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ACDC
01-13-2013, 12:17 PM
When Navy SEAL Robert Guzzo returned from Iraq, he feared seeking treatment for PTSD would endanger his career. The Fold devotes today’s show to telling his story. (Must Watch)


http://www.washingtonpost.com/video/thefold/a-navy-seals-tragic-secret/2013/01/09/899e181c-5a2e-11e2-9fa9-5fbdc9530eb9_video.html?wpisrc=emailtoafriend

HK in AK
01-13-2013, 03:28 PM
Thanks. The most painful stuff is the stuff you don't talk about.

BrownBär
01-13-2013, 07:18 PM
That is really sad. I think that going to look for help when you have PTSD is hard for any soldier, but I can imagine that it´s even harder for SOF soldiers because of the reputation they have. Thanks for posting.

Moose_Hates_You
01-13-2013, 07:26 PM
That is really sad. I think that going to look for help when you have PTSD is hard for any soldier, but I can imagine that it´s even harder for SOF soldiers because of the reputation they have. Thanks for posting.

Please don't do that. Talking about the things you've had to witness and do is hard for anyone. The range of emotions are wide and painful, no matter if you're some FOBbit or a door-kicker.

alphabet
01-14-2013, 12:02 PM
When I was in, I've seen guys that were passed over for promotion or deemed "combat ineffective" because they sought out help for troubles they were having. I was only a dumb grunt, not having witnessed a fraction of the stuff that SOF personnel might have witnessed. I can only tell you this, combat affects everyone differently. I remember taking 3 post deployment health assessments and each time having to lie about what I'd seen or done because of fears that I'd face some repercussion from my senior guys or fear of not picking up the next rank. It was discouraging to see people not get promoted for seeking out help they surely needed. It's the nature of the beast sadly.

I wish everyone would get the help they deserve. Like the guy above said, it can be a gunslinger or a pog, it doesn't matter. Everyone reacts to traumatic events differently.

awis
01-14-2013, 12:12 PM
sad loosing a great man.
condolence to his family friends and specially to his mom,dad and daughter. :(

BrownBär
01-14-2013, 01:06 PM
When I was in, I've seen guys that were passed over for promotion or deemed "combat ineffective" because they sought out help for troubles they were having. I was only a dumb grunt, not having witnessed a fraction of the stuff that SOF personnel might have witnessed. I can only tell you this, combat affects everyone differently. I remember taking 3 post deployment health assessments and each time having to lie about what I'd seen or done because of fears that I'd face some repercussion from my senior guys or fear of not picking up the next rank. It was discouraging to see people not get promoted for seeking out help they surely needed. It's the nature of the beast sadly.

I wish everyone would get the help they deserve. Like the guy above said, it can be a gunslinger or a pog, it doesn't matter. Everyone reacts to traumatic events differently.


Please don't do that. Talking about the things you've had to witness and do is hard for anyone. The range of emotions are wide and painful, no matter if you're some FOBbit or a door-kicker.

I see what you mean. Thanks guys.

vinny_121_ND
01-15-2013, 04:09 AM
I feel for this SEAL. PTSD is real, war is horrible. Here's Scot Spooner in NRA life of duty who talks about ptsd and how he dealt with it and is still dealing with ptsd.

http://www.nralifeofduty.tv/#!/patriotprofiles/video/755