, both physically and mentally, the near Silver Spur holders were given a written exam testing common Army knowledge and cavalry expertise. After completing and successfully passing all requirements, these Soldiers earned a highly respected status within the cavalry community.

"The saying goes, you're not a true cavalry man unless you have your spurs," said Porras. "[There are] some differences from Spur Rides in the past to today's updated version, but the overall team building and camaraderie goals are exactly the same."

A unique trait within the cavalry squadron is that not all companies are made up of cavalry scouts. A support company and infantry company help shape the squadron, and are just as important to the team. They too were also able to earn their Spurs.

"The Spur Ride is a great chance for us to share with our infantry brothers the traditions of the cavalry," said Hambrick. "Our Charlie Company, our infantry company, is a great addition to this team and a vital part of the squadron and only makes us stronger. I am glad we have them."

Cavalry scouts operate as one of the first personnel to move forward into an area to provide forward reconnaissance in spotting, finding and relaying key information about the enemy to commanders and leaders in the field.

Their duties include assisting with observation posts, gathering reconnaissance information, performing and helping with navigating. Adding an infantry company to the mix only increases the strength to an already lethal force.

"The Spur Ride is a challenging exercise that will build better teams for us all," said Capt. Michael Haith, commander of the squadron's lone infantry company. "With these last two deployments we have already a huge legacy and this is great that we are adding the Spur Ride to it."

The squadron is relatively new to the Army, though its lineage dates back to World War II as the 705th Tank Destroyer Battalion which was attached to the 502nd Inf. Regt. and was deactivated following the war's end.

The unit returned to active service Sept. 12, 2004, when 3rd Bn., 502nd Inf. Regt., was redesigned into today's Widowmakers.

Since then the squadron already has two deployments under their belts, and a very rigorous training schedule. To be able to conduct its very first Spur Ride benefits all.

"I've been here for five years and it feels good to see this unit to have the chance to earn the Silver Spurs," said Spc. Jonathon Morrison, a small arms and artillery repairer, Company D. "I look forward to seeing more of these opportunities that will continue a great tradition."

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vor033
12-10-2009, 09:01 PM
Soldiers of the Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, air assaulted into a village near Tikrit, Iraq, on Oct. 21, 2008. The Soldiers aimed to disrupt weapons trafficking operations by extremist networks in the region

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vor033
12-10-2009, 09:23 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers taking part in the Warrior Competition on Contingency Operating Base Speicher in Tikrit, Iraq. The Warrior Competition consisted of fifty-four soldiers from Multi-National Division North, who competed in various tasks that tested their physical strength, basic combat skills, Medical skills and Army Soldier knowledge to determine the most skilled warrior among them.

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LineDoggie
12-10-2009, 09:36 PM
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WTF is he planning on hitting without his Rear Aperture Up?

Apparently, he is using the New ACOG with Romulan Cloaking Device

socom6
12-10-2009, 09:43 PM
Army strong!!!woot Sweet Army pics guys keep it up.

vor033
12-10-2009, 09:47 PM
By Sgt. 1st Class Kevin Doheny
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

TIKRIT, Iraq — I will always place the mission first. I will never accept defeat. I will never quit. I will never leave a fallen comrade.

These principles have instilled a warrior's mentality for a generation of Soldiers, which was the vision of former Army Chief of Staff Gen. Peter Schoomaker when he had the Army adopt them. As the Army's top officer, he often stated that regardless of gender, rank or military occupational skill, Soldiers will live by the Soldier's Creed and do whatever it takes to accomplish the mission.

"We need to encourage innovation and increase resiliency," he said, "and most importantly, we need to reinforce the Warrior Ethos in every Soldier."

In the Salah ad Din province, the Spartans of the1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, follow this ideology and have expanded on their 'traditional' role of supporting the brigade in a variety of support missions.

The Spartans still provide the support to the Bastogne Brigade, but have also taken on the additional security responsibility for a vast area of operations. Taking on this role with limited combat forces, the Spartans have adapted and employed their support Soldiers to conduct combat operations.

The commander of the battalion, Lt. Col. Rick Rhyne, a Special Forces officer with experience in accomplishing missions with outside-the-box thinking, displayed his confidence in a group of support Soldiers during a recent air assault operation, Sept. 7, 2008.

Operation Chalcis, an air assault operation targeting possible al Qaida in Iraq hideouts, wasn't performed by the battalion's attached infantry company or the commander's security team; it was conducted by its Signal Company.

"The opportunity that the battalion commander bestowed upon my company to execute this operation shows his great trust and confidence of my Soldiers," said Capt. Alex Peake, commander of Charlie Company, 1st STB.

The company's traditional role is centered on operating and managing the Bastogne Brigade's signal network operations. They are responsible for nearly all the communication across the province's vast area, which is roughly the size of Vermont.
According to 1st Sgt. Juan Vasquez, his company's ability to balance both technical and tactical skills is a valuable asset to the battalion. He attributes this balance to the warrior mentality exhibited by his troops.

"As the conditions on the battlefield change so must the mentality of our Soldiers," said Vasquez. "A never quit attitude puts them in a mindset to train on tactics that are not an inherit part of their jobs, however they are an inherit part of being a Soldier."

Signal Soldiers often find themselves in maneuver units, thus being part of combat operations is nothing new to the mission. Signal Soldiers are often called upon to adhere to the high standards of their combat-arms brethren, while at the same time expertly providing their technical capabilities.

However, command and control of an air assault is not "business as usual" for the Signal Corps Soldiers.

Operation Chalcis was coordinated, planned and executed under the command and control of Peake and his platoon leaders. Ground breaking in itself, the air assault may have been the first of its kind, and the leaders of the company understand the legacy that they will leave behind.

"I am proud to be in Charlie Co., 1st STB, and I'm proud to be a Screaming Eagle," said 2nd Lt. Jerome Jose, platoon leader. "I'm grateful that we have been given the opportunity and responsibility to carry on the tradition of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)."

"Being a part of the 101st, it is expected for our Soldiers to adapt to new challenges and perform tasks they may not be familiar with," said 1st Lt. Scott Widener, platoon leader. "The Soldiers in our company are a testament to the Warrior Ethos."

As the Army evolves as the battlefields change, Soldiers such as the Cannibals of Charlie Company understand that they must retain the Soldier-first mentality. This resonates throughout the ranks within the Spartan family.

"I don't think your average Signal Company would have the opportunity to have command and control of an air assault mission, but then again, this is not a normal STB," said Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Wurm, platoon sergeant. "We are all Soldiers. We have a specific MOS, but any of us can be called upon to be a Soldier, not just a Signal Soldier."


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vor033
12-10-2009, 10:11 PM
Bastogne Sappers Conduct Multi-faceted, Counter-insurgency Operations to Secure the Once Restive Cities of Tikrit and Owja

By Sgt. 1st Class Kevin Doheny
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division

TIKRIT, Iraq— It is 2 a.m., and the streets are empty as calm resides over the once restive city of Tikrit.

The only sounds are stray dogs howling and the echoing of messages transmitting from the speakers of local mosques.

In just a few hours the silence resonating throughout the city will be shattered with the thundering sound of helicopters carrying a combined force of U.S. Soldiers and Iraqi Police to a remote location where the enemy seeks refuge and plans attacks inside Tikrit.

The mission on this morning: to kill or capture extremists seeking safe haven in the desert areas west of the restive city.

The helicopter blades turn faster and faster as last minute checks are completed, and the stoic looks show men ready for battle.

The aircraft launch and are quickly hidden in the pitch-black Iraqi sky. During flight, the sky begins to turn to light gray as the sun begins to rise. As the suns peeks over the horizon, a reddish-orange glare engulfs the extremist hideout. From out of the waning darkness, the helicopters swoop down and its occupants swiftly dismount the aircraft and assault the al Qaida safe haven.

This operation named "Himera", a combined air assault with Soldiers from the 1st Brigade Combat Team and Iraqi police, targeted al Qaida fighters seeking safe haven near Tharthar Lake in the western portion of the Salah ad Din province.

The operation showcased the ability of coalition and Iraqi security forces to assault multiple targets in different locations throughout the province during a single air assault operation.

"We are disassembling the terrorist network that is trying to negate any progress my Iraqi counterparts are making inside the city of Tikrit," said Capt. John Gabriel, Alpha Company commander.

While adept at fighting the enemy in the open desert, for the Soldiers of Alpha Company it is not always helicopters and bullets.

In the days leading up to this operation these same Soldiers were confronting the enemy threat using a different method; social interaction.

This technique has become synonymous with Soldiers in this counter-insurgency fight.

By getting out amongst the people to expand relationships and trust, these combat engineers can more effectively secure the population centers of Tikrit and Owja; while at the same time defeat the enemy outside of the cities.

"My Soldiers see the difference they're making by treating the people in our area with respect and dignity," Gabriel said. "The people in Tikrit and Owja have gone from a negative or neutral perception to coalition forces, to an extremely positive one."

The 1st Special Troops Battalion has a unique task and organization here in Iraq. A brigade special troops battalion, are designed to, support the brigade and its subordinate units with communications, intelligence, chemical reconnaissance, military police and engineer assets. For the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, the BSTB still provides the standard combat support to the brigade, but was also given the additional responsibility of securing a large portion of the Salah ad Din province, centered on the greater-Tikrit area. As a result of this non-standard mission, the battalion was given the additional assets of two military police companies and an infantry company to help assist.

"Task Force Spartan brought together a diverse mix of companies and military specialties that have contributed to the overall mission success," said Maj.

Timothy Povich, 1st BSTB executive officer. "We have infantry, engineer, military police, intelligence and signal companies as well as a Headquarters company all working in harmony to accomplish the mission. Every company brings a unique perspective and skill to the fight which sets us apart from your normal maneuver task force."

The routine combat engineer mission in Iraq is often tied to conducting route clearance operations. This mission is extremely vital to safety of U.S. Forces traveling on the dangerous Iraqi roads as well as the overall safety of the local Iraqi populace. Upon arrival in Iraq in September 2007; Alpha Company initially had this task. Taking on more and more civic responsibilities, the company recognized it needed to focus on the people and their security, rather than tackling both tasks.

"Combat Engineers performing a maneuver mission is not new to the Army, however in the last few years our ability to provide mobility through route clearance has overshadowed the other skills we bring to the battlefield," said Gabriel. "Sappers pride themselves on their ability to fight like Infantry when called upon to do so, and still accomplishing their doctrinal tasks of providing mobility, counter-mobility and survivability to other maneuver elements."

Over the past several months, Gabriel's combat engineers have routinely conducted local leader engagements in addition to census and clearing operations in both Tikrit and Owja. Meetings with "mukhtars" or heads of villages or neighborhoods, occur almost daily. These meetings allow them to pass information along, as well as gather information on the needs of the people there.

"We realized early on that the majority of the population was either not informed or misinformed of their government's progress and the intent of coalition forces in their city," said Gabriel. "They also needed a chance to vent and discuss issues with us. We routinely go through neighborhoods to inform them of the progress being made in the city and to answer questions."

Although proud of the combat proficiency of his Soldiers and his Iraqi counterparts, Gabriel acknowledged that one day he hopes lethal operations won't be necessary and all of the focus can be placed on the populace.

"The population is pleased with the security their police are providing them," Gabriel said, "I look forward to the day when lethal operations are not needed."

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vor033
12-10-2009, 10:44 PM
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Mortar Shoot
U.S. Army Spc. Shawn Taylor launches 60 mm mortars from a combat outpost in Arghandab, Afghanistan, Nov. 30, 2009. The Army operates from combat outposts to add flexibility to operations in their sectors. Taylor is assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea

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Humanitarian aid in Rajan Kala, Afghanistan

U.S. Soldiers unload humanitarian aid for distribution to the town of Rajan Kala, Afghanistan Dec. 5, 2009. The team used their Stryker armored vehicles to move the humanitarian aid from the Joint District Community Center to the town of Rajan Kala. The Soldiers are assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 17th Regiment. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II


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Ranger training

2LT Andrew Shattuck, a student in his final week of U.S. Army Ranger School, travel a short distance on a dirt path before veering back into the forested swampland of Auxiliary Field Six at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. His platoon hiked nearly eight kilometers through the swamp Tuesday.

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Conducting 360-degree security during Ranger training

Soldiers take a knee and conduct 360-degree security while a reconnaissance group moves ahead to ensure their path is clear.

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Testing the new XM-25 weapon system

A Soldier aims an XM-25 weapon system at Aberdeen Test Center, Md. It features an array of sights, sensors and lasers housed in a Target Acquisition Fire Control unit on top, an oversized magazine behind the trigger mechanism, and a short, ominous barrel wrapped by a recoil dampening sleeve.

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Training on all terrain vehicles in Germany

U.S. Army Soldiers train on the advanced mobility course on all terrain vehicles in Boeblingen, Germany, Oct. 22, 2009. The Soldiers are assigned to the 1st Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group. The course allows Soldiers to gain experience on different surfaces from sand and gravel to steep grades, and can also be used for training in humvees. U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson

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First Javelin missile firing in India

Sgt. Peter Bitter, a cavalry scout team leader and Javelin/Stryker gunner, and Sgt. Michael Resendez (left), a truck commander and Javelin gunner, both assigned to Troop B, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, complete the first Javelin missile firing in India as part of Yudh Abhyas 09 in Babina, India, Oct. 23.

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Color guard at Fort Bagg

Soldiers representing the diverse missions of Fort Bragg, N.C., serve as the color guard during the Warrior Leader Course, Class 01-10 graduation, Oct. 15

vor033
12-10-2009, 11:00 PM
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Grenade launcher

U.S. Army Spc. Timothy Cooke, left, and Sgt. Kyle O'Leary prepare to shoot a grenade launcher during range training at Exercise Yudh Abhyas in Babina, India, Oct. 15, 2009. The bilateral exercise involves the armies of India and the United States, and all soldiers are assigned to the 25th Infantry Division's 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Crista Yazzie

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Early dawn in Tacome valley, Afghanistan

U.S. Army Spc. Jason Hebert provides security in the early dawn during an air assault mission above Tacome valley in Zabul province, Afghanistan, Oct. 14, 2009. Hebert is assigned to Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tia P. Sokimson

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World's premier snipers converge on Fort Benning

Sgt. Nicholas Irving, of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, takes aim during the "Defensive Shoot" event at Wagner Range on Fort Benning, Ga., during the Ninth annual U.S. Army International Sniper Competition held Oct. 15-22.

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Return to FOB Lane, Afghanistan

Spc. Justin Slagle returns to Forward Operating Base Lane in a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter after an air assault mission in the Zabul province of Afghanistan, Oct. 15, 2009. Even as leaders in Washington struggle with the next steps in Afghanistan, troops there are moving to better protect the Afghan people by separating them from Taliban influence and intimidation. Photo credit: Spc. Tia P. Sokimson.

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Air-assault mission in Paktika province

PAKTIKA PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- Paratroopers from 3rd Platoon, Company B, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division prepare to load a CH-47 Chinook Helicopter in the Bermel District of the Paktika province in eastern Afghanistan, Oct. 13, during an air-assault mission to detain a known militant. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Andrya Hill, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

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Exchanging tactics

Spc. John Walis, Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 69th Infantry Regiment, fires a 50-caliber machine gun against opposing forces during the Orient Shield field training exercise, Aibano Training Site, Japan, Oct. 16.

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Live Fire

U.S. Army Pfc. Kevin B. Mettler (front), 22, and Pvt. Jason R. Pompa (rear), 26, mortar gunners for Mortar Platoon, L Troop of the 4th Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, based in Vilseck, Germany, cover their ears as a long-range training round is fired out of a 120-mm mortar which has a maximum range of 6,800 meters. The training rounds have cartridges similar to 12-gauge shotgun shells at the top of each round that detonates a white flash upon impact instead of sending out shrapnel as a live mortar would.

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Night Fire


Participants in the Department of the Army Best Warrior Competition fire at targets as the night sky is illuminated with simulated munitions, adding a breath of realism to the night fire event. The competition was held at Sept. 27-Oct. 2 at Fort Lee, Va. Photo credit: T. Anthony Bell

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Army Best Warrior Competition

Master Sergeant Robert Bowman, Texas Tech University ROTC, reviews an event binder at the Best Soldier Competition while awaiting an appearance before the Soldier of the Year Board at Club Lee on Fort Lee Va., Sept. 28, 2009. The Best Warrior program is a test of physical and mental endurance, and lasts a weeklong. U.S. Army Photo by Pfc. Joel LeMaistre

vor033
12-10-2009, 11:14 PM
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STUTTGART, Germany -- On two separate days in April, members of Company B, 1st Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), were engaged in hostile enemy action, resulting in nine of its members receiving awards for valor.

Staff Sergeants Steven Hurt and Jason Lebeau each were pinned the Bronze Star Medal with "V" device and Staff Sergeants Daniel Devlin, Juanmanuel Mata, John Lewis and Christopher Smith were decorated with Army Commendation Medals with "V" device during a ceremony held July 29, at Panzer Barracks. Devlin also received a Purple Heart.

Three other team members not present at the ceremony who also earned the Bronze Star for Valor were Sgt. 1st Class Jason Dryden, Staff Sgt. Kenneth Powell and Staff Sgt. Keith Waller. Waller also received a Purple Heart.

Day one - April 3, 2009

The team was partnered with a Romanian Special Forces detachment and was called to assist two platoons from the 10th Mountain Division to capture a senior-level insurgent hiding in a compound.

By the time they arrived, the enemy had fortified its position within the compound, emplacing crew-served weapons and strategically positioning fighters to defend against the assault.

"Within five minutes we were taking pretty effective fire from the insurgents. Waller and four of the Romanian soldiers were immediately hit," said the detachment's team sergeant. "Incredibly, Waller kept up the fight until the medics pulled him away."

At that point, Hurt, one of the team's communications sergeants, realized that he needed to reposition to make contact with the air medevac. After just completing an assault against the enemy position, he again exposed himself to enemy machine gun fire while moving to establishing communications.

"Staff Sergeant Hurt is one of my most aggressive Soldiers - a shooter first," the team sergeant said. "He was one of the first guys up on that roof, and he knew when it was time to pull out of the fight to get satellite communications and relay information on the ground situation."

As the enemy continued its attack on their position, Smith, Dryden and Powell continued to treat the injured soldiers, also putting themselves at serious personal risk.

Day two - April 17, 2009

The team, partnered with an Afghanistan National Army platoon, a squad of Soldiers from 3-71st Cavalry Regiment and a Romanian Special Forces team, were preparing to conduct a deliberate detention operation of an insurgent commander and improvised explosive device facilitator.

The team sergeant described the situation as the "worst timing" for the men, as they were already physically and emotionally spent after clearing five insurgent compounds during the previous 24 hours.

The enemy had an elevated position and watched as the men entered a narrow alleyway before opening fire and inflicting life-threatening wounds on two of the 3-71 Soldiers. The enemy also launched a rocket-propelled grenade in the alleyway, with fragments of the grenade penetrating the edge of Devlin's helmet and lacerating his head.

"I knew I was dinked, but it was nothing serious," Devlin said.

While receiving direct small arms fire, the Special Forces Soldiers began giving immediate first aid care to the wounded Soldiers and placed seven tourniquets on one of them, eventually saving both his life and limb.

Both Mata and Lebeau would take turns providing suppressive fire against the enemy, while also taking turns giving critical care by applying direct pressure to stop the bleeding.

The team sergeant, who was separated from his men, attributed the many hours of first aid cross-training his Soldiers conducted before their deployment for saving the lives of the two wounded Soldiers. He added that every man is confident enough to do some part of every other man's job on the team.

Summing up the actions of all the men on those two nights, Devlin said, "If any one member of our team had not been there, it could have been so much worse. Everyone played a vital role and everyone made a difference."

LineDoggie
12-10-2009, 11:28 PM
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Exchanging tactics

Spc. John Walis, Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 69th Infantry Regiment, fires a 50-caliber machine gun against opposing forces during the Orient Shield field training exercise, Aibano Training Site, Japan, Oct. 16.



Ha! I Know Walis, he's in My old Bn. He's a Tugboat Deck Hand in NYC. They loved this tour, especially the Slo-Ju tent. He just came back from Afghanistan in January this year.

Good dude

vor033
12-10-2009, 11:30 PM
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Reflexive fire training

Soldiers participate in reflexive fire training on Sept. 29 during the 2009 Department of the Army Best Warrior Competition held Sept. 28 - Oct. 2 at Fort Lee, Va. Sgt. Jonathan Jordan, representing U.S. Army Medical Command, is pictured in front.

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Orchard Training Area, Idaho

U.S. Army Soldiers depart an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter during training on Orchard Training Area, Idaho, Sept. 16, 2009. The Soldiers are assigned to the Utah Army National Guard, 19th Special Forces Group, and the helicopter crew is assigned to the 34th Weapons Squadron, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The 34th Weapons Squadron is conducting the terminal employment phase of the Nellis Weapons School syllabus.

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Staff Sgt. Francis Macale secures the landing zone

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Macale secures a landing zone as his transportation, a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter, flies away near the Koh Band district of Kapisa province, Afghanistan, Sept. 14, 2009. Macale is a squad leader assigned to the Kapisa Provincial Reconstruction Team. U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. Darrick B. Lee

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Preparing Black Hawks

U.S. Army Soldiers load into two Black Hawk helicopters as they prepare to fly to a nearby town and conduct a presence patrol in Taji, Iraq, Sept. 18, 2009. The soldiers are assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division's Company F, 3rd Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Travis Zielinski

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First Captain leads Corps of Cadets

U.S. Military Academy First Captain Tyler Gordy (front) leads the Brigade Staff during the Acceptance Day Parade, Aug. 15, at West Point, N.Y. Photo credit: John Pellino.

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A day with Black Hawk crews

During an early morning start, an orange glow from the sun fills the sky as a team of UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters from Company B, 3rd Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, depart Camp Taji Airfield, Iraq, Aug. 18, 2009. The aircrews are flying to a training area where they will be conducting training with Iraqi army soldiers

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Ranger Rendezvous

U.S. Army Rangers parachute from a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III
during Ranger Rendezvous over Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga., Aug.
3, 2009. More than 1,000 Rangers assigned to four Ranger battalions from
across the country participated in a mass tactical airborne operation.

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Ranger Rendezvous

A mass airborne operation involving more than 1,000 Soldiers of the 75th Ranger Regiment begins the biennial Ranger Rendezvous Aug. 3, 2009 at Fort Benning, Ga.

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Securing the landing zone

A U.S. Army paratrooper from 2nd Battalion, 377th Parachute Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, secures the landing zone during an air assault mission to search the area of Khost Province, Afghanistan, during Operation Champion Sword, July 29. Operation Champion Sword is a joint operation involving Afghanistan national security forces and International Security Assistance Forces focused on specific militant targets and safe havens within eastern Afghanistan

vor033
12-10-2009, 11:45 PM
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Protecting the border

U.S. Soldiers from 10th Mountain Division and the 4th Brigade Combat
Team, 4th Infantry Division, maintain security of a landing zone while a
CH-47 Chinook approaches near Binshai in Kunar province, Afghanistan,
July 22

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Scope shot

U.S. Army Sgt. Cavazos attempts to take a photo of the image down his
sniper scope while performing guard duty on Combat Post Pirtle King, Afghanistan, July 8, 2009. Cavazos is assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment. The main focus of the post is to maintain control over Tsunnel valley, an area formally used as a high-traffic route for al-Qaida. U.S. Army photo by SSG Christopher Allison.

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Securing Barge Matal


U.S. Army soldiers fire mortar rounds at suspected Taliban fighting positions during Operation Mountain Fire in Barge Matal, a village in eastern Nuristan province, Afghanistan, July 12, 2009. U.S. and Afghan forces secured the remote mountain village, which was overwhelmed by insurgent forces several days before. The U.S. soldiers are assigned to the 10th Mountain Division's 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Matthew C. Moeller

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New M-320 grenade launcher

A paratrooper with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, fires a training round from the new M-320 grenade launcher while learning to use the weapon on a Fort Bragg, N.C., range July 1. The brigade was the first unit in the Army to receive the advanced grenade launcher that will replace the Vietnam-era M-203.

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Security patrol

Soldiers with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion,
32nd Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, patrol outside Forward Operating Base Joyce, in Kunar province. During the Patrol, the Soldiers met with Afghan border police officers to discuss continued security along the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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TOW missile fire

A Stryker vehicle crew belonging to the 4th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, fires a TOW missile during the brigade's rotation through Fort Polk's, Joint Readiness Training Center.

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Airborne Jump

A U.S. Army Soldier leaps from the ramp of a C-130 aircraft during an airborne operation on Fort Bragg, N.C., commemorating the airborne invasion of Normandy, June 6, 2009. The Soldier is assigned to the 28th Combat Support Hospital. U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Maj. Kelly C. Luster

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Top of Combat Outpost Texas, in Sadr City, Baghdad, Iraq.


Spc. Kristopher Doktor, of Peoria, Ill., a Soldier in Company A, 1st Battalion 6th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, scans his sector of fire through the sights on his M240 Bravo machine gun, on top of Combat Outpost Texas, in Sadr City, Baghdad, Iraq.

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Steep cliff patrol

Spc. Andrew Harvey, a 1st Infantry Soldier, patrols along steep cliffs of the Korengal Valley's surrounding mountains during Operation Viper Shake, Afghanistan, April 21, 2009.

Elbs
12-10-2009, 11:48 PM
That Stryker shot is amazing! Keep em coming :)

Arnie100
12-10-2009, 11:53 PM
^^Yeah! You can even see the wires trailing behind the missile!

vor033
12-11-2009, 12:03 AM
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Korengal Valley, Afghanistan

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Infantry Division, conduct a patrol during Operation Viper Shake, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, April 21, 2009.

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High elevations

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Infantry Division, traverse steep elevations of more than 2,000 meters, during Operation Viper Shake, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, April 21, 2009.

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Mountain camouflage

Cpl. Thomas Bourget, assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Infantry Division, observes the mountain landscape opposite of his position that surrounds the Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, April 21, 2009.

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Lakota jump


A Fort Polk Soldier jumps from a Lakota LUH 72A helicopter during high altitude, low open airborne operations April 8, while another Soldier prepares to jump. The event marked the first time a Lakota was used in airborne operations on Fort Polk and just the third time Army wide.

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Hovering Hawks

U.S. Army Soldiers wait to be picked up by UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters south of Balad Ruz, Iraq, March 22, 2009. The Soldiers are assigned to the 25th Infantry Division's 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team. DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Walter J. Pels.

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Sunrise in Afghanistan

U.S. Army Sgt. Robert Newman, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army Europe, watches the sunrise after a dismounted patrol mission near Forward Operating Base Baylough, Zabul, Afghanistan, March 19, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Adam Mancini/Released)

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Airborne Mud

Two U.S. Army soldiers walk their vehicle through the muddy paths of Forward Operating Base Airborne south of Kabul, Afghanistan, March 6, 2009. The soldiers, assigned to the 10th Mountain Division's 3rd Brigade Combat Team and part of Task Force Spartan, took control of the base last month. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker

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Bagram Chinnok

U.S. Soldiers from Alpha Company, 1st Platoon, Personnel Security Detail, 101st Airborne Division exit a CH-47 Chinook helicopter to provide security in Bagram, Afghanistan, Feb. 15, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Prentice C. Martin-Bowen/Released)

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Valley View

U.S. Army 1LT Jared Tomberlin (left) from Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment gets a first hand view of the land with outgoing commander 1LT Larry Baca from Charlie Co. 1-4, on top of a ridge near Forward Operation Base Lane, Zabul Province, Afghanistan, on February 21, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Adam Mancini / Released)

killedbill
12-11-2009, 04:32 AM
Amazing pictures, thank you!

bruss
12-11-2009, 09:47 AM
Those Korengal pics look like Colorodo..

vor033
12-11-2009, 05:24 PM
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Afghanistan

A Headquarters and Headquarters Troop , 6th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, humvee sits on a plateau overlooking the route of a Combat Logistics Patrol that is coming their way to deliver supplies to the area. The scouts were there to watch for enemy activity and protect the patrol from attack.

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'Blues Platoon' conducts 'Fallen Angel' training

Baltimore native Pfc. John Dixon, a Soldier in Company F, 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, guards the perimeter as other Blues Platoon Soldiers tend to wounded aircrew members during a training exercise Jan. 15 on Fort Hood, Texas. The term "Blues Platoon" is used in reference to ground forces who are attached to aviation units.

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uparmored convoy

Armored Security Vehicles move into Forward Operating Base Shank as part of a four-hour convoy that carried Soldiers of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team from Bagram Air Field to the the FOB. Soldiers of the brigade wil continue to move into their respective FOBs until early Feb.

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Paratroopers assist with security during National Police graduation ceremony

Paratroopers assigned to the Troop C, 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, partnered with Iraqi security forces to provide security for the national police graduation Jan. 9 in the Rusafa district of eastern Baghdad.

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The U.S. Army Drill Team uses bayonet-tipped 1903-style Springfield rifles during a demonstration of their skills during the pre-game activities before the start of the All-American Bowl high school football game in the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. The team is part of the 3rd U.S. Infantry 'Old Guard'

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U.S Soldiers detonate firebombs in an Iraqi palm grove to destroy hidden ****y traps, explosives and weapons, Dec. 22, 2008.

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Paratroopers assigned to 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) conduct airborne operations from a Colorado Army National Guard CH-47D Chinook assigned to 2nd Battalion, 135th Aviation Regiment, into the snow-covered terrain of Fort Carson, Colo., Dec. 10, 2008. The airborne operation conducted under the command of Dutch Special Forces with the assistances of a 10th SFG (A) jumpmaster, helped familiarize the American paratroopers with Dutch commands. Operations like this help sustain and foster a good working relationship with the Dutch, said a 10th SFG (A) operations officer. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Liesl Marelli, Colorado National Guard) (Released)

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Task Force 'Thunder' cleans up grove in Panda Garden

An Abrams tank from Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Armor Regiment, Task Force 4-27 “Thunder”, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad, clears fallow fields surrounded by an untended palm grove in the Jabour area, south of Baghdad, Dec. 15. The farmland is suspected of being mined and containing unexploded ordnance and improvised explosive devices. The tank has a roller attachment at its prow used to uncover mines and other explosive devices. Operation Panda Garden, under the direction of the company, is intended to clear the area of explosive devices and search for any caches buried in the area. The cleared farmland will then be used by local villagers and the grove will be tended for its dates.

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Following the casing of the brigade, battalion and division colors, soldiers assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division Horse Detachment perform a cavalry charge accompanied by a helicopter flyover performed by the 1st Cavalry Division Air Cavalry Brigade on Fort Hood's Cooper Field, Texas, Dec. 12, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Phillip Turner

vor033
12-11-2009, 05:44 PM
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Battle of the Bulge

In late 1944, in the wake of the allied forces' successful D-Day invasion of Normandy, France, it seemed as if the Second World War was all but over. But on Dec. 16, with the onset of winter, the German army launched a counteroffensive that was intended to cut through the Allied forces in a manner that would turn the tide of the war in Hitler's favor. The battle that ensued is known historically as The Battle of the Bulge. The courage and fortitude of the American Soldier was tested against great adversity. Nevertheless, the quality of his response ultimately meant the victory of freedom over tyranny

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Soldiers from Company A, 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment with Combined Task Force Currahee walk back down a mountain in the Paktika Province of eastern Afghanistan during a search for a weapons cache. (U.S. Army Photo By: Sgt. Zach Otto)

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U.S. Forces Korea honors veteran's

Veterans of Foreign Wars District III hosts a memorial event Nov. 11 at Yongsan Garrison, Seoul Korea. U.S. and Korean dignitaries placed wreathes and flowers to honor veterans.

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Standing by on a hill top, Soldiers with the 101st Division Special Troops Battalion, 101st Airborne Division watch as two Chinook helicopters fly in to take them back to Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan Nov. 4, 2008. The Soldiers searched a small village in the valley below for IED making materials and facilities. (Photo by Spc. Mary L. Gonzalez, CJTF-101 Public Affairs)

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Soldiers from A Company, 101st Division Special Troop Battalion air assault into a village inside Jowlzak valley, Parwan province, Afghanistan. Afghan National Police searched the village while Soldiers provided security and conducted key-leader engagements.

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Soldiers with Charlie Battery, 1-377 FA fire an M198, 155mm howitzer during a recent combined live-fire exercise.

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. James Gibson scans the terrain while his battle buddies keep a watchful eye from the water during training on Camp Atterbury, Ind., Sept. 20, 2008. The soldiers are assigned to 2nd Battalion, 152nd Cavalry Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron Airborne.

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Soldiers from units within Task Force Currahee fire at iron targets over 500 meters away during a range day portion of a training class on the newly-issued M14 during a four day training class on the new weapon at Forward Operating Base Salerno, Khost province, Sept. 8.

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During training, troopers from Company D, 2nd "Lancers" Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st "Ironhorse" Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division point out their target as they drop to one knee after moving in from the drop zone. The Soldiers planned their point of attack and continued to gain on the target during an air assault mission on Sept. 3, 2008. This is one of the various drills the Ironhorse Brigade conducted during their pre-deployment field training exercise, Rampage

vor033
12-11-2009, 06:22 PM
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Soldiers with 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) take cover as UH-60 Black Hawks bring Soldiers into Habbash Village during Operation Monmouth, a combined air assault, Aug. 27, 2008.

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Sgt. Joshua Robbins, native of ****son, Tenn., serving with the 66th Engineers Company, "Sappers," 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, "Warrior," 25th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, torches an area with a flame thrower in an effort to deny terrorists concealment, and give coalition forces at Joint Security Station Mushada East a clear line of sight along a road, which lies between Mushada and Tarmiyah in the Tarmiyah Qada.

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Soldiers with Co. A, 3-187th Inf., 3rd BCT, 101st Abn. Div. (AASLT) prepare to go to the pickup zone during Operation Kips Bay, a combined air assault in Al Betra, about 30 kilometers southwest of Baghdad, Aug.8. Photo by Pfc. Christopher McKenna

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A Paratrooper with Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment fires at the enemy with a M240 Bravo machine gun during a combat patrol exercise, Aug 5, 2008. During the exercise, paratroopers experienced many scenarios which they may face in combat such as combating an insurgent cell.

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Spc. Jesse A. Murphree, Destined Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment (Airborne), greets his 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team comrades returning from deployment in Afghanistan, on the flight line at Aviano Air Base, Italy, July 22. Murphree lost his legs in an improvised explosive device attack in the Korengal Valley, near Ali Abad, Afghanistan, Dec. 27, 2007, and has been undergoing treatment at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

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U.S. Soldiers assigned to a survey team from Task Force Castle prepare to move out on a mission in Afghanistan July 11, 2008. The Soldiers will survey a proposed site for a new observation post. DoD photo by 1st Lt. Tomas Rofkahr, U.S. Army.

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Cavalry Scouts from Troop B, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, dismount a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from 3rd Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cav. Div., during an air assault training operation dubbed “Operation Dark Horse Lightning” at the St. Elijah Company Military Operations in Urban Terrain Site on Fort Hood, Texas, June 30.

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The Louisiana National Guards two new UH-72 Lakotas touch down for the first time at Esler Field in Pineville, La. Photo by Stephanie J. Cross

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Two UH-60L Blackhawk helicopters, flown by pilots from the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade's Task Force "Diamond Head," head towards a landing zone for a planned air assault mission at the Pohakuloa Training Area, on the Big Island of Hawaii, May 30. Photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrone C. Marshall Jr

Navel Lint
12-11-2009, 06:37 PM
Ha! I Know Walis, he's in My old Bn. He's a Tugboat Deck Hand in NYC. They loved this tour, especially the Slo-Ju tent. He just came back from Afghanistan in January this year.

Good dude


Forgive my ignorance, but those three rods running along the barrel, what are they for and why are they on some and not others?

stick.up.kid
12-11-2009, 06:41 PM
Great photos, really appreciate you posting them all. Vor

DnA
12-11-2009, 06:56 PM
Forgive my ignorance, but those three rods running along the barrel, what are they for and why are they on some and not others?

They are part of the BFA for the M2 HMG so it can shoot blanks.

vor033
12-11-2009, 08:55 PM
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CAMP TAJI, Iraq- Under the cover of night, an AH-64D Apache attack helicopter from the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, departs the flight line to conduct operations in support Operation Iraqi Freedom, here, Dec. 2, 2009.

vor033
12-11-2009, 09:18 PM
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The crew of B-52 fires a 120mm mortar from their Stryker MCV-B during crew certification for 8th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

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Soldiers from B Troop, 8th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment fire 120mm mortars from their Stryker MCV-B during crew certification. Photo by Jason Kaye

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The SPARK provides additional stand-off capability to vehicles and crews against pressure activated or VOIEDs, and is proving to be an extremely effective tool against insurgent-placed IEDs and explosive devices.

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U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Shane Chapman, from 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, yells for a medic to treat an Iraqi civilian injured in a vehicle borne improvised explosive device explosion March 6, 2008, in Mosul, Iraq. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Robertson)

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U.S. Army Spc. Brandon Garcia, from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 249th Infantry Regiment (Light), Guam Army National Guard, launches a simulated attack against Djiboutian army soldiers during Operation Able Dart 08-01 on Forward Operating Location Ali Sabieh, Djibouti, March 4, 2008. The Soldiers are teaching counterterrorism tactics to Djiboutian army soldiers during the 10-week Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock)

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Members of U.S. Army Special Forces soar out the back of a C-17 Globemaster III at an altitude of 6,000 feet during a high altitude, low opening training exercise, Feb. 22 during Balikatan 08 in the Philippines.

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A U.S. Army Stryker armored vehicle stands ready prior to a live-fire training exercise during Exercise Key Resolve/Foal Eagle 2008 at the Rodriguez Live Fire Range in South Korea Feb. 24, 2008. The annual joint exercise between U.S. forces and Republic of Korea forces provides training to enhance interoperability and combat readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Lou Rosales)

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U.S. Army Sgt. Joseph Chmielewski, from Bravo Company, Division Special Troops Battalion, Task Force Gladius, pulls security during a key leader engagement at the Jalokheyl village on main supply route Vermont in the Kapisa province of Afghanistan Feb. 5, 2008. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Johnny R. Aragon)

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Several OH-58 D Kiowa Warrior helicopters sit on the flight line of Jalalabad Airfield in Afghanistan Feb. 17, 2008, as two others depart on a mission. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. George Welcome)

vor033
12-11-2009, 09:46 PM
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Cpl. Michael Good, a Soldier from B Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, moves along a path overlooking the mountainside village of Aranas while on patrol in the Nuristan province. ARANAS, Afghanistan. Photo by Spc. Eric Jungels.

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Soldiers from the 172nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team patrol Mosul, Iraq, Feb. 14, 2006. Photo by Tech. Sgt. John M. Foster.

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A paratrooper from 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade, watches as an aircraft flies overhead while dropping supplies in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, Nov 9

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U.S. Army Soldiers from the 19th Special Forces, Utah National Guard conduct an urban village assault Nov. 13, 2007, at Camp Williams, Utah, during an extraction of a simulated downed pilot as a part of a Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) Integration exercise. The training was given by Airmen from the 34th Weapons Squadron, United States Air Force Weapons School out of Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The exercise\'s objective was to expand expertise and integration with Utah\'s 211th Aviation Group AH-64 Apache Joint Rotary Wing, 4th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon Striker assets, 19th Special Operations Forces, and conduct extensive joint CSAR operations against surface to air threats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald)

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An AH-64D Apache from Company B, 1st Attack Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, flies over a residential area in the Multi-National Division-Baghdad area Oct. 12. The Apache crew was conducting a reconnaissance mission to keep an eye out for enemy mortar and anti-aircraft systems

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U.S. Army Soldiers of Alpha Troop, 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division out of Fort Lewis, Wash., fire 120 mm mortars from a Stryker vehicle at Joint Combat Outpost Key West, Iraq, Aug. 28, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. John Crosby)

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Capt. Sean Spence, the commander of B Co. TF Eagle, rides shotgun on an AH-64 Apache during an Apache extraction exercise Aug. 25 at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo.

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A Multi-National Task Force (East) Soldier, rides shotgun on an AH-64 Apache during an Apache extraction exercise Aug. 25 at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo

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U.S. Army Soldiers of Foxtrot Company, 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Air Brigade of Fort Campbell, Ky., practice recovering personnel at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center in Southeast Indiana's Jennings County July 18, 2007, in preparation for a scheduled deployment to Afghanistan. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Russell Lee Klika

vor033
12-11-2009, 09:58 PM
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Maj. Christopher Milstead, attached to Task Force Bayonet, watches as a 500-pound bomb lands on a Taliban position after a small fire fight during Operation Destined Strike in Chowkay Valley, Afghanistan Aug. 22

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Scouts from 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment (Airborne), pull overwatch during Operation Destined Strike while 2nd Platoon, Able Company searches a village below the Chowkay Valley in Kunar Province, Afghanistan Aug. 22.

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Scouts from 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment (Airborne), react as villagers below run after spotting the Soldiers moving on the hill side during Operation Destined Strike in Chowkay Valley, Afghanistan August 22.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division provide security during a halt while on patrol in the Diyala River Valley region of Iraq Aug. 15, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Robert C. Brogan)

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1st Lt. William Cromie , Alpha Company, Special Troops Battalion, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, watches Aug. 15 his Soldiers from an over watch position as they clear an ambush point previously used by Taliban extremists in Chowkay Valley, Afghanistan

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A Soldier from Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment (Airborne), watches cattle run for their lives while a CH-47 helicopter prepares to land on Landing Zone Shetland during Operation Saray Has July 19 near Forward Operating Base Naray, Afghanistan.

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Capt. Nathan Springer, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop Commander, 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment (Airborne), looks up the mountain July 19 while on patrol during Operation Saray Has. During Operation Saray Has, two rocket positions were found that had been previously used to attack Forward Operating Base Naray

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1st Lt. Chris Richelderfer, Executive Officer of Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment (Airborne), looks at possible enemy positions during Operation Saray Has July 19 near Forward Operating Base Naray,Afghanistan.

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Command Sgt. Maj. Victor Pedraza, Command Sgt. Maj. of 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment (Airborne), looks at possible enemy positions during Operation Saray Has July 19 near Forward Operating Base Naray, Afghanistan.

Arnie100
12-11-2009, 10:07 PM
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That soldier looks like he wants a steak dinner instead of MREs!! rofl Great pics, as usual, vor!

Cipher
12-11-2009, 10:11 PM
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First Captain leads Corps of Cadets

U.S. Military Academy First Captain Tyler Gordy (front) leads the Brigade Staff during the Acceptance Day Parade, Aug. 15, at West Point, N.Y. Photo credit: John Pellino.

That dude is prior service, good for him. I see some prior service ROTC cadets around campus, but I didn't know USMA accepted prior service soldiers as well.

vor033
12-11-2009, 10:11 PM
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A CH-47 Chinook helicopter from Alpha Company, 7th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment extracts U.S. Army Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment from the top of a mountain in the Andar province of Afghanistan after searching for Taliban members and weapons caches June 6, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Marcus J. Quarterman)

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A CH-47 Chinook helicopter from Alpha Company, 7th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment moves in to extract U.S. Army Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment from the top of a mountain in the Andar province of Afghanistan after searching for Taliban members and weapons caches June 6, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Marcus J. Quarterman)

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment search mountains in the Andar province of Afghanistan for Taliban members and weapons caches June 6, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Marcus J. Quarterman)

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A U.S. Army Soldier from 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment searches the mountains of the Andar province of Afghanistan for Taliban members and weapons caches June 6, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Marcus J. Quarterman)

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The Michigan Army National Guard uses a bambi bucket, an aerial firefighting tool suspended below a helicopter, to extinguish a fire 10 miles from Tahquamenon Falls State Park, Mich., Aug. 8, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Helen Miller)

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 158th Infantry Regiment, Arizona National Guard walk down the side of a mountain on a foot patrol to Forward Operating Base Kalagush in the Nuristan province of Afghanistan June 19, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt, Isaac A. Graham)

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U.S. Army Soldiers with Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment patrol fields in Sumalot, Iraq, May 16, 2007, looking for weapons caches. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rachel M. Ahner)

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U.S. Army Paratroopers with 1st Platoon, Alpha Battery, 2nd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division conduct a dismounted patrol through Al Suleikh, Iraq, June 20, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jeffrey Alexander)

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Stryker infantry carrier vehicles from Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment move out from Sabina Point inside the Shoalwater Bay Training Area in Australia June 20, 2007, following an amphibious beach landing exercise during Talisman Sabre 2007. The biennial exercise is designed to train Australian and U.S. forces in planning and conducting combined task force operations, which will help improve combat readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sandra M. Palumbo)

vor033
12-11-2009, 10:30 PM
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Two U.S. Army snipers from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division provide overwatch security for locals during a town meeting in Dey Yak, Afghanistan. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Micah E. Clare

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A Soldier from 2-1 Inf., 5th Bde., 2nd Inf. Div. fires an AT4 during training at Range 59

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Soldiers in 3rd Platoon, Combat Company, 1-32 Infantry climb into the snowline of a mountain near the village of Aybat in Eastern Afghanistan during a two week mission including patrols, air assaults and talks with the local elders designed to establish a link between the local populace and the Afghan government. (Photo by Spc. Jon H. Arguello)

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Soldiers in 3rd Platoon, Combat Company, 1-32 Infantry climb into the snowline of a mountain near the village of Aybat in Eastern Afghanistan during a two week long mission including patrols, air assaults and talks with the local elders to establish a link between the local populace and the Afghan government. (Photo by Army Spc. Jon H. Arguello)

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Army Pfc. Ronald Craig (right) and fellow Soldiers in 3rd Platoon, Combat Company, 1-32 Inantry, return from a patrol during a two week misison flushing the enemy out of the villages of Tsapre and Aybat. (Photo by Army Spc. Jon H. Arguello)

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U.S. Army Soldiers try to shield themselves from an approaching sandstorm before conducting raids in Sharqat, Iraq, April 3, 2007. The Soldiers are from Alpha Company, 5th Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Robert C. Brogan)

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A U.S. Army Soldier watches for suspicious activity during a joint operation with the Iraqi police in Baqubah, Iraq, March 31, 2007. The purpose of the operation is to clear houses and palm groves near the Diyala River of any insurgent forces. The Soldier is with the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stacy L. Pearsall)

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Soldiers of Company B, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, search for insurgents and weapons in the palm groves of Qubah, Iraq, March 25. The company assisted troops from the 82nd Airborne Division in clearing insurgents from several villages in the Diyala River basin. The mission is part of an ongoing military operation in Diyala province aimed at disrupting terrorist activities

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Charlie Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment burn down a Taliban safehouse discovered during operations in the Paktika province of Afghanistan March 30, 2007. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Justin Holley)

vor033
12-11-2009, 11:02 PM
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Members of the Honor Guard practice their moves prior to the start of the U.S. Army Chief of Staff change of responsibility ceremony at Fort Myer, Va., April 10, 2007.

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Bolwell, of Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, communicates with his squad during dismounted maneuvers at Warrior Valley on Rodriguez Range Complex, South Korea, March 24, 2007, as part of exercise Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration/Foal Eagle 2007. The annual joint command post and field training exercise demonstrates U.S. resolve to support South Korea against external aggression while improving combat readiness and joint/combined interoperability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel N. Woods)

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U.S. Army Spc. Robert Vasquez parachutes from a hot air balloon over the Maesong-Ri range in South Korea, March 26, 2007. U.S. and South Korean Special Forces team members are performing the jumps as part of exercise Reception, Staging, Onward movement, and Integration / Foal Eagle 2007. The annual joint command post and field training exercise demonstrates U.S. resolve to support South Korea against external aggression while improving combat readiness and joint/combined interoperability. DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Nic Raven, U.S. Air Force

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U.S. Army Sgt. Sean Bundy and Sgt. Dennis First walk to the rally point to link up with the Iraqi army soldiers from 1st Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Iraqi Army Division for an Iraqi army-led operation in Al Muradia village, Iraq, March 12, 2007. Bundy and First are assigned to 4th Platoon, Delta Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

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An M1126 Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team maneuvers at Warrior Valley on Rodriguez Range Complex, South Korea, March 24, 2007, during exercise Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration/Foal Eagle 2007.

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Soldiers guards the key route to Mecca in southwestern Iraq near the border

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U.S. Army Sgt. Auralie Suarez and Pvt. Brett Mansink take cover in a ditch Al Doura, Iraq, March 7, 2007. The Soldiers are from Charlie Company, 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division and were on a joint patrol in Al Rashid when their unit received small-arms fire from Al Doura

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U.S. Army Sgt. Auralie Suarez and Pvt. Brett Mansink take cover in a ditch Al Doura, Iraq, March 7, 2007. The Soldiers are from Charlie Company, 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division and were on a joint patrol in Al Rashid when their unit received small-arms fire from Al Doura

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A U.S. Army Soldier from 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division provides security while other Soldiers load the wounded into an armored vehicle during training at Fort Stewart, Ga., March 2, 2007. The 3rd ID is conducting training with the assistance from observer controller teams from the National Training Center in preparation for a future deployment. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt.AlfredJohnson)

LEGEND
12-11-2009, 11:46 PM
Great thread. Until this one, we had pretty much every other army photos thread but not US Army, go figure...

Camo seems to work great in Afghanistan, lots of photos soldiers really blend in with the surroundings. What year did the army finish deploying the new uniform?

khalifah
12-12-2009, 12:59 AM
quick question,

For Soldiers that specialize as Tankers, Admin, Supply, etc.(other than Infantry)how often is it that they are needed for foot patrols as oppose to their specialty in Iraq/Afghanistan.?

DnA
12-12-2009, 11:22 AM
quick question,

For Soldiers that specialize as Tankers, Admin, Supply, etc.(other than Infantry)how often is it that they are needed for foot patrols as oppose to their specialty in Iraq/Afghanistan.?

Didn't you post this exact same question in the USMC thread?


Anyways, non Infantry MOS guys have been employed in Infantry Roles, look a few pages back an your see an article about a Signals Company from the 101st doing an Air Assualt mission in Iraq.

khalifah
12-12-2009, 05:27 PM
yes i did,

i figured it would be a different case somehow, that and work had left me braindead while posting last night.:roll:

anyhow, i appreciate the input.:)

vor033
12-12-2009, 10:43 PM
FORT BRAGG, N.C. – In German: American Airborne Soldaten freuen uns auf den Tag, sie können an Bord einer Ebene und rufen Befehle in einer fremden Sprache.
Or, paraphrased in English: Part of the experience of being an American paratrooper involves an odd desire to one day board a plane and shout commands in a foreign language. Why? Because that scene would probably occur during a joint operation with a foreign army, an operation which just might end with paratroopers holding a shiny new set of jump wings.

But giving out new jump wings is more or less the icing on the cake, explained Scott Murray, air officer for the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg and the G-3's executive agent on a joint airborne operation known as Federal Eagle.

Federal Eagle is a bi-annual event involving U.S. and German militaries in cooperative airborne operations held this year Oct. 20-23 at Sicily Drop Zone.

AN OVERVIEW

Twice a year, American and German Soldiers team up to share airborne tactics, said Lt. Col. Christoph Böecker, German liaison officer with the XVIII Abn. Corps.

In the spring, the shared tactics stick primarily to freefall airborne operations.

But each fall, in a tradition going back 13 years, six German jumpmasters from Germany's 31st Airborne Brigade and approximately 750 U.S. paratroopers conducted a series of static-line airborne jumps placing paratroopers down onto one of Fort Bragg's drop zones. On the last day of the event, a reciprocal jump is held where the German jumpmasters exit an aircraft led by American jumpmasters.

"Federal Eagle is also a chance to get some U.S. guys the German jump wings and the opportunity to jump out of a German airplane," said Sgt. Maj. Alexander H. Göeb, who also serves as a German liaison officer with the XVIII Abn. Corps.

"We speak the same language," said Göeb, who originates from Bavaria, Germany.

"German and American paratroopers, we are both equal," he said, adding, "We're jumping out of a flying airplane. That's crazy!"

SIMILARITIES, DIFFERENCES

Böecker explained that the airplane used on nearly every Federal Eagle jump is a German C-160, an aircraft similar to the C-130 used by the U.S. Air Force and familiar to many American paratroopers. The T-10 parachutes used during Federal Eagle were also familiar to the Americans.

Which is all to say that much of Federal Eagle's procedures this year were already familiar to the paratroopers involved, including the hand motions of the German jumpmasters.

But the commands of the six jumpmasters — shouted in German then echoed back by all the paratroopers lined up side by side in the C-160 flying 1,300 feet above ground — may have sounded foreign, but their meaning was well understood. At least that's how Spc. Michael Callahan recalled the scene once he'd landed safely on the drop zone.

"I don't know any German, but I know the motions for 'Hook Up!' and 'Check Static line!' and all that we go through as paratroopers," said Callahan, a paratrooper with Fort Bragg's C. Troop, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment (Reconnaissance and Surveillance).

An Ithaca, N.Y., native, Callahan arrived to Sicily Drop Zone with Soldiers and paratroopers of the 1-38 Cav. Every year, a different element of Soldiers gets the task of helping coordinate the finer details of Federal Eagle. Though these details could seem tedious, they wind up affording the paratroopers the privilege of jumping with German jumpmasters — a task they understand is a rare honor, as well as one which translates to a set of foreign jump wings for their Army dress uniforms.

"I've been looking forward to this since I came to Fort Bragg," said Pfc. Alina Zamora, a San Diego native and medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, Special Troops Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division. "It really was amazing and there was nobody hesitating to get out the door at all today!"

ALL CLEAR FOR ANOTHER YEAR

For everyone present at the drop zone, family members and Soldiers both German and American, the skies remained clear and temperatures stayed just below 70 for most of the day. 2009's Federal Eagle fall event could hardly have gone better, which puts a little bit of pressure on next year's Federal Eagle events.

Until then, Göeb said he and Böecker will do the best they can to ensure Federal Eagle stays a safe, bi-annual event on Fort Bragg. That's because, as Böecker explained, there is the possibility that German and American paratroopers will need to make a combined jump some day, some where. Both these armies need to be ready in case those circumstances happen to come up.

In the meantime, said Göeb, "We look forward to Federal Eagle because it gives us a chance to give something back to the United States."


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vor033
12-12-2009, 10:57 PM
NEW YORK, N.Y -- New York Army National Guard 1st Sgt. James Meltz, a New York State Trooper from Cropseyville, N.Y., received the USO of Metropolitan New York's Prestigious George Van Cleave Military Leadership Award at the organization's Annual Armed Forces Gala & Gold Medal Dinner, Wednesday, Dec. 9, in Manhattan.

Meltz, a member of the New York State Police Special Operations Response Team, has served in both Iraq and Afghanistan with 2nd Battalion 108th Infantry. He received the Bronze Star for Valor for his actions in Iraq in 2008 while serving as first sergeant of D Co. 2nd Battalion 108th Infantry.

After his company was ambushed he rescued Soldiers from a burning humvee, returned fire with a machinegun, and then continually exposed himself to the enemy as he assisted the company commander in organizing a successful resistance and counterattack. Meltz served on Active Duty and in the Army Reserve before joining the New York Army National Guard in 2003.

This is the second year in a row in which the New York Army National Guard has represented the Army in receiving the prestigious award, which is presented to one member of each armed service annually.

In 2008 the award went to 1st Sgt. Troy Steward of Buffalo, a member of 2nd Battalion 101st Cavalry, who also served in Afghanistan.

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New York Army National Guard 1st Sgt. James Meltz poses with his wife Colleen and daughter Ginny following his receipt of the prestigious George Van Cleave Military Leadership Award from the USO of Metropolitan New York at the organization's annual Manhattan dinner on Wednesday, Dec. 9.

vor033
12-12-2009, 11:50 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers from the 3/509th Battalion and 1/501st Battalion, 4th Brigade, 25th Infantry Division during Operation Champion Spear, Paktia province, Afghanistan, Sept. 3, 2009

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vor033
12-12-2009, 11:53 PM
A mini-mushroom cloud billows behind Army engineers from E Company, 1st Battalion, 77th Armour Regiment "Steel Tigers" and Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians attached to 4th Brigade, 1st Armoured Division. The detonation was designed to eliminate loose unexploded ordnance and illegal munitions seized by Iraqi security forces in Dhi Qar province. The battalion is deployed from Fort Bliss, Texas, to advise and assist the Iraqi army and Iraqi police in Dhi Qar and Muthanna provinces.

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DnA
12-13-2009, 12:04 AM
Pretty cool Company pic

vor033
12-13-2009, 12:31 AM
FORT HOOD, Texas - Deploying Colorado Guardsmen continued building upon their foundation of Close Quarter Combat training at Fort Hood, Texas, May 21.

The Soldiers, who are assigned to 1st Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Battalion, 157th Field Artillery, Colorado Army National Guard, 115th Fires Brigade, incorporated their medic platoon in the training to help simulate how to treat a casualty while also trying to clear a room or a house.

Using a basic floor plan outlined on the ground, known as a "glass house," the Soldiers, in small teams, practiced clearing rooms and hallways. At the discretion of the 1st platoon sergeant and the medic platoon sergeant, they would call out to the team a scenario such as, "Third man was hit. Lower leg injury."

With that, the Soldiers determined a security plan and performed buddy aid.

The pressure didn't let up. If the Soldiers didn't react properly and quickly enough, the platoon sergeants would add to the pressure.

"What are you going to do now? Where's your call to higher? Who is pulling security?" they shouted at the teams.

"I learned a lot I didn't know from the classes on what to do if we [have] a casualty under fire, what to do if we [have] casualty while clearing a building, and the proper procedures for clearing the building using the [techniques from] the CQC range," said Spc. Sean Dolan of Colorado Springs, Colo.

The platoon trained recently on the Fort Hood CQC range and decided to continue training on their own to both enhance their knowledge and practice building their muscle memory.

The [concept of] muscle memory consists of many tasks such as muzzle awareness, team-building for small teams to clear rooms and how to conduct buddy aid when their adrenaline is pumping and time is ticking quickly.

I wanted to give [our] certified Combat Lifesavers the opportunity for additional experience, said Sgt. 1st Class Matthew Byerly of Johnstown, Colo.

With the help of the Medic Platoon, the Soldiers practiced applying tourniquets, safely moving a casualty and how to administer an IV in the field.

Colorado's 3rd Battalion, 157th Field Artillery is deploying to Iraq this summer at the culmination of their mobilization training at Fort Hood. The battalion is assigned to the 115th Fires Brigade, which consists of more than 2,000 personnel from Wyoming, Colorado, Alabama, South Dakota and Minnesota. For many of these states, the deployment is the largest ever of their respective Army National Guard units.


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Blasphemy
12-13-2009, 03:32 AM
Afghanistan (mix number 1)













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Soldier on the left...looks like his handguard is coming off.

Carib
12-13-2009, 03:34 AM
A question: I see a lot of infantry companies in the 173rd ABN BDE using names like Chosen, Battle, Destined company. Is that something specific to the 173rd or do other Amry units follow suit?

kalabaw
12-13-2009, 06:46 AM
convoy security mission at joint base balad, iraq.

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what type of armor is this??

stick.up.kid
12-13-2009, 07:34 AM
A question: I see a lot of infantry companies in the 173rd ABNDIV using names like Chosen, Battle, Destined company. Is that something specific to the 173rd or do other Amry units follow suit?

I dont think its unique to the 173rd Airborne BRIGADE(not division). My stepdads unit in Iraq, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, had Company names such as Bull, Apache, Comanche, Ghostrider, Hawk, Iron..etc

Martino
12-13-2009, 09:12 AM
I dont think its unique to the 173rd Airborne BRIGADE(not division). My stepdads unit in Iraq, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, had Company names such ass Bull, Apache, Comanche, Ghostrider, Hawk, Iron..etc


I have family in 2nd Stryker cavalry.

Alpha-17
12-13-2009, 10:23 AM
A question: I see a lot of infantry companies in the 173rd ABNDIV using names like Chosen, Battle, Destined company. Is that something specific to the 173rd or do other Amry units follow suit?

Different units use different company names. Able, Battle, etc are common, while others are rare(r). I'm in B Co, but we go by "Legion".

vor033
12-13-2009, 06:33 PM
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Shootout on Haifa Street

Sgt. Kevin McCallum, from the 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, prepares to fire again at insurgents on Haifa Street in Baghdad, Jan. 24. Photo by Spc. Shea Butler

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Bridging the Tigris


Soldiers move a section of bridge into place near Tikrit, Iraq. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kitt Amaritnant

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Training at Fort Pickett


U.S. Army Soldiers rappel out of a Navy helicopter during the joint service exercise Operation Granite Triangle at Fort Pickett, Va., Feb. 18, 2007. Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 172nd Mountain Infantry Division; 237th Military Police Company and 183rd Regional Training Institute Regiment are participating in the exercise. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. William Servinski II)

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U.S. Army Soldier from the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team return fire on insurgents from a rooftop in Buhriz, Iraq, March 14, 2007. Soldiers from the 5th Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division are conducting their first mission in the Diyala province. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stacy L. Pearsall)

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U.S. Army Soldiers with the 5th Quartermaster Detachment (Aerial Delivery) and U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 786th Security Forces Squadron, Sembach Air Base, Germany, execute an airborne jump exercise over Southwestern Germany March 7, 2007. DoD photo by Airman Kenny Holston, U.S. Air Force

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CAMP KEATING, Afghanistan - A Chinook helicopter lands at Camp Keating March 6 to pick up Task Force Titan Soldiers moving north to the Kamu campsite, the newest site the squadron has set up in its efforts to help the Afghan government beef up security in Nuristan Province. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amber Robinson)

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A U.S. Army soldier carries a wounded Iraqi child into the Charlie Medical Center on Camp Ramadi, Iraq, for medical evaluation on March 20, 2007. The child is one of several Iraqis who were attacked by anti-Iraqi forces after they allegedly told coalition forces of insurgent activity in the 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment area of operations. DoD photo by Lance Cpl. James F. Cline III, U.S. Marine Corps.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from the 2nd Platoon, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Division assume a security perimeter as an M1126 Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle exits a C-17 Globemaster aircraft March 18, 2007, at Daegu Air Base, South Korea, during Reception, Staging, Onward-Movement, and Integration/Foal Eagle 2007. The exercise is to demonstrate resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) against external aggression while improving ROK/U.S. combat readiness and joint/combined interoperability. The focus of the exercise is on strategic, operational and tactical aspects of general military operations in the Korean theater of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sandra M. Palumbo)

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U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Ciarrochi and Sgt. 1st Class James Breakfield, Security Battalion Joint Security Area, United Nations Command, Republic of Korea, secure a helicopter landing zone for an ROK army Chinook 47 helicopter March 27, 2007, for an air movement exercise as part of exercise Foal Eagle 2007 in South Korea. The purpose of the exercise is to demonstrate resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) against external aggression while improving ROK/U.S. combat readiness and joint /combined interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Nic Raven)

vor033
12-13-2009, 07:04 PM
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Members of the Old Guard stand in formation during a welcoming ceremony for Army Secretary John McHugh hosted by Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey Jr. and presided over by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Fort Myer, Arlington, Va., Nov. 2, 2009. McHugh was sworn in as the 21st Army Secretary on Sept. 21, 2009. DoD photo by Cherie Cullen

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U.S. Army Spc. Zackery Cely provides security from a tower on Forward Operating Base Lane in the Zabul province, Afghanistan, Oct. 5, 2009. Cely is assigned to Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment.

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U.S. Army Soldiers detonate an improvised explosive device while clearing a route in Logar province, Afghanistan, Sept. 15, 2009. The Soldiers are assigned to the 10th Mountain Division's 3rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team. Soldiers assigned to route-learing platoons help ensure that roads remain unobstructed so operational movement can proceed. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Derek L. Kuhn

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U.S. Army Soldiers carry a bag filled with food and water that will sustain them while on a multi-day mission near Sar Howza in Paktika province, Afghanistan, Sept. 2, 2009. The Soldiers, assigned to 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, will hide the bag until they return to gather and distribute the contents before moving to a different location. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Smith

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Keeping warm in Afghanistan

U.S. Army Sgt. Nathan Schrock tries to keep warm after waking up on a cold morning in the mountains near Sar Howza in Paktika province, Afghanistan, Sept. 4, 2009. Schrock is assigned to the 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Smith

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Cadet cut

A bushy-haired new cadet receives his first haircut from barber Tony Davis at the Cadet Barbershop during R-Day in processing, June 29. Barbers gave 944 haircuts to the Class of 2013 during in processing. Photo Credit: Sgt. Vincent Fusco, West Point Directorate of Communications.

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Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody, commander, U.S. Army Materiel Command,
speaks with members of the U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights,
at Yankee Stadium prior to the Army Appreciation Game June 14. The
Golden Knights jumped into the stadium, and Gen. Dunwoody threw out the first pitch to start the game in celebration of the Army's 234th Birthday. (photo by Sgt. 1st Class Richard A. Guzman, New York City Recruiting Battalion)

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XM-25 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System

The XM-25 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System is the Army's first "smart" shoulder-fired weapon. It launches 25mm dual-warhead, low velocity, flat trajectory ammunition designed to explode over a target.

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Working under a night sky, U.S. Army Sgt. Derrick Douglas, right, and Spc. Nicholas Kirckof, left, review aircraft logs to plan the night's work load on Camp Beurhing, Kuwait, May 5, 2009. Douglas and Kirckof, both AH-64D Apache attack helicopter crew chiefs, are assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division's Company B, 4th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Travis Zielinski

Speedster
12-13-2009, 09:01 PM
Great thread!

vor033
12-13-2009, 09:49 PM
CAMP BONDSTEEL, Kosovo - Here is a recipe for disaster. Try and create a well-oiled fighting force with junior non-commissioned officers and enlisted Soldiers who are from different states and have never worked together. Make sure to mix in various military occupational skills like finance, military intelligence, aviation, and cavalry, to name a few, and then have them conduct small unit combat operations. Finally toss in leadership changes every day and expect positive results in two weeks.

With these ingredients you would imagine a clashing of opinions and a complete utter breakdown in team cohesion, but this is what the U.S. Army subjects their future enlisted leaders to during the Warrior Leader Course, a boiling pot of unique Soldiers and skills.

"This course is distinctive. It brings together different MOS's, which combine our knowledge and helps in areas some might be rusty" said Spc. Lee Caldwell, an 11 Bravo infantryman with Team Spartan, Co. A, 1-185th Combined Arms Battalion (Armor), Task Force Nightstalker. "This course helps us better ourselves because we all need to be Soldiers first and what it comes down to is working with other skill sets and knowing each others part."

Warrior Leader Course is the testing ground for those Soldiers wishing to enter the ranks of the NCO Corps. The Multi-National Task Force-East KFOR 11 mission held three classes at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo, and brought eight National Guard instructors from Regional Training Institute's across the United States to help teach, mentor and guide students as an effective tool to aide the Soldiers when the time comes to earn their *****es.

Another unique aspect of this NCO education course is it was offered to deployed Soldiers at their duty location. "If we were in Iraq or Afghanistan I would have had to send my guys [to this course] after we were done with our tour," said Master Sgt. Edward Martinelli, Task Force Falcon's training NCOIC. "It really helps for [National Guard] Soldiers to knock it out here while family and work aren't affected," Martinelli said. He then added that the California's 40th Infantry Division, who is in charge of the mission, had been planning these courses months before even being mobilized. Their efforts paid off as more than 160 National Guard Soldiers from Alaska, California, Texas, West Virginia and Maryland graduated.

The WLC cadre had a laundry list to test and evaluate each Soldier: performance around the garrison and living quarters, tactical leadership in the field, running an Army physical fitness training session, passing the Army Physical Fitness Test and height and weight, land navigation and teaching a class. Almost a parallel for the challenge the students would face in working with someone outside their unit, the RTI instructors had only met each other days before the start of the first class.

"This is my first time doing an Mobile Training Team. [The cadre] didn't know each other when we arrived and we had four days to click," said Sgt. 1st Class Michael Graham, Senior Small Group leader, 640th RTI, Camp Williams, Utah. "Luckily, we were already on the same page because we used the Course Management Plan and Program of Instruction."

Graham led his eclectic band of subject-matter-experts, who brought their own seasoned brand of leadership and experience from Camp Shelby, Miss., Camp Cook, La., Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa., and McCrady Training Center, S.C., and made the most of the limited training area space within the confines of Bondsteel's perimeter. "We didn't know what to expect in regards to the terrain we would be working with but it worked out well in the end," said Graham.

"It was absolutely fantastic to be able to see the route of march we would follow from our classroom," said Staff Sgt. Daniel Nagle, 3rd Battalion, 166th RTI, FITG, referring to the rolling hills with thickets of trees the students would use as their field training site. This added bonus helped the Soldiers with their troop leading procedures, map orientation, phase line construction and ultimately created some of the most realistic sand tables. Despite the close distance from their desks to the wood line the instructors came up with ingenious ways to transport their troops into the tactical portion of the course. Soldiers piled in the back of Bradley Fighting Vehicles or jumped onboard Black Hawk helicopters. This helped increase the realism and gave those who never rode in one the experience and adrenaline rush of being inserted into a simulated combat situation.

"We got 100 percent support from the units and felt they gave us their best Soldiers," said Graham. Staff Sgt. Christopher Petty, another Small Group leader from the 154th RTI out of Camp Shelby, Miss., agreed.

"These young Soldiers we have here are going to make outstanding leaders," remarked Petty. "They impress me with their willingness to learn. They are taking this course seriously," said Petty, who is also part of an MTT for the first time. "They are learning to come together and be successful at it. They are adapting as we go and getting things done to the best of their abilities," said the Tupelo, Miss., native.

With only two weeks to squeeze in all that the U.S. Army expects new sergeants to know, the cadre sets aside the last few days to bring the classroom concepts to raw reality. Each troop is subjected to two field evaluations.

"The instructors and this course really hammer home the concept of what leadership is all about. We study counseling and all that it entails. We go over a lot of the things I've seen my leaders do but now it makes a lot more sense why they do it," said Spc. William Tobin, a 15 Tango UH-60 Black Hawk repairer and crew chief with the 1-169th General Support Aviation Battalion based out of Edgewood, Md.

Tobin, who spent four years on active duty as an infantryman, says he can see the learning curve being more difficult for those without a combat arms background but believes that each student can overcome any inexperience by getting involved and setting the example.

The action in the field hits a crescendo when platoons face off against each other, leaders are hit with casualties and must respond with confidence and authority, combat lifesaver skills are tested and a landing zone is secured while a MedEvac is called in.

"[The cadre] makes sure that we understand what it is like to be an NCO, to lead troops. That is what this is all about," said Tobin, who is from Church Hill, Md., essentially, what the instructors are teaching, is to live by the NCO Creed.

It may take time for some of the 160 new graduates to fully realize their new found responsibility and run with it in full stride, but when Sgt. Maj. of the Army Kenneth Preston paid a special visit to Camp Bondsteel and conducted an NCO Induction Ceremony the new sergeants got a huge kick start.

Preston spoke about his three-step process in how leaders should grow and utilize sergeants in the Army. Step one; establish a standard. Step two is put someone in charge of enforcing the standards. Step three is to hold the sergeant accountable.

The thirteenth sergeant major of the Army made it very clear what he and the rest of the NCO Corps expected of the graduating class, after all it is written in the U.S. Army Creed of the Non-Commissioned Officer, which can be traced back to 1973, and is considered the yardstick by which to measure an NCO.

"I am aware of my role as a Non-commissioned Officer. I will fulfill my responsibilities inherent in that role."

With the creed and Preston's process, and not to mention the great training from the MTT cadre, the students now have a good recipe for success.

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vor033
12-13-2009, 10:23 PM
Hand Selected by Task Force Spartan Commander for Exceptional Service, Reserve MP Company Ends Mission in Iraq With Full-scale Air Assault

TIKRIT, Iraq - On a hazy morning, April 12, a group of Army Reserve Soldiers from the 56th Military Police Company from Mesa, Ariz., did something they never thought they would get the chance to do, conduct a Screaming Eagle Air Assault.

Military policemen in Iraq routinely conduct Police Transition Team duties in assisting Iraqis with the policing of their communities, but rarely, if ever, get the opportunity to conduct full-scale air assaults.

The 56th, attached to the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, have spent the last 11 months in Tikrit patrolling streets, training policemen and conducting combat operations.

On their 11th month, they were given the opportunity of a lifetime; conduct a joint air assault with the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division.

Along with their Iraqi police counterparts, they crammed into UH-60 Black Hawk and CH-47 Chinook helicopters, preparing to hunt down al-Qaida in the desolate western desert of the Salah ad Din province.

As the blades on the helicopters began to turn, the Soldiers signaled to the crew chiefs that they were primed for take off.

What was waiting for them in the desert was something their commander, Maj. Richard VanBuskirk, from Clarkston, Mich., described as "controlled chaos".

As they completed their insertion and jumped from their helicopters, they realized why 101st Soldiers are feared by the enemy.

The surprising arrival of coalition and Iraqi forces by helicopter left targeted AQI members with no choice but to "squirt" from the objective. The result of this enemy fleeing to their trucks was an ensuing fire-fight.

"Supporting attack helicopters informed us that a group of men were moving to trucks located near a house," said VanBuskirk. "The men in these trucks were armed with machine guns and assault rifles. They fired on us multiple times as they tried to flee our location, but we eliminated the enemy threat."

After clearing numerous buildings, houses and exploiting numerous items linked to AQI, the mission was complete and they once again loaded on helicopters and returned to base.

According to Staff Sgt. David Heath, from Phoenix, Ariz., the purpose of this IP intelligence-driven mission was to take the fight to the insurgents, denying them safe haven and refuge.

"Denying an insurgency the safety and security to plan and execute their missions is a major component to the overall security mission in Iraq. It's not just an important mission, it's THE mission," said Heath.

Heath admits that the Soldiers in his unit could not have completed a mission with as many moving parts and pieces as there were, without the competency of the Iraqi S.W.A.T. He feels they deserve as much credit for the overall success of the mission, which resulted in the killing of five AQI and the detaining of three.

Ever since the Spartans of the 1st STB assumed responsibility of the greater-Tikrit area in October 2007, they recognized the proficiency of the MPs. This led to the selection of the unit to conduct an operation of this size, which is usually set aside for the battalion's attached infantry Soldiers.

The 1st STB has a unique task organization in Iraq. They are the only Special Troops Battalion to have responsibility for a large amount of battle space. Certain units under its command, such as the 56th, are tasked to conduct joint Iraqi police, full-spectrum combat and counter-insurgency operations in their respective areas of responsibility.

"What is unique about the 56th MPs is that the PTT Company has been given more responsibility than a normal PTT company due to our task organization and limited combat forces here in the Tikrit area" said Timothy Povich, 1st STB Executive Officer. "They have operated the same way as any other maneuver unit while also accomplishing their PTT mission ever since we have been in Iraq. They own their own battle space in Tikrit, and conduct engagements with local leaders, conduct training and patrol the streets with Iraqi police."

Povich said the 56th was selected by his battalion commander, Lt. Col. Rick Ryne, for this air assault because they exceeded all expectations throughout their unique mission in Iraq.

"The 56th MP Company has done an incredible amount of work for us, this was a great opportunity for them to conduct an air assault with their IP, to kind of end their deployment with a successful mission," said Povich. "The battalion commander picked them because they aren't your normal MP Company."

According to VanBuskirk, it has been an honor to serve under Task Force Spartan. He said, "Being under the command of the 1st STB over the last few months has been the most rewarding period in my 20 year career."

VanBuskirk stated that his company's final mission in Iraq was as unique as the duties they have conducted for the active duty Army battalion they supported for the last seven months.

"If you look back throughout military history, it will be very difficult if not impossible to find a United States Army Reserve Military Police Combat Support Company to be chosen to lead a joint coalition/Iraqi police air assault mission from start to finish," said VanBuskirk. "This also shows how joint active duty Army and Army Reserve relationships have matured over the years, and the confidence our battalion and brigade has in our company."

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vor033
12-13-2009, 10:26 PM
First Brigade Combat Team "Bastogne", 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) leadership talk about M1128 Stryker Mobile Gun System Vehicle capabilities with 4-9 Infantry Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division Soldiers in Salah ah Din province in February.

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vor033
12-13-2009, 10:45 PM
BALAD, Iraq - As the ramp slammed down in the muck, the rain came howling in drenching the men who leaped off the back of the Chinook helicopter. The troopers hurried into the field of sloppy mud where they slipped and slid through the landing zone to reorganize in the pitch-black Iraqi night. Not even the moon was friendly on this mission, which would prove to be a testament to the guts of Army Infantrymen and to the determination of Charlie Company Soldiers to make even the most remote hamlets in the Salah ad-Din province safe from al Qaida's treachery.

Soldiers from Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division conducted Operation Helsinki Feb. 15 to clear out al Qaida fighters from an area here that has typically not received much attention from coalition forces.

Helsinki was a combined counter-insurgency operation, which was conducted in partnership with the Iraqi army, to help enable legitimate governmental organizations and to provide security for the citizens in the Bichigan peninsula, said 1st Sgt. Timothy Seeber, Charlie Company First Sergeant.

Seeber called the Bichigan area, west of Balad, an al Qaida safe-haven that AQI flees to in order to avoid being killed or captured. "AQI is on the run here and they know we have the means and mobility to kill or capture them where they hide," said Seeber.

Helsinki began with a pre-dawn air assault into the fertile farmlands of the Bichigan area, which were heavily soaked with the early morning rain. With mud smeared on faces and firearms, Charlie Company Soldiers spent the day moving from house to house questioning residents and searching for AQI weapons caches along with Iraqi army soldiers.

The search turned up two weapons caches and resulted in the apprehension of a suspected AQI operative.

Since Charlie Company moved from FOB Caldwell near the Iranian border in early December, they have been instrumental in capturing three of the Balad area's high value targets and have discovered numerous weapon caches, said Staff Sgt. Tommy Pafford.

Much of the success that Charlie Company has had is due largely to spending a great deal of time out among the people and to the Sons of Iraq movement, which has enabled U.S. and Iraqi forces with quality intelligence about AQI operations in the area, said Pafford.

Spending time outside of the relative comfort of FOB Paliwoda has paid dividends for Charlie Company who often find themselves operating in austere conditions.

"Staying outside the wire overnight in the mud and cold is the norm for us," said Pvt. First Class Michael LaChappelle, who along with his fellow Charlie Company troopers found himself without a helicopter ride back to base on Feb. 15 due to poor weather conditions.

After spending much of Operation Helsinki cold and wet, the "Rock" Soldiers would have to bear the elements under a foggy, black Iraqi sky until the weather improved.

"My guys would walk to the end of this Earth if they were asked to," said Pafford. "They realize that this war is bigger than us."

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vor033
12-13-2009, 10:47 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Alpha Company, 2nd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) stand by as helos take off in Iskandaria, Iraq, during Operatin Tundra on Dec. 20. (U.S. Navy photo/Petty Officer 2nd Class Kim Smith)

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vor033
12-13-2009, 10:53 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers of the 56th MP Company, attached to the 101st Airborne Division, conduct a joint patrol with the Iraqi police in Samrah, Iraq, on March 9, 2009

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vor033
12-13-2009, 11:52 PM
An enemy car bomb was exploded by Soldiers of 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and an Air Force explosive ordnance team in support of Operation Fulton II, Jan. 18. A total of 22 enemy car bombs were found during operation Fulton II with some being found with the help of local Iraqi informants

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vor033
12-14-2009, 12:17 AM
101st Airborne Artillery Fires Shells in Support of Operation Fulton Harvest

Soldiers from Alpha Battery, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, fire rounds from their M119A2 Howitzer at enemy targets during Operation Fulton Harvest in the Al-Jazeera Desert

Alpha Battery fired over 1,100 rounds in 48 hours while in direct support of 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment during the operation, which was a combined arms counterinsurgency operation aimed at destroy and neutralizing an al-Qaida training camp southwest of Samarra. (U.S. Army Photo/1st Lt. Jonathan J. Springer)

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TheCarLessDriven
12-14-2009, 02:52 AM
Some amazing High-Definition footage of Artillery firing at FOB Bastic in Afghanistan.

http://vimeo.com/6096438

(Embedding isn't working, but the HD doesn't work in embedding anyways)

He has other great High-Definition footage as well of live fire training, airborne jumps, etc.

Panchito12
12-14-2009, 04:15 AM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/73063dotjpg





Great Pic!!!p-)

hogdriver
12-14-2009, 01:42 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/177830dotjpg

I have a question, why are those lenses red?:oops:

dudski
12-14-2009, 01:44 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/177830dotjpg
Shaded for the sun?

DnA
12-14-2009, 01:45 PM
I have a question, why are those lenses red?:oops:

Referring to the M68?

Because it's a red dot sight that is turned on.. an because of the light.. angle, etc it looks like a red lense.

dudski
12-14-2009, 01:45 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/74918dotjpg
Kiowa! ftw!

dudski
12-14-2009, 01:56 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-38dotjpgAn AH-64D Apache from Company B, 1st Attack Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, flies over a residential area in the Multi-National Division-Baghdad area Oct. 12. The Apache crew was conducting a reconnaissance mission to keep an eye out for enemy mortar and anti-aircraft systems
Dont D's have the advanced radar domes?!

flanker7
12-14-2009, 02:00 PM
Only Longbow "D". Plain "D" have provision but no RADAR

JC0352
12-14-2009, 02:07 PM
Referring to the M68?

Because it's a red dot sight that is turned on.. an because of the light.. angle, etc it looks like a red lense.

They always look that way, regardless of it being off or on. The LED doesn't light up the inside of the sight, making it visibly red from the outside. The red coating on the lens is a reflective coating that makes the "dot" visible on the lens to the shooter. Looking at the sight from the front, the only way you can tell it's on is to hold it close and you can see a tiny red light up in the top of the tube, towards the back.

Koreansentry
12-14-2009, 08:02 PM
http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/multimedia/index.asp?mm_file_id=5467&play_clip=Y
http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/cheerleaders/Cheerleader.asp?cheerleader_id=32
Rachel Washburn, U.S army + cheerleader

http://bemil.chosun.com/nbrd/data/10044/upfile/200912/20091213154013dotjpg

http://bemil.chosun.com/nbrd/data/10044/upfile/200912/20091213154014dotjpg

Alpha-17
12-14-2009, 08:12 PM
Rachel Washburn, U.S army + cheerleader

http://bemil.chosun.com/nbrd/data/10044/upfile/200912/20091213154013dotjpg

http://bemil.chosun.com/nbrd/data/10044/upfile/200912/20091213154014dotjpg

I knew there was a reason I joined the Army, and I think you just found it.

Soldat_Américain
12-14-2009, 08:15 PM
I knew there was a reason I joined the Army, and I think you just found it.

FUUUUUUUU she's mine!p-)

DnA
12-14-2009, 08:48 PM
They always look that way, regardless of it being off or on. The LED doesn't light up the inside of the sight, making it visibly red from the outside. The red coating on the lens is a reflective coating that makes the "dot" visible on the lens to the shooter. Looking at the sight from the front, the only way you can tell it's on is to hold it close and you can see a tiny red light up in the top of the tube, towards the back.


Seen. I just assumed it was like the EoTech an when turned on from certain angles the glass looks red. But relooking at that pic it does look like the glass is actually red.

stick.up.kid
12-15-2009, 06:22 AM
I cant post these on here since these photos cant be saved, but they're really good photos. So check em out yall.

Afghanistan Kunar Summer 2009 (http://www.photoshelter.com/c/lucianread/gallery/Afghanistan-Kunar-Summer-2009/G0000n1o6XlEriNA/)

Afghanistan Kunar Winter 2009 (http://www.photoshelter.com/c/lucianread/gallery/Afghanistan-Kunar-Winter-2009/G0000ltzhCN3O2LU/)

Alpha-17
12-15-2009, 09:12 AM
FUUUUUUUU she's mine!p-)

Why did I have to join the Infantry? All we get for officers are dumb college grads that think they know everything; we never get smoking hot, dumb college grads that think they know everything!

joeyl
12-15-2009, 09:14 AM
Why did I have to join the Infantry? All we get for officers are dumb college grads that think they know everything; we never get smoking hot, dumb college grads that think they know everything!

I wonder how her first deployments going to go?

Currahee 1SG
12-15-2009, 01:43 PM
[QUOTE=vor033;4624066]

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-43dotjpg

What a shot.

flanker7
12-15-2009, 01:45 PM
What's the thing above and to the right of the first two parachutes?

DnA
12-15-2009, 01:46 PM
What's the thing above and to the right of the first two parachutes?


No idea, but it looks pretty big whatever it is.

flanker7
12-15-2009, 01:54 PM
When we jump you can see some log books from the parachutes fly around but this seems a bit bigger

Currahee 1SG
12-15-2009, 02:36 PM
What's the thing above and to the right of the first two parachutes?

Maybe a Pack Tray from a previous jumper or a light piece of equipment that was not stored correctly.

Generally speaking I don't know.

Soldat_Américain
12-15-2009, 03:35 PM
I wonder how her first deployments going to go?

Pregnant...that's how I see it going.

vor033
12-16-2009, 01:44 PM
PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, Calif. — Tracking down a high-value target while walking unfamiliar streets, occupied by a foreign people who, for all intents and purposes, may not trust you can be tough even for the most seasoned squad leader, especially with new Soldiers in tow.

This scenario is all too common for the armed services and that's why the Army mandates Military Operations on Urban Terrain training for its Soldiers.

However, for the students at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, they also relish the opportunity to not only run through the MOUT, but to also use their language instruction to negotiate their training course.

The opportunity to marry the training came for members of F Company, 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, during a course set up on the former Fort Ord.

"Basically we needed to train the team on MOUT and ... interpretation exercises," Sgt. Justin Wolfgram, F Company, 229th Military Intelligence Battalion, said. "The commander found a way to integrate the two."

Wolfgram, who was also team leader for his newly formed squad for the scenario, said at first he did not expect much to come of the exercise, but later found it to be a welcome surprise.

"I think it was genius in general, integrating our 'how to' (tactical) training ... with what we are learning with our languages," he said. "I'm glad because, to be honest, I thought today was going to be a waste."

Staff Sgt. Andy Johnson, squad leader, was able to exercise his leadership and communications skills with the new squad, which he said will help him in the future.

"It taught me to think on my feet," he said of the often hectic scenarios that included in-your-face civilian role-players, fire fights and suicide-bombings, to name a few. "Being a leader you get to find out the strengths and weaknesses of your squad quickly through interactions and work from there," he added.

Johnson said he was also grateful for having the opportunity to train in something that is outside the general DLI training. He explained that because of the long, intensive language training done inside of a classroom, it is not generally easy to schedule DLI students for tactical-type training.

"I got to refresh on what I've forgotten and go from there," said Johnson, an eight-year veteran with war experience.

The scenario was not only a refresher for Johnson, but an eye-opener for the newer Soldiers, who are often coming into DLI directly after graduating from basic combat training.

"I liked it a lot because it is very useful," Pvt. Chelsea Nehm said of her experience. "There was good teamwork and our leaders knew what was going on."

Nehm said that the exercise helped her realize what it may be like for her as her military career progresses. She also said she appreciated the chance to practice her new language in an outdoor, realistic setting.

"It was good that the (portrayed) enemy was (foreign) and gave the team the ability to use our language outside of the classroom environment," Nehm said.

She also praised her leaders' abilities during stressful situations, saying that "They are all really good leaders and you can tell they have experience."

Johnson also shared the same sentiment of his squad members.

"The main thing about these Soldiers is that they are smart," he said. "They pick things up ... quickly, and for me, coming out here, it has been a joy to work with them."
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vor033
12-16-2009, 02:02 PM
Future U.S. Army combat medics practice the rescue and treatment of a downed helicopter crew during advanced individual training on Camp Bullis, Texas, a sub installation of Fort Sam Houston. San Antonio and other neighbouring jurisdictions recently teamed up to protect the camp's expanding training mission in the nation's third-fastest growing metropolitan area. U.S. Army Environmental Command photo by Neal Snyder.

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vor033
12-16-2009, 02:19 PM
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11th regiment, 5th Infantry Division, January 1945.

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GI's of a Tank Destroyer unit with the new German Assault Rifle Sturmgewehr MP44

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Troopers with Company G, 504th PIR, advance through deep snow along a firebreak with a Sherman tank from the attached 740th tank battalion near Herresbach, Belgium janauary 28, 1945.

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Pvt. Charles Preston, brushing the snow of a machine gun 30-caliber.

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M-10 Tank Destroyers shooting at enemey positions.

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US soldiers of the 101st airborne div. in Bastonge

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Staff sergeant James Martin, Company F, 325th GIR is photographed as he returns from outpost duty near Ordimont, Belgium

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American Sherman M4 tank moves past another gun carriage which slid off icy road in the Ardennes Forest during push to halt advancing German troops. december 20th, 1944

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Werbomont: Tank destroyers attached to the 82nd Airborne Division move up in the fog toward Chenaux, December 20, 1944., Belgium.

vor033
12-16-2009, 02:34 PM
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Laroche

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American soldiers looking at frozen corpses of German soldier killed during the Battle of the Bulge. 1945.

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Food being served to weary American Infantrymen, I Company - 347th Inf.Regt. - 87th ID - La Roche area. january 14, 1945

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Malmedy. US troops and equipment marching down a country road as German forces break through lines during the Battle of the Bulge. dec 1944

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American patrol moving towards smoldering German Royal Tiger tank with crew inside. La Gleize. december 16, 1944

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American medics aiding a wounded comrade during the Battle of the Bulge.

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American soldiers resting alongside the road near the front lines during the Battle of the Bulge. dec 1944.

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Tired American medic returning from the front lines during the Battle of the Bulge. 1945

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American soldier peering across a snowy field, 1945.

vor033
12-16-2009, 02:57 PM
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American soldier shaving 1945

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Machine gun toting American soldier in a foxhole near the front lines during the Battle of the Bulge. December 1944

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Sgt. Tommy Lyons just back from a week in the front lines near the town of Murrigen during the Battle of the Bulge 1945

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Vehicles and infantry of the US 1st Army on the road during winter fighting in the Ardennes forest Fosse, 1945

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American soldiers in a snowy ditch somewhere in Belgium during the counter offensive. 1945

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Soldiers of US 1st Army hacking at frozen ground to dig foxholes near their machine gun position during a lull in the last ditch German offensive

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Tired American soldier just back from the front lines near the town of Murrigen during the Battle of the Bulge 1945

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American troops manning trenches along snowy hedgerow in the northern Ardennes Forest .December 20, 1944

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American soldiers in a foxhole near the front lines during the Battle of the Bulge. December 1944

vor033
12-16-2009, 03:09 PM
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Lierneux. Members of US 3rd Armored Div. standing nr partly concealed tanks at edge of forest during the Battle of the Bulge, the last ditch German offensive of WWII. 1945.

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Troops of the 82nd Airborne Division advance in a snowstorm behind the tank in a move to attack Herresbach, Belgium. 28 dec,1944

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Christmas Eve bombing of Bastogne, Belgium, the town in which the 82nd airborne division was besieged for ten days. This photo was taken on Christmas Day. 1944

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Bastogne. Troops of the 101st Airborne Division watch C-47’s drop supplies to them. 26 December 1944.

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Tankmen of the U.S. First Army gather around a fire on the snow-covered ground near Eupen, Belgium, opening their Christmas packages 30 dec 1944.

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Saint - Vith

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Lierneux

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(L-R) Adam H. Davis & Milford A. Sillars of 110th Reg., part of the Battered Bastards of Bastogne, taking a break during 8-day German siege. Bastogne, dec 19, 1944

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A 7th Armored Division antitank gun covers the approach on a road to Belgium (12/23/44)--Railroad crossing near Vielsalm, Belgium.

vor033
12-16-2009, 03:17 PM
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Three men of B Co., 101st Engineers, emerging for rest in snowy landscape after holding woodland position all night against German counter attack nr. Wiltz, Luxembourg January 14, 1945.

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U.S. troops of the 28th Infantry Division, who have been regrouped in security platoons for defense of Bastogne, Belgium, march down a street. Some of these soldiers lost their weapons during the German advance in this area. Bastogne, Belgium (12-20-44)

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GI's from the 82nd Div. praying in front of a crucifix prior to battle (L-R) Charles Badeaux, Theodore Sohoski & John Bogdan. dec 29, 1944.

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U.S Troops

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Captured german weapons. Three MP 40 and two MG 42

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La Gleize

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Americans firing mortar shells on German propositions

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Bastogne

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Bradley, Eisenhower & Patton 1945

vor033
12-16-2009, 08:04 PM
FORT IRWIN, Calif. - Soldiers from the Regimental Support Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment participated in the RSS Maintenance and Truck Rodeo here Dec. 3-4.

"The purpose of the rodeo is to give our Soldiers the opportunity to show off their maintenance and driving skills," said Chief Warrant Officer Jeff Swein, the RSS squadron motor officer and officer-in-charge of the competition.

The 58th Engineer Company, 511th Military Intelligence Company, Supply and Transportation Company, and Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, RSS, all sent teams of ten Soldiers to represent their respective units and participate in the rodeo.

Trophies were awarded by Lt. Col. Andrew C. Cooper, the Regimental Support Squadron commander, to the winning team of the No Fuel Rally, the best drivers, and the best overall team.

The Rodeo started with Soldiers taking the Army Physical Fitness Test in the Army Combat Uniform. After the test, they foot marched from the Cpt. Harold A. Fritz Memorial soccer field to the Regimental horse stables.

Once at the horse stables, the competition continued with timed events testing the Soldier's mission essential tasks list skills, including recovering a rolled over vehicle in a simulated minefield.

"We were all picked for specific events on our team," said Pfc. Trevor R. Hall, a Gainesville, Fla., native, now a mechanic with Maintenance Platoon, Supply and Transportation Company. "I was picked for the recovery event. Even though my team out ranked me, they trusted me to make decisions about rolling the truck over."

Pfc. Hall, and the rest of the Supply and Transportation Troop team, went on to be named the rodeo's Best Overall Team. They weren't the only Soldiers who had a game plan coming into the competition.

The team from the 58th Engineer Company found out about the competition three weeks beforehand and started training for it during and after work, said Pvt. Brian J. Kear, a Saint Cloud, Fla., native, now a heavy construction equipment operator with the 58th Engineer Company. Four Soldiers from the 58th Engineer Company team went on to win the Best Driver titles.

The last event of the rodeo was the No Fuel Rally. Soldiers pushed a Humvee to different stations set up in the Supply and Transportation Troop motor pool. At each station, judges gave the Soldiers tasks to perform on the vehicle. The team that completed all tasks, and pushed the Humvee over the finish line the fastest, won the rally.

Despite having two teammates injured the day before and on crutches for the event, the 511th Military Intelligence Company won the No Fuel Rally.

"Each person had something to do at each station on the rally," said Pfc. Katia J. Floyd, who is assigned to Headquarters Platoon, 511th Military Intelligence Company. "We definitely had a plan going into it. Pushing the HMMWV uphill was the most intense part of the whole thing."

Chief Warrant Officer Swein said that this was the first rodeo put on by the Regimental Support Squadron, but he hopes that he can help out in another before he leaves Fort Irwin.

"The event was a competition," said Sgt. Victor A. Ballesteros, a supply non-commissioned officer with the Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, RSS team. "Everyone was out here giving their best, and we worked as a team the whole time."

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Uboj
12-16-2009, 09:04 PM
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Amazing images.....thanks for the effort.

ID on the rifle the GI is carrying on the far right? Captured STG 44? Mag looks wider though?

LineDoggie
12-16-2009, 09:13 PM
Amazing images.....thanks for the effort.

ID on the rifle the GI is carrying on the far right? Captured STG 44? Mag looks wider though?It's a Stg 44

LineDoggie
12-16-2009, 09:17 PM
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LarocheInteresting Picture, the Soldier with the Binoculars is wearing a British Denison Smock. The Cargo Pockets added to the M43 Trousers indicate Airborne Personnel

Freddys
12-17-2009, 12:38 AM
Another WWII pic
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Blasphemy
12-17-2009, 02:07 AM
ive been waiting to see a thread about the US Army and not it's dozens of specialized units.

vor033
12-17-2009, 03:20 PM
A U.S. Army OH-58 Kiowa Warrior flies over Forward Operating Base Frontenac, Afghanistan, Dec. 14, 2009. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II/Released)

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vor033
12-17-2009, 10:35 PM
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U.S. Army Spc. Benji McHugh, of Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 238th Aviation Regiment, works security from the ramp of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in Khost, Afghanistan May 26, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Prentice C. Martin-Bowen/Released)

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Staff Sgt. Craig Stevens (center), of Pottsville, Pa., with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment, maneuvers through a cloud of dust to get into position between two other Soldiers, June 3, after dismounting the departing UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter. The 56th Stryker Brigade Combat Team Soldiers air assaulted into the desert near Nubai, northwest of Taji, along with Iraqi army soldiers to conduct searches for possible weapons caches.

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During a downed aircraft training exercise, U.S. Army soldiers practice providing medical aid to two AH-64 Apache pilots as two UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters bring in the downed aircraft recovery team to a training site on Camp Taji, north of Baghdad, Iraq, June 10. The soldiers are assigned to 1st Cavalry Division's Company F, 3rd Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade and the Black Hawk crewmembers are assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Travis Zielinski

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Prepping for a launch, Sgt. Donald Melvin (left), an unmanned aerial vehicle mechanic, from Columbus, Miss., a 1st Infantry Division Soldier attached to 2nd Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, and Spc. Stephen Cantrell (right), from Wichita Falls, Texas, a UAV mechanic, in 1st Inf. Div., also attached to the 1st ACB, set a UAV onto a ramp that will help propel the aircraft into flight at Camp Taji, Iraq, north of Baghdad, June 25

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Kenneth J. Butler, of Braintree, Mass., fires a 7.62mm caliber sniper rifle while on Camp Victory, Iraq, June 24, 2009. Butler returned to Iraq with the Troops First Foundation after being wounded in action in the Baghdad region. Butler lost his right arm above the elbow while serving with the 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division.

Edit: Just noticed the Mistake in the quote that came with the Photo above and have now adjusted it.

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U.S. Army Sgt. Eric Kay with 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, yells instructions to fire an 81-mm mortar shell during a live-fire demonstration, for members of the Iraqi army in Diayala, Iraq, June 28.

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U.S. Army Spc. Brad Mattix, with Charlie Company, 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 5th Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, provides security at Combat Outpost Sangar, Zabul, Afghanistan, on Nov. 22, 2009. DoD photo by Tech. Sgt. Efren Lopez, U.S. Air Force.

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Staff Sgts. Cody Flood and Michael Jamison collect data on explosives in preparation for a controlled detonation Nov. 23, 2009, at Mahmudiyah, Iraq. Sergeants Flood and Jamison are 447th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technicians. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-40dotjpg

U.S. Soldiers with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Regiment unload Humanitarian aid for distribution to the town of Rajan Kala, Afghanistan Dec. 05, 2009. Charlie Company used their Stryker armored vehicles to move the Humanitarian aid from the Joint District Community Center to the town of Rajan Kala. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II/Released)

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A Soldier celebrates during the 110th playing of the Army-Navy football game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Dec. 12, 2009. DoD photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley

vor033
12-17-2009, 11:14 PM
1st Lt. Marlena Morgan, a U.S. Army Paratrooper with Headquarter and Headquarters Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Task Force Fury), 82nd Airborne Division poses with tennis player Anna Kournikova, Dec. 16, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. Kournikova and other celebrities went on a USO tour to raise morale among troops serving here.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232503dotjpg

DnA
12-17-2009, 11:32 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-45dotjpg

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Kenneth J. Butler, of Braintree, Mass., fires a 50 caliber sniper rifle while on Camp Victory, Iraq, June 24, 2009. Butler returned to Iraq with the Troops First Foundation after being wounded in action in the Baghdad region. Butler lost his right arm above the elbow while serving with the 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division.



.50cal eh... yea no

Anyways, good to see Soldiers with amputations still being able to serve.




1st Lt. Marlena Morgan, a U.S. Army Paratrooper with Headquarter and Headquarters Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Task Force Fury), 82nd Airborne Division poses with tennis player Anna Kournikova, Dec. 16, at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan. Kournikova and other celebrities went on a USO tour to raise morale among troops serving here.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232503dotjpg


That 1LT ain't bad lookin either :p

To bad I missed most of those USO an whatever we(Canada) call our version of that by being in Zhari.

vor033
12-18-2009, 03:06 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-58dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade arrive to Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan in a CH-47D Chinook helicopter, Dec. 17.

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Branches of the Kunar River meet in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan as seen from the cabin of a helicopter, Dec. 17.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-55dotjpg

U.S. Army Sgt. Travis Woodard, 24, from Hampton, Va., travels aboard a CH-47D Chinook helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division flying over the Kunar Province, Afghanistan, Dec. 17. Woodard is a mortar operator assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

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A U.S. Army CH-47D Chinook helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division prepares to land inside the landing zone at Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan, Dec. 17.

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U.S. Army Sgt. Travis Woodard, 24, from Hampton, Va., travels aboard a CH-47D Chinook helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division flying over the Kunar Province, Afghanistan, Dec. 17. Woodard is a mortar operator assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-46dotjpg

U.S. Army Sgt. Jennifer Cohen, from Victorville, Calif., ducks her head to prevent dust from hitting her face as a CH-47D Chinook helicopter lands at Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan, Dec. 17. Cohen is a broadcast journalist assigned to the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) from Fort Meade, Md.

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U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade arrive to Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan in a CH-47D Chinook helicopter, Dec. 17.


http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/8-42dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade arrive to Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan in a CH-47D Chinook helicopter, Dec. 17.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-41dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade arrive to Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan in a CH-47D Chinook helicopter, Dec. 17.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/10-20dotjpg

U.S. Army Sgt. Jennifer Cohen, from Victorville, Calif., waits to board a helicopter at the landing zone in Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan, Dec. 17. Cohen is a broadcast journalist assigned to the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) from Fort Meade, Md.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/11-19dotjpg

A U.S. Army CH-47D Chinook helicopter from the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division prepares to land inside the landing zone at Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan, Dec. 17.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/12-18dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 1st Battalion, 32th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, wait to board a helicopter at the landing zone inside Forward Operation Base Joyce, Afghanistan, Dec. 17.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/13-17dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division refuel a CH-47D Chinook helicopter at Forward Operation Base Fenty, Afghanistan, Dec. 17.

vor033
12-18-2009, 03:39 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-59dotjpg

U.S Army Lieutenant Michael Barnhart from Task Force Denali 92 MP directs his team at Ghurki Kholah village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

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A U.S Army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP uses a Hide's camera to scan the fingerprints of an Afghani villager during a patrol to collect information at Ghurki Kholah village in Paktya province December 11, 2009. Hide is an identification system using fingerprint and retinal scans

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An U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP patrols at Wazi-Zadram village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

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An U.S Army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP gives a pen to a child during a patrol at Wazi-Zadram village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

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A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP uses a camera to scan the fingerprints and iris of an Afghani villager during a patrol to collect information at Ghurki Kholah village in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 11, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-47dotjpg

An U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP patrols at Wazi-Zadram village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-44dotjpg

U.S Army Lieutenant Barnhart Michael from Task Force Denali 92 MP directs his team at Ghurki Kholah village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/8-43dotjpg

An U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP patrols at Ghurki Kholah village in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 11, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-42dotjpg

An U.S Army soldier from Task Force Denali 92 MP patrols at Wazi-Zadram village in Paktya province December 11, 2009.

vor033
12-18-2009, 03:45 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-60dotjpg

A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav checks a 105mm Howitzer during snowfall at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 9, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-56dotjpg

A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav checks a 105mm Howitzer during snowfall at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 9, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-57dotjpg

A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav checks a 105mm Howitzer during snowfall at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 9, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-54dotjpg

A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav checks a 105mm Howitzer during snowfall at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 9, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-48dotjpg

A U.S army soldier from Task Force Denali 1-40 Cav plays with snow at FOB Wilderness in Paktya province, Afghanistan, December 9, 2009.

vor033
12-18-2009, 03:57 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-61dotjpg

SGT Joseph Delair of Syracuse, NY fingerprints and photographs men from a nearby village at the Sahowza District Center on December 2, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan. The men are registered and checked in the system to make sure they are not wanted as an enemy combatant. Today President Obama said he wants to send an additional 30,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan, bring the total number to nearly 100,000.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-57dotjpg

SGT Joseph Delair of Syracuse, NY with the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment trains Afghan National Policemen at the Sarhowza District Center on December 2, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan.

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Sgt. Joseph Delair of Syracuse, New York, with the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, trains Afghan National Policemen at the Sarhowza District Center on December 2, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-55dotjpg

Soldiers from the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment roll out of the Sarhowza District Center in an MRAP on December 3, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan. The U.S Army shares the district center with Afghan National Police which they are training to take over the lead role for security in the district.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-49dotjpg

Soldiers from the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment prepare to roll out of the Sarhowza District Center in an MRAP convoy on December 3, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-48dotjpg

Soldiers from the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment prepare to roll out of the Sarhowza District Center in an MRAP convoy on December 3, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-45dotjpg

Soldiers from the Army's Blackfoot Company 1st Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment huddle around a fire with policemen from the Afghan National Police (ANP) at the Sarhowza District Center on December 3, 2009 near Sarhowza, Afghanistan.

vor033
12-18-2009, 08:28 PM
I dont have any captions for these Photos, but the intensity of them I think makes up for that.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-62dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/10-21dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/11-20dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/12-19dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/13-18dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/14-14dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/15-15dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-58dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-59dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-56dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-50dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-49dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-46dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/8-44dotjpg
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-43dotjpg

stick.up.kid
12-19-2009, 04:36 AM
Here is some video that goes with those pics

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69Gjy-x9aO0

RIP PFC Dewater

vor033
12-19-2009, 02:51 PM
Here is some video that goes with those pics

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69Gjy-x9aO0

RIP PFC Dewater


Thanks for posting the Video, it really helps explain the intensity of the Photos !

vor033
12-19-2009, 03:46 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers from 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment convoy in Striker vehicles through Dab Pass to Forward Operating Base Sweeney, Afghanistan, for a mission, on Nov. 2. Dab Pass is a mountainous route that is narrow in many places and known to be a high-risk area for Improvised Explosive Devices and Taliban activity. These Soldiers are deployed to FOB Wolverine, Zabul province, Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom conducting counterinsurgency operations. (Photo by: Staff Sgt. Christine Jones)

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/233181dotjpg
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http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/233188dotjpg

vor033
12-19-2009, 03:55 PM
229th Military Police Company, 336th MP Battalion, 49th MP Brigade, gunner, Private 1st Class Andrew Thomas pulls security for his convoy while traveling down Route Irish, Baghdad, Iraq, Dec. 9. The Virginia National Guard unit is home based in Virgina Beach, Va., and it has a primary mission of personal security detachment, or PSD.


http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/233033dotjpg

vor033
12-19-2009, 04:05 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232983dotjpg

Pfc. Marc Fisher, of Boston, Mass., a Soldier from C Company, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, patrols around Contingency Operating Post Carver, Dec. 16, to ensure there were no threats to the installation or the Soldiers living there.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232984dotjpg

Staff Sgt. Alexis Rodriguez, of Saginaw, Mich., a squad leader with C Company, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, observes his surroundings during a base defense patrol around Contingency Operating Post Carver, Dec. 16

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232985dotjpg

Staff Sgt. Alexis Rodgriguez, of Saginaw, Mich., a squad leader in C Company, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, coordinates with his subordinate team leaders over his radio while on a base defense patrol around Contingency Operating Post, Dec. 16, to prevent attacks on the installation.

vor033
12-19-2009, 04:18 PM
Date: 12.18.2009

BAGHDAD, Iraq—While upcoming elections, scheduled for next spring, give many Iraqis a sense of hope in their ability to improve their government and way of life, insurgents view elections as an opportunity to conduct attacks and impose their own agenda.

American Soldiers are hard at work to deny the insurgency any ground within the Istiqlaal area, northeast of the capital, and outlying areas.

Soldiers from 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division have conducted a series of raids and cache searches in and around Istiqlaal to interdict weapons and explosives trafficking into areas closer to Baghdad.

Throughout this month, U.S. troops worked long days with their partners from the 6th Iraqi Emergency Response Unit and 2nd Brigade, 1st Iraqi Federal Police Division, executing raids and cache searches in the rural Rashidiyah and Fahama areas along the Tigris River.

The combined forces began work early in the morning, arriving at several different agricultural areas while the sun came up. Soldiers and ISF spread out across fields and through groves to search for caches of explosive materials and weapons.

Meticulously, the team searched and cleared over 22 suspected cache sites throughout Rashidiyah and Fahama and searched many target houses.

Partnered teams of Soldiers and IPs established traffic control points everyday to interdict weapons trafficking while others searched populated areas for illegal weapons and worked to arrest wanted insurgents with warrants issued by the Iraqi courts.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232932dotjpg
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vor033
12-19-2009, 04:20 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/232475dotjpg

A UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flies low over Contingency Operating Base Basra during the late afternoon hours, Dec. 12.

vor033
12-20-2009, 08:03 PM
Soldiers of Bravo Company 82nd Division Special Troops Battalion provide security while a CH-47 Chinook drops Solders off during an air assault mission Dec. 18, 2009, Parwan, Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/233426dotjpg
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http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/233435dotjpg

PJ187
12-20-2009, 09:55 PM
Check out the camo worn in this cnn vid. I think its UCP-Delta. Looks better than the ACU IMO.

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2009/12/15/starr.afghan.supply.lines.cnn?iref=allsearch

vor033
12-20-2009, 10:18 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/ArmyMedivacEvacuateWarWoundedAfg-1dotjpg

Medic Sgt. Bryan Eickelberg of Arden Heights, Minnesota, with the 82nd Airborne Combat Aviation Brigade, watches doctors work on a grievously wounded unidentified Afghan National Army soldier (ANA) that he had just brought in from the battlefield November 1, 2009 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan. The soldier, who later died of his injuries, had stepped on a land mine planted by insurgents severely wounding his legs. Medivac medics, crew chiefs and pilots fly at a moments' notice into the war zone in Afghanistan, quickly retrieving wounded Western and Afghan troops alike from the battlefield.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/ArmyMedivacEvacuateWarWoundedAfghandotjpg

Medic Sgt. Bryan Eickelberg of Arden Heights, Minnesota, with the 82nd Airborne Combat Aviation Brigade, keeps watch in a Medivac helicopter as they land in a combat zone to pick up a wounded unidentified Afghan National Army soldier (ANA) November 1, 2009 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan. Medivac medics, crew chiefs and pilots fly at a moments' notice into the war zone in Afghanistan, quickly retrieving wounded Western and Afghan troops alike from the battlefield.

vor033
12-20-2009, 10:46 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-63dotjpg

SFC Jeremy Ellis from Ashland, Kentucky of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade looks out from the top of a Stryker armored combat vehicle as it leaves on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-59dotjpg

SPC Louis Phay from Yerington, Nevada of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade keeps watch from the top of a Stryker armored combat vehicle while on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-60dotjpg

SPC Robert Isom (L) from Central Falls, Rhode Island and Roman Taylor of Avondale, Arizona of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade stand guard as members of their platoon speak with policemen with the Afghan National Police before leaving on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-57dotjpg

SFC Jeremy Ellis from Ashland, Kentucky of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade looks out from the top of a Stryker armored combat vehicle as it leaves on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-51dotjpg

SGT Joshua Hedensten from Cambridge, Minnesota of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade keeps watch from the top of a Stryker armored combat vehicle while on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-50dotjpg

Pvt. Kevin White from Wakefield, Rhode Island of the U.S. Army's Alpha Company 4th Battalion 5th Stryker Brigade stands guard as members of his platoon speak with policemen with the Afghan National Police before leaving on a mission from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Wolverine on December 11, 2009 near Qalat, Afghanistan. The battalion has been tasked with helping to secure Zabul Province in southeastern Afghanistan.

vor033
12-20-2009, 11:03 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-64dotjpg

Lt. Andrew Minoski of Las Vegas, Nevada of the U.S. Army's 172nd Brigade Combat Team (C) dons his body armor before a patrol January 19, 2009 in Musayyib, in the Babil Province, Iraq. Musayyib was once an explosively dangerous zone for American troops; now a fragile peace is at hand, as the area's restive Shia and Sunni groups formed U.S.-sanctioned militias to keep order. American troops are stepping up patrols in advance of important Iraqi elections on January 31.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-60dotjpg

Lt. Andrew Minoski (L) of Las Vegas, Nevada of the U.S. Army's 172nd Brigade Combat Team questions a resident about hanging Palestinian flags, which can be a sign of protest against American forces January 19, 2009 in Musayyib, in the Babil Province, Iraq.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-61dotjpg

Lt. Andrew Minoski of Las Vegas, Nevada of the U.S. Army's 172nd Brigade Combat Team leads a patrol of soldiers January 19, 2009 in Musayyib, in the Babil Province, Iraq.

vor033
12-20-2009, 11:12 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-65dotjpg

Pfc. Dustin Napier (L) of Cincinnati, Ohio and Army Chaplain Jonathan Knoedler of Portland, Oregon, both in the 3-89 Cavalry Regiment of the 10th Mountain Division, sit in a Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle while traveling the streets of east Baghdad May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq. MRAPs, specially designed with V-shaped hulls to withstand the blasts of roadside bombs, are considered by the military to be their safest vehicle, and have been rolled out in force to soldiers in Baghdad recently

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-61dotjpg


Soldiers exit a Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle at Forward Operating Base Loyalty May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq

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Army Chaplain Jonathan Knoedler of Portland, Oregon of the 10th Mountain Division walks in front of a Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq.

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Soldiers exit a Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle at Forward Operating Base Loyalty May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq

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A gunner sits in the well of a Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle as it moves on the streets of east Baghdad May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq.

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A Mine Resistant Ambush Protective (MRAP) vehicle is parked at Forward Operating Base Loyalty May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq

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Army Chaplain Jonathan Knoedler of Portland, Oregon (center) leads men of the 3-89 Cavalry Regiment of the 10th Mountain Division in rallying call before moving out in a MRAP vehicle onto the streets of east Baghdad May 12, 2008 in Baghdad, Iraq.

Gungnir
12-21-2009, 06:18 PM
I dont have any captions for these Photos, but the intensity of them I think makes up for that.

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and the like from that post...

B Co, 1-26 INF, 3rd IBCT, 1st Infantry Division in Korengal Valley, 2009

stick.up.kid
12-22-2009, 01:25 AM
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10th Mountain Division soldiers provide cover for an assault squad in Northern Italy. 1945http://i50.*******.com/vhxevcdotjpg

A battle weary 45th Division Medic at Anzio.http://i50.*******.com/2hrh2mhdotjpg

Machine Gun crew in the streets of Aachen Germanyhttp://i48.*******.com/kaqn9hdotjpg

Soldiers from the 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, land on Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6th 1944.http://i49.*******.com/a4mmtgdotjpg

Pvt. Paul Oglesby, 30th Infantry, examines the damage to the altar of a Catholic church in Acerno, Italy, as light pours through the bomb-shattered roof. September 23, 1943.http://i49.*******.com/rjdxd2dotjpg

American infantrymen seek shelter from German shells in the town of Geich, Germany. December 11, 1944.http://i45.*******.com/a4oso7dotjpg

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Paratroopers from the 101st Airborne pose with a captured German flag. June 1944http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff100/LUGR/PARATROOPERS/101stpix2dotjpg

A Paratrooper from the 101st Airborne dashes through enemy shelling in Holland

Arnie100
12-23-2009, 05:45 PM
Any new pics?

stick.up.kid
12-24-2009, 08:54 AM
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Staff Sgt. Jason Hughes, Squad Leader, 1st Platoon, Charlie Co., 1-17 Infantry, writes a letter home to his grandmother at the Baba Saheb district center in Kandahar. He often takes up to three days to write a letter, taking his time to figure out what he wants to say.http://i46.*******.com/15nupaadotjpg

After scouting some new desolate hills about 1000 yards away from the last compound, Staff Sgt. Matthew Sanders, Charlie Co., 1-17 Infantry, takes in his newly assigned patrol base, an empty hilltop outside of town. Who needed walls or buildings anyway for the winter? C-wire is just as good.http://i49.*******.com/35k5rlydotjpg

After about an hour and half break from building the FOB, it’s back to work for 4th Platoon, Charlie Co., 1-17 Infantry. Their Thanksgiving meal is quickly worked off by digging out an entrance for the Strykers, filling sandbags, and building guard towers on the compound.http://i48.*******.com/10p3v6hdotjpg

Members of 4th Platoon, Charlie Co., 1-17 Infantry, eat their Thanksgiving meal after taking over a compound for a brand new FOB near the Argandab valley in Kandahar. Most of the troops said the dinner was decent enough – although there was one loud dissent, “the mashed potatoes taste like ****! And that’s the best part of the meal!” It was universally agreed, though, that flying and trucking in a hot holiday meal was a very, very good thing.http://i50.*******.com/2evbxp3dotjpg

Sgt. Ryan Sharp, 21, from Brookfield, Wi. (C), shows the rest of 1st Platoon, Bravo Co., 1-17 Infantry, his share of videos and pictures of the unit before turning in for the night – ranging from their training almost 3 years ago in Ft. Lewis, to their current deployment in the Argandab valley in Kandahar, Afghanistan. “A lot of us went to Basic together, and most of us have been together for a long time. It’s stuff from battle drills, classes, and training – us goofing around. It’s probably the first time a group of us together has seen the collection.”http://i47.*******.com/11uxa3kdotjpg

Spc. Brandon Trentham, Bravo Co., 1-17 Infantry, prepares to leave COB Outlaw in the Argandab valley in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The company generally rotates out to another FOB a kilometer away every five days, always on foot. He estimates that his bag weighs around 50 lbs. – and with his 240 and body armor, he’s probably carrying at least his body weight in gear. “You kinda get used to it,” he said.http://i48.*******.com/epn1bodotjpg

Sgt. Jason Hawkins, Bravo Co., 1-17 Infantry, watches the perimeter on patrol shortly after sunrise in the dense orchards and vineyards of the Argandab valley in Kandahar, Afghanistan. During the summertime, the foliage is so dense that visibility is only around 40 ft. when you’re kneeling. Grunts from across several operating areas have compared it to Vietnam – the daily patrols in a thick belt of green, regular gunfights, explosions heard in distance, and the Kiowas overhead – but minus the naplam, of course.

stick.up.kid
12-24-2009, 09:00 AM
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Members of 1st Platoon, Blackwatch Co., 2-1 Infantry, look for a downed “Raven” UAV from another battalion near Hutal village, along Highway One, in Kandahar. The Raven is rather small – it weighs a only few pounds, and has a four foot wingspan, and is particular useful with infantry operations (http://www.armytimes.com/news/2009/11/army_raven_110209w/).

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Lt. Nicholas Privette leads members of 1st platoon, the “Roughnecks,” on cordoned search through nearby Hutal village, looking for insurgents that may be holed up in the area.

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Spc. Anthony Hernandez sets up his 240 in a wagon at the entrance of an alleyway while on patrol with 1st platoon, the “Roughnecks,” Blackwatch Co., 2-1 Infantry, near COP Rath in western Kandahar.

stick.up.kid
12-24-2009, 09:10 AM
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Keeping watch right before 120mm mortars are called in on insurgents in the hills, near a road building patrol north of FOB Baylough. Good thing they practiced last night.

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A natural spring appeared on the base the other week, seeping up during construction, and the 1-4 lads were forced to dig a stream channel through the FOB to prevent their new pond from overrunning the base – the water table is rather insane here in the valley. Water gurgles all over the place. They have frogs hopping around now

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st. Lt. Jason Basilides, Platoon Leader, Bravo Company, 1-4 Infantry, hops a creek headed back from a patrol doing local surveillance. I assumed Afghanistan would be completely arid and desert-like – and much of it is – but parts of it are incredibly fertile, and very green. Everywhere we walk on patrol has roaring streams appearing from nowhere, or seeping through walls, roads, or muddy flats.

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Pfc. Paul Liberatore, and Spc. Nick Giovanelli, from Bravo Company, 1-4 Infantry, were in the MWR and gym, respectively, when the first mortars rounds started landing near the base – and are starting to stand down after an hour wait on the sandbagged roof.

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Sgt. Trent Barnes from Bravo Company, 1-4 Infantry, calls in a 120mm mortar attack on hills nearby where insurgents are gathering to attack near FOB Baylough, Zabul province.

stick.up.kid
12-24-2009, 09:23 AM
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One of the most ubiquitous sights on patrols when you get near a village is children – first quiet, then unruly, they literally start appearing and mulitplying exponentially. And won’t leave you alone until you give them pens, or as our interpreter did, made them line up for candy. They don’t like lines.

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The terrain is so rough here that almost all patrols are “dismounted” – that means no lifts from a Humvee… Humping all your ammo, water through the mountains.

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At one corner of the base is a natural hilly outcrop of rocks that has been fortified with bunkers. Pfc. Wesley Gatewood, Pfc. Paul Liberatore, and Spc. Nick Giovanelli, from Bravo Company, 1-4 Infantry, take a quick smoke break from moving generator equipment up the hill.

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As we got off our much delayed bird to FOB Baylough, a remote oupost in the mountains north of Lagman, a burly sergeant immediately gathered us together and said, “First rule about Baylough is – piss before you ****. We **** in bags here, and if you pee in them, it will burst the bags – and – YOU – will have to clean it up.”

kosalo
12-24-2009, 02:14 PM
And who are those guys? The upper one is obviously a bearded cave-dweller, but the lower one - they sure have strange allies :)
L

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Virus
12-24-2009, 02:34 PM
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Lol, love this one. We had a guy who wrote 23 on almost every surface you could write on in one of our OPs, and when found out, was made to rebuild the whole OP at night lol. Was hilarious because most people had just watched the movie and going into the OP was creepy to see that crap.

vor033
12-24-2009, 02:36 PM
KHOST PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Soldiers located at Combat Outpost Spera partnered with members of the Afghan national army to destroy a multi-room building, used to protect insurgents as they travelled through Khost province, Dec. 18.

U.S. Army 707th Explosive Ordinance Disposal Team out of Fort Lewis, Wash.; 3rd Scout Platoon, Troop A, 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Alaska; and members of the Afghan national army destroyed the multi-room building, nicknamed the "Taliban Hotel," to restrict insurgent freedom of movement and logistic support.

"In theatre, as a whole, my team and I are responsible for the safe mitigation of explosive hazards, ranging from unexploded ordinance to improvised explosive devices," said U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Dennis Speek, 707th EOD team leader. "Our current mission at COP Spera is to explosively destroy a complex known as the 'Taliban Hotel' that is being used by insurgents for safe haven while conducting attacks in the vicinity of COP Spera."

Securing the surrounding area is the main priority of the 707th EOD Team and ANA.

"I am tasked with conducting border patrols to deny insurgent weapon and supply smuggling capabilities," said U.S. Army 1st Lt. Kevin Jewell, Jr., platoon leader for the 3rd Scout Platoon. "Along with that task comes mentorship and partnership with ANA counterparts to create a safer environment for the people of Afghanistan."

The destruction of the "Taliban Hotel" helps show the people of Afghanistan that insurgent forces are not tolerated in this area, Jewell said.

Demolishing the hotel took a large amount of explosives, and the mountainous terrain called for unconventional methods of transportation in order to get equipment to the location. In this situation, the ANA provided the solution; the combined forces team loaded the backs of donkeys to carry 300 pounds of C-4 explosive charges.

"We are happy to help stop insurgents from entering our country in any way we can," said Baaz Mohammad, Afghan national army medical soldier. "With the help of the ANA-supplied donkeys, the trip is made more bearable."

According to Jewell, his unit's presence with the Afghan national security forces allows them to conduct missions that would conventionally be out of ANSF's grasp. Being partnered with American forces allows the ANSF opportunities to conduct missions that would otherwise be out of reach, such as the EOD destruction of the "Taliban Hotel," giving them something to work towards.

"We are supporting the ANSF to build a strong military presence that can support and defend their government against insurgents and criminals," he said. "That way, one day, they can conduct missions on their own at the same level, which is ultimately our goal in Afghanistan.

"Levelling the 'Taliban Hotel' prevents the insurgents from relying on another avenue to spread violence and turmoil with the borders of Afghanistan."

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vor033
12-24-2009, 03:04 PM
CONTINGENCY OPERATING LOCATION Q-WEST, Iraq — Members of a Mississippi Army National Guard unit conducted a routine presence patrol around Contingency Operating Location Q-West, Dec. 15, demonstrating their strategies for combating complacency.

Soldiers with 1st Platoon, A Company, 2nd Battalion, 198th Combined Arms, 155th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, a mechanized infantry unit out of Hernando, Miss., serving as COL Q-West's force protection company, conducted the mounted patrol as part of their daily battle rhythm.

"The biggest risk we face is complacency," said Staff Sgt. Stephen S. Poff, the first squad leader and native of Ashland, Miss. "This mission is the same thing, over and over. We look for ways to keep it fresh. We conduct battle drills for events like indirect fire or vehicle recovery. We vary our route."

Poff said that each platoon in the company spends two weeks as the quick reaction force, which conducts the presence patrol, then spends two weeks performing battle space missions, such as supporting operation and maintenance missions to the pump house or securing convoys as needed.

"The platoon rotates QRF duty every 48 hours between the squads," said Poff. "A squad makes up to three two-hour patrols every 24 hours. Then another squad rotates in, and the one rotating out conducts vehicle maintenance and, when possible, gets a day off."

Sgt. Patrick A. Martin, a truck commander, said uneventful patrols and a repetitious battle rhythm contribute to the risk of complacency.

"Not much happens on this mission, so we vary our routes to stay fresh," said Martin, a resident of Southaven, Miss. "Once, we found an unexploded mortar round, but otherwise the weather is our biggest challenge, rain and fog. Mostly, we encounter dogs, dust and fog. Lately, the winter rain makes the desert muddy, and it can get very foggy at night."

Spc. Timothy D. Millican, a gunner from Southaven, Miss., agreed that the mission has been peaceful.

"QRF is probably the least exciting thing we do," said Millican. "When we're not on a perimeter patrol, we pretty much sit and wait for something to happen, and this has been a quiet area of Iraq."

Sgt. Jeremy L. Sapp, a truck commander from Blue Springs, Miss., uses patrols to share experiences he gained during the unit's previous deployment in 2005.

"During patrols, I try to use some of the stuff I learned in the last deployment to teach the younger guys who haven't deployed before," said Sapp. "I tell them about things that could happen in different situations. Those things haven't happened, but they could and these younger guys need to keep that in mind."

Spc. Chance W. Jeffress, II, Sapp's gunner, said these stories were educational and kept him alert.

"I like listening to Sapp's stories," said Jeffress, a native of Horn Lake, Miss. "When we're on a patrol, he will point out situations that we're going through and talk about how they dealt with them during the last deployment. Those stories are interesting and give me a better perspective on our mission."

The vehicles' internal communications – the intercom system to which all crew members are connected with head phones – helps Soldiers stay focused, said Spc. William B. Waldrop, a gun truck driver.

"Talking to each other is a big part of patrolling," said Waldrop, a native of Senatobia, Miss. "We constantly talk about everything we're seeing, and that keeps my mind on the mission. The other thing that keeps me focused is when my vehicle commander yells at me to stay focused."

Millican said the presence patrols help maintain cordial relations with the local Iraqis.

"I like the presence patrols because they give us a chance to experience the local community," said Millican. "We get to know the people who live in the local villages."

When interacting with the local population, the QRF members take care to follow the U.S.-Iraq Status of Forces Agreement, said Sapp.

"We adhere to the Status of Forces Agreement and don't go through populated areas, but we pass near some small villages," said Sapp. "The people know us, and they often come out to greet us, especially the children. We share water and sometimes give the kids candy."

Sgt. Jeffrey J. Jackson, platoon medic, said it was important for the local community to see the presence patrol.

"These patrols help us maintain good relations with the local community, that's true," said Jackson, a native of Hernando, Miss. "The patrols let the locals know we are here and we're engaged. If a base stopped guarding outside the wire, hostile forces might show up. The locals would be vulnerable, and the base might start receiving mortars and rockets."

The perimeter patrol conducts a reconnaissance of abandoned villages in the vicinity of Q-West, said Sapp.

"When we first got here, we cleared a number of abandoned villages, and we still check them out occasionally," said Sapp. "To stay fresh, to keep the mission from being too repetitive, we also practice our battle drills."

The relative peacefulness of current sustainment operations required a significant adjustment from veterans of previous deployments who grew used to full spectrum operations, said Poff.

"I enjoy this deployment more than the last one; it's a lot quieter," said Poff. "But some of the older guys feel different."

Jackson said that he had trouble getting used to the difference in missions.

"Comparing this deployment to the last one, there is no comparison," said Jackson. "In 2005, it was kicking in doors and a lot of shooting, but now we are doing a totally different mission. That's tough for some of us who deployed last time to get used to."

Jackson said he found it difficult to reconcile conducting operations in a combat zone but living on a post that operates like a peace-time garrison.

"We leave the wire and might face combat, especially during battle space missions when we could receive mortar or rocket fire or get hit by an improvised explosive device," said Jackson. "When we get back, we are living in garrison conditions. The question that goes through my mind sometimes is, 'Is this combat in Iraq or garrison duty back in the States?'"

Capt. Drew Clark, commander of A Company, said he understands the dilemma.

"They're infantry Soldiers," said Clark, a resident of Madison, Miss. "It's what they do. As far as interacting with the local citizens, the senior non-commissioned officers who've been here before know how to conduct themselves with Iraqis."

Clark said he is confident in the adaptability of his Soldiers.

"When we first got here, I went on several presence patrols, but my Soldiers have a good handle on that mission," said Clark. "They are doing an outstanding job. We haven't had a single breach of physical security since we arrived. They've helped keep the base secure."

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Facaletz
12-24-2009, 03:19 PM
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what's with that romanian PM (AK),a joint patrol smth??

vor033
12-24-2009, 03:42 PM
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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Mehall from San Antonio, Texas, of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, takes a knee and pulls security as he waits for his team to catch up, after searching a former ammunition factory for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Soldiers attached to the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and the 55th Signal Company, 21st Signal Brigade, come down a three story tower after searching a former ammunition factory for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Army Spc. Mark Mclain, from Marin, Ohio, and U.S. Army Spc. Joseph Munizich, from Los Angeles, Calif., of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, search a former ammunition factory for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Mehall, from San Antonio, Texas, and U.S. Army Spc. Mark Mclain, from Marin, Ohio, of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, come down the stairs from the second story of a former ammunition factory, searching for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, enter a former ammunition factory to search for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Mehall from San Antonio, Texas, of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, pulls security while being posted on top of a ladder, as his team searches a former ammunition factory for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20

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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Mehall, from San Antonio, Texas, of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, climbs a ladder to reach the roof of a former ammunition factory, in search of improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20.

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U.S. Army Spc. Mark Mclain, from Marin, Ohio, and U.S. Army Spc. Joseph Munizich, from Los Angeles, Calif., of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, search a former ammunition factory junkyard for improvised explosive devices and other explosives in Nassir Factory, Iraq, Dec. 20

vor033
12-24-2009, 04:44 PM
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U.S. Army 1st Lt. Jason Cumiford, relays grid coordinates by radio to the tactical operations center at Combat Outpost Terezayi while out on patrol in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. Cumiford serves as a platoon leader with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala. He and his Soldiers work with the Afghan border policemen out of Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah to sustain border security and maintain peace amongst the local population.

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A Mark 19 Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station, can be mounted on the top of various combat vehicles and has an array of cameras and advanced electronic sensors. U.S. Army Soldiers from Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala., utilize the CROWS while pulling guard duty at Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah in the Terezayi district of eastern Afghanistan's Khost province.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, maintain 360-security during mounted patrols in Terezayi district, Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 2. The Soldiers, out of Fort Richardson, Ala., conduct daily security patrols to ensure security throughout the Terezayi district.

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U.S. Army 1st Lt. Matthew Meggs, conducts a security patrol in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. Meggs and other Soldiers with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala., work with the Afghan Border Police operating out of Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah, near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border in eastern Afghanistan. Meggs, a fire support officer, provides indirect fire support to ground maneuver units.

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A round from a Mk19 Common Remotely Operated Weapons Station, is test fired for accuracy at Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. U.S. Army Soldiers serving with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala., utilize the CROWS while pulling guard duty alongside the Afghan border police at the Afghan COP.

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U.S. Army Pfc. Christopher Long takes a break after pulling guard duty at Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec 4. Long serves as a squad designated marksman with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala.

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U.S. Army mortar men from Company B, 2nd Battalion, 151st Infantry Regiment, Indiana National Guard, provide 120 mm mortar fire support to Soldiers from Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala., at Afghan Combat Outpost Chergotah located in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4.

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U.S. Army Sgt. Mihail Golin, uses a tube launched, optically tracked, wire guided missile to help secure the Afghanistan and Pakistan border crossing of Chergotah in the Terezayi district of Khost province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. Security in Chergotah is a daily struggle due to a vast amount of mountain crossings. Golin serves as an infantryman with Company D, 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, out of Fort Richardson, Ala.

vor033
12-24-2009, 05:06 PM
Story by Sgt. Francis Horton

Date: 12.24.2009

CAMP ADDER, Iraq – All Soldiers are trained on various convoy operations before they deploy, even if they never step into an armored vehicle during their deployment.

Here at Camp Adder though, some Soldiers continue to hone their skills because it can save their lives.

"We're doing convoy lanes training," said Sgt 1st Class Robert Moore, a resident of Buffalo, Mo. and platoon leader, "G" Platoon, 121st Brigade Support Battalion. "It involves everything we would do in a convoy."

The battle drills include summoning medical evacuations, reacting to improvised explosive devices and vehicle recovery.

"We have to make sure we can get from point 'A' to point 'B,'" said 1st Lt. Jennifer Beatty from Crestview, Fla., the convoy commander of "G" Platoon.

Beatty's job is twofold. Not only must she take command of a convoy of armored vehicles crossing Iraq, but she also has to make sure her Soldiers are up to speed on their weapons and equipment, she said.

While everyone has a duty to perform, Beatty gets all of her Soldiers trained in every job they may encounter during the convoy.

"I make sure the Soldiers are cross trained in special tasks and teams," she said.

If one person goes down, someone else might need to take charge, whether it is as a gunner, driver or medic.

Currently, "G" Platoon is practicing IED defeat, in which the Soldiers must react to roadside bombs.

As they drove through the training area their eyes watched for any signs of possible explosives.

Spotting a fluttering bag on the side of the road weighted down, with wires sticking out, the convoy stopped and called up a nine line request to address a possible unexploded ordinance.

Unfortunately for them, just because they saw it did not mean they would get out of the training to react to a disabled vehicle. As they passed by, a small explosion went off near one of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles.

Air Force Staff Sgt. Tor Hvidsten, an explosive ordinance disposal specialist with the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron, and his team set up the explosives, placing a primary and secondary explosive to best mimic the attacks from insurgents.

"This way, they can feel the blast and react properly," Hvidsten, of Virginia Beach, Va., said.

While not large enough to injure the Soldiers in the vehicles, it can be felt and heard by everyone.

"The [explosive] simulates the real thing," Moore said. "It gives off smoke and light and can disorientate you."

After the explosion, the convoy came upon Moore "wounded" and the MRAP disabled. Moving quickly, the various teams set to work, some pulled security around the convoy, others rescued Moore from the vehicle and strapped him down to a stretcher so they could carry him to their medical vehicle.

Once the wounded were secured, the tow bar was connected to the "damaged" vehicle and the platoon was ready to move again.

"I love this training," Beatty said. "It gives us an idea what to work on and what to sustain."

Though there were a few minor hiccups, the Soldiers moved calmly and quickly, showing that the training was second nature to them.

"We had great communication throughout," said Spc. Michael Morlan, a fuel specialist from Paoli, Ind.

The platoon conducts missions every other week from here to Forward Operating Bases Hunter and Garryowen, Moore said.

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vor033
12-24-2009, 05:07 PM
Story by Sgt. Jennie Burrett

Date: 12.24.2009

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BAGHDAD—"I was probably two feet from my door of my truck when I heard gun fire and it felt like someone just cracked me in the right shoulder blade with a hammer," said Spc. Matthew Mortensen of Olathe, Kan.

The combat medic with 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was part of a presence patrol conducting a neighborhood search, Dec. 10, in an area historically known for weapons caches, rockets and mortars.

As the patrol walked the streets, a mounted element went from check point to check point providing security for them. Having reached the last check point, Staff Sgt. Manoj Prasad of Watertown, N.Y., and Mortensen dismounted to maneuver the trucks into a static security posture, when shots were fired.

"I saw a bullet hole in his shirt, and when I cut it open all I could see was blood," said Prasad. "I looked for an exit wound and couldn't find one."

Being the medic on scene, Mortensen provided first aid care to himself after he was injured until he reached the Joint Security Station Loyalty aid station. Combat medics are responsible for providing first aid and frontline trauma care on the battlefield with the primary role to provide medical treatment to wounded soldiers.

"After I was shot, I had my platoon sergeant examine for a wound and he found one on my right shoulder blade," said Mortensen. "Then I jumped into the truck, threw off my kit because I couldn't reach my right side with my kit on. After I took it off, I started cleaning up some of the blood with gauze then I used the package for the gauze and created a pressure dressing over the wound just in case it penetrated my chest cavity. I didn't know what happened to the bullet so that was the only thing I was really worried about"

After the initial treatment, Mortensen was medically evacuated to another JSS. Mortensen kept his composure throughout the event and was able to provide Prasad with the proper medevac procedures for entering the JSS.

The day following the incident, Mortensen was awarded a Purple Heart and a Combat Medical badge while he was in the hospital at Victory Base Complex.

The Purple Heart is awarded to those who have been wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917 with the U.S. military. The Combat Medical Badge is a decoration of the United States Army, which was first created in January 1945. The badge is awarded to any member of the Army Medical Department, pay grade colonel or below, who are assigned or attached to a medical unit (company or smaller size) which provides medical support to a ground combat arms unit during any period in which the unit was engaged in active ground combat.

Mortensen was sent back to the United States for rehabilitation and recuperation. After spending a month back in the States, he anticipates he will return to his platoon in Iraq sometime in February.

vor033
12-24-2009, 05:20 PM
Pfc. Josh Barrios from Torrence, Calif., and Staff Sgt. Brent Holmes from Marysville, Wash., both mortarmen with B Troop, 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, conduct a fires mission Dec. 16 from Camp Clark in the Khost Province of eastern Afghanistan.


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vor033
12-24-2009, 05:24 PM
Story by Spc. Luisito Brooks

Date: 12.23.2009

BAGHDAD – It takes more than just hot air to get the Aerostat surveillance system up in the sky, it also requires many hours of training.

Soldiers from 4th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division have spent the last month learning from the ground up how to assemble, operate and perform minor maintenance on the system, here, at Joint Security Station Muthana.

The surveillance systems that are mounted on the Aerostat blimp have the ability to view objects or locations many kilometers away, during day or night.

"With this training [we] will able to operate the system ourselves and provide a aerial view across the area of operation," said Sgt. Perter Burkes, a infantryman from Austin, Texas. "The Aerostat is a pressurized flexible structure that's filled with helium and it looks like a blimp."

Part of the 28-day training on the $4 million piece of equipment required the Soldiers to spend two weeks in the classroom learning the ins and outs of the system.

"In the class we learned about each part of the system, how to put them together and operate it," Spc. Val Tapia, a fire support Soldier from Stockton, Calif. "The class was very helpful because we were able to ask all the questions we needed."

At the end of the classroom session of the course the Soldiers had to take a written exam to test their knowledge on the system.

"I studied very hard for the written test," said Spc. Roy Justin, a radar repair specialist from Castleton, N.Y. "I was very proud that I did excellent on the test."

Every Soldier that did well on the written exam continued on to the hands-on portion of the course.

"We inventoried each piece of the system and then basically put the entire thing together," said Tapia. "It took us two day to put it together."

The final portion of the course required each person to master how to launch and recover the Aerostat.

"It took a team of about eight people 15 to 20 minutes to launch and recover the system and each person on the team had to learn everyone else's position," said Tapia. "We launched and recovered the Aerostat at least 50 times, under the supervision of the civilian instructor, so that everyone would be confident no matter what position they were thrown in."

The Soldiers completing the Aerostat training course will provide a major asset to the area.

"The training was excellent," said Burkes. "Now that this team is almost done with the training, we will be able to provide the visual support that is very essential for the safety of our Soldiers."

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vor033
12-24-2009, 05:32 PM
Story by Daniela Vestal

Date: 12.22.2009

It has been more than 40 years since Fred Ebb coined the phrase "Money makes the world go round" and a lot has changed since then – especially for the former office-bound finance Soldiers of the Army. Today every Soldier is focused on training for their wartime mission in addition to their primary military occupational specialties.

This was especially true for the Soldiers of B Detachment, 4th Financial Management Company, 142nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, who culminated a month of training with a live-fire exercise, Dec. 10.

The unit is new, having just stood up in March, and has been working on their deployment pre-training since September, relying on determination and hard work to get them through the intense time line of training.

"We started with nothing," said Capt. Mary Johnson, B Det. commander. "We've been building teams and establishing systems and [the Soldiers have] been doing an outstanding job. I've been putting a lot of demands on them to make sure they are trained and ready to go."

The convoy live-fire tested the unit's preparedness by continually throwing different scenarios at the Soldiers each time they went through the 10-mile-long lane. Each iteration took about an hour to complete and covered situations ranging from reacting to improvised explosive devices to calling down MEDEVAC support for wounded Soldiers.

"Today's live-fire was good for us," said Pfc. Derek Fabors, "We got a lot of different situations thrown at us so a lot of critical thinking was involved and I'm always a big fan of that. Having to think on your feet and adapt to change – I think that's what makes the best Soldiers.


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The Dane
12-24-2009, 05:43 PM
Thanks Vor, for all these great pictures you provide. It's outstanding! :)

Arnie100
12-24-2009, 05:44 PM
Awesome pics, as always, vor033!

vor033
12-24-2009, 10:55 PM
Thanks for the comments guys i am glad you like the Photos :)

vor033
12-24-2009, 11:01 PM
Some of these Photos were seen onTodays daily pics thread, but i thought they should be on here as well and i found a couple of extras.

I find these Photos interesting as they show a Unit trialling Multi-Cam as one of the possible replacments for ACU/UCP Camo - Sorry no hi-res yet

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Col. Randy George, left, commander of the 4th brigade, 4th Infantry Division, awards soldiers of the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry at Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2009.

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Soldiers belonging to the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry stand at attention during awards ceremony at Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2009.

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Soldiers belonging to the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry fire mortar rounds at enemy positions from Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan Thursday Dec. 24, 2009.

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Soldiers belonging to the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry fire mortar rounds at enemy positions from Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan Thursday Dec. 24, 2009.

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Soldiers belonging to the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry fire mortar rounds at enemy positions from Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan Thursday Dec. 24, 2009.

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Soldiers belonging to the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry carry mortar rounds as they prepare to fire on enemy positions from Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan Thursday Dec. 24, 2009.

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Col. Randy George, left, commander of the 4th brigade, 4th Infantry Division, awards soldiers of the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry at Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2009.

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Col. Randy George, commander of the 4th brigade, 4th Infantry Division, awards soldiers of the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry at Command Outpost Michigan near the village of Kandigal, in the Pech river valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2009.

Steelersfan413
12-24-2009, 11:06 PM
Damnit! I was about to post those^

Carib
12-24-2009, 11:49 PM
My buddy is with that unit 4/4 2-12. I'm about to find out if he is getting that multi-cam since he just is arriving.

vor033
12-24-2009, 11:53 PM
POPE AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. - You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen. But on Dec. 6, it was not a team of reindeer, but Air Force Maj. Jeff Dasher, a navigator in the 95th Airlift Squadron here, who guided the mission for the 440th Airlift Wing's C-130 Hercules that flew a group of "Soldier Santas" across the morning sky.

One might say he was born for this mission.

"It's the name," Dasher said with a chuckle. "I had to be on this flight."

His flight was part of the 12th annual Randy Oler Memorial Operation Toy Drop, a program sponsored by Fort Bragg, N.C., and Pope Air Force Base officials providing toys to needy children in the Fayetteville, N.C., area. The toys, donated by the participating service members, are delivered to children in time for Christmas.

More than 1,200 Army paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division and 18th Airborne Corps suited up in their jump gear to be a part of the charity event, which brought participants from as far away as Germany.

Air Force Col. Merle Hart, 440th Airlift Wing commander, greeted the paratroopers as they checked their gear and marched toward the flightline to board Dasher's C-130.

"I'm proud that the 440th can be a part of this operation," Hart said. "This is a great outreach that our soldiers can provide and a token of our support to the children of other military members and the local community."

This year, the 440th Airlift Wing, in conjunction with the Air National Guard's 145th Airlift Wing from Charlotte, N.C., and the Air Force Reserve's 910th Airlift Wing from Youngstown, Ohio, provided airlift for the day's event.

Since its inception 12 years ago, the program has become so popular that Army paratroopers have to win a lottery to participate. To enter the lottery, each paratrooper must buy a toy for one of the needy area children. Though only 1,200 lucky winners actually jump, far more choose to participate and bring donated gifts to Fort Bragg.

For more than 1,000 children, these soldiers and airmen flew in a promise to them that they would have a very merry Christmas.

"They have a massive wrapping session," said Air Force Lt. Col. William Whittenberger, 440th Operations Group commander. "A lot of the wives and families help out. It becomes a big party."

Whittenberger was mission commander for this year's Toy Drop and also flew one of the C-130s.

"We've got 1,200 troops to drop in a fairly short time frame, so we're doing a parallel running course that's 17 miles long, and it is about 12 minutes from takeoff to drop," he said. "Our goal is five minutes between each air frame."

For Army Pfc. Caleb Wood, a 20-year-old soldier stationed at Fort Bragg, it would be only his sixth jump. Along with other members of his chalk, Wood waited in the passenger terminal shelter on the Pope flightline as other soldiers prepared their gear.

"It's my first year doing this," Wood said. "I bought a tricycle to support the event."

As Wood stood in line for his turn, Army 1st Lt. Judith Wood from 126th Transportation Company, 82nd Sustainment Brigade, waited for her turn to climb inside the fuselage of a C-130 to jump.

"I enjoy this because it's a rush, and it's great for the kids," she said. "I hope I'm here again next year. They tell you not to look down, but when you're there, you can't help it. We ask ourselves why we're doing this, but when we jump, it's all worth it."

Seated on the bleachers set out in the red sand against the stark winter-blue sky, family members waited alongside the Sicily Drop Zone on the far side of Fort Bragg for their loved ones. As the C-130 approached, they held up their hands to shield their eyes against the glare of the sun. The plane flew in smoothly, and one by one, the dark silhouettes of the soldiers dipped out of the plane and snapped straight, as one after another their parachutes ballooned into perfect mushrooms.

The line of parachutes stretched along the field as those soldiers who had already completed their flight marched in formation past the bleachers.

Meghan Scott and her husband, Army Capt. Andrew Scott of the Air Defense Battalion, donated a Candyland game.

"[My husband] loves to jump, and it's a great way to help out," she said. "We're very fortunate to live the way we do, so this is just a small way to give back."

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vor033
12-25-2009, 12:00 AM
PARWAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan - Over mountainous terrain, a pair of UH-47 Chinook helicopters glided through the cold air to the remote village of Shaykh Ali in Afghanistan's Parwan province Dec. 19, carrying nearly 45 Task Force Cyclone team members.

Their mission: to speak with district leaders, police and villagers about how to better serve and contribute to the local people.

The group unloaded off the helicopters swiftly in the snow-covered fields to meet Afghan National Police officers. They then moved to the village center, where they met with the district subgovernor, business owners and townspeople.

Leading the team of Task Force Gladius soldiers, who are in charge of security for all of the areas within Parwan province, was Army Capt. Booker Wilson, commander of B Company, 82nd Division Special Troops Battalion. Wilson said the people he spoke to were friendly and pleased with the recent and earlier operations in their area.

"The people of Shaykh Ali were hospitable and engaging," Wilson said. "They were pleased with current coalition forces and past coalition force actions, and requested more coalition force and Afghan government involvement."

A human terrain team research manager, Army 1st Lt. Raphael Howard, had similar thoughts on how the people responded to the visit from coalition forces.

"The people we interviewed were very happy to speak with us and happy to see that coalition forces were interested in them," Howard said. "They were particularly happy at just being able to express their concerns. The children in the area were especially behaved, and are a credit to their families and village."

Task Force Cyclone's senior civilian representative, Abigail Friedman of the State Department, also talked with the people.

"This mission was important to me, because it is critical that we connect with the people of Afghanistan and understand what their needs are and how the international presence in Afghanistan can help the people," Friedman said. "We were very well received, both by the village elders and in the bazaar by the local merchants and villagers."

Team members, the information from this mission will be used to develop a strategy that will help communities in the areas to be more self-sustaining. It also allows coalition forces to maintain a close relationship with the Afghan government, police and residents of the area to better serve the people of Parwan province.

"This mission allowed Task Force Gladius to assess the effects of current and recently completeled projects," said Wilson. "This assessment also allowed Task Force Gladius to gain a sample of public opinion concerning the effects of future projects concerning road expansion and project placement."

All agreed that this type of research is crucial to development and assessment of the area, as well as integration between civilian and military operations throughout the Task Force Cyclone area of operations.

"We work together well in the planning of these kinds of missions, and then, once on the ground, we seem to intuitively know how to help each other out," Friedman said. "Both the senior U.S. military officers and the senior civilians are active in engaging with the community and elders."

A couple of hours after arriving, the team converged back into the fields where they were dropped off, armed with new information and a better knowledge of the villagers living there. Hundreds of villagers gathered at the edges to watch them go.

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AIRASSAULT7
12-25-2009, 05:14 AM
Check out the camo worn in this cnn vid. I think its UCP-Delta. Looks better than the ACU IMO.

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2009/12/15/starr.afghan.supply.lines.cnn?iref=allsearch

yeah but you can clearly see that the ACU blends in with that camo
so ACU is worthful

vor033
12-25-2009, 10:53 PM
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US Army Soldier from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment perform Military Operations Urban Terrain training during a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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US Army Soldiers from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment perform Military Operations Urban Terrain training during a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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A US Army fire team from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment scouts a simulated enemy obstacle during a Military Operations Urban Terrain training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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Two US Army Soldiers from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment disable a road block obstacle during a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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US Army Specialist Thomas Doss and his team from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment perform Military Operations Urban Terrain training during a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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An eight-wheeled Stryker mechanized unit from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment performs in a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

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An eight-wheeled Stryker mechanized unit from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment performs in a training exercise under the Joint Task Force East in the Novo Selo Training Area in Bulgaria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

stick.up.kid
12-26-2009, 05:54 AM
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The soldiers stationed at Observation Post Restrepo, overlooking the Korengal Valley, are engaged in protracted battle against a toxic mix of local insurgents, Taliban leaders, foreign jihadis and al-Qaeda members.

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The enemy routinely fires on the soldier's positions from perches in the gorge. No one knows what — or who — lies at the end of the 6-mile-long valley because no one has been able to make it that far. In this photo, smoke rises from a mortar fired by American troops

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Over the past nine months, the unit has lost seven men.

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US Specialist Jordan Turner is 21 years old

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Soldiers from the unit head to Obi Naw Village.

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The unit is beset by an ambush while on patrol.

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The soldiers interview a village elder about insurgent activity during a night patrol. The unit had hoped that the man would accompany them on a search mission, part of an effort to set an example to other members of the community. The man declined to take part.

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A Bravo Company soldier provides security while members of his unit interview residents of Loi Kolay, another village in the valley

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The outpost is provisioned with MREs, but occasionally someone carries in something special, like chips or Mountain Dew.

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A fortified position is well stocked with heavy guns.

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Members of the unit return from a night patrol to Loi Kolay. Captain Howell observes that it will take more than troops to subdue the insurgents. "To win this war, it's going to take patience," he say.

vor033
12-27-2009, 04:14 PM
Nice Photos stick.up.kid thanks for posting them :-)

vor033
12-27-2009, 04:19 PM
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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Conn, an instructor for the 7th Army Non Commissioned Officer Academy located at the Joint Multinational Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, says he learns something new every day from his Warrior Leader Course students. Conn said the training that Soldiers receive at WLC is significant to becoming a qualified leader in today's Army. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson/133rd MPAD)

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Conn, an instructor for the 7th Army Non Commissioned Officer Academy located at the Joint Multinational Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, says he learns something new every day from his Warrior Leader Course students. Conn said the training that Soldiers receive at WLC is significant to becoming a qualified leader in today's Army. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson/133rd MPAD)

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Soldiers carry a "wounded" comrade off of the battlefield during a training exercise at the Joint Multinational Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, July 16. The Soldiers are students in the Warrior Leader Course held at the 7th Non Commissioned Officer Academy here. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

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U.S. Army Sgt. Andrew Haase, a Soldier with the 146th Signal Company based in Weisbaden, Germany, searches for enemy movement during a training exercise at the Joint Multinational Training Command located in Grafenwoehr, Germany, July 16. The exercise was part of the Warrior Leader Course evaluation phase at the 7th Army Non Commissioned Officer Academy. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson/133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

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U.S. Army Sgt. Andrew Haase pulls security in the ****e position after an Improvised Explosive Device was discovered by his team during a training exercise at the Joint Multinational Training Command located in Grafenwoehr, Germany, July 16. Haase and other Soldiers in his Warrior Leader Course were evalauted on leading troops in tactical situations after three-weeks of classroom instruction. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd Moblie Public Affairs Detachment)

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A Soldier attending Warrior Leader Course at the 7th Army Non Commissioned Officer Academy treats a "wounded" Soldier during an evaluated training exercise July 16, at the Joint Multinational Training Command located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

vor033
12-27-2009, 04:33 PM
Sorry but no Captions with these Photos


The Theater Specific Individual Readiness Training (TSIRT) course taught by the 7th Army Combined Arms Training Center (CATC) prepares Soldiers for deployment.

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vor033
12-27-2009, 05:19 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers 4/319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment on a training exercise at the Joint Multinational Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, May 11. The Soldiers are trained to meet the standard of 12 minutes from the moment they touched the Howitzer until the first round went down range.

They also conducted timed-training that included sling loading their M119A2 Howitzer to a CH-47 Chinook Helicopter, unloading it at a pre-determined location and sending four rounds down range. The Soldiers will utilize training received at the JMTC for upcoming deployments to Afghanistan. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd MPAD)

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LineDoggie
12-27-2009, 05:30 PM
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Ahh, yes the Iron **** Ridgeway look from the O/C-T, Instructors. I always put them in my ammo pouches since we didnt carry Mags.

vor033
12-27-2009, 06:25 PM
The 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, based in Vilseck, Germany, became the first unit in Europe to fire the Army's newest howitzer, the M-777, at the Grafenwoehr Training Area on July 24, 2009


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vor033
12-27-2009, 06:48 PM
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The Joint Multinational Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, has added
the new MRAP All Terrain Vehicle, or M-ATV, to its fleet of vehicles. The
vehicle is built for small unit combat operations in highly restricted
rural, mountainous, and urban environments. The JMTC added 10 M-ATVs and 40
Max Pro MRAP vehicles to the fleet this year.

Pictured here, Mr. Kyle Dorr explains some of the vehicles unique features to his Soldier-students prior to taking the vehicle out into the Hohenfels Training Area. (Photo by Michael Beaton, JMTC Public Affairs)

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U.S Soldiers from Alpha Company 1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment, 7th U.S. Army JMTC, are on a dismounted patrol crossing the Arghandad River to assist The Afghanistan National Police(ANP)on humanitarian relieve at Kashani village in Zabul Province, Afghanistan on October 9.,2009.

1-4 IN is deployed throughout southern Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The company is part of the longest continually-serving U.S. conventional unit in Afghanistan.

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Sgt. 1st Class Chris Rightmyer, a sniper instructor at the International Special Training Centre (ISTC), monitors a Special Forces (SF) sniper during an evaluated exercise at the Grafenwoehr Training Area July 24. Rightmyer said the ISTC, sponsored by the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command, provides Soldiers with invaluable training with NATO partners -- which in turn makes working relationships easier on the battlefield. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd MPAD)

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U.S. Army Master Sgt. Eric Ludan, an instructor for the International Special Training Centre's (ISTC) Sniper Course provides feedback to two Special Forces Soldiers following a live-fire exercise July 24 at the Grafenwoehr Training Area. The Sniper Course is an intense five-week course that teaches NATO Special Operations Forces (SOF) in basic sniper fundamentals. The students spent the night stalking and observing their targets during the evaluated exercise. The facilities at the Joint Multinational Training Command allow the SOF throughout NATO to train to standard. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Gina Vaile-Nelson, 133rd MPAD)

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Soldiers provide a visual depiction of military uniforms worn as they were worn during distinct periods throughout the history of the noncommissioned officer during the Joint Multinational Training Command’s Year of the NCO Culminating Event on 10 Dec at Grafenwoehr’s Tower theatre.

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A student in the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command’s (JMTC) Small Arms Master Marksmanship Course takes aim with an M-249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) on the Grafenwoehr Training Area in Germany, May 12, 2009. The course -- taught by the JMTC’s Combined Arms Training Center (CATC) – helps non-combat soldiers become familiar with a variety of the Army’s small arms weapons systems. (Photo by Spc. Michelle Waters, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

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A Soldier peers around on obstacle to locate his target on the Grafenwoehr Training Area during the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command’s (JMTC) Small Arms Master Marksmanship Course on May 12, 2009 in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The two-week course includes a week of classroom familiarization with the weapons, followed by a week of firing on the ranges in Grafenwoehr. (Photo by Spc. Michelle Waters, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

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A Soldier fires a machine gun as instructors look on at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command's (JMTC) Small Arms Master Marksmanship Course on the Grafenwoehr Training Area, May 12, 2009.(Photo by Spc. Michelle Waters, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

corra
12-27-2009, 06:57 PM
hi i found some pics :
i'm sorry if is a repost
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corra
12-27-2009, 06:58 PM
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vor033
12-27-2009, 07:08 PM
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A U.S. Army Maxxpro Mine Resistance Ambush Protected vehicle provides security while Coalition Soldiers blow up an improvised explosive device 300 meters away in Jalrez, Afghanistan on Nov. 11, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Soldiers cover their heads while a CH-47D Chinook helicopter approaches the landing zone at Combat Outpost Garda in Jalrez, Afghanistan on Nov. 11, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Paul Doty, from Waterloo, Ill., assigned to Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, sits on a road guard wall with the Shigal Valley as a backdrop in the Kunar Province, Afghanistan on Dec. 7, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. David Benson, 28, from Lynnwood, Wash., an infantryman assigned to 1st Platoon, Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, provides security for his convoy before leaving the district center in Dangam, Afghanistan on Dec. 3, 2009. Dangam is a district within the Kunar Province of Afghanistan that limit with the Pakistan border. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Spc. Jeremy Kasper, a gunner assigned to Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, holds his M-4 Carbine that was crushed when his humvee rolled over at the Munay Village in the Shigal District of Kunar Province, Afghanistan on Dec. 7, 2009. Kasper lost also lost his eye protection during the incident. The vehicle rolled over due to the bad condition of the road in that area. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Spc. Jason Jasinski, from Buffalo, N.Y., assigned to Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, walks during a patrol near the Shigal Valley in the Kunar Province, Afghanistan on Dec. 7, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Spc. Victor Bardales, 28, from Brooklyn, N.Y., assigned to Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, provides security during a patrol across the Munay Village in the Shigal District of Kunar Province, Afghanistan on Dec. 7, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

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U.S. Army Spc. Matthew Spaulding, from Long Beach, Calif., assigned to Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, provides security with an M249B Squad Automatic Weapon during a patrol across the Munay Village in the Shigal District of Kunar Province, Afghanistan on Dec. 7, 2009. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Teddy Wade/Released)

Squeezee
12-27-2009, 07:14 PM
http://i45.*******.com/vqr1jodotjpg

Any chance of a hi-res?

Anyway, great pictures so far.

vor033
12-27-2009, 07:23 PM
U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 77th Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, fire a 105 mm round with an M119 light-tow howitzer during live-fire training at Combat Outpost Monti in the Kunar Province of Afghanistan on Dec. 2, 2009.

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vor033
12-27-2009, 07:37 PM
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U.S. Army Spc. Stephan Franklin, 20, from Potosi, Missouri, assigned to Alpha Company, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, sits on a tree branch while providing security during a patrol along the river bank in the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan in search for improvised explosives devices on Aug. 28, 2009.


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U.S. Army Soldiers from Alpha Company, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, patrol a village in the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan in search for improvised explosives devices on Aug. 28, 2009.

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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Cooper Gibson, a explosive ordnance and disposal technician, from Seymour Johnson, N.C., and U.S. Army Sgt. Zachary Cleland, a combat engineer assigned to Alpha Company, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, laughs after finding an improvised explosive device during a patrol in the streets of the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Aug. 28, 2009.

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U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph Redhair and Sgt. Zachary Cleland, both combat engineers assigned to Alpha Company, Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, talk after finding an improvised explosive device during a patrol in the streets of the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Aug. 28, 2009.

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U.S. Army Sgt. Lance Becker, 23, from Grand Mount, Iowa, and other Soldiers assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

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U.S. Army Pfc. Andre James, 24, from Oxford, Penn., assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, smokes a cigarette while taking a break during a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, cross a river dam during a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st Platoon and 3rd Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 30, 2009.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol through a village inside the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

vor033
12-27-2009, 07:50 PM
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U.S. Army Spc. Paul Pickett and fellow Soldiers from 3rd Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, take a break after climbing a mountain next to the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 30, 2009.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st and 3rd Platoons, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, prepare to go out on patrol after spending the night inside a compound in the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 30, 2009

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st and 3rd Platoons, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, climb a mountain next to the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 30, 2009.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st and 3rd Platoons, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, climb a mountain next to the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 30, 2009

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U.S. Army Spc. Paul Pickett, assigned to 3rd Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, takes a break after climbing a mountain next to the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 30, 2009

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U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 3rd Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, travel down a mountain next to the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 30, 2009.

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U.S. Army Spc. Paul Pickett assists Spc. Jose Sanchez, a medic, after he felt off and twisted his right ankle during a dismounted patrol across the mountains above the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 30, 2009. Both Soldiers are assigned to 3rd Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, rush to their vehicles and cover their weapons to prevent water from pouring in as a hail storm approaches COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Aug. 31, 2009

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A hailstorm falls over COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Aug. 31, 2009.

vor033
12-27-2009, 07:57 PM
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A U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter approaches the landing zone at COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009.

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A U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter approaches the landing zone at COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, offload a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter seconds after landing at COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009

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A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter approaches COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009, to bring re-supplies for Soldiers from Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

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A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter approaches COP Tangi in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009, to bring re-supplies for Soldiers from Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

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A U.S. Army Maxxpro mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, assigned to the 118th Military Police Company, 16th Military Police Brigade, out of Fort Bragg, N.C., follows a route clearance convoy with Soldiers from the 41st Engineers Company, out of Fort Riley, Kansas, in the Tangi Valley, Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-57dotjpg

A U.S. Army Maxxpro mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, assigned to the 118th Military Police Company, 16th Military Police Brigade, out of Fort Bragg, N.C., follows a route clearance convoy with Soldiers from the 41st Engineers Company, out of Fort Riley, Kansas, in the Tangi Valley, Afghanistan on Sept. 2, 2009.

stick.up.kid
12-27-2009, 07:57 PM
These two photos are from the same unit of the 10th Mountain..2/87 infantry

Soldier's helmet with his fallen comrades written on it

http://i49.*******.com/e68svadotjpg

Medevac after IED strike
http://i47.*******.com/1zwzympdotjpg

vor033
12-27-2009, 08:07 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-77dotjpg

U.S. Army Pfc. Irving Pena, 20, from Eagle Lake, Texas, and other Soldiers assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the mountains above the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-73dotjpg


U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the mountains above the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-74dotjpg

A view of the Tangi Valley, a beautiful but hostile location, as seen from the mountains on Aug. 29, 2009, in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-70dotjpg


U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Cody Anderson, a squad leader assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, provides security while taking a break after climbing up a mountain above the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan during a dismounted patrol on Aug. 29, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-64dotjpg

.S. Army Soldiers assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the mountains above the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-63dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers travel down the mountains during a dismounted patrol near the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009. All Soldiers are assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-58dotjpg


U.S. Army Sgt. Lance Becker, 23, from Grand Mount, Iowa, and other Soldiers assigned to 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, conduct a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/8-53dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, cross a river during a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-47dotjpg


U.S. Army Soldiers from 1st Platoon, Apache Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, cross a river during a dismounted patrol across the Tangi Valley in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan Aug. 29, 2009.

vor033
12-27-2009, 08:55 PM
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/1-78dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers from Alpha Company Engineers, Brigade Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division search for improvised explosive devices on the side of route Pluto in East Baghdad, Iraq, Jan. 10, 2006.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/2-74dotjpg

Staff Sgt. Ryan Beagle from B Battery, 4-320th Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Division jumps a fence after patrolling a field during operation blackfoot in the Zafaraniyah District, Baghdad on January 16, 2005. The Iraqi Police and US Soldiers were looking for Weapons caches suspected to be hidden in that area.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/3-75dotjpg

Staff Sgt. Michael Amstrong from A company 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Division gets on one knee and secures the perimeter during a raid operation in an open field in Tikrit, Iraq on February 23, 2006. The operation was conducted by the Iraqi Army and US soldiers from the 101st Division in search for weapon caches.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/4-71dotjpg

A U.S. Army M1A2 Abrams tank provides front security for a convoy bringing construction materials to a traffic control point near a brick factory in Narwan, Iraq, April 11, 2006. This tank and its crew are part of the 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat team, 4th Infantry Division.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/5-65dotjpg

Staff Sgt. Brad Smith from 3-320th Field Artillery, 101st Airborne Division shoots a suspicious object sitting in the middle of the road during a main supply road patrol in Tikrit, Iraq on April 23, 2006. The 101st Airborne Division is currently deployed in the Tikrit area and Northern Iraq on support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/6-64dotjpg

Cpl Brandon Helton operates a M240B Machine gun and provide security for his platoon during Operation Iron Triangle in a desert area near Balad, Iraq on May 9, 2006. Helton is assigned to C Company 3-187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Operation Iron Triangle was conducted to find, kill most wanted terrorists and to search for weapon caches.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/7-59dotjpg


Soldiers from C Company 3-187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division wait for the helicopters in a fighting position at a desert near Balad, during the Air Assault Operation Iron Triangle on May 9, 2006. Operation Iron Triangle was conducted to find and kill most wanted terrorists.

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/8-54dotjpg

U.S. Army Soldiers from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division wait to be picked up by helicopters at a in a fighting position in a deserted area near Samarra, Iraq, during an air assault mission conducted to find and kill most wanted terrorists May 9, 2006

http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/US%20Army/9-48dotjpg

U.S. Army Sgt. Leno Lemus, right, and his squad from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, performs a ballistic breach to open the door of a house in a small village near Balad, Iraq, during an air assault mission May 10, 2006.

KahunaSniper
12-27-2009, 09:22 PM
Waiting around at the police station, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, spring 2008. (Doesn't he look like someone familar? lol)
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f85/ewe_eye/Picture064dotjpg

This is why should go Marines. lol
http://s45.photobucket.com/albums/f85/ewe_eye/?action=view&current=M203FallsOffAirborne.flv

I couldn't pass that one up.

Sloppy Joe2
12-28-2009, 10:27 PM
Waiting around at the police station, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, spring 2008. (Doesn't he look like someone familar? lol)


This is why should go Marines. lol
http://s45.photobucket.com/albums/f85/ewe_eye/?action=view&current=M203FallsOffAirborne.flv

I couldn't pass that one up.thats a Cavalry Stetson and you dont know **** yet about the Army or the USMC, so quit talking **** and stay in your lane.