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John R.
04-17-2010, 09:20 AM
http://i42.*******.com/2z5ocqpdotjpg
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joel Meyer and Staff Sgt. Derek Walton train on room-clearing tactics on Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., April 5, 2010. Meyer and Walton are assigned to the 28th Security Forces Squadron. Meyer was selected as the 2009 Security Forces Air Force Noncommissioned Officer of the Year.
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joshua J. Seybert

What is the purpose of these groups? And what other ground units does the AF have? I know very little about this topic, so any information is appreciated. Some numbers would be nice as well.

MN_Air
04-17-2010, 10:38 AM
They have the Para Rescue men. They do some awesome stuff. If I don't get the Pilot career I'll go PJ.

Corrupt
04-17-2010, 11:39 AM
I am intrigued by this actually. Do the USAF have an equivelent to the RAF Regiment. Ie its own proper infantry unit specialised in taking holding and defending airfields?

John R.
04-17-2010, 11:55 AM
MN, I know about pararescuemen. I'm also interested in other units and their areas of deployment.

MN_Air
04-17-2010, 01:27 PM
Looks like they have:

EOD: Explosives disposal
Tactical Air Control Party: Call in air strikes
Special Operations Weather: Deploy with special ops teams and operate weather equipment (?)

2Sheds_Jackson
04-17-2010, 03:18 PM
I was with an Air National Guard Air Control Squadron - but I do believe they have active duty ACS units as well. Lots of convoys, putting up tents, digging fighting positions, sleeping in mud. It was glorious.

I can't think of a name
04-17-2010, 03:25 PM
The USAF is responsible for their own security now. They patrol the perimeters of their bases in the US, Overseas and in A-stan and Iraq. I assume they have SWAT type response teams too for emergencies or breaches.

Falcon57Bravo
04-17-2010, 03:47 PM
The dark blue berets of the Airmen pictured mark them as members of the USAF Security Police. They are simply the Air Force's equivalent to Army or Marine Corp MPs. They provide perimeter security and law enforcement on USAF bases.

Corrupt
04-17-2010, 04:50 PM
The dark blue berets of the Airmen pictured mark them as members of the USAF Security Police. They are simply the Air Force's equivalent to Army or Marine Corp MPs. They provide perimeter security and law enforcement on USAF bases.

Yeah we have the RAF police, but do you have an equivelent to our Rockapes?

Rockthekazbah12
04-17-2010, 05:01 PM
Looks like they have:

EOD: Explosives disposal
Tactical Air Control Party: Call in air strikes
Special Operations Weather: Deploy with special ops teams and operate weather equipment (?)


I'm friends with a guy in school to do EOD, A guy that is finishing training for Para rescue and my friend's brother is Special Operations Weather. I went to high school and middle school with the EOD guy and Para rescue guy.

Wildgoose
04-17-2010, 05:40 PM
They stopped using the term "Police" in the mid-90s. The Security Forces are the ground defense element of the Air Force. Most Air Forces of the world have similar equivalents. The USAF Security Forces have duties of force protection, ground defense and military police, as needed. They combine the missions of RAF Regiment and RAF Police. In the 1980s RAF Regiment and USAF Security Forces worked in combined command to secure the NATO Ground Launched Cruise Missile mission when it was active.

USAF Security Force personnel recieve their initial training in light infantry and military police skills in Lackland AFB Texas. From there, many personnel receive further training in junior NCO and senior NCO schools, along with US Army Ranger School, US Army Basic Airborne, and US Army Air Assualt Schools, for selected individuals.

Zoomie
04-17-2010, 11:21 PM
I was with an Air National Guard Air Control Squadron - but I do believe they have active duty ACS units as well. Lots of convoys, putting up tents, digging fighting positions, sleeping in mud. It was glorious.
And there's also Combat Comm, where we have our own ACS flight, and we can make magic happen.

John R.
04-18-2010, 04:01 AM
Gentlemen, thanks a lot! Do we know an exact number of operators serving in these Security Forces?

Zoomie
04-18-2010, 07:18 AM
Gentlemen, thanks a lot! Do we know an exact number of operators serving in these Security Forces?
They're Airmen, not special forces. :roll:

doctor rizz
04-18-2010, 07:02 PM
I can answer the security forces questions for ya. For I am one currently now. Like said above, we are not special forces but military police. The main jobs that we have are law enforement, flightline security, nuke protection, and base defense. Security Forces have a couple of specials within the career field, Counter-sniper teams, Ravens, k-9, CATM, and a kinda SWAT team. I forget the name of them. If you have questions about those specials just ask and I will answer. We go through basic training at lackland, 8 weeks now used to be 6 1/2 weeks. Then we stay at lackland and go through 13 weeks of training, during those 13 weeks we go through 3 weeks at Camp Bullis. We can go through ranger, airborne, and all those schools but I have only seen a couple go through them. Our main weapons are the M4 and M9, but are also trained on the M240B, M249, M203, M67 grenades. Counter-sniper teams use M24 and M107. Some security forces get trained on the MP5 and MP5K but I heard it only done with the Air Force One when it is on the ground. Feel free to ask any questions.

Panchito12
04-18-2010, 11:28 PM
I can't believe nobody brought up the CCT (Combat Controllers). The true commandos of the USAF.

p.s. The SP's are just uniformed security. Anyone can get into that AFSC.

sgt_G
04-18-2010, 11:33 PM
I've heard of air commandos....do they still exist??

baboon6
04-19-2010, 07:10 AM
I've heard of air commandos....do they still exist??

Air Commando was just the old name for what is now called Special Operations. Air Commando Squadrons were renamed Special Operations Squadrons in 1969.

doctor rizz
04-19-2010, 02:56 PM
p.s. The SP's are just uniformed security. Anyone can get into that AFSC.

Yeah and they send you to that tech school if you fail your AFSC tech school.

Dominique
04-19-2010, 05:46 PM
http://i42.*******.com/2z5ocqpdotjpg
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joel Meyer and Staff Sgt. Derek Walton train on room-clearing tactics on Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., April 5, 2010. Meyer and Walton are assigned to the 28th Security Forces Squadron. Meyer was selected as the 2009 Security Forces Air Force Noncommissioned Officer of the Year.
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joshua J. Seybert

What is the purpose of these groups? And what other ground units does the AF have? I know very little about this topic, so any information is appreciated. Some numbers would be nice as well.

Security Forces perform Air Base Defense, Security, and Law Enforcement on USAF installations. They've were formerly called Security Police, and Air Police. As far as other ground units go, they have Tactical Air Control Parties, Weather teams, Combat Controllers, Pararescue, EOD, Air Liaison units, mobile training teams, and personnel assigned to support ground units.

Dominique
04-19-2010, 05:48 PM
The USAF is responsible for their own security now. They patrol the perimeters of their bases in the US, Overseas and in A-stan and Iraq. I assume they have SWAT type response teams too for emergencies or breaches.

The "SWAT type response teams" are called Emergency Services Teams (EST). Their are also specialist units responsible for securing nuclear materials, and recovering nuclear facilities if they're attacked, They're called Tactical Response Force (TRF).

kahuna
04-20-2010, 03:23 PM
The air special operations units are Combat Controller Apprentice, Pararescue Apprentice, Special Operations Weather Man, and the Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) Apprentice. For more info see http://airforce.com/opportunities/enlisted/careers/general/

baboon6
04-20-2010, 05:37 PM
I think the AC-130's are the current air commando if I'm not mistaken.

Besides AC-130s, AFSOC also uses MC-130s, Ospreys and a few other types too.

Zoomie
04-20-2010, 11:20 PM
The air special operations units are Combat Controller Apprentice, Pararescue Apprentice, Special Operations Weather Man, and the Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) Apprentice. For more info see http://airforce.com/opportunities/enlisted/careers/general/
:cantbeli: Ummm. . .no. The ability to copy and paste does not make one right. Not to mention the question's already been answered by now.

dangerdan87
04-21-2010, 05:13 AM
Looks like they have:

EOD: Explosives disposal I have called in a lot of IED and UXO reports
Tactical Air Control Party: Call in air strikes Called in a few CAS's
Special Operations Weather: Deploy with special ops teams and operate weather equipment (?) We have always been told not to worry about weather, because we'll do the mission anyway

Of course I'm not Air Force though. But it sure was funny when some Air Force and Army officers told my buddy that crew served weapons weren't allowed in the chow hall (he had a SAW).

kahuna
04-21-2010, 01:59 PM
:cantbeli: Ummm. . .no. The ability to copy and paste does not make one right. Not to mention the question's already been answered by now.

Umm...where did I exactly say someone was wrong? He asked a question instead of guessing I looked it up and answered it is up to him to look further into it if he is infact interested. Please take it easy it's really not that serious and you added nothing to the topic. SO on that note you have a good one.

Dominique
04-21-2010, 10:46 PM
The air special operations units are Combat Controller Apprentice, Pararescue Apprentice, Special Operations Weather Man, and the Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) Apprentice. For more info see http://airforce.com/opportunities/enlisted/careers/general/

Combat Control (CCT), Special Tactics Officer (STO - CCT officers), Pararescue (PJ), Combat Rescue Officer (CRO - PJ officers), Special Operations Weather Tech (SOWT), and TACP personnel (normally Joint Terminal Attack Controllers - JTAC) are assigned to one AF's Special Tactics Squadrons. PJs and CRO are also assigned to Rescue Squadrons (also CROs are in charge of SERE Specialists - The guys that train AF personnel in survival techniques, and test out survival gear). TACP and Weather guys support conventional, airborne, air assault, and SOF forces. SOF TCAPs are assigned to the 17th Air Support Operations Squadron (which is part of Air Force Special Operations Command's 720th Special Tactics Group - the "parent" unit for all of the US based Special tactics Squadrons), one of the STS, or to the 720th STG HQ.

kahuna
04-21-2010, 11:13 PM
Thanks DOM

MichaelF
04-21-2010, 11:24 PM
It was a giant mistake to combine the Airbase Ground Defense and Law Enforcement fields. Each is a full time portfolio. Especially so when the defenders are obliged to establish control of the sectors adjacent to the fence (which could stretch tens of kilometers out from the fenceline).

The USAF needs Air Police and a version of the RAF Regiment. Not a camel.

Ordie
04-22-2010, 09:21 AM
I recall the USAF having game wardens at Vandenberg AFB.

Aren't all aircraft maintenance and support tasks considered ground units?

baboon6
04-22-2010, 10:02 AM
I recall the USAF having game wardens at Vandenberg AFB.

Aren't all aircraft maintenance and support tasks considered ground units?

I think the question was really about ground combat units. Perhaps the original poster should have been more specific...

John R.
04-22-2010, 10:27 AM
You are allowed to discuss any ground unit connected to AF in my thread. :grin:

My main target of research is the U.S. Army (especially its campaign in Afghanistan) and as I said - I know very little about this topic, so if you have anything interesting about the lowest mechanic, who spends his life repairing Black Hawks, do not hesitate...

The thread would otherwise be named "...ground combat units"...

baboon6
04-22-2010, 10:40 AM
You are allowed to discuss any ground unit connected to AF in my thread. :grin:

My main target of research is the U.S. Army (especially its campaign in Afghanistan) and as I said - I know very little about this topic, so if you have anything interesting about the lowest mechanic, who spends his life repairing Black Hawks, do not hesitate...

The thread would otherwise be named "...ground combat units"...

Well the majority of personnel in the USAF are in ground units. Besides all the ones already mentioned, you have construction engineers whose primary purpose is to build airfields but who also carry out other tasks. they have been deployed to Afghanistan too:

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2009/06/mil-090608-afns03.htm

http://www.michaelyon-online.com/red-horse.htm

http://www.ng.mil/news/archives/2010/04/041410-Pennsylvania.aspx

Then of course there is a vast supply and administration organisation...

Dominique
04-22-2010, 11:47 AM
It was a giant mistake to combine the Airbase Ground Defense and Law Enforcement fields. Each is a full time portfolio. Especially so when the defenders are obliged to establish control of the sectors adjacent to the fence (which could stretch tens of kilometers out from the fenceline).

The USAF needs Air Police and a version of the RAF Regiment. Not a camel.

I agree with you, and a lot of the Security Forces guys I know agree with you. IMHO, they should have two seperate fields LE/Security and ABGD. The LE/Security would handle LE, entry control, aircraft security, EST, LE K-9, etc. The ABGD units would be modled on the RAF Regiment, and would be trained as light infantry and handle patrols outside the base perimenter (up to 10 KM), convoy escort missions, etc.

Dominique
04-22-2010, 11:51 AM
Well the majority of personnel in the USAF are in ground units. Besides all the ones already mentioned, you have construction engineers whose primary purpose is to build airfields but who also carry out other tasks. they have been deployed to Afghanistan too:

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2009/06/mil-090608-afns03.htm

http://www.michaelyon-online.com/red-horse.htm

http://www.ng.mil/news/archives/2010/04/041410-Pennsylvania.aspx

Then of course there is a vast supply and administration organisation...

The AF calls its engineer units, Civil Engineers. They have a couple specilist units RED HORSE (which are their rapid deployment engineer units), Airborne RED HORSE (parachute capable units), and a few others. As far as other "ground units" go, most of the AF doesn't actually fly, they support the pilots.

MichaelF
04-22-2010, 11:47 PM
I agree with you, and a lot of the Security Forces guys I know agree with you. IMHO, they should have two seperate fields LE/Security and ABGD. The LE/Security would handle LE, entry control, aircraft security, EST, LE K-9, etc. The ABGD units would be modled on the RAF Regiment, and would be trained as light infantry and handle patrols outside the base perimenter (up to 10 KM), convoy escort missions, etc.

One essential item(s) on the prospective TO&E is a Weapons Company (Heavy Mortars, etc). Nothing better for large perimeter defense (airbases being bigger than FOBs). Especially considering your security teams are likely to be dispersed along said perimeter, and the naughty people (who want to come in) can readily gain local superiority. Gun vehicles (or ASVs/Strykers) and 120's are vital.

Moreover, the unit has to be organized as a rifle Company/Battalion (Squadron/Wing/Dragon/whateverthehellyoupeopleuse). Not "shifts" or any of that cop-speak. Personnel should attend Fort Benning (there's room), not Lackland AFB. No LE personnel should be involved in that training pipeline (sorry, but Horses for Courses).

Dominique
04-23-2010, 03:06 PM
One essential item(s) on the prospective TO&E is a Weapons Company (Heavy Mortars, etc). Nothing better for large perimeter defense (airbases being bigger than FOBs). Especially considering your security teams are likely to be dispersed along said perimeter, and the naughty people (who want to come in) can readily gain local superiority. Gun vehicles (or ASVs/Strykers) and 120's are vital.

Moreover, the unit has to be organized as a rifle Company/Battalion (Squadron/Wing/Dragon/whateverthehellyoupeopleuse). Not "shifts" or any of that cop-speak. Personnel should attend Fort Benning (there's room), not Lackland AFB. No LE personnel should be involved in that training pipeline (sorry, but Horses for Courses).

Actually they have a heavy weapons squadron (the 204th - although they got rid of their mortars a few years back. I also don't think they need to attended Ft. Benning, but they do need to have something similar to OSUT. All of the ground combat types, would attend it before heading off to more specialized training courses.

John R.
04-25-2010, 11:45 AM
an addition in form of a new photo

http://i42.*******.com/348n20ydotjpg
U.S. Air Force airmen participate in advanced arms training at Orangeburg, S.C., on April 9, 2010.
DoD photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandra Hoachlander, U.S. Air Force. (Released)

randir14
04-27-2010, 12:39 PM
My cousin is in the Air Force. He's in Iraq right now and guards a base and goes on patrols. He was home a couple weeks ago and had pictures of IED craters and a flipped MRAP, he also said mortars land near their base every night. Also had a funny story about being issued an M203 but their base had no rounds for it.

Dominique
04-28-2010, 01:01 PM
If you want some good history on Air Force ground base defense, read up on a unit called the Combat Security Police, and Project Safeside. There's a decent amount of info on them on the net, a couple of books, and the Combat Security Police Association has a website. The author Leroy Thompson was a CSP in Vietnam.

MichaelF
05-10-2010, 02:36 PM
Whenthe USAF was established as an independant Service, in 1947, the first couple of generations of AF leaders still retained their former Army outlooks and culture. This can be radily seen in the setup of the AF in the 50's and 60's.

However, once they were gone (LeMay's retirement is a good metric), the leadership that grew up in the Blue Suits really had little idea how to organize the chunks of the AF that never touched an aircraft. The corporate culture shifted, too (hence the jokes about the AF being soft or civilianized).

This is really what led to the combining of the Security Police and Air Police fields, and the roundabout way of approaching Airbase Ground Defence.

I'm not banging the drum for my own Service, but the USAF really needs to let the Army (specifically, the Infantry Schoolhouse) organize and train its defenders. At Ft. Benning. Not to mention reestablishing the Air Police as a seperate field (nothing wrong with the program at Lackland being dedicated to that field).