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PATTO
07-28-2013, 09:57 PM
When USS Indianapolis was hit by Japanese torpedoes in the final weeks of WWII, hundreds of crewmen jumped into the water to escape the burning ship. Surrounded by sharks, they waited for a response to their SOS. But no one had been sent to look for them.

In late July 1945, USS Indianapolis had been on a special secret mission, delivering parts of the first atomic bomb to the Pacific Island of Tinian where American B-29 bombers were based. Its job done, the warship, with 1,197 men on board, was sailing west towards Leyte in the Philippines when it was attacked.

The first torpedo struck, without warning, just after midnight on 30 July 1945. A 19-year-old seaman, Loel Dean Cox, was on duty on the bridge. Now 87, he recalls the moment when the torpedo hit.

"Whoom. Up in the air I went. There was water, debris, fire, everything just coming up and we were 81ft (25m) from the water line. It was a tremendous explosion. Then, about the time I got to my knees, another one hit. Whoom."

LD Cox LD Cox was on the bridge when the first torpedo hit
The second torpedo fired from the Japanese submarine almost tore the ship in half. As fires raged below, the huge ship began listing onto its side. The order came to abandon ship. As it rolled, LD, as Cox is known to his friends, clambered to the top side and tried to jump into the water. He hit the hull and bounced into the ocean.

"I turned and looked back. The ship was headed straight down. You could see the men jumping from the stern, and you could see the four propellers still turning.

"Twelve minutes. Can you imagine a ship 610ft long, that's two football fields in length, sinking in 12 minutes? It just rolled over and went under."

The Indianapolis did not have sonar to detect submarines. The captain, Charles McVay, had asked for an escort, but his request was turned down. The US Navy also failed to pass on information that Japanese submarines were still active in the area. The Indianapolis was all alone in the Pacific Ocean when it sank.

"I never saw a life raft. I finally heard some moans and groans and yelling and swam over and got with a group of 30 men and that's where I stayed," says Cox.

"We figured that if we could just hold out for a couple of days they'd pick us up."

But no one was coming to the rescue. Although the Indianapolis had sent several SOS signals before it sank, somehow the messages were not taken seriously by the navy. Nor was much notice taken when the ship failed to arrive on time.

USS Indianapolis in 1945 USS Indianapolis in 1945
About 900 men, survivors of the initial torpedo attack, were left drifting in groups in the expanse of the Pacific Ocean.

And beneath the waves, another danger was lurking. Drawn by the carnage of the sinking, hundreds of sharks from miles around headed towards the survivors.

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The Jaws connection
Robert Shaw as Quint
Salty sea dog Quint (Robert Shaw, pictured) was a US Navy veteran. Questioned by Hooper and Chief Brody about a tattoo he'd had removed, he revealed it had said USS Indianapolis and described the sinking in an extended monologue:

"Eleven hundred men went into the water. Vessel went down in twelve minutes. Didn't see the first shark for about a half an hour..."

"We were sunk at midnight, I saw one the first morning after daylight. They were big. Some of them I swear were 15ft long," remembers Cox.

"They were continually there, mostly feeding off the dead bodies. Thank goodness, there were lots of dead people floating in the area."

But soon they came for the living, too.

"We were losing three or four each night and day," says Cox. "You were constantly in fear because you'd see 'em all the time. Every few minutes you'd see their fins - a dozen to two dozen fins in the water.

"They would come up and bump you. I was bumped a few times - you never know when they are going to attack you."

Some of the men would pound the water, kick and yell when the sharks attacked. Most decided that sticking together in a group was their best defence. But with each attack, the clouds of blood in the water, the screaming, the splashing, more sharks would come.

"In that clear water you could see the sharks circling. Then every now and then, like lightning, one would come straight up and take a sailor and take him straight down. One came up and took the sailor next to me. It was just somebody screaming, yelling or getting bit."

The sharks, though, were not the main killer. Under the scorching sun, day after day, without any food or water for days, men were dying from exposure or dehydration. Their lifejackets waterlogged, many became exhausted and drowned.

"You could barely keep your face out of the water. The life preserver had blisters on my shoulders, blisters on top of blisters. It was so hot we would pray for dark, and when it got dark we would pray for daylight, because it would get so cold, our teeth would chatter."

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Find out more
Loel Dean Cox
Loel Dean Cox's interview with the the BBC World Service programme Witness was broadcast on Radio 4 at 14:45 BST

Listen via BBC iPlayer Radio
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More from BBC World Service

Struggling to stay alive, desperate for fresh water, terrorised by sharks, some survivors started to become delirious. Many started to hallucinate, imagining secret islands just over the horizon, or that they were in contact with friendly submarines coming to the rescue. Cox recalls a sailor believing that the Indianapolis had not sunk, but was floating within reach just beneath the surface.

"The drinking water was kept on the second deck of our ship," he explains. "A buddy of mine was hallucinating and he decided he would go down to the second deck to get a drink of water. All of a sudden his life-preserver is floating, but he's not there. And then he comes up saying how good and cool that water was, and we should get us a drink."

He was drinking saltwater, of course. He died shortly afterwards. And as each day and each night passed, more men died.

Then, by chance, on the fourth day, a navy plane flying overhead spotted some men in the water. By then, there were fewer than 10 in Cox's group.

Initially they thought they'd been missed by the planes flying over. Then, just before sunset, a large seaplane suddenly appeared, changed direction and flew over the group.

"The guy in the hatch of the plane stood there waving at us. Now that was when the tears came and your hair stood up and you knew you were saved, you knew you were found, at least. That was the happiest time of my life."

Navy ships raced to the site and began looking for the groups of sailors dotted around the ocean. All the while, Cox simply waited, scared, in a state of shock, drifting in and out of consciousness.

"It got dark and a strong big light from heaven, out of a cloud, came down, and I thought it was angels coming. But it was the rescue ship shining its spotlight up into the sky to give all the sailors hope, and let them know that someone was looking for 'em.

"Sometime during the night, I remember strong arms were pulling me up into a little bitty boat. Just knowing I was saved was the best feeling you can have."

Of a crew of almost 1,200, just 317 sailors survived.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23455951

A series of simple errors leading to a tragedy of enormous proportions.

LineDoggie
07-28-2013, 10:01 PM
When I was a Kid My Grandfather kept a black scrapbook, it was filled with newspaper reports of lost US ships was about 4inches thick. He had an entire page from the NY daily news on the USS Indianapolis loss. back then they didn't tell the press about the sharks. I have no idea why he kept it as no one in the family was Navy in WWII. he had been a Stoker in WWI

Shelldraken
07-28-2013, 10:21 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1vDjZmb4lE

Great scene from a great movie.

harghill1718
07-29-2013, 09:16 AM
Horrific incident. Unimaginable.

commanding
07-29-2013, 03:05 PM
I read the book In Harms Way (http://www.amazon.com/Harms-Way-Indianapolis-Extraordinary-Survivors/dp/0805073663/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375124611&sr=1-1&keywords=USS+INDIANAPOLIS) about the USS Indianapolis, which was a great book. Tragic trial after the war of the captain, and having the Japanese commander of the sub that sunk the Indy testify against him in the trial, and the final act of the captain committing suicide on his front porch. The whole story is stranger than fiction.

shell's post above video:

http://youtu.be/U1vDjZmb4lE

ebk187
07-29-2013, 07:03 PM
Isn't there a similar story involving the Imperial Japanese? Something about a platoon of men dissappearing in a swamp with alligators?

ebk187
07-29-2013, 07:08 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ramree_Island


That night [of the 19 February 1945] was the most horrible that any member of the M.L. [motor launch] crews ever experienced. The scattered rifle shots in the pitch black swamp punctured by the screams of wounded men crushed in the jaws of huge reptiles, and the blurred worrying sound of spinning crocodiles made a cacophony of hell that has rarely been duplicated on earth. At dawn the vultures arrived to clean up what the crocodiles had left. . . . Of about one thousand Japanese soldiers that entered the swamps of Ramree, only about twenty were found alive.

TheKiwi
07-29-2013, 07:37 PM
I cast a skeptical eye on those claims. 1000 Japanese soldiers with rifles and bayonets and grenades were unable to stop crocodiles from eating 98% of them?

harghill1718
07-29-2013, 07:44 PM
I cast a skeptical eye on those claims. 1000 Japanese soldiers with rifles and bayonets and grenades were unable to stop crocodiles from eating 98% of them?
If you read the article, around 500 escaped, and disease, scorpians etc probably got the rest. No ones really sure how many were taken by the crocs.

TheKiwi
07-29-2013, 07:46 PM
Yeah, hence my skepticism on the claims that crocs got the lot of them. I could see the crocs having a fair old feast on the ones that died from disease mind you...

ferguson
07-29-2013, 08:56 PM
Story I read they were ocean going crocodiles-30 footers who came home as part of their routine and caught the guys by surprise. They had been chased into the swamps by Australians. If you have never seen true mass panic in action, don't be too quick to judge the actions or inactions of the soldiers. Add darkness to the mix plus exhaustion, starvation, sickness, you name it.

TheKiwi
07-29-2013, 09:38 PM
Yeah, but no. 20 or 30 soldiers being killed by croc attacks I could buy. Some who drowned or who were dragged down by the muck and mire being eaten afterwards probably too. But 400-900? I very much doubt that.

Coattail Rider
07-29-2013, 09:49 PM
Story I read they were ocean going crocodiles-30 footers who came home as part of their routine and caught the guys by surprise. They had been chased into the swamps by Australians. If you have never seen true mass panic in action, don't be too quick to judge the actions or inactions of the soldiers. Add darkness to the mix plus exhaustion, starvation, sickness, you name it.


anyone familiar with crocs would have reservations about the numbers quoted.

and ive worked with Australian reptiles on and off for 20 years - never seen any evidence of a 30 footer

crocs dont need to eat that often...so your proposing 500 plus large, territorial animals living in the same swamp, all hungry, all with a ****** for some asian takeaway

no dice yo

Shelldraken
07-29-2013, 10:06 PM
The facts of the battle seem to be:

Battle of Ramree Island

Time: 40 days
Area: 1,350 square km
Allied Combat Power: 2 x Inf Bde, 1 x BB, 1 x CL, 1 x Liberator bomber wing, 1 x Thunderbolt fighter wing
Total Japanese Casualties: 500 KIA/MIA

I think it’s pretty clear that the greater majority of the 500 Jap deaths were not caused by crocodile attack.

ebk187
07-30-2013, 12:17 PM
I think it’s pretty clear that the greater majority of the 500 Jap deaths were not caused by crocodile attack.
Speculative. Plus, the wiki article I linked provides testimony from a credited naturalist.

Mastermind
07-30-2013, 01:05 PM
When I was a Kid My Grandfather kept a black scrapbook, it was filled with newspaper reports of lost US ships was about 4inches thick. He had an entire page from the NY daily news on the USS Indianapolis loss. back then they didn't tell the press about the sharks. I have no idea why he kept it as no one in the family was Navy in WWII. he had been a Stoker in WWI

Man! LD, that would be a fantastic artifact if you could find it.

My own father was a nut on racial upsets throughout the Memphis, Tenn. area and he was even staying in a motel not far from where MLK was shot the night before the shooting. His scrap book even had all sorts of evil KKK stuff where local papers would put photos of lynchings, etc. right on the front pages. He said, "One day, no one will believe this evil took place!" He kept it kind of the same way Nazi holcaust stuff is kept---so future generations would not be able to deny it ever happened. But, when he died, a black nurse in the nursing home he was in tossed it in the garbage and it was lost forever. It is really sad how stuff like that vanishes---might be she was right, but, still a piece of history is still history - evil, good or indifferent.

TheKiwi
07-30-2013, 05:07 PM
Speculative. Plus, the wiki article I linked provides testimony from a credited naturalist.

Plenty of others who give it zero credence including people who have worked with reptiles for decades...

Shelldraken
07-30-2013, 06:35 PM
Speculative.

Technically itís speculative to say that the sun will come up in the east tomorrow. But itís a pretty reliable speculation to make.


Plus, the wiki article I linked provides testimony from a credited naturalist.

Testimony for the Ď1,000í crocodile kills is based on one night of observing from a boat in which he Ďheardí the crocs doing death rolls. He then deduced from 1,000 soldiers and only 20 captured that the rest must have been eaten by crocs. Not noting that 500 Japanese escaped and that there was a month long battle involving around 5,000 Allied soldiers vs 1,000 Japanese, air strikes from over 100 bombers and fighters and shore bombardment from a fleet including a battleship and a cruiser.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ramree_Island

The claims were made by Lt.Cdr. Bruce Wright, RCN. Who was a forestry manager from Canada. Hardly much experience in Crocodiles. His specialty was ducks.

http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/environment/ASFWB/wright.html

Draw your own conclusion. There is no way this is anything like the USS Indianapolis sinking shark attacks.

Euroamerican
07-30-2013, 07:02 PM
I've mentioned it before, and I can still say that I found the book "All the Drowned Sailors" by Raymond Lech to be a very interesting read about the disaster.

ebk187
07-30-2013, 08:26 PM
Technically itís speculative to say that the sun will come up in the east tomorrow. But itís a pretty reliable speculation to make.



Testimony for the Ď1,000í crocodile kills is based on one night of observing from a boat in which he Ďheardí the crocs doing death rolls. He then deduced from 1,000 soldiers and only 20 captured that the rest must have been eaten by crocs. Not noting that 500 Japanese escaped and that there was a month long battle involving around 5,000 Allied soldiers vs 1,000 Japanese, air strikes from over 100 bombers and fighters and shore bombardment from a fleet including a battleship and a cruiser.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ramree_Island

The claims were made by Lt.Cdr. Bruce Wright, RCN. Who was a forestry manager from Canada. Hardly much experience in Crocodiles. His specialty was ducks.

http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/environment/ASFWB/wright.html

Draw your own conclusion. There is no way this is anything like the USS Indianapolis sinking shark attacks.
Why you are associating an armed conflict incident with an astronomical occurrence is beyond me.


No one is suggesting that one thousand enemy troops were eaten by crocodiles. Just like how no one is suggesting that one thousand American sailors were eaten by sharks. No one knows. There are many dynamic variables in warfare which attribute to the loss of life. Dehydration, infection, etc.. Given that Wright was an established academic and researcher, not merely an individual whom "[specialized] in ducks", I do not believe he would use his own work (his book) to grossly exaggerate fatal reptile attacks.

My conclusion is, most individuals will discredit the claim of the aforementioned mass fatal crocodile attacks on Ramree Island simply due to lack of direct American eyewitness testimony.

TheKiwi
07-30-2013, 08:39 PM
American eye witnesses would be rather unlikely what with the ground troops being British and all. The idea the crocs would hang around in an area subject to a weeks worth of airstrikes, artillery and ship bombardment seems rather unlikely too...

Shelldraken
07-30-2013, 08:40 PM
Why you are associating an armed conflict incident with an astronomical occurrence is beyond me.

Demonstrating that not all speculation is equal. And there was no association of the sun to this battle. That was pretty clear to anyone who can read english.


No one is suggesting that one thousand enemy troops were eaten by crocodiles.

Guinness book of records were, or at least 500 odd.


Just like how no one is suggesting that one thousand American sailors were eaten by sharks.

559 sailors died in the water. Many by shark attack. Even if it was only 50 or 100 by shark attack it is still a highly significant number and probably far more than were killed by Crocodiles on Ramree island.


No one knows.

The catch cry of all conspiracy theorist, BS artists and the like through history.


There are many dynamic variables in warfare which attribute to the loss of life. Dehydration, infection, etc.. Given that Wright was an established academic and researcher, not merely an individual whom "[specialized] in ducks", I do not believe he would use his own work (his book) to grossly exaggerate fatal reptile attacks.

Actually he was only established as a researcher well after the war. And there have been plenty of scientists who exaggerated far more scientific studies for promotion gain than just remembrance of one night during a war 20 years ago. It is also worth pointing out that Wright did not witness a single Japanese soldier being taken by a crocodile.


My conclusion is, most individuals will discredit the claim of the aforementioned mass fatal crocodile attacks on Ramree Island simply due to lack of direct American eyewitness testimony.

Good for you. But this has nothing to do with the conclusion I and others in this thread (most of which aren’t Americans) have made about this case. Which is it is extremely unlikely crocodiles had any significant input into the killing of the 500 odd Japanese soldiers who died in this battle. Which is totally unlike the case of the USS Indianapolis and the well documented high number of shark attacks.

commanding
07-30-2013, 08:45 PM
Man! LD, that would be a fantastic artifact if you could find it.

My own father was a nut on racial upsets throughout the Memphis, Tenn. area and he was even staying in a motel not far from where MLK was shot the night before the shooting. His scrap book even had all sorts of evil KKK stuff where local papers would put photos of lynchings, etc. right on the front pages. He said, "One day, no one will believe this evil took place!" He kept it kind of the same way Nazi holcaust stuff is kept---so future generations would not be able to deny it ever happened. But, when he died, a black nurse in the nursing home he was in tossed it in the garbage and it was lost forever. It is really sad how stuff like that vanishes---might be she was right, but, still a piece of history is still history - evil, good or indifferent.

I am with you in your thoughts on this MM, historical things that document things like the holocaust and the KKK and even other terrible things need to be preserved. That is one thing that worries me a bit for the future, due to our insane dependence on digital communications, that even digital photos, and letters/emails etc will all be gone in 150 years.

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 08:58 PM
My conclusion is, most individuals will discredit the claim of the aforementioned mass fatal crocodile attacks on Ramree Island simply due to lack of direct American eyewitness testimony.


or due to it not ****ing happening

you dont need an eye witness to know that it doesnt stack up

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:05 PM
Demonstrating that not all speculation is equal. And there was no association of the sun to this battle. That was pretty clear to anyone who can read english.



Guinness book of records were, or at least 500 odd.



559 sailors died in the water. Many by shark attack. Even if it was only 50 or 100 by shark attack it is still a highly significant number and probably far more than were killed by Crocodiles on Ramree island.



The catch cry of all conspiracy theorist, BS artists and the like through history.



Actually he was only established as a researcher well after the war. And there have been plenty of scientists who exaggerated far more scientific studies for promotion gain than just remembrance of one night during a war 20 years ago. It is also worth pointing out that Wright did not witness a single Japanese soldier being taken by a crocodile.



Good for you. But this has nothing to do with the conclusion I and others in this thread (most of which aren’t Americans) have made about this case. Which is it is extremely unlikely crocodiles had any significant input into the killing of the 500 odd Japanese soldiers who died in this battle. Which is totally unlike the case of the USS Indianapolis and the well documented high number of shark attacks.

So, it's ok for you to guess that "50 or 100" shark attack deaths is plausible but not 50-100 crocodile attack deaths? There's something wrong with you. Why are you still trying to discredit Wright? Have you ever enrolled in university? What about enrolling in a university for a forestry degree or administering multiple biology departments? I would rather take his word over your sorry ass speculative comments any day.

And for the record, no, I do not believe that one thousand Japs were eaten by saltwater crocodiles.

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 09:17 PM
So, it's ok for you to guess that "50 or 100" shark attack deaths is plausible but not 50-100 crocodile attack deaths?


you do understand theres a big difference in how these animals feed? One is a territorial hunter which can go without food for months, the other is quite happy to feed in large numbers and will eat until it cant eat any more.


One is plausible, the other much less so

and yes there are some rare occasionas where NILE crocs will, for want of a better word, 'group feed' - mostly during mass migrations of animals across rivers in Africa. Ive seen footage of small groups of esturine(saltwater) crocs gathered feeding on massed schools of migrating fish, but its extremely rare.
Crocs big enough to take down a man, generally dont like hanging out

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:21 PM
you do understand theres a big difference in how these animals feed? One is a territorial hunter which can go without food for months, the other is quite happy to feed in large numbers and will eat until it cant eat any more.


One is plausible, the other much less so

and yes there are some rare occasionas where NILE crocs will, for want of a better word, 'group feed' - mostly during mass migrations of animals across rivers in Africa. Ive seen footage of small groups of esturine(saltwater) crocs gathered feeding on massed schools of migrating fish, but its extremely rare.
Crocs big enough to take down a man, generally dont like hanging out
Basically, you just contradicted your entire premise for refutation.

TheKiwi
07-30-2013, 09:24 PM
Which bits of "extremely rare" and "Crocs big enough to take down a man, generally dont like hanging out" are contradicting his premise exactly?

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:28 PM
Which bits of "extremely rare" and "Crocs big enough to take down a man, generally dont like hanging out" are contradicting his premise exactly?
Let's read it together, yeah?



One is plausible, the other much less soAnd then he goes on to say that "group feeds" do in fact occur. Consider that crocodiles kill more humans than sharks each year, how it is not plausible that a reptile species known for group feeding is incapable of killing more than one person (Jap)?

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 09:29 PM
Basically, you just contradicted your entire premise for refutation.


how

you know that the NILE croc is a different animal to a saltwater croc, yes?

you know that small groups (5-10 crocs of 6-12 ft in length) of salties would not be able to eat 10 men, let alone 100?

you know what the words extremely and rare mean?

I forgot to mention that these events are seasonal/annual migrations, and these habits have developed over thousands of years...

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 09:31 PM
Consider that crocodiles kill more humans than sharks each year,


source?

Please also differentiate between various croc species...because NILE crocs are very different to Salties as ive said earlier, and they make up the majority of attacks.

How many people go missing each year and are eaten by sharks,only to be listed as presumed drowned? How many people in Africa get eaten by crocs that dont get reported.? these figures are in no way going to be accurate

Shelldraken
07-30-2013, 09:32 PM
So, it's ok for you to guess that "50 or 100" shark attack deaths is plausible but not 50-100 crocodile attack deaths?

I didn’t “guess” 50 or 100 shark attacks but suggested that number purely because it would indicate a highly significant number of shark attacks against the in water crew of the USS Indianapolis. Which is what I wrote in that initial post.

The point I’ve been trying to make, that any reasonable person would understand, is that the 1,000 Japanese were faced with a huge number of lethal threats including the active agency of as many as 10,000 Allied soldiers, airman and sailors armed with everything from .303 rifles to 15 inch battleship guns over a period of 40 days. To suggest that during this onslaught one night of hiding in a swamp would result in a significant number of casualties caused by crocodile attack (more than 10), not to mention the 980 suggested by Guiness, because one guy heard something from his boat that he thought sounded like a croc attack is just plain crazy.


There's something wrong with you. Why are you still trying to discredit Wright? Have you ever enrolled in university? What about enrolling in a university for a forestry degree or administering multiple biology departments? I would rather take his word over your sorry ass speculative comments any day.

Ohh someone please pass me a Kleenex I need to cry after being skewered so.

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:40 PM
I didn’t “guess” 50 or 100 shark attacks but suggested that number purely because it would indicate a highly significant number of shark attacks against the in water crew of the USS Indianapolis. Which is what I wrote in that initial post.

The point I’ve been trying to make, that any reasonable person would understand, is that the 1,000 Japanese were faced with a huge number of lethal threats including the active agency of as many as 10,000 Allied soldiers, airman and sailors armed with everything from .303 rifles to 15 inch battleship guns over a period of 40 days. To suggest that during this onslaught one night of hiding in a swamp would result in a significant number of casualties caused by crocodile attack (more than 10), not to mention the 980 suggested by Guiness, because one guy heard something from his boat that he thought sounded like a croc attack is just plain crazy.



Ohh someone please pass me a Kleenex I need to cry after being skewered so.
Another paragraph? That's cute.

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:42 PM
Oh man I would have offed myself if I had to deal with you Australians instead of the Brits in Afghanistan LOL

Shelldraken
07-30-2013, 09:44 PM
Another paragraph? That's cute.

Obvious Toll, Is Obvious

205764

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 09:44 PM
Oh man I would have offed myself if I had to deal with you Australians instead of the Brits in Afghanistan LOL

Brits have a bigger tolerance for stupid.....

Illinois Strong
07-30-2013, 09:53 PM
Another paragraph? That's cute.

You've lost.

Anyways, interesting thread. Didn't expect this kind of content when I clicked the title.

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:53 PM
Brits have a bigger tolerance for stupid.....
If only they had kinder words for Aussies

ebk187
07-30-2013, 09:55 PM
You've lost.

Anyways, interesting thread. Didn't expect this kind of content when I clicked the title.
War veteran and possessor of a bachelors and masters degrees indicates that enemy forces were killed by crocodiles. Australians online red flag it. Yeah, you're right. I "lost" LOL

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 09:58 PM
War veteran and possessor of a bachelors and masters degrees indicates that enemy forces were killed by crocodiles. Australians online red flag it. Yeah, you're right. I "lost" LOL

How many Crocs has he worked with? or seen

war veteran or not, hes full of it

Have you ever worked with a croc?

Ever had to sit on one while waiting for sedatives to take effect?

Ever helped gather eggs while hoping an angry 15ft mother doesnt come bursting out of the bushes and take you off at the knee?

No?

then STFU because your betters have schooled you in this thread

Colby
07-30-2013, 10:08 PM
War veteran and possessor of a bachelors and masters degrees indicates that enemy forces were killed by crocodiles. Australians online red flag it. Yeah, you're right. I "lost" LOL

The only argument I see going on is about the amount taken

Coattail Rider
07-30-2013, 10:10 PM
The only argument I see going on is about the amount taken


exactly

but never let facts get in the way