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James
03-24-2005, 02:06 AM
In another thread our own Para inspired me with the following post:


I know this is a little of this topic, but I was reading the other that the American Vets of WW2 are dying of at the rate of 1,400 per DAY. In our little town I have been collecting some of their stories and photo's and putting them on a CD ROM. These CD's are then sent of to the appropriate Military museums and have been well received there. May be it is me being silly but there are some great stories and photographs out there which need to be collated along with the stories for once the people have gone the thread is broken, as most of the photo's are chucked away with the rubbish as the people dealing with the persons effects just don't know what they are or mean.

I thought it would be interesting to have members contribute stories of family (or their own) that have something to do with military history. My hope is that we can keep some memories alive. I hope we won't see any debates or flaming in this thread. My fingers are crossed. ;)

Both of my grandfathers served in WWII. One was a pilot with the 8th and 9th AAFs. He flew B-26 Marauders out of England and later the continent during WWII. He also flew the DOuglas A-20 and A-26. He left the Army in 1946 and started a sporting goods store in Hoquiam, Washington. WHen The Korean War began, he ran to the sound of the guns and flew Douglas A-26s again. He was MIA in April 1952. He is still MIA - nothing has been learned to date.
My other grandfather served with the Coast Guard during WWII. He was a meteorologist and did a lot of sailing out of Boston from 1943-1945. He launched weather balloons with packages of instruments to help forecast what would be happening in Europe. He told me once that he remembered seeing a lot of empty lifeboats and oil slicks, but they never picked anybody up, alive or dead, during the Battle of the Atlantic. Once, a German U-Boat fired a torpedoe at his ship. He heard the alert, and everyone ran outside - no one wanted to be inside if they got hit! Lucky for them, the torpedo ran completley under the ship and kept on going.

After the war he worked for the U.S. Weather service in Seattle, WA. He was also a volunteer firefighter, and retired as a Chief in 1985. He died on March 13 of old age.

I am eager to read about what stories other members here can tell.

Buckeye67
03-24-2005, 03:04 AM
My father just missed WW2, but enlisted in the Navy in 1946. He served on the USS Turner and was there during Operation Crossroads - the nuclear test(s) at ****** Atoll. I knew that he'd served in the navy, but not that he was present for Crossroads.

I asked him "So you actually saw them light off a nuclear weapon?"

He nodded and grinned and said "Oh yeah... we saw it."

Pretty damn amazing if you ask me. He then described how they sailed into the area after the blast (yeah, complete with radioactive fog/mist and water) to take samples and readings. Fortunately he's not suffered any sort of ill effects from that.

Following his service in the Navy, he joined the Army. He attended basic training at Ft Knox, KY (where I would attend basic about 35 years later) and was later stationed in Italy and Austria as, of all things, a conductor on a troop train. :)


Good thread, I'm looking forward to reading everyone's posts. :)

digrar
03-24-2005, 03:44 AM
Not much of a military history in my family, but I have two great uncles that served in the islands North of Australia in WWII. They were both in their early to mid 30's when they enlisted, one was a shearers cook and went on to be a cook in a Officers mess and the other was a gunner in the 4th Australian Field Regiment, dragging guns up and down the greasy mountains of Papua and Guinea. No Infantrymen in the family :( .

Koen
03-24-2005, 04:12 AM
My Father's father was studying to become a priest in 1914, when the germans invaded belgium, they fled to france. In 1916 he was mobilised, but because he was in seminar they made him a brancardier. He spent a year in the trenches and worked in a field hospital later on.
After the war, he did not want to be a priest any longer and fortunatelly for me married my grandman.

My mother's father did his military service in 1934 in the infantry, he was mobilised at the time of the crisis of Munich, demobilised and then mobilised again in september '39. He was part of a heavy machine gun team in an infantry regiment. In May '40 they were told to retreat without seeing germans and finally dug in around Antwerp. There they saw german helmets approaching and started firing at them, the germans ran away immediatelly, an hour later they were fired upon by artillery. This continued all day long, one of this comrades went so mad that he wanted to attack the german guns, they had a lot of trouble keeping him in the trench, by night the artillery stopped and they found out they were alone, the rest of their batallion had gone. In the dark they went looking for the rest, but saw germans approaching from their back, they hid in a forest, but the germans found them, and so he started his POW-carreer. They were send on a train to germany and had to help on farms under guard of soldiers, they slept in pigs-stables. He was liberated in 1941, got home to find no work so they had a very tough time to survive the war, had to eat all the cats around...

My father was a conscript/Reserve NCO in a tank bataillion in 1960, they were leaving for the congo, their tanks were already in antwerp to be loaded on a ship, when the whole thing was cancelled.

Scagel
03-24-2005, 04:17 AM
Some generations back, my great-great-gr...grandmother shot the last indian on the oregon trail.

My grandma was high up in the Alaka State Defense Force (http://www.ak-prepared.com/asdf/) and helped stockpile weapons and devise strategies to keep back a possible Jap invasion (her contributions were used to build defense during the Cold War), then attended West Point during Korea, and finally drill instructed at Parris Island.

I know there were/are alot of Serb military folks in my moms side of the family, but I'm not sure of any specifics (embarrasing that Ive neglected half my heritage :oops: )

Also, not sure if this is military, but if you've heard of Scagel knives- the guy that started it was in my family.

RGRBOX
03-24-2005, 09:38 AM
MY family is rich in military history, from a great, great, great Grandfather who was Col, Carolina who fought for the South in La. My grandfather was in the 6th ID in the Pacific, Island hopping. My Step-Grandfather was a pilot in the Navy and flew the E-1, my Dad was a LRRP in the 1st CAV during Vietnam, my Step dad was an AirCommando in the AF, and was stationed at England AF Bace and in Vietnam. My Grandfathers brothers were in the 101st at Bastogne and the other with Patten when he went to Bastogne to help the 101st. My Grandfathers Cousins were born in Argentina and went over to Germany to fight for the Fatherland because of their Mother, they were SS and never returned. Myself and all, but one of my 5 brothers are or were in the Army. All MOS's from myself infantry, one Artillery, one Medic, and one Supply Spec. I also have a step brother who was in the USAF. And 3 uncles who served in the Army.

Para
03-24-2005, 07:00 PM
Many thanks for the kind words James, Now being an old git my my memories of grandparents takes me back a long way. My grandfather joined the 2nd Dragoons as a lad, spent 15 year in India along the North West Frontier during the 19th Century when he left the army after 21 years he joined the Metropolitan Police and become a member of the Royal Protection Squad and was a great friend of Princess Alice. He rejoined the colours in 1915 and served with the Iniskinlings on the Western Front and on one of the attacks he was one of only 6 men from his Battalion who made it back from an attack on the enemy trenches, he managed to go through three years in front lines with out a scratch. My Uncle joined the Royal Engineers at the age of 13 he took all the courses offered to him and got a degree as Quantity Surveyor he was then given a commission and wound up as a Colonel in the RE. My father was more interest in aircraft and joined the RAF, he wanted become aircrew back in the the 1920's when flying was still a daring thing to do. He qualified as a Navigator and later on as a Radio Operator and flew bi planes all over the middle east. He was recalled for active service in 1938 about a year before war was declared and was sent to France in Fairy Battles. When the Germans broke through in 1940 they where ordered to bomb he bridges over the river Mers, as he was married with young children he was ordered to stand down, none of the planes ever returned all where shot down during the attack. He then made his way to Dunkirk and was lifted of the beaches, from their he went went to Fighter Control at Hawkinge and a near miss by a bomb during the battle of Britain moved the 3 foot thick concrete roof about five feet to one side. After the Battle Britain he was shipped of the Canada to help set up the Empire flying schools and to work as an instructor. We next saw him in 1947 as he had to stay on and close things down. My sister had a commission in the Royal Air Force and work as liaison officer during the Coronation in 1953 for the Queen when she was visiting different RAF stations during her tour of the Country, my sister after leaving the the RAF became an editor of a local newspaper then went over to the States, her son joined the American Green Berets as a Soldier and worked his way through he ranks and when I last spoke to him he was then a Major. My wifes uncles and cousins are ranking members of the IRA. Then there is me I wound up as Paratrooper for my sins and was lucky not to still be in jail for some of the strokes I pulled, I think I was one of the last people to be charged with Mutiny on the High Seas and to get away with it after the first mate of our troopship was thrown over the side while we where in Algiers harbour, and I was also down for a court martial for refusing punishment, but the charges where later dropped as their were hundreds of other paratroopers doing the same thing, so they got rid of the CO instead

James
03-24-2005, 07:14 PM
WOW.

THanks for the repsonses so far.

Para
03-24-2005, 07:39 PM
Talking about war stories, I had thousands of men working for me and I used to get them talking during their breaks in the staff canteen. One chap had been at Nagasaki just before the atom bomb fell on the place.
The Japanese where marching him and many others of to a death camp to be killed as an invasion was expected. He said he got a right beating from the guards for cheering when the Atom bomb went off as felt he would then live to go home. Another chap had been an Ack Ack Gunner on the HMS Baraham when that ship blew up in the Med with a huge loss of life. Another one had been flying Lancaster and was shot down on the last day of the War in Europe after bombing the SS Barracks in what was called the Eagles lair. He landed right in the middle of the barracks square and there where bodies all over the place and he thought God I will now get shot. An SS man came up to him and said today the war is over for you, tomorrow it will be over for me, He was not locked up but it was suggested to him that he should stay put till the Allied troops had arrived for his own safety. Another time we had our boiler man and a former German POW who stayed behind to live in England at the same table. The Boiler man was saying that he was in Destroyers during the war and had helped sink a U boat and gave the number of the boat that they had sunk.
I looked at the Germans face and it was a picture, as he been on that U Boat when it had been sunk. The German who was a big lad to say least leaned over and grabbed the old chaps hand and said okay you sunk me but thanks for stopping and picking me up, At least I am alive to tell the tale. It struck me as odd that the two of them should meet in such a way.
Still I could tell these yarns all days but I will no doubt bore you all to death so I will but out and let some other people get in on this.

Ratamacue
03-24-2005, 10:21 PM
My grandfather served in the US Army during the Korean War (1951, I think). Doesn't really talk about it at all, though, and I can't say I blame him.

My uncle served in MACV-SOG during Vietnam, doing recon on the Ho Chi Minh trail inside Laos and Cambodia. We only learned that after he'd gotten sufficiently plastered during Thanksgiving one year :P . He talked mostly of guiding in air strikes and receiving mortar attacks and stuff like that. Once again, I think the fact that he was inebriated was the only reason that he really wanted to talk about it at all.

My other uncle served in the US Army just after Vietnam. He mostly just likes to talk about how miserable it was in the bush stationed along the East/West German border.

Scagel
03-25-2005, 03:57 AM
My uncle served in MACV-SOG during Vietnam, doing recon on the Ho Chi Minh trail inside Laos and Cambodia. We only learned that after he'd gotten sufficiently plastered during Thanksgiving one year :P . He talked mostly of guiding in air strikes and receiving mortar attacks and stuff like that. Once again, I think the fact that he was inebriated was the only reason that he really wanted to talk about it at all.

One of my dad's buisness associates was on a student visa to the US from Germany while getting his Master's and was drafted (apparently they can do that) for vietnam. He figured if he was going to do it, he might as well do it right, so he volunteered for the Army Rangers and wound up in Laos. He's normal about 90% of the time, but some of the stress/trauma from his experiences causes him to fall into stange mental episodes every now and then. Very sad considering he wasnt even American when he got drafted.

Para
03-25-2005, 07:40 PM
When I joined the Parachute Regiment we had a quite little man as a storeman who had won the Military Medal which is a very gong to have.
We often wondered what this chap had done and it did not take us long to find out. Well he had been parachuted into Arnhem and had been with a small squad os soldiers that had been cut off, sso they dug in and fought off the Germans for days. After a while three German tanks appeard along with a Company of Infantry, well the tanks lumbered up until they where about 50 yards from trenches and opened fire. Well they where out of Piat bombs and they were taking a hell of pounding, during this time our little storemans best mate was blown bits beside him. What did he do but grab a Sten gun and a number of magazines and charged the tanks. He climbed on first tank he came to and stuck the barrel of the Sten gun through an observation slit and emptied the Magazine into the tank killing all the crew, he then attacked the next tank doing the same thing and whole time this going on he was under very heavy machine gun and rifle fire from the supoorting German troops. On knocking out tank number two he then repeated the same thing on tank number three knocking that out as well. Having removed the tanks from that were shelling them he he made a dash for cover and made it unharmed to cheers of his mates. Now they all thought his award should have been far higher than an MM but as there was no officer alive in this unit to submit a report on his actions he could only get the MM regardless of what any one else said

Ichhabe
03-25-2005, 08:10 PM
In the fall of 1944 the Germans decided to withdraw from my county Finnmark in the northern part of Norway.
Due to a Führerbefhel they decided to use the scorched earth tactic. That meant the total destruction of Finnmark and forcing the people to evacuate.
In this mayhem my Grandparents on my fathers side found themselves in.
They lived on an island just northwest of Hammerfest and was in the beginning of November evacuated there first. They were allowed to take 15 kilo pr. grown up person with them. Having 3 children from the age of 1-4(my father was 4) they had to think of them first, so they took most of their belongings that was needed for the evacuation with them. As they were rounded up, they saw the Germans setting their house on fire, killing of the animals and then shipped them to Hammerfest.
There they were for a few days, watching the Germans burning down the town, section by section.
Around November 5 they were again put on a ship and now they were send off to Tromsø.
While they were there they had the pleasure of seeing Tirpitz being sunk on November the 12. from the best seats in the house. They was on a farm about 500 meters from were Tirpitz was.
Then it was on a ship again around November 20, destination Trondheim.
Here they was given quarters inside the Cathredal of Nidaros.
My Grandmother told me how amazed she was when comming in to that building that she only had seen a small photo of, and then watching two nuns sitting and playing cards on some benches inside the church.
In December 44 they where sent further south to a farm in Telemark where they was untill the end of the war in May 45.

They came home to Tufjord in early 1946 just to see that the Germans had really cleaned up the place. Not a plank was standing in a upright position and there were only ashes to see.

Being told these stories when I was a kid, I was amazed to learn that they actually did not feel a grudge toward the Germans for burning down all what they owned in the world. They told me that they understood it was a war, and ugly things do happen. What did it help to hate the Germans. Let the past be the past...

My Grandfather died in 1987 and my Grandmother followed on Christmas eve in 1991. I will never forget them.

PhillyMobster
03-25-2005, 09:54 PM
My family has a spotty military background. As far back as I can trace, I had ancestors in the Mclachlan clan in Scotland, who fought in the rebellion of '46, and as a consequence of Culloden, had to leave, and ended up coming to America.

Then I had an ancestor, Joseph Hotchkiss, who served with the 1st Michigan Cavalry under Custer during the ACW, and had a leg blown off at Cold Harbor. I had three ancestors on my fathers side, who were Irish brothers who enlisted in a Pennsylvania Regiment during the Civil War. Two lived through, the other died an unglamorous death in a hospital tent from disease.

My Great Grandfather worked in the Philadelphia Naval Yard as a pipe-fitters assitant from age 16-18, during WWI. On his 18th birthday, he quit his job at the Navy Yard, went to the nearest Army recruiting office, but was turned away at the door. It was November 11, 1918. He spent the rest of his life being mad about that. :lol:

My Grandfather is the family member I know least about, actually. He joined the Army in WWII, as soon as he turned 18, but like my Great granddad, he was too late. The only wartime service he saw was stateside.

After the war, he decided to stay in the Army, and was deployed with an artillery unit to Korea. While there, he was injured by a exploding landmine, and spent a little while recovering. After that, rather than being sent back to his unit, he was made a guard at Panmunjom for a while.

During this time, he had become fluent in several oriental languages, and was sent to Vietnam in the 60s as part of some linguistics unit. I don't know when his tour ended. All the information I just put down there came from his mouth just before he died, so if there are errors, it is my fault for not recording them correctly.

EDIT:
I just discovered that my Great-great uncle served under Pershing in Mexico. I don't know any details, but he returned home with a disease (some form of Tuberculosis) that finally killed him in 1917.

Lifeinasmallbox
03-26-2005, 03:30 AM
my dad told me a story about a time when he was in the air force...

he was out doin his job on the airfield and a call came over his radio of a F/A 18 that had a burnt out engine and needed a pit stop...the guy in the tower asked "whats ur position" and the pilot replied "New York"...tower guys asked "whats ur ETA" and the pilot said "15 minutes"

so about 15 -20 minutes passed and the plan landed and parked right into the hanger and after about 2 hours the plane was ready...pilot started everything up and broke the sound barrier damn near vertical from the base


Always loved that one

Gnist
03-26-2005, 02:39 PM
My great grandmother, had a small drycleaning shop i sourthern part of Jutland, Denmark. She was the lover of an german Staff officer, at the local base. What her lover did not know, that she US and UK downed pilots from the bombing runs over the northof germany.

Grandfarther on my mothers side, he was an infantry soldier, but he was imprisoned after being in a firefight with the german troops, that were advancing up through Jutland.

My step grandfather, he fled Denmark and went to the UK, he inlisted and was sent of to Afrika.

My dad, he spent 4 years in the The Queens Royal Guard, in the MECH INF.

My brother did a tour in the army, ART. M109 Paladins. And then spent 2.5 Years in the Navy, on the inspection frigates in the north atlantic.

My self, well 10 years of active duty in the Navy and Army. In the navy i was a torpedo spec. Later on i went comms. A couple of tours in Kosovo and Macedonia. And alot of tours in the med. with the Navy.

My great cousin was a USMC, but unfortunately he was killed by insurgents in Iraq last year, in an ambush near Bagdad.
Semper fi, bro, allways in my heart.

My other great cousin is currently an intelligence spec. Were and what unit i don´t know.

Way back i have navy folks in my family, but thats another story.

Aerosoul
03-26-2005, 04:38 PM
My great cousin was a USMC, but unfortunately he was killed by insurgents in Iraq last year, in an ambush near Bagdad.
Semper fi, bro, allways in my heart.



Sorry to hear that. :(

Gnist
03-26-2005, 07:24 PM
Thx Silencer87. He did his duty as a good marine. And i just hope that the sacrifice made by all the troops will bring peace and a free world to this earth.

Opening Batsman
03-26-2005, 11:23 PM
I am very proud of my family's military history. My great-grandfather enlisted in the AIF on his 18th birthday, August 1916, and was put in the 60th Battalion. He fought on the Western Front, and the highlight of his service was being involved in the liberation of Villers-Bretonneux. I have his war medals in front of me, the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. He is the only relative I know of who was in WW1, I do not know much about my older ancestors.
One of my grandfathers was in the navy during WW2 and was stationed at Port Moresby in PNG during the fighting there. He told me how he and his mates were lined up on the beach with their rifles being yelled at by an officer who insisted that they would stop the Japanese Army right there and then. He told me he was scared stiff as the Japanese were advancing down the Kokoda Track towards Port Moresby. He has the 1939-1945 Star, the Pacific Star, the 1939/45 War Medal the Australian Service Medal.
My Uncle was in 53 Anti Aircraft Company during WW2. I am currently awaiting his service record to come through from the National Archives of Australia. I think he served in Africa before coming back to the Pacific, although I am not sure. The RSL took away his medals, unfortunately. The records should be coming through any day now.
My other Grandfather was in the Pommish Army and a tank crewman, I think he was the driver. They landed the day after D-Day. He told me that a Canuck tank fired on them and killed one of the blokes with him. He was the second tank in the collumn, and him and the tank in front of him sped off in front of everybody because they wanted to be the first to reach Paris. Suddenly they realised that there were German patrols everywhere and that they were on their own. They hid the tanks in one of those enourmous hedges and waited for the rest of their mates to catch up. They never did come. So after surviving for a week they were eventually starved out (they were afraid to ask the local farmers for help for fear of betrayal) and had to strike out on their own. They burned the tanks so the Germans couldn't have them but one of the men was overcome by the fumes while getting out of the tank and died in the fire. They left their weapons behind as they knew they would loose a firefight (being a party of just a few men) and this way they hoped they wouldn't be killed if they got captured. So after wandering around a bit they ran into a German patrol and they surrendered. The thing is, the Germans were more scared of them as they were of the Germans! But they were taken POW and spent the rest of the war as POWs. I don't know where or when, he doesn't speak of that time.

MEGR
03-26-2005, 11:54 PM
Had a distant relative who fought in the Civil War. His name was Joseph Hooker and fought under the Union.

Other than that, I have an uncle who fought in Vietnam in the Quang-Tri province. I don't know if he did any actual fighting, but he doesn't like to talk about it and I leave it at that.

Oh forgot... My cousin works in the NSA and my uncle used to be in the Navy during the mid-90s.

Frank Discussion
03-27-2005, 12:06 AM
My father served in the US Army during the Korean War, he didn't talk much about it but I know he was wounded near the Chosin Reservoir. He would tell me how unsettling it was to hear the Chinese blowing bugles prior to an attack. Later he also served in the USAF and I know he was based at Thule, Greenland.

My younger brother also served in the US Army as did I.

James
03-27-2005, 01:33 AM
My parents are both retired from the Army. Two uncles were in the airforce. One of them was a FAC in Vietnam. I have a cousin who spent almost a year in Iraq with the 1st Cav, and a brother in law who was there for 15 months with the 1st AD. Now he's in the process of becoming a Special Forces officer.
I enlisted in the USMC in 1993 and was on active duty thru 1997. Now I work for a PMC in direct support of the U.S. Gov't in Afghanistan.

memphiz
03-27-2005, 03:32 AM
Moms side:
Father-
Joined the Royal Canadian Engineers in 1939, served in the 10th division Overseas Contsruction Coy. Basicaly digging trenches, building railways etc.. Served until 1945, left the army and became a carpenter and lost 2 fingers, Died in 1962. My mom was 4 at the time.

Mother-
Born in Scottland, and left for England in WW2 to be a nurse. While in England there was a bombing raid done overnight and the next morning when they went to see the damage outside her apartment building they found an unexploded bomb sitting in the courtyard.

Anywho, they met in England, then came back to Canada after the war to start a family etc..

Dads side:
Grandpa-
Joined the Winnipeg Grenadiers and was shipped off to defend Hong Kong in 1939. Was held as a POW by the Japanese for 4 years. Was rescued by the USMC in 1944.

Uncle (grandpas son)-
Joined the RCAF in WW2 and wanted to be a pilot, btu couldnt see well enough. Decided to be a door gunner, but was to big. SO he joined the logistics and bought and sold stuff for the Air Force.

Scagel
03-27-2005, 05:07 AM
Well I just talked to my moms mom about that side of the family so here goes...

My granpa fought against the nazis in serbia (not a chetnik so dont flame me) until he and his wife were forced to leave when Tito started cracking down. My uncle and his family stayed behind and lived through the communist period, but when he was called up to fight in Slobo's army they fled to Greece and moved back after things settled down; now he's enjoying a pretty slack career as a paratrooper (lots of training and partying).
Probably the most interesting story was my great-grandfathers, he fought on the Tsars side (teh whites) during the red revolution. Eventually, he realized that his side was going to lose, but he was committed to not giving up. He told his wife and 2 kids to leave and find a new home, and he stayed behind to fight. Noone heard from him again, and he was 18. RIP :(

Aerosoul
03-27-2005, 05:09 AM
Well I just talked to my moms mom about that side of the family so here goes...

My granpa fought against the nazis in serbia (not a chetnik so dont flame me) until he and his wife were forced to leave when Tito started cracking down. My uncle and his family stayed behind and lived through the communist period, but when he was called up to fight in Slobo's army they fled to Greece and moved back after things settled down; now he's enjoying a pretty slack career as a paratrooper (lots of training and partying).
Probably the most interesting story was my great-grandfathers, he fought on the Tsars side (teh whites) during the red revolution. Eventually, he realized that his side was going to lose, but he was committed to not giving up. He told his wife and 2 kids to leave and find a new home, and he stayed behind to fight. Noone heard from him again, and he was 18. RIP :(

Wow, intriguing. Salute.

Knutsen
03-27-2005, 02:45 PM
My grandparents were too young to fight when spanish civil war started but their brothers (all of them are still alive ) fought for the republican side. They are from Valladolid and Palencia , in the northern half of spain , and Valladolid was one of the strongholds of the fascist forces so they moved to Catalonia to defend Barcelona.
When the war finished all of them but two were captured by the fascists and after spending betweeen 2 and 10 years in prison they returned to civilian life in Spain. Of the two who weren't captured , one of them went to the soviet union in one of the ships the USSR used to rescue republicans and fought his fellow countrymen (again) of Blue Division. He returned safely from the USSR and now lives in Geelong (Australia). The other one went to France and enlinsted Legion Étrangere and fought the nazis in Africa. After the war he moved to Switzerland and never returned to Spain (except during holidays or special events like weddings).

I don't know much about them , personally i've seen them no more than 10 times and always for a short time.

My mom's dad did his military service in artillery near Valladolid. He told me lots of stories about German 88s (he was a loader ). Next time i visit my grandmom i'll aske her for his photos. He passed away in 2000 and i'll never forget him.

My other grandfather did his military service in Tetuán (spanish city in spanish morocco, now belongs to morocco) and returned to Spain but when the Spanish Moroccan war started in 1956 he was sent to Sidi Ifni. He was there but never saw action.

About my norwegian family (3 generations back ) i have no idea of their military past.

maundy
03-28-2005, 10:14 AM
I have a relative who fought in the Boer war.

Grandfather SIB Maritime WW2 in Papua.

Dad Nasho then enlisted.

Oh and my grandfather was a lcpl yet had rank on his shoulder and carried (and took home) a pistol. Something sus there.

foxtrot023
03-28-2005, 12:48 PM
Me: Brigada de Montaña- Mountain Brigade (Reserve). I also worked with SOUTHCOM for 3 years as a civilian contractor. I also saw front row action during Just Cause (and have the pics, that someday i will post here)

My father: Combat engineer Lt., served in the Spanish Sahara.
My uncle: served in the navy

My paternal grandfather: Captain in the Infantry. Fought for the nationalists on the Spanish Civil War.

My Maternal grandfather: Fought with the republicans in the Spanish Civil War.

My great great grandfather: Fought in the carlistas wars. He was one of the ministers for Carlos.

I also have a 500 yrs old relative who was part of an order (I will have my family tree to see which one)

Seiyuuki
03-28-2005, 04:43 PM
Japanese side of my family have root in the Takeda clan back, back in feudal Japan, an uncle who was an Imperial guards during World War II and a cousin who is currently carrying on that tradition. My Vietnamese family root fought the Mongols, the Chinese, the Japanese and my paternal grandfather fought with the Viet Minh against the French. Now when Viet Minh, well, now they are the Viet Cong, came back and as my grandfather to allow my dad, his oldest son, to fight with them against the American, my grandfather took out his AK-47 and chased them away. My dad eventually became company commander with ARVN, one uncle who flew the A-37 Dragonfly for the South Vietnamese Air Force (he still has his graduation certificate, trained in Texas) and another uncle who died in service with the South Vietnamese Navy. My uncle in the Air Force managed to escape to the U.S. in 75's when South Vietnam failed. My dad tried three times to escape, but no luck and was sent to "re-education" camp.

Legion
03-29-2005, 05:26 PM
My paternal grandfather was in the Navy in WWII. My fathers stepfather (has been married to my grandmother for sum 35 years) was in the Marine Corps for 21 years. After leaving his job as a Texas State Trooper he joined the Corp in '65. He served 4 tours in Vietnam from '65 to '69. After leaving the Corp he worked with the CIA, DIA, and a few other alphabet agencies. He recently retired from Governement service and returned to Texas from the Pentagon.

My fathers brother was also a Marine who was an aircraft mechanic on a carrier in '74-'75.

Also my father-in-law was in the Corp in Vietnam '72-'73. He was a USMC liason to the ROK Marines there.

The only family member I have currently is my brother-in-law who is in the Air Force. He has been to Iraq, Oman, and Uzbekistan.

Mamon
03-29-2005, 11:18 PM
My paternal grandfather was US Navy during WWII, served in the Pacific on an oil tanker I believe.
My maternal grandfather was an army captain (surgeon) in the nationalist forces during the Spanish Civil War. He was deployed with units fighting around Madrid and wounded twice. My aunts and uncles have told me countless tales of his bravery.
His youngest brother (my granduncle) was studying during most of the Spanish Civil war but in 1938 he graduated and became an artillery officer in the nationalist forces and was posted around Cordoba. Every male relative of mine since then has served in the armed forces, and atm I have a cousin who is a Colonel in the Spanish Air force.

Elmo
03-30-2005, 05:09 PM
He had wanted to study Forestry in Helsinki, but alas,

Grandfather experienced the Winter War in Karelian Isthmus straight out of Reserve Officer School and survived, although a surgeon wanted to amputate his frozen feet. (sounds like a cliche but it is true)

During the brief peace, he was forced to take a fast schooling in the Military Academy, as there was need for more professional officers.

Then came the Continuation War. All I know is that he was with JRI
(Infantry Regiment I) in late spring of 1944. The regiment was in Valkeasaari in Karelian Isthmus, all too relaxed and preoccupied with anything but serious warmaking, after all, there had been a long long lull in the fighting.

Then, on June 9, all hell broke loose. The Soviets wanted to brake Finnish defences in Valkeasaari, and they sure did it. The attack was supported by one of the biggest artillery barrages of the whole WWII (this is what many sources claim, I just don't know how it can be measured)...anyway, the barrage could be heard all the way in Helsinki.

What was soon left of the Regiment was running away in disorder, retreating and leaving everything behind. And boy did they run! Nobody can blame them.

Well, my grandfather survived, as he was with signals, already behind the main line of defence and scattered in the woods. He stayed in the army and retired an Lt.Col.

During his last years as a demented old man he would wake up screaming "Take cover!" and such. It was Valkeasaari all over again for him.

ShotOver
03-31-2005, 11:34 AM
Me mum's dad was a mechanic in the RAAF, based in England for the whole war, he worked mainly on the langcaster Bomber(Sp?).
My Grand Uncle (Fathers Side) was dishonorably discharged for pulling gold teeth from Japanese POW's (Live and Dead, not always pulling them out).
Another member of my family on my mothers side, I THINK it was my Grandfathers, Fathers brother was killed at the battle of the Somme by a chunk of German shrapnal with his initials painted on it. German graffitti, was pure co-incidence. True story.
Also another family member of mine, mothers side during WW2 was involved in a bomb raid over Germany and while flying information noticed the above planes bomb-doors were stuffed and were about to drop their bombs, so he pulled away, but the plane behind him took his place and was hit by falling bombs.
Great Grandfather's two brothers were sappers in the Australian Army in WW1, both came back and dug trenches in their front yard for thier children to play in.
One of my mothers cousin went to the Falklands after he signed up for the Army, took a round in the eye if i remember correctly. Don't really know what he is upto now.
That is all I can remember at the moment that are interesting stories. Had alot of my mothers side simply not come back from WW1 and WW2, same on my dads side without any odd stories.

I am the first to join as the Navy, hope I break my family's un-lucky streak :lol:

sharpe
04-01-2005, 06:05 PM
Well, I don't know many stories about my father's family during the war. My mothers side is different however.

My granddad flew flying boats for the Royal Netherlands Navy during WW2. He was stationed in what is now Indonesia. My grandmother joined him there just before the occupation of Holland.

in 1942 as Java surrendered to the Japanese, my grandmother and my mother, who was born in 1940, were like so many others all across Asia put into camps. They would move and be found five years later by my grandfather.

My grandfather was/is a lucky man. He survived being shot down twice. Not so very long ago, I found out he was a survivor of the Japanese raid on Broome. He told me he was taking of with his Dornier flying boat as a Zero came at him headon. As they had open gas canisters aboard for a long overland flight, his plane burst into flames nearly immediatly. He made it out alive though.

I recently found out that his brother in law was in the Dutch Green Berets (KCT, commandos) I don't know what he did though.

Macs.
04-01-2005, 06:36 PM
Fathers Site:
Grandfather - Wehrmacht - KIA on the eastern front.

Mothers Site:
Grandfather - Wehrmacht - MIA on the Normandy, D-Day.

Both great-grandfathers died during WW1.

Its a shame that I still don't know much about my grandfathers, expect one photo from my Grandfather, on fathers side.

James
04-02-2005, 01:06 AM
THanks for sharing Macs.

I went to grade school in Germany, courtesy of the U.S. Army. THere was an older German woman who worked in the hospital for my mom who had been in her 20s in Stuttgart during the bombings in 1944 and 1945. I don't know if they're still around, but in the 1980s there were still big tower bomb shelters in the cuty. SHe had to shelter their often.
My famly and I lived on the economy, and one man we got to know a little bit was a vet of the Eastern Front. That was all he ever said about it - that he had been there.

Laconian
04-02-2005, 09:38 AM
Several great uncles on my mother's side enlisted in the Army right after Pearl Harbor. One became a door gunner on a B-17 and developed battle fatigue after 20 something missions. He died shortly after the war, & I never met him. The other two wound up in the infantry, one going ashore with the Big Red One at Omaha Beach. He was wounded in the hedgerow fight and told me the story of how his squad leader left him holding prisoners with an empty M1 cause they couldn't spare the ammo. He later returned and joined the 69th IN Division through the rest of the camaign in NW Europe. His brother was assigned as a lifeguard to what is now MacDill AFB. It was hysterical when I was home on leave from either West Point or the Army to see these old guys argue about their time in the service. The one that was in Europe always grilled me about weapons (he was a big fan of the BAR), tactics and such, while the other always asked about chow and if I ever made it to the O-club pool at MacDill. Then the insults would start. Very typical vets, very typical brothers, very typical Italian-American: arms waving shouting at each other in English, cursing at each other in Italian, hugging each other when they were through. Hilarious guys.

On my dad's side (7 boys + 2 girls), 2 of the brothers went Navy. One was an Army Combat Engineer in Korea ('50-'52). One went in the Coast Guard ('50-'53). My dad was an infantryman in the 4th ID in Germany ('54-'56). When I was a kid I'd ask him if he was in the war, and he replied he fought in the Battle of the Bars. He turned down an appointment to the WP Prep school, to get married, but that never worked out. It was kind of appropriate that I graduated from WP about 30 years later...

wiking
04-02-2005, 02:26 PM
None of my norwegian relatives fought in WW2, both my grandfathers were little kids, and my great grandfather showed up and volunteered but was denied due to being to old.

But my grandfather on my fathers side was drafted into the Army and sent to Germany as a part of the British occupational force in 1952, and served there for 6 months. Around that time there was talk about sending Norwegian troops to Korea, and if they had decided to do so my grandfather might have been sent there.

My grandfather on my mothers side tried to evade military service in the early 50's, but when the ship he had joined went to another port in Norway instead of going abroad he was dragged of by MP's (not literally speaking) and served in the Navy.

i have distant relatives in the US, decendants of relatives who emigrated.
atleast one fought for the north in the civil war, and died of wounds received during the Cickamauga (sp?) campaign, and 2 relatives served in North africa and italy in WW2, i met them but was told not to ask about it as it was a subject they didn't talk about.

Another relative was a radar operator on a ship in the pacific.

Not exactly a military experience, but a story i remember very well, my grandmother was very little during WW2, and she remembers once when German soldiers came on a house search. As they were standing in their living room, one young soldier bent down and looked at my grandmother and said "i have a little girl just like you back home", i'll remember that story for as long as i live.

That is as far as i know the military history of my family and relatives.
I allso have one relative who is an helicopter technician and was wounded in Iraq.

Lokos
04-02-2005, 02:56 PM
My great-grandfather began his military career in 1912, when he fought for Serbia in the Balkan Wars (1912-1913). They kept him in the army as an infantryman and he fought throughout 1914-1918 (non-stop), going through all the travails the Serbian Army itself went through (the 1914-1915 successes, the encirclement/retreat, the re-organization on Corfu and then the counter-offensive in Salonika). Then, in 1918, he went to Russia to fight for the Whites. He stayed there until 1922 (fighting the whole time), and then he finally made it back to Serbia sometime in early 1923.

His wife, who hadn't seen him since 1914, nearly died of shock.

That's ten years of constant, high intensity warfare... and the bugger got through it with nothing but a leg wound.

My grandfather's brothers fought in WW2 (one as a Chetnik, one as a Partizan). He joined the Army after the war (too young to have fought) and ended his career in the Reserves as a Major in the artillery.

My uncle had a short stint in the 1991-1995 war in the border fighting. But, apart from that, no family veterans in that specific war.

And I fought in KiM during the 1998-1999 war.

I have other relatives who work for the Ministry of Defense, but we're only talking combat duty here, right?

Lokos

Macs.
04-02-2005, 07:23 PM
My famly and I lived on the economy, and one man we got to know a little bit was a vet of the Eastern Front. That was all he ever said about it - that he had been there.

I have another relative who was 17 at the end of the war, and joined the Waffen-SS.

He was a POW and was in a jail in Sibyria until 1955 (If I remember right), and when he came back he never ever talked one word about the war.


THere was an older German woman who worked in the hospital for my mom who had been in her 20s in Stuttgart during the bombings in 1944 and 1945. I don't know if they're still around, but in the 1980s there were still big tower bomb shelters in the cuty.

Yeah, my Grandmother lost all her familiy members during the bombing of Stuttgart. (Father, Mother, Brother, and Sister.)

Opening Batsman
04-03-2005, 01:40 AM
My Grand Uncle (Fathers Side) was dishonorably discharged for pulling gold teeth from Japanese POW's (Live and Dead, not always pulling them out).
rofl Typical Aussie. ;)

Like I said, the National Archives of Australia just got back to me the service record of my Uncle, but I can't work out where he was posted.
He went AWL for a while, and on a seperated occasion the record reads, "Without orders leaving his guard. Admonished." :lol: I also found out he was a Lance Corporal by the end. I wish I had had time to talk to him before he died. :(
My Great Grandfather who I talked about in the 60th Battalion on the Western Front during WW1, he was punished for "Taking a bath without a permit". :P

Lurch
04-03-2005, 11:37 AM
.

The_MadMan
04-04-2005, 04:00 AM
The only remotely war related thing in my family is that my grand parents on my mothes side hid a jew from the Nazis.

Guess we are not really a military family..

TheBelgian
04-04-2005, 05:59 AM
My great grandpa was a soldier in World War I and a Major in WWII.

In WWI he was finghting in the trenches in Flanders Fields. After a few years, instead of waiting to get shot or blown up, he decided to get sent home in a more stylish way. He ate too much chocolate (which was in plentifull suply for the belgian soldiers since it stays good long and, well, we're belgian) and he got a bad liver disease. He got sent home from the front and spent the last few months of the war recovering in a hospital. To this day i still dont know if he did it on purpose, but I love the story. :lol:

Eryx
04-04-2005, 08:27 AM
I can trace my ancestry to the Dumontville clan, a norman clan. They participated in the conquest of sicily. From my mother side, her grandfather was at verdun. Plus a long list of military tradition. My great grand father was a bavarian, he thought in the german army. But my grand father moved to alsace in 1923 fought against the german early during WW2, the irony. No collaborators run into the norman lines of pure blood, lot of train derailling by great uncles, they much have hated the germans gut, the proud people they were.

wiking
04-04-2005, 01:16 PM
Forigners on a student visa can be drafted, asked a teacher i had who lived and studied in the US and he was drafted but didn't go. I think he *****ed loud and long enough about the fact that he wasn't an American citizen so he finished his education and buggered off back home fast as he could.

Ichhabe
04-04-2005, 01:22 PM
A friend of mine was on his way to Australia where his parents had migrated the year before. He got a cable from his mother where she begged him not to enter cause he had won the lottery.
Without being an Australian citizen and without having set his foot on Australian soil, he was to be send to Vietnam.
First time he was in Australia to visit his parents was in 1990 or 91 when he was not wanted by the police anymore.

11F5S
04-05-2005, 12:47 AM
Forigners on a student visa can be drafted, asked a teacher i had who lived and studied in the US and he was drafted but didn't go. I think he *****ed loud and long enough about the fact that he wasn't an American citizen so he finished his education and buggered off back home fast as he could.

Why in the world would he have registered with the Selective Service System if he was on a student visa??

ALIENS ** REQUIRED TO REGISTER?

Lawful non-immigrants on visas (e.g., diplomatic and consular personnel and families, foreign students, tourists with unexpired visas (Forms I-94, I-95A), or those with Border Crossing Documents (Forms I-185, I-186, I-444). No

Permanent resident aliens. Yes

Special (seasonal) agricultural workers (Form I-688). Yes

Special agricultural workers (Form I-688A). No

Refugee, parolee, and asylee aliens. Yes

Undocumented (illegal) aliens. Yes


NOTE: Immigrants who did not enter the United States or maintained their lawful non-immigrant status by continually remaining on a valid visa until after they were 26 years old were never required to register. Also, immigrants born before 1960 who did not enter the United States or maintained their lawful non-immigrant status by continually remaining on a valid visa until after March 29, 1975 were never required to register.

EasyC
04-05-2005, 04:48 AM
someone remind me....

there was some place, that had aussie soldiers and it was being over run by Japs (im sure), anyway, I think Canberra bombers were sent over to get the people out of there. Anyway have any idea what im talking about?

and yes, the answer will lead to further explanation of what im going on about!

but does anyone know? I think it may have been in/near PNG, or some place like that. Ambon maybe?

Opening Batsman
04-05-2005, 04:59 AM
Maybe Rabaul? But that is just a guess.

DrunkenGuinness
04-07-2005, 05:39 AM
yeah it was too bad really, Japs bombed vegemite. btw are there any colored races who kicked rednecks ass?

Uhlan
04-07-2005, 06:21 AM
I had a Great-Uncle Schicklegruber in WWII but the family doesn't like to talk about it.

James
04-07-2005, 11:42 AM
yeah it was too bad really, Japs bombed vegemite. btw are there any colored races who kicked rednecks ass?

In WWI the Germans hated French colonial soldiers from Morocco and Senegal. Then of course there are Indians and Ghurkas.

Hellfish
04-07-2005, 03:00 PM
Great idea, James.

My dad's dad was a B-24 crewman in the South Pacific. My dad has my gradfather's squadron memorial book, I remember their logo was a pirate, but I can't recall anything beyond that. I'm pretty sure they were based in New Guinea, though. After the war, he stuck with the Army when the Army and Air Force broke off, got a commission, and was a tank company commander during the Korean War. He retired in '70, I think, after being my dad's commanding officer in the Army Reserve's 85th Division based out of Chicago. He died long before I was born and my dad doesn't talk about him much...

My dad enlisted in '65, never got sent to Vietnam (Thank God). Got a commission in the infantry around '68, IIRC and retired as a Lt.Col. in the 85th Division in '85.

My mom's dad was an artillery forward observer in WW2. He and his brother landed at Normandy shortly after the invasion. He was with the 95th Division. I don't recall the details, but he was awarded the Bronze Star at some point - I think it was for repairing commo lines while under fire - and my uncle inheireted the medal when my granddad died about 10 years ago. I inheireted a gigantic swastika when my granddad passed away that he took as a war trophy. I still have it in a box in my closet. It's one of my few treasured possesions.

I myself enlisted in 1995 as an infantryman in the Illinois Guard. In all honesty, I just joined for some fun and college money (Illinois has veteran grants that pretty much pays for everything). The best benefit about being in the Guard was that you could volunteer for anything at any time. In my 6 years in, I was deployed to Germany (att. 1-4th Inf at Hohenfels), Fort Irwin (att. 2-11th ACR), JRTC (att. 29th Inf Bde) and Kuwait (ARCENT) and trained with the British Army. It worked out really well because I could finish a semester of school and go off to be a soldier for a few months, then come back and be a student again in the fall. I finished my enlistment in July of 2001. I tried reenlisting on 9-11, but when I called my old unit I couldn't get through, and my parents and girlfriend at the time convinced me it was a bad idea anyways, so I finished my degree and went to work for minimum wage after graduation... :oops:

b.scheller
04-08-2005, 01:22 AM
My Grand-Grand-Grand Father, Julius Röehr (my mother's grandfather) was a Obergefreiter (Corporal)l in the Imperial German Army during the First World War.

Although Polish, his homeland had been partitioned, by the three superpowers. Thus he lived on the Prussian/German side, and was drafted into the German Army.

He fought on the Eastern Front, in the First World War and was taken captive by the Russians, in 1915.

Sent to Siberia, he escaped from the P.O.W camp within the cold desolate Russian climate, and made it back to Poland in six years. By the time he got back, Russia no longer existed.

His son, would later refuse to become a Deutsch Volk, and was *****ped of his name and forced by the German authority to stop using the o-umlaut, due to his refusal to accept his German ethnic origins.

My grand-grandfather on my step fathers side, was a intelligence officer by the rank of major in the Polish Army. He fought in the war but avoided capture after the defeat in 1939. He continued to gather intelligence afterwards.

His son, was a Special Commando officer within the LWP after the war. His unit was to be sent to North Korea for supposed help. Luckily, the mission was called off, due to the pressure of Moscow.

My grandfather Arkadiusz Scheller, was sent to a forced labour camp, where he spent the rest of the war, as for my other grandfather Jan Roehr, had lived in obscurity during the remnent of the war.

My grandfathers relatives, fought in the Warsaw Uprising of 1944, one of his cousins was an officer in the Anders Army and fought at numerous places.

As for the German living Scheller family, that was releted to my grandfather, my grandfathers cousin thrice removed, was a sailor aboard a U-Boat. Lost both legs, I'm not quite aware of the reasons behind it but lived after the war in total shame and abandonement.

I'm the first in my family, who has not yet served in the Armed Forces. My step father was a draftee in the LWP in the early 1980's.

Rossdobby
04-08-2005, 08:55 PM
My Grandfather was a top gunner on a Landcaster for the Canadian Airforce. All I know was that he was a flight LT

ramy
04-09-2005, 05:50 AM
My dad took part in the 1973 war against Israel. He was an officer in the Egyptian Army. He had his own SAM site. One of the neghboring SAM sites shot down a large Isreali spy plane; needless to say the day after that happened the Israelis retaliated and bombed those sam sites. My dads friend who ran a neighboring SAM got his legs blown off and subsequently died. He said they were dropping like 500 pound bombs at that time and it was pretty scary nothing like now a days where bombs are sometimes the sizes of small cars...

wiking
04-09-2005, 06:40 AM
My grandfather was in the navy sometime in the 50's, and once they were doing an exercise with a torpedo with a training warhead.

Anyway, the torpedo was to be fired on a ship, set to go under it and then the training warhead would make it float up to the surface to be picked up.

The guys picking it up were waiting and waiting and didn't find it. they knew it had been launched but it just didn't float up. So most likely it either went of course or it sank. So they radio to the target ship and ask if they've seen it. The respoce comes "yeah, we've got it in the Asdic room (sonar)" :lol:

Thing was set to shallow and smashed straight through the ships hull.
Might be a rumor, might be true. But it's a good story anyway.

2RHPZ
04-12-2005, 08:10 AM
My great-great grandfather served in WWI in the Austrian army and was killed in 1915 at Italy/Slovenia border. My great grandfather was NCO - tortured to death by communists in 1953 because he shown satisfaction with the death of Communist president Gottwald (one of the worst Stalin´s servants). My dad served two and half years as a conscript (during Cuban crisis) in the tank regiment of Czechoslovakian people Army.

S'13
04-12-2005, 10:42 AM
My father was a Paratrooper in the Six Day War, took part in the take over of the Temple Mount. He became deaf in his left ear after a Jordanian mortar shell exploded not far from him. He also took part in the Yom Kippur War and countless operations (including Operation Inferno in 1968 and Operation Litani in 1978).

Static
04-12-2005, 05:05 PM
ok here's how mine goes.

Granfather McGillivary - A U.S Marine, was deployed to Viet 'Nam. I know that he was a Sergant. My family doesn't really tell me a whole lot about him because I guess after the war or sometime even later he became a huge alcoholic, deserted his family, and eventually died in a car crash while drinking and driving (go figure).

Granfather Morris - He served 20 years in the U.S Navy and was a Chief Petty Officer. No one in my family tells me of the things he did simply because he never told them. But what i do know is that he flew some sort of plane, I think a transport or something and when he was serving in Viet 'Nam. He eventually died of cancer in 1997 or 1998 I can't remember.

Granfather Aikin - I have no idea if he served or not but I do know that he built planes for the U.S Air Force. I think he was one of those contractor peoples of some sort. He died last year of cancer or somethign I'm not for certain.

But yeah that's my military family history that I know or, except for the Scottish side of me. You guys ever seen Brave Heart? Well that blue and white sign that Mel Gibson paints on his face is my Clan's logo or sign, it has a techinical name of somesort but I'm uncertain of what it's called.

Static
04-12-2005, 05:09 PM
ok here's how mine goes.

Granfather McGillivary - A U.S Marine, was deployed to Viet 'Nam. I know that he was a Sergant. My family doesn't really tell me a whole lot about him because I guess after the war or sometime even later he became a huge alcoholic, deserted his family, and eventually died in a car crash while drinking and driving (go figure).

Granfather Morris - He served 20 years in the U.S Navy and was a Chief Petty Officer. No one in my family tells me of the things he did simply because he never told them. But what i do know is that he flew some sort of plane, I think a transport or something and when he was serving in Viet 'Nam. He eventually died of cancer in 1997 or 1998 I can't remember.

Granfather Aikin - I have no idea if he served or not but I do know that he built planes for the U.S Air Force. I think he was one of those contractor peoples of some sort. He died last year of cancer or somethign I'm not for certain.

But yeah that's my military family history that I know or, except for the Scottish side of me. You guys ever seen Brave Heart? Well that blue and white sign that Mel Gibson paints on his face is my Clan's logo or sign, it has a techinical name of somesort but I'm uncertain of what it's called.

radx
04-12-2005, 05:11 PM
My grandfather faught the Japanese during ww2 along side American Paratroopers and with the British Commandos. He was a Bren Gunner.

My great uncle was KIA during WW2 as a pilot for the RAF somewhere in Europe.

Most recently my distant cousin was KIA in Iraq via IED. He was a recon dude.

roland
04-14-2005, 07:09 PM
All that are little stories [franckly I didn't read all yet]: do you have an ancestor that had eaten his colonel ? I'm sure not. Me yes :)
He was in the Napoleon army in Spain and got prisonner by .. the British I don't remember in witch battle (what the Brits were doing in Spain, I don't know too, may be were pissing Napoleon off, as if he didn't had enough problems with the Spaniars but that is an other story) So he was prisonner with his group and was sent on a tiny Island: Cabrerra. and they forgotten them ....... :| Once the prisoners eat everything on the island, they started to die of starvation. After the war, when each camp had to release there prisonners, the Brits had there memory refreshen by the French about those prisonners and they rushed to the island. Most of the prisonners were dead and, since there had been acts of canibalism and since my ancestor survived, in the family, we say he eaten his colonel :lol:
All that is true, there was a book about it where my family name appears.
bloody Rosbif.. p-)

Next time, if you're nice, I'll talk to you of my ancestor that had eaten the Elephant of the Vincenne zoo near Paris ;)

HavocIRL
04-15-2005, 09:35 PM
My grandfather was in the LDF(Local Defence Forces) during WW2. He was taking part in a training exercise with no live ammo on him when a German plane crashed down near where his section was training. The officer, eager for medals, ordered them over to the wreckage whereupon(In my grandfathers words) a giant blonde haired, blue eyed luftwaffe pilot stepped out of the wreckage. He took a step towards them and looked at the men around him with their weapons(Without ammo) pointed at him and then quick as a flash drew his pistol. The men in the section were just about to dive for cover when he flicks the pistol around and hands it to the officer who was a bit shocked at the sight of it. The German was imprisoned for the rest of the war. My grandfather told me that the pilot settled in Ireland after the war but I'm not sure whereabout.

His brother, joined up with the British army. he fought with the 50th division in Normandy. While clearing out a farm house a few miles from the beaches, his platoon were attacked by some Germans. After a short fight the Germans waved a white flag. My granduncle and another chap were sent forward to capture them while the rest of the platoon covered them. All the Germans came forward at once except 2 who were behind the main group. As my granduncle moved toward them, one of the men leaned forward to reveal a machine gun strapped to his back, the other man pulled the trigger and sprayed the two soldiers. However the man with the machine gun leaned forward too far and ended up shooting both soldiers in the legs and shins. the British Platoon returned fire and killed both the Germans.

The other guy was wounded and evacuated. My granduncle got one of his arteries severed and lost a leg. Luckily the field hospitals at the beaches were only 10 mins march from the front so he didn't die.

memphiz
04-16-2005, 04:46 PM
Moms side:
Father-
Joined the Royal Canadian Engineers in 1939, served in the 10th division Overseas Contsruction Coy. Basicaly digging trenches, building railways etc.. Served until 1945, left the army and became a carpenter and lost 2 fingers, Died in 1962. My mom was 4 at the time.

Mother-
Born in Scottland, and left for England in WW2 to be a nurse. While in England there was a bombing raid done overnight and the next morning when they went to see the damage outside her apartment building they found an unexploded bomb sitting in the courtyard.

Anywho, they met in England, then came back to Canada after the war to start a family etc..

Dads side:
Grandpa-
Joined the Winnipeg Grenadiers and was shipped off to defend Hong Kong in 1939. Was held as a POW by the Japanese for 4 years. Was rescued by the USMC in 1944.

Uncle (grandpas son)-
Joined the RCAF in WW2 and wanted to be a pilot, btu couldnt see well enough. Decided to be a door gunner, but was to big. SO he joined the logistics and bought and sold stuff for the Air Force.
My mom also had an uncle who was blown up by a land mine (was thrown at him) and another uncle was robbed and murdered on a ship in ww2.
I also have a great great great grandpa who served in the B69 1st Company Battery of the Belgian army.
http://img23.exs.cx/img23/6587/Haegeman.jpg

walford
04-18-2005, 03:35 PM
My father was an NCO in the 535th US Army Engineer detachment and participated in the construction and maintainence of the worlds 1st floating nuclear power plant [regardless of what the Russians might say] the MH-1A Sturgis. She powered the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal from 1968 until decommissioned in the mid-1970s.
http://www.almc.army.mil/alog/issues/SepOct01/MS684.htm

-=TFN=-Karab
04-22-2005, 06:53 PM
My father is currently serving in the US Army. When he was 18, he was on a bus to Boot Camp (USMC) one week after school was out. After a few years of service he got out. Tried to get a job. Figured military was much better. Joined the National Guard for college cash. Slapped him into a tank without any training--- he did fine. Got out of that. Then finally joined Active in Army. I won't give too much specific detail about his position-- but he's got a G-3 position working here at the USASOC HQ at Bragg p-) Given 20+ years to the country and has loved it all. PCSing to McDill AFB for a higher position for USSOC this summer(rather than USASOC). WOOT! Florida here I come!!

Three of my uncles (on my father's side) have served in the Army. Two of them got out, one of them is still in (last time I checked) as an Infantryman for the Army.

One of my cousins just got out of the USMC after being deployed to Iraq twice and Haiti once. Had his finger sliced off from his machete while sheathing it (disrupted sheath). USMC pays him medical pensions for the faulty equipment. But he said it severed all the nerves and he didn't feel a thing-- they sewed it back on. His wife doesn't like it (USMC life) so they moved back to Oregon to take care of their newborns. He was stationed here at Lejeune.

Another one of my cousins is currently serving in the Navy. I have hardly ever talked to him-- living the life of an Army Brat doesn't keep you close to home-- so I don't know exactly what he does. He joined up about two years ago.

My mom's side of the family... All the males have served in their Army because Korea (South) has cumpulsory service for all "normal" males. None ever stayed in it for longer than the required service time however.

Back to my father's side... Our first ancestor to arrive in North America came from Germany (I suppose for search of work). He arrived in the mid 1700s. What's BEAUTIFUL though is that he served on the Colonial side against the British as a 1st Lieutenant during the War for Independence :) We have his service number and everything--- it's in the 3000s (I'd rather not put up the number because I don't want any psychos to look it up and find out our family's last name-- nothing personal p-) ). Which is something we all admire. He was one of the first three thousand or so to serve this country. I guess it is in our blood to be patriotic.

And now... I'm going to carry on the legacy. I figure as soon as I get out of High School-- I'll either go to college on an ROTC scholarship (no, I don't have high hopes-- I'm rather a very intelligent kid.... in the top of my class) or join up and go Infantry my first three years. What I do is undecided as of yet. But, a friend of mine (who is in the Army currently) said "Go Infantry your first three years because then when you switch MOS's everyone will think you are hardcore." p-) I love this country, I love this military, I want to be a part of it.

wiking
04-23-2005, 06:51 AM
This is a story i've heard from my sister.

A girl in her class had a grandfather or great grandfather who was planning to emigrate to the US in the early 1900's.

He got a ticket, sailed to england to board a ship, but managed to miss it.
He was of course very angry about this, spending lots of time and money just to miss the bloody boat.

He turned out to be one of the luckyest men in the world, the ship he missed was the Titanic.

As far as i know he canceled his plans to move to America and stayed in Norway.

barake
05-02-2005, 10:02 PM
my grandfather was at midway just before the battle. he was drug all over the pacific during WWII installing and working on sonar and radar stuff, which was pretty new back then. came home and worked on pinball machines, and later arcade machines till he died about 15 years ago. his ship was sunk in the coral sea. not many people survived, they were in the water for 3 days, and there were sharks. sharks on tv or movies would cause him to have bad dreams for weeks.

my two uncles were both in vietnam, my dad had an existing foot injury and he couldn't sign up. my oldest uncle has all kinds of interesting stories. he was a radio operator on a ship, and spent a ton of time on land, too.

a few years ago my cousin joined the army, and ended up in the rangers. he has since been discharged. he is not in good shape, mentally, anymore.

both sides of my family fought in the civil war, and some are even famous. i need to look up info on them sometime.. should be interesting.

Dexx
05-08-2005, 09:31 AM
My grand father was born in 1916 and joined the Wehrmacht in 1936 after being mistreated by his employer and couldn't find another job. He served in the 487 Inf Reg/ 267 Inf Div( http://www.feldgrau.com/InfDiv.php?ID=178 ) from Belgium over the Channel Coast in France , the battle of encirlcement of Minsk and Byalistok to Moscow with the 4. Panzerarmee in late 1941. He got the Iron Cross II and I. Close to Moscow he was taken POW by the Russians. He once told me the story of this event: He was hiding with two other soldiers in a field. Then a Russian unit came out of the blue and began shooting at them. One of the soldiers ran away and my grandfather didn't know what then happened to him. He and the other one threw away their rifles and gave up. Standing there, the Russians came over and gave the other soldier a headshot. Then he was taken POW until 1950. He once told me that he didn't wish his worst enemy to endure the time of being a POW in Russia; must have been horrible. Another thing what stayed in my mind was that he said he lost the best years of his life in the war/Russia.

His brother served in Norway. When he should be transferred to Russia the plain crushed and he died.

My grand grandfather served in WW1 and got instantly killed by a headshot at Verdun.

wiking
05-08-2005, 09:45 AM
Great story Dexx, your grandfather was lucky to be one of the few who made it back. Who did his brother serve with, and where in Norway was he based?

This is the story of the grandfather or great grandfather of a girl who went to school with my sister.

while he was young he made plans to emigrate to america, he saved up money and bought a ticket. He got on a boat to England where he was to board a ship bound for America.

Unfortunately he managed to come in just a little bit to late and missed the boat. He was pissed as hell, alot of time and money had gone into this trip, and now he missed the ship.

In hindsight, he was among the luckyest buggers in the world, the ship he missed was the Titanic. I assume he went home to norway and stayed here.

RSK
05-11-2005, 12:47 AM
Both of my grandfathers were about 13 to 15 years old when the war ended in 1945. They lived around the city of Knin in the province of Dalmatia, Yugoslavia.

Upon the occupation of Yugoslavia by the Axis Dalmatia was incorporated into the Independent State of Croatia.
http://www.pavelicpapers.com/documents/isc/index.html

Upon the establishment of the ISC mass murder and the Ustasa program of genocide against Serbs, Jews and Gypsys began thankfully my grandparents survived the Ustasa slaughter of 1941-1942, mostly thanks to the Serbian Chetnik Uprising of 1941 against the Ustasa.
http://www.ravnagorachetniks.org/istorija_e_2.asp

My greatgrandfathers from my fathers and mothers sides were both Chetniks in with the Dinaric Chetnik Division under the command of Duke Momcilo Djujic who was under the command of allied General Dragoljub Draza Mihailovic in Serbia.

As Chetniks with the DCD, my g. grandfathers helped establish a safe area for Serbs of Dalmatia, Lika, W. Bosnia from further Ustasa slaughter.

But,as you can read on http://www.ravnagorachetniks.org/istorija_e_2.asp the DCD was attacked by Communist bands under the command of Josip Broz Tito.

With the backstabbing actions of G. Britain giving aid to the Communists my Grandfathers in the DCD retreated to Italy and further into the free world. Settling in England and Canada.

As for my grandfathers they stayed behind in 'occupied' Yugoslavia under Communist rule not being able to get good jobs or security because their fathers were Chetniks and fought on the allied side.

Picture Links:

One of my g. grandfathers
Standing Top Right:
http://www.pogledi.co.yu/galerija/dcd/jedinice/7V.jpg

My Great-Grandfather from my mothers side in the middle:
http://media.militaryphotos.net/photos/albums/album203/aab.sized.jpg

DCD Commander Vojvoda "Duke" Momcilo Djujic:
http://www.pogledi.co.yu/galerija/dcd/vojvoda/index.php

Officers and Guerills of the DCD:
http://www.pogledi.co.yu/galerija/dcd/vojnici/index.php
http://www.pogledi.co.yu/galerija/dcd/jedinice/index.php


Cheers!

RSK

TuNeRsHaRk
05-15-2005, 10:27 PM
my great grandfather lived in Drammen Norway and worked with the norwegian partisans there.

they planned to rescue a few friends from one of the jails there so they bought alot of Liquor and got the german guards drunk then they hired some beautiful norwegian women to seduse or keep the germans busy while they emptied the cells, after they had gotten all the people out of the jail they dressed like german soldiers and marched the prisoners across town, after the mission was a success someone ratted them out and my great grandfather was taken to a camp where he was tortured. but he did make it out alive. this is all a true story and can be found in a book i have laying around about Drammen During the war but i cant remember the name of it.

Catch22
05-18-2005, 11:03 PM
My grandfather from mothers side, and his brother went looking for work to Belgium in the early 1930s', worked as miners there for some time to eventually end up in French Foreign Legion in mid 30's, they were sent to Algeria and some other colonies too. By the time of WWII their Regiment was stationed in France, but Im not sure what was their combat history. All in all both ended in POW camp until liberated in '44 by Americans. Then my grandfather returned to Poland shortly after the end of the war, his brother on the other hand returned to the Legion, he was a sergant there. Later his unit was sent to Indochina where he died on malaria in 1947, but certain date still remains unverified.

My grandfather from father's side was a Russian, a talented engineer he worked at some military facility during WWII.

CONSERVATIVE53
05-21-2005, 09:11 PM
My great Grandfather was a machine gunner in WWI. My Grandad was stationed on a battle ship in the Pacific during WWII, he would have been one of the soldiers to invade mainland Japan if we didn't drop the A bombs. My Grandfather was a Doc on an aircraft carrier in Korea. I have three uncles that were in Vietnam, two were in the Navy, and one was a marine sniper who was at Hue during Tet.

meph.
05-24-2005, 09:01 AM
last year i contacted the german archive for former wehrmacht soldiers, they have the complete unit history of nearly every person who ever did anything in the german army. i had to wait 6 months for the answer letter, but the informations i got were very interesting.

my mothers' dad (i dont say grandfather to him because he died before i was born) joined the Waffen SS in 1940. in 1941 he participiated in 'Unternehmen Barbarossa', the raid on the soviet union, he was in a SS Division in the Heeresgruppe Süd (Krim, Oilfields of Baku...). in 1941 he got wounded for the first time, shot in the left lower leg by a russian semi auto rifle, joined the troops again 4 weeks later and was restationed with his unit in yugoslavia for anti partisan fighting. in 1943 he was wounded again in the same leg, but he staied with his unit, in 1944 he joined the 13. SS division "Handschar - kroatische Nummer 1", was wounded again in the _same_ leg and was then sent to germany as some kind of drill seargent in a SS training camp. in 1945 he got captured by the brits, braught to england where he had to repair war damages as a POW until 1948/9. they asked him to stay there but he refused and returned to austria, where he married my grandmother, who still lives in our hometown. he died in 1971 when my mum was 14.
im not proud that he was in the SS, but it was his choice and times were different.

my other grandfather was in a german mountain division until he got capured by the americans in 1944. in 1943 he got the iron cross second class, but i still dont know for what reason. his unit history was very undetailed.
he died in 1991, was a great man, i loved him.

a great uncle of mine was a flight technician in a messerschmidt facility, had something to do with the first jet engines and knew wernher von braun. sadly i dont know anything about him, except that the americans asked him to immigrate to the US for flight/rocket research proposes, but he refused for a reason i cant remember. hm.

Kicius
05-24-2005, 09:13 AM
My grandfather from the father's side served in HMG squadron 1st Uhlan Regiment in September 1939 and his cousin served as AT rifle gunner in this regiment.

On 11th september - during one of the most tragic events of september campaign (battle between two polish units - uhlan regiment and infantry battalion when many good people died - including 1st Uhlan Regiment commander) my grandfather's horse was killed, and he lost his boot under the horse's body. Separated from his unit, he decided to return home, but about week later was arrested by Russians. He was lucky - because he was simple soldier, so they let him free few hours later.
During the ocupation he served in Homeland Army - probably as a engineer platoon comander (but we are not sure ). In june 1944 almost every male from grandfather's family were executed by Germans during village pacification - but grandfather again managed to escape. After the war - he was again arrested by Russians and spend some time in coal mine.He died in 1987.

My grandfather from mothers side was too young to fight in WWII, but was almost executed by Germans, when they find Jewish hideout in his village. To this day he don't understand why they let him, and his family free.
My grandmother spend four years on german farm as a "slave'.
He also was very lucky, because they treated her very well (As she said it was realy rare). Maybe because of fact, that she was very young, and they lost their only son in 1941 on eastern front.

Pandy
05-30-2005, 10:11 PM
My Great-Grandpops service with the Marines during World War 1. That's all we know of him, fact that we never knew how he was killed over there but only that he was killed.

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My Grandpops on my Dad's side serviced in World War 2, and Vietnam with the 82nd airborne. He was part of the 82nd airborne jumps in D-Day and Holland in 1944. He said they were sent to Berlin for occupation duty, and then returned to the United Sates in 1946.

He said from 1949 till Tet, they were just training and training and training. He was then sent to the Dominican Republic during their civil war in 1965. He was back in the US the same year.

During the Tet Offensive, he was sent to Vietnam, he was then sent back to the US in like 1969 or 1970, one of those. After Vietnam, he got out of the US ARMY and retired. His still alive and proud to show me his medals every time I visit him in Northern Ohio. He got a silver star, bronze star, and 4 Purple Hearts.

--------------------------

My Grand-Daddy on my Mom's side lived in Korea when Japan was there. I heard stories that he fought against Japan when they were there in 1925 till 1945.

In 1950 till 1953, he fought during the Korean War against the North Koreans. He was awarded a Bronze Star from the United States for heroism. I was with him one time when he had a flash back, a small group of people were coming towards us on the road and he jumped, and basically ran forward. He stopped after running about 20 feet, looked back and told me that he throught they were getting attacked by an another wave of Chinnese troops, and was moving to the machineguns to help feed them ammo...

------------------------------------

My Uncles in Korea, (All Three of them) serviced in the South Korean Army after the Korean War. My oldest Uncle was deployed to Vietnam with the South Korean forces there, and saw a bit of action. He was with the paratroop units that were sent.

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My dad, he was with the 101st airborne during Desert Storm. He wouldn't tell me what action he has seen but he was given an CIB for being there, so my guess would that he have, his just not tellin me.

Then he was deployed with the Ohio National Guard to Iraq in 2003 and then retired when he got back. He got a Bronze Star from that little visit.

--------------------------------------

Myself, I was only deployed on Homeland Defense days after 9/11 and throughout 2002-2004. Had a visit to Wash DC (Air-Defense-Arty) and a few other spots in the United States. Missed out on a deployment to Iraq (May of 2003), but we invaded in March, so I lucked out on that. I only got myself a Meritorious Service Medal just lately, which I'm damn proud of, I tell ya.

I'm going to retire here stortly, in a few months myself but proud of my service, and can't wait to walk the earth to wonderland. :)

Vorster
05-31-2005, 03:12 AM
Both my grandfathers served in the South African Army in ww 2 one in the Airforce and one the Army. Some of the other members of my family actualy fought in Italy and Africa. My Father and all of his generation fough in the 23 year bush war. One of my uncles, Jan Breytenbach, gained fame as the creator of the Recce and 32 Battalion (the Baffulo soldiers) and also led the largest airborne op after ww 2 in the strike on cassinga in angola.

mudbunny
05-31-2005, 10:16 AM
Some how releated to General Custer. One Grandfather was a paratrooper in the 101st and jumped into Normandy on D-day, and from what I know from his friends, because he won't talk about it, did some heroic stuff, but then again, who didn't on that day? Other Grandfather was a top turret gunner in a B-25 Bomber in the Pacific. All great uncles served in the Army in WW2, most were in Armor with Patton on the march to Germany, some didn't make it home. Father was a corpsman in a Marine Corps Recon outfit in 'Nam, but he doesn't talk about it either, he did tell me that his platoon had caught a Vietcong soldier wounded after his squad was ambushed by them, and the 2LT wanted to bring the guy back for Intel, but instead my dad said that he told the Lieutenent to get bent and instead put a round right between the Vietcong soldiers eyes. My two brothers were in the Air Force, one was a bomb loader *snicker*, and the other a Nurse. I was a ground pounder with the 101st (Airborne-Air Assault) for 4 years, and then my knees and back convinced me to do something else.

OnTheRocks
06-11-2005, 03:07 PM
My family comes from the south of Poland so all my grandparents saw some kind of action during the two world wars.

My dads mom was married to a Colonel in the Polish Cavalry as he was of noble birth. He was captured and executed at Katyn together with the other Polish officers. For the remainder of the war my grandmother worked with the partisans in Poland together with her brothers shipping weapons, printing manuals on how to conduct terrorism against the Wehrmacht. She was awarded several medals that I have at home, although Im not quite sure of which kind they are.
Her second husband was also a soldier in the polish army during ww2. He was captured by Soviets and send a to siberian prison camp from where he escaped and walked back to poland for many years.
Other brothers of her served in the free polish army at cassino, but I dont really know anything about them more than that they were at cassino.


On my mothers side, her father was drafted into the Russian army at the age of 14 in WW1 as he lived very near the Ukraine. He told my mom stories about how they sometimes were armed with pitchforks and loaded full of vodka and were ordered to attack. He survived the war and became a member of the parliment in poland afterwards.

My moms mother lost 12 of her brothers in WW2, wither as soldiers or as partisans. She herself did some work for the german occupation forces to stay alive, and after the war she was nearly executed by the soviets for that.
She and the other ladies that had been working for the Germans were living in an isolated house in some forest when soviet soldiers entered the house at night and shot them all. My grandmother survived because the soldier that came to her room was a friend of hers from school, and he recognized her and helped her out through the window so that she could escape.

I never got to talk to my grandparents about this stuff, I only know what my parents were told.

wiking
06-15-2005, 07:00 AM
My Great-Grandpops service with the Marines during World War 1. That's all we know of him, fact that we never knew how he was killed over there but only that he was killed.

--------------------------------------

My Grandpops on my Dad's side serviced in World War 2, and Vietnam with the 82nd airborne. He was part of the 82nd airborne jumps in D-Day and Holland in 1944. He said they were sent to Berlin for occupation duty, and then returned to the United Sates in 1946.

He said from 1949 till Tet, they were just training and training and training. He was then sent to the Dominican Republic during their civil war in 1965. He was back in the US the same year.

During the Tet Offensive, he was sent to Vietnam, he was then sent back to the US in like 1969 or 1970, one of those. After Vietnam, he got out of the US ARMY and retired. His still alive and proud to show me his medals every time I visit him in Northern Ohio. He got a silver star, bronze star, and 4 Purple Hearts.

--------------------------

My Grand-Daddy on my Mom's side lived in Korea when Japan was there. I heard stories that he fought against Japan when they were there in 1925 till 1945.

In 1950 till 1953, he fought during the Korean War against the North Koreans. He was awarded a Bronze Star from the United States for heroism. I was with him one time when he had a flash back, a small group of people were coming towards us on the road and he jumped, and basically ran forward. He stopped after running about 20 feet, looked back and told me that he throught they were getting attacked by an another wave of Chinnese troops, and was moving to the machineguns to help feed them ammo...

------------------------------------

My Uncles in Korea, (All Three of them) serviced in the South Korean Army after the Korean War. My oldest Uncle was deployed to Vietnam with the South Korean forces there, and saw a bit of action. He was with the paratroop units that were sent.

-------------------------------------

My dad, he was with the 101st airborne during Desert Storm. He wouldn't tell me what action he has seen but he was given an CIB for being there, so my guess would that he have, his just not tellin me.

Then he was deployed with the Ohio National Guard to Iraq in 2003 and then retired when he got back. He got a Bronze Star from that little visit.

--------------------------------------

Myself, I was only deployed on Homeland Defense days after 9/11 and throughout 2002-2004. Had a visit to Wash DC (Air-Defense-Arty) and a few other spots in the United States. Missed out on a deployment to Iraq (May of 2003), but we invaded in March, so I lucked out on that. I only got myself a Meritorious Service Medal just lately, which I'm damn proud of, I tell ya.

I'm going to retire here stortly, in a few months myself but proud of my service, and can't wait to walk the earth to wonderland. :)

Now THAT is quite a family history mate.

I've got some distant relatives in the US who served in North Africa and Italy, and one who was a radar operator on a ship in the pacific.

I'll see if i can find out more about them and where they served and what they did and so forth.

A guy my dad knows was in the army at some point during the cold war.
He told me once he was sent to Northern Norway at a time when alot of troops were mobilized because they feared the Russians were about to march across the border.

HanauJager
06-15-2005, 09:11 PM
My Grandpa was a corporal with the 596th Combat Engineer Coy. attached to the 517th Parachute Regimental Combat Team in WWII. He saw action in Italy, Southern France, Belgium and Germany. The 517th was never really attached to any division although by the end of the war I think it was part of the 82nd. My grandpa would usually tell me stories of his time during training. One story was one of the guys in the company was a joker and threw a dummy handgrenade into the officers mess. The call 'GRENADE' went out and guys were jumping out of the mess all over the place. One of the NCO's broke his arm. Another guy got plastered drunk and stole a 2 ton truck from the motorpool and drove it out of the base with the MP's in pursuit only to loose the MP's and return it without getting caught. He doesn't talk much about his combat stories. He's starting to open up about his experiences finding and clearing mines under fire. One I remember was when his company and elements of the 517th ran into those huge Jagdtiger tanks on their way into Germany. I remember him telling me he and the other guys crapped their pants when they saw those tanks. He's in his 80's now and has recently survived a big heartattack in classic paratrooper style. Once a para always a para.

Virus
06-25-2005, 11:48 AM
Turns out I'm releated to http://www.answers.com/topic/sverre-petterssen


Sverre Petterssen, a famed meteorologist :o



The forecast provided by Sverre Petterssen and the other meteorologists caused Eisenhower to decide at 0430 4 June to postpone D-day to June 6, at first they planned to postpone the operation to June 19, but luckily all three teams predicted a break in the weat

Figured out how lol, my great-great-great grandfathers daughter, was his mother....



I have other family members, in ww1,ww2, one was a bomber who was shot down over Italy (dont know more than that though, well I have a copy of a newspaper clipping /shrug)

Inquisitor
07-03-2005, 04:12 PM
It was May the 6th in Sarajevo,the quarter of Grbavica.In May the 3rd Serbs with the JNA occupied that quarter(ain't I lucky eh?)...they just came there from the barracks and the hills that are really close to my quarter.My father says it was funny,sometimes he looked down upon the balcony of our building and he would see true chetniks,with long beard and kokarde(a kind of hat),normal serb youngs and...the Yugoslav army.He says it's funny,10 years ago you couldn't even imagine chetniks and the JNA together.Well this time it happened. In those 3 days noone dared to get out of their apartments,we locked the door of the entrance of our building...there were serbs too there but they didn't want to get out neither.The 5th, in the evening, you hear some chetniks down there lauding:"Open the dorrs or we gonna throw a bomb inside".Noone managed to do anything but the serbs of our building went to open the door, but no,they were not "traitors" they just tought everything would go fine. So they opened the doors...some residenters went down to talk with serbs and chetniks.One of the chetnik told a residenter to make the list of muslims,croats and serbs living in the building...that night nothing happened.Tomorrow morning my father went down with others too,and there was a chetnik lauding at a serb saying"here we are protecting you from muslims,is this the reward we get from you??" but noone replied it was pure chaos.My father heard a conversation between a serb who went to the JNA commander and told him "Mayor,your troops seem a bit...grude at us" and the commander replied "Oh they are nervous,try to understand them"...so my father was there looking how the situation was and saw a guy,a nice guy,an armed serb who was there with others,but he seemed fine,he seemed a Sarajlija too. So my father went to him and was like "Jarane(a term used in Sarajevo to say "friend") listen,I got 2 young kids(I was one of them) ,my wife and her mother who feels really bad...is there a way to get her out of here,we want to take her to a hospital". He said: "Jarane,I got no problems,but if you want to cross the bridge(there was a bridge really close to us),beware of them(meaning muslims) they are shooting at everyone...". And my father was like "oh don't worry about it,thank you very much,I'm going to tell my wife now.So my father returned to the apartment and said"we gotta get out,now!" .And that was what we did. We just took some money and nothing else.So we went down,me,my brother,my father,my mother and my grandma and we found some of our neighbours(serbs) who were talking to the soldiers...2 old mans,2 serbs,our neighbours saw my mather who was scared to death,and proposed to walk us to the other side of the city("muslim" controlled).We immediately agree and my father looked for the serb soldier of before and asked him if he could walk us too.He did it but just for few meters,than it was 5 of us plus the old mans.You cannot even imagine what a little distance it was,maybe 100 meters between our building and the bridge.So we walked the bridge.Lol I didn't want to give my hand to the old man,he was a stranger.But somehow we made it,my father and mother were scared to death,there were a lot of snipers...but yes we made it. So that was it,the serb even went to buy some bread on the "muslim" side and returned to our quarter.We walked the main street of the city(with my grandma) and there were the JNA barracks in the middle,the "Kasarna Marsala Tita" and we were afraid of that too.But we made it succesfully to the home of my father's bro.In the same apartment there were 17 of us lol,because there came even my aunt and her 3 kids because they were from Dobrinja(another occupied quarter) with the help of UN convoys who escorted women and kids.Later,we decided to get out of the city,and lol we took the last bus who went out of Sarajevo.That was the last bus,the day after,the siege begun for other 3 years and it wasn't that easy to get out of the city.But it isn't still finished lol.In the quarter of Ilidza,serb occupied(Ilidza and Dobrinja were at the perifery,that's why they were occupied) we were held there because "muslims" held as prisoners the JNA soldiers from the barrack we walcked by.But we released the soldiers,and they released our convoy,made up of 5000 women and kids.Than we went in Croatia,for a year,and than to Italy,where I am now.

Hugh Jardon
07-04-2005, 02:35 AM
My old man always told me and my brother about how he got the worst end of the deal in a shootout with a sniper at Remagen. Apparently they were on the east side of the bridge and there were German snipers around on the hills to the south.

They got 3 Shermans to sit along the road shooting up likely places and he and another guy were on the back of 2 Shermans shooting the .50 cals at anything that looked like a good target.

He told me that the guy on the tank next to him had a bullet whiz by his ear and decided that it was a job for the infantry. He saw the guy jump down and get behind the tank, just as he turned his head back to keep shooting a bullet bounced off the top of the tank, richoched off the .50 cal and hit him in the chest.

He said it was like getting kicked by a horse, he half flew through the air and bounced off the rear of the tank and landed in the dirt.

The bullet bounced off a rib and broke it but that was all, it all but got him out of the war because he was sent back to France. They had to operate I guess because pieces of the bullet were in there.

He was a bridge engineer at Remagen. I think he said the 51st or 50th Engineers.

Gallewicz
07-05-2005, 05:09 AM
My fathers side: My grandmother was a member of the polish resistance, hid jews and such.
Her uncle or something was a pilot, a captain if I`m not wrong. He got shot down over Warsaw.
My grandfather was a partisan or something, I`m not sure. At the end of the war, he got sent to some place in eastern Poland because a group of polish soldiers was refusing to let the russians through. He was ordered to kill them but he deserted. He was caught and put in prison, about to be executed. My grandmother then told the guard that she was pregnant and he let my grandfather go. He never recovered.

My mothers side:
My grandfather was a partisan, if I`m not mistaken. Don´t really know much about him.
But I do know that many people from my family were put in concentration camps, don`t know how many, or which for that matter. It isn´t anything that my parents, or grandparents, want to talk about.

CONSERVATIVE53
07-20-2005, 02:30 PM
EDIT

bigjeff
07-21-2005, 01:06 PM
My grandpa's elder father was a lieutanant of the chinese army fightin against Japanese and he was killed by a head-shot.Tat's all i know about him.Not much info coz china was so messy at tat time. my gandpa told me when i was just 6 and he had dead alreadi as well.

snniper77
07-22-2005, 06:47 PM
Father side:

-->Grand Mother dad fought in the Italian Army against the Austrian-Hungarian Empire (that s the literal translation from the spanish Imperio Austro-Hungaro) during WWI

-->Grand Mother dad brothers all fought in Italy with the resistance against the facsist, luckily none of them died or get caught.

-->Grand Father dad was a chemical engineer and was caught by the Germans in Italy and sent to work in the V1 development, luyckily he escaped and brought all his family to Argentina

Geezah
08-09-2005, 05:58 PM
This is very cool.

On my fathers side.

My Grandfather was a rear gunner in the B17s, 486th, 833rd Heavy Bombardment Group during WW2.
I have two great uncles that are both retired Royal Marines, one was in the Korean War the other was involevd in the Falklands War and the first Iraq war. I do not have many details on those guys and keep on meaning to call them to get more details. I have a great great uncle that was a Para during WW2, he was involved in the Battle of Arnhem, and his name in mentioned in the book, A Bridge Too Far(Sergeant Major George Gatland).

I have other family members that were involved in WW2, but I do not have too much info on them, they are not so much direct relatives.

On my mums side.

My grandfather was in the Home Guard(for those that know Dads Army) during WW2, and that's about it really, I'm not aware of any others serving.

Khabbi
08-12-2005, 02:35 PM
Oki , had to check with my mom and dad so I didnt write down some false stuff

My dads side ( Hungary ) , his father ( my grandfather ) was in some tankbrigade or mech infantry , He was shot in the arm and captured by the russians , he was a POW for some time and then the americans took him over as a POW where he worked as a chauffeur for them , he didnt know much english but I guess he faked it as much as possible and got the gig , they used to call him joe , " hey Joe " . Hungary was "on" germanys side , but it was more or less fight for hungary and do your job , or ells u get in "trouble " , he never had any nazzi sympathy or anything like that , my grandfather did his job and Im proud of him

My Moms side ( Hungary ) , My grandfather didnt serve in the hungarian army , not sure why , but the real great thing was that when the Nazzis were rounding up Jews to go to the death camps , my grandmother decided to hide their neighbours ( who were jewish ) in their house . I know that this was very dangerous and if cought would prob be killed , she hid them for along period of time and it ended up saving the family ( wife , husband + 2 kids ) . Ive always been so proud of this ,

Im proud of my whole family , they did their best and thats all you need to do .

wiking
08-12-2005, 04:59 PM
great story Khabbi. That is something to be proud off.

Have you ever met the people, or relatives of them, that your granny hid?

i must say, you gran sounds like a tough old..........she sounds pretty cool. p-)

percell_086
08-13-2005, 01:21 PM
Wiking, couldn't have said it better about the waffen SS.


My Grandpa on my dad's side fought in Korea as part of the Belgians sent there. He got hit by shrapnel in the neck on the 17th of december 1951 while he was a 1st sgt. leading a platoon ( their normal CO was on R and R) up onto a hill called 'King'. He was making radio contact with HQ when shrapnel from a mortar round hit him. He went down. After the fight he stayed in the hospital for some time and left Korea and went back to belgium. He had a big scar of it and always had a coarse voice. He died of cancer on 26 june 1992. You can read this all in the book ' Belgians can do too!' by Frans De Wit.


Percell

Khabbi
08-13-2005, 01:26 PM
great story Khabbi. That is something to be proud off.

Have you ever met the people, or relatives of them, that your granny hid?

i must say, you gran sounds like a tough old..........she sounds pretty cool. p-)

Nope , when the comunists were taking over hungary both my moms and dads family escaped out of hungary , so Ive only been to hungary like 3 times , Never met anyone from my moms side , my granny died befor I was born , never got to meet her which is ... well whats the word ? ,
she was just a great person and just the sort of person I would like to have met .

percell_086
08-13-2005, 02:05 PM
My dad is a Lt. colonel in the Belgian army ( Mech. Inf.) and has been on quite a few operations.
He went to Croatia ( 1992 and 1996), Bosnia (1994), Macedonia and kosovo (1999). Mostly for 6 months each.
The last tour he did was in Afghanistan for 4 months in 2004 with my uncle.

My Brother is now a Sgt. in the army and has been in Kosovo for 4 months with a recce-squadron.

My cousin and uncle are both in the service too.

And I'm trying to get into the officers school here, but I wasn't accepted this year. Better luck next time :D .

Percell

James
08-16-2005, 05:31 PM
Last week my family had a reunion, and I saw a cousin whom I hadn't seen for several years. After 9/11 he joined the USAR, and he was in Iraq for about 9 months last year and early this year. It was good to see him.

A family friend was there, and at one point he told me and my cousin "Thanks for what you're doing."

I was very moved.

Macs.
08-16-2005, 09:09 PM
Was at the Soldiers Memorial at the town where my grandparents lived, and found out that my grandfather (on my fathers side) died in Lithuania, just 4 days after his daughter was born.
Still don't know what unit.

plodey
08-23-2005, 07:28 AM
My great grandfather was a career soldier and faught in the Boer war as a teenager, then faught with the Australian Light Horse Brigade at Gallipoli in WW1 and made it back. I should try and find out more about him.

My great uncle faught in WW1 with the 3rd Australian Pioneers and was KIA on 26th July 1917 in Belgium. His younger brother was also KIA on the Somme, France. This year I was able to finally visit their graves (http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=57513).

My grandfather faught in the 58/59 Australian Infantry Battalion in New Guinea against the Japs in WW2 in a mortar platoon and as a rifleman (he was known for being a crack shot).
A few of his stories
- one of his mates put maggots into a shoulder wound to stop gangrene
- he once pitched a tent only to find next morning it was full of bullet holes
- he once placed rocks on his shoulders as 'pips' so he could sit at the front of the cinema (usually reserved for officers)
- he was asked to apply to become an officer, but turned them down because he wanted to stay with his mates
- many people from the Battalion were from the same area in Victoria, and his Battalion had heavy casulties.

He didn't really talk about it much at all, although the last few years before he died (last year) i had a few chats. Before he died he signed the famous painting of the 58/59th fighting in my Australian Army history book "when will we learn to solve our problems without war".

My father was drafted (called up) for Vietnam, but luckily the war finished first.

baboon6
08-25-2005, 09:15 AM
My grandfather (on my father's side) served in the South African army in the Second World War. He was a corporal in the Witwatersrand Rifles/Regiment De La Rey, an infantry battalion in the 6th SA Armoured Division. After spending the early part of the war guarding German internees he arrived with the division in Italy in early 1944. His unit subsequently saw some very heavy fighting, culminating in the Battle of Monte Stanco in October 1944, where he was badly wounded by German mortar fire. Most of the rest of his section were killed. He spent several months in hospital and the wounds (both physical and psychological) affect him to this day. He recently gave me a short piece he had written (part of a book he is writing) to read on his experiences in Italy.

His brother (now deceased) was a transport pilot in the SA Air Force in the war and then flew with the Israeli Air Force in the 1948 War. Since the fledgling IAF lacked combat aircraft some of his missions involved dropping grenades on the enemy from a Piper Cub!

I don't know much about my mother's family history but I know her father served with the SA Artillery in North Africa.

wiking
08-25-2005, 09:20 AM
I recently talked with a relative of mine in the US, i haven't the details completely, but the story goes like this;

Her Grandmother was a nurse in WW2, she was in a field hospital in europe somewhere. Her Grandfather was an officer, he went to the rear to visit some of his men who had been wounded, there he met the nurse who would become his wife.

Sounds like a hollywood cliche war movie\love story, but aparently it's true.

percell_086
08-25-2005, 01:38 PM
That's a nice story wiking.


Very interesting stories guys!


Percell

Hydro
08-25-2005, 09:11 PM
Went to France to see the WW1 Commonwealth Graves again earlier this month, and a really interesting war story was revealed by my Dad, concerning his side of the family.

I believe it it concerns my great Aunt, my Grandmothers Aunt. She had 9 sons, most serving in the Cameronian Highlanders (I think), in WW1, but I know at least one served elsewhere in the Royal Artillery. All 9 joined up to fight. 8 were killed, and the decision was made to send the ninth home due to the familys loss (the son in the Artillery), but not before he had both his legs blown off. I've seen all their medals, a few letters and things.

Very very sad story, kind of real life Saving Private Ryan stuff.

I found so many of my relatives on the Thiepval memorial. An incredible monument to the incredible sacrifice these men made. Very poignant is the Cemetary behind it, containing 300 French and 300 British soldiers, side by side.

toki
08-29-2005, 08:47 AM
Mothers side: Grandfather was a doctor and responsible for a large rural area in tirol(austria). That and a problem with his left eye(almost blind - not 100% sure what it was) made him more suitable to „serve“ the homefront as civillian. Died in the 70‘s never met him.

Fathers side: Grandfather worked in a submarine dockyard in Danzig(Schichau Werft). http://www.u-boot-archiv.de/bau/werften/schichau_danzig.html (sorry german). He worked on several submarines and later was put in Wehrmacht service. More or less (un)voluntary - not that there was a choice afterall. After a short period of fighting he was captured by the russians and brought to siberia. There he was the only survivor of his unit. (can‘t tell which unit) There was one day he was saved by some russians in a snowstorm while doing work on railroad tracks which was also the cause for the loss of almost all his fingers... and comrades. A shot of vodka and the dislocating of his shoulder was the only anaesthetization he got when they amputated his fingers behind his back, but of course he was very thankful that they even cared about him (which was kind of unusual, since he was still the enemy and they had their own shortcomings) and never lost a bad word about russians.
He returned in the early/mid fifties. In this time my father, who was born in the war grew up with the idea his father fell in the eastern front. My fathers family fled back to northern germany where they actually where coming from. One day my grandfather was standing in the door. My father never talked about that moment. I know it from my aunt. My grandfather died when i was 7. I just remember that he never spoke much, had all his fingers gone with partially bones sticking out and as my father told me he has never had a cold or any kind of flue in his rest of his life, because siberia seemed to have toughened him mentally and obviously his immune system. I don‘t think he had a warm relation to my father.

Atlantic Friend
08-29-2005, 10:03 AM
I don't know much of my family's military history.

One of my uncles was sent, then a young officer, to Algeria to command a small unit of Algerian harkis.

One of my cousins is the XO of a Triomphant-class nuclear missile submarine.

Vorian
08-29-2005, 07:46 PM
My great-grandfather(mother's side) was killed during the battle of Crete. He was a volunteer in the Cretan guard and was shot by German soldiers in Maleme airport.
My other great-grandfather was reported missing in the Greek-turkish war in 1922. He was 19 then. Luckily he was captured and held prisoner for one year until he was released.
My uncle in law (I don't know if this is the correct word) is Greek-Cypriot and was injured during the Turkish invasion. He still can't walk well.

That is in short my family's military history.

Asheren
09-01-2005, 06:06 AM
My grandmother brother served on U-boots during WWII. He never returned from war and i don't know anything else about him. His cousin served in wermaht and also died. My grandgrand father was arrested after WWII by russians and we never hear about him agin, our familly is the only one on my street that wasn't expeled after war because my grand grand fahter barricaded dors. In my father village there was old man who fought at Stalingrad. He told him once how russian assault looks like. "They were running at us and we shoot till our MGs overheat and jammed. And they keep marching. They started shooting back at close range. We build fortifications from dead russian bodies because there were soo many dead that it was impossible to shot from trenches." In same vilage there was skirmish bewen german tank(ppl say it was tiger) and three T34. One T34 was destroyed other two pulled back. When wreckage was removed it sill had round in his main gun. Later germans burned and sunked tank and apc in nearby swamp.

wiking
09-01-2005, 12:31 PM
the u-boat service had like 90% casulty rates. Not many came back :(

It's sad, for they were damned brave men.

percell_086
09-01-2005, 07:43 PM
Very true Wiking, very brave men.


Asheren, those are some stories! I'd love to come get the T34 out of the swamp if it's still there. ;)


Percell

Adam Wilhelm
09-01-2005, 10:14 PM
...She had 9 sons, most serving in the Cameronian Highlanders (I think), in WW1, but I know at least one served elsewhere in the Royal Artillery. All 9 joined up to fight. 8 were killed...


The men was volunteering from some villages in masses during aug/sep -14 and they served in the same regiment, company and platoon.
In one assault whole villages was completely wiped out of men.

wiking
09-02-2005, 05:06 AM
...She had 9 sons, most serving in the Cameronian Highlanders (I think), in WW1, but I know at least one served elsewhere in the Royal Artillery. All 9 joined up to fight. 8 were killed...


The men was volunteering from some villages in masses during aug/sep -14 and they served in the same regiment, company and platoon.
In one assault whole villages was completely wiped out of men.

:( it must have been shyte being unfit for service and living like the sole surviving teenager\young adult in a village like that.

Asheren
09-02-2005, 07:34 AM
That wasn't T34 they sunk german tank. Last remains of T34 was removed sometime after war. And yes they are still propably there because no one dare to go to this swamp.

I also know few "fun" military stories.

When my father was in millitary they had excercises with ABC troops. After exercises two guys got their butts burned because "elephants" screw the job and left some "stuff" on bench.

Other one is from my friend who is currently in military. During the exercises round got struck in mortar. The guy tried to push the round down the barrel hiting it with second round. Fortunatly he was stopped before he pushed his luck too far.

Last one is from my summer trip with few friends we traveled on foot thru forest near Legnica city. We always use foresters maps because they allow to make shortcuts. Unfortunatly military areas and such are not marked on it, especialy when you have only xeroed part from it. My friend heard call of nature and go to get some privacy. Few second later we saw him kicking something and yelling. " Hey guys there is a dud round here." I never was lying on the ground so fast. He was kicking old HE tank round. We found few more around. It was a bit strange but you expect such things whe you travel thru area that for many years was one big training ground. Later we saw strange sight like from the move. Two american style barracks and flag pole. The gras was quite high but it was cut almost at straight line. Few second later three soliders came to us asking. "Are you don't know this is a military area?" We were deep in to military training grounds without even knowing it. The reason was quite simple. They build the bridge above road so military vehicles when passing don't interrupt civilian traffic. They also post signs but they done it on the road. When we were crossing the bidge we wasn't able to see what was written on them.

wiking
09-02-2005, 08:00 AM
Be glad you didn't wander into a live-fire exercise :lol:

Asheren
09-02-2005, 09:18 AM
It wasn't possible because we entered part where storage, kitchen and soo was.

Hmm i remember one from time when i was a scout its not quite military but there was some soliders in it. We were at summer camp had three soliders (Cook and two drafted) from nearby military unit to help us. I was assigned to guard duty. You know its dark and every one is sleeping. It can be pretty scary especialy when you are 12 years old. Then i heared some noises nearby. I turned on the flash light and saw huge doberman watching at me. God i never was soo scared in whole my life. Dog must be bit suprised because it runed away. But i hear some other apparently human noises nearby. I woke up commander and he ordered me to woke up soliders. They took tent poles and disappeared in the night. I was alone agin with that dog running somewhere near. I took my knife, flash light an waited. Few mintues later there was a sudden noise and someone yelled. "Dober get him!" Followed by sound of hurt dog. Some ppl were running in the darkness then i heard something that keep me smiling every time i was assigned to guard duties during summer camps. "argh argh dont hurt me... Shut up the children are sleeping! argh argh..." It repeated till they drag him to hut that was our HQ during that camp. What happend: Few young rednecks from nearby village decided to pay us a visit. They damaged one tent and stole some candy bars from our warehouse tent. Their dog was runnig lose around. When they moved towards my camp to wreak some more havoc they were suprised by two soliders. Dog tried to bite one of them and was hit with tent pole. Then guys decided to run. Soliders catched one and let others run. Guys must be quite suprised when they menage to get to their car. Tires were flat because cook find it before them. They had a long trip home just to meet the police, car belonged to one of the guys father and he was propably not very happy.

wiking
09-02-2005, 10:35 AM
by the way asheren, you shouldn't happen to know omega7?





p-) no offence mate......you'll get the joke sooner or later.

Asheren
09-05-2005, 06:15 AM
hehe you mean my "spanglish" i know its terrible but...Omega7 nah its not that bad i think.

wiking
09-05-2005, 07:03 AM
hehe you mean my "spanglish" i know its terrible but...Omega7 nah its not that bad i think.

you are right. we can understand you ;)

But you've got to complement Omega's didication. He sure as hell isn't giving up.

Telnyashka
10-02-2005, 03:32 PM
You could say this is military story...

my father, was the right age to be conscripted and go to Afghanistan when he was in USSR. My mother luckily managed to get him to go to the MVD-VV (internal army) instead of regular army.

The interesting part...the local division where he lived, where he would go if he was conscripted, went to Afghanistan.

so very lucky that he managed to get away from that war...that war scarred too many people.

Ogi
10-07-2005, 07:04 PM
earliest military history I know about in my family is about 200 years ago, when my grand grand grand father killed one Turkish Aga, and sparked rebellion which he led. Rebels won several small battles, and eventually Turkish army stopped coming to their mountain. He in particular was killed on Christamas of 1804 or 1806, dnno when exactly. Tursk attacked while he ate dinner with his family and that was it. I had two grand fathers in WWII, and one grand, grand father. In Bosnian civil war my dad and mew both joined Army of Republic of Srpska in the early 1992 and stayed in till 96. He was a radio operator, and I was in infantry.

That is it. :D

walford
10-07-2005, 08:21 PM
hehe you mean my "spanglish" i know its terrible but...Omega7 nah its not that bad i think.Your post translated into Omaga7: As for me the where I who remember one from times considerably am the troop reconnaissance person it is, the soliders which is that it was. 3 soliders from the unit of the nearby troop who helps us whom it had in summer camp (2 it is drafted) there were we. I was allotted to supervisory obligation. The darkness darkness and all 1 you have known that it has neglected. When the hole are 12 years are old, as for that it is possible considerably to be the scary especialy. Then as for me the noise which has the vicinity the heared. I came out and turned with the light/write which does not have the eye, looked at enormous doberman supervision with me. God the I deciding; all with was not the soo my life which it could have. Being Runed, the dog must be bitten the suprised. But I hear the noise of the human with respect to a certain other appearance in the vicinity. I awoke the commander, he to me the eye sense is ordered the soliders. Those take the stick of the tent, are to go out in the night. I was just the agin which has that dog which it is running somewhere soon. As for me my knife namely the light/write taking which is not the coming out eye which waited it is. The small-numbered mintues afterwards is abrupt noise there, as for someone it is. " The Dober him who is obtained! " You continue with the sound of the Hurt dog. As for the Ppl what which was moving with the darkness I who continue to smile me by all means was allotted to supervisory obligation between the, then I heard. " As for the argh of the argh me who am not damaged... the child who is tightened to sleep, the! As for the argh of the argh until... pull him " they to the shed, our hq as for that the reel during the camp which is returned they were. What kind of happend: The rednecks whose small amount from close village is young had decided to pay visit to us. They damaged one tent, stole the candy stick which has from the tent of our warehouses. The dog loses the runnig, was. When those already moving a little destruction to method of my camping to the wreak, the suprised it was with 2 soliders. The dog those 1 tried the fact that you bite, the stick of the tent you hit. Then the person had decided to run. One the catched and other things tried the Soliders that move. As for the person to their cars considerably at the time of the suprised there are their menage in order to obtain, it becomes. The tire before those heuristic that of the **** with of level was. Those meet to the police, the car which possesses the house of traveling which is long exactly belonged to 1 person of the human father, he was not the very happy propably.

Belrick
10-19-2005, 06:11 PM
This tale is a blurred in the telling.

My grandfather was in the 2nd NZ division and sometime in 1942 in libya his (brengun carrier?) took a hit from a suspected 88. The round passed clean thru the 'tank' without exploding. Unfortunately it also went thru my grandfathers best mate. Apparantly it was rather gory in the 'tank' and my Grandfather freaked out.

He suffered severe shell shock, was sent to a military hospital for a while but was deemed non-fit for combat and spent the rest of the war as a MP in Italy.

When he got home to NZ he became a alcholic and through away all his service medals, but luckily for me he meet up with a returning WREN whom became of course my grandmother :)

A few years before he died the goverement of NZ presented him again with all his medals he'd thrown away along with a OBE presented by the governer general of NZ for service to the community.

ps: he stayed an alchoholic till my uncles were old enough to hit back after a particulary violent family episode. He swore off alchohol there after.

REBEL44
11-05-2005, 05:26 PM
Great stories..mine is...plain.

My ancestor was a Spanish Admiral sent with a fleet to colonize Mexico.

Generations later..Pancho Villa came to their Hacienda and gave them the choice to be escorted to the US Border or else.

So they left.

Some servants did stay..they were killed.

Galil
11-10-2005, 09:16 AM
Nice families

droopy
11-10-2005, 05:17 PM
Both of my grandfathers served in WWII ... the one from my mother`s side fought as a border guard in the Romanian Army ... and the one from my father` side was an artilery officer and fought with the germans against the soviets at Rostov -on Don ... both survieved the war.
My father`s side grandpa died in '76 well before i was born ... and the other died 3 years ago.

MARINO
11-11-2005, 06:27 PM
By granfather, and the father of my other grandfather fought in Spanish civil war, One was a Cpt and was killed, after an attack of 3 days, i have all his documents( he also fought in Morocco). The other was a corporal(artillery) and then served with Division Azul Eastern Front.The father of my gandmother, fought in Morocco war( took part in Alhucemas landings) and uncle fought in Ifni War, were he was killed, an mabush.

RandallH1989
11-12-2005, 01:07 AM
Not sure if I posted this already, but my grandfather served in WWII. He told a story once about when his company came upon a grove of peach trees, they all ate them, and it turned out they were not ripe.

He sat in a ****ter the rest of the night firing out the door during a German counterattack with his Thompson.

He was also on Normandy beach, I think.

Also, my other grandpa was in the Navy in Vietnam. He saw a guy get cut in half by an exploding pipe on a ship.

Johnny_H02
11-21-2005, 04:38 AM
Where to start

My great grandfather and his son George Rex Gordon served in the first world war.

George Rex Gordon a private in the 85th infantry battalion ( Cape Breton Highlanders ) was KIA on the Cambrais Road in April 1918 nearly at wars end. he was emerging from a wooded area when he caught shrapnel to the neck and died a day later from his wounds. I still have some personal effects that were found on him.

My Grandfather Peter Sherwood was a wireless operator for the Royal Canadian Airforce in Newfoundland and my Fathers Father Bill Harrison was a Asdic operator on a minesweeper HMCS Georgian from 1943 untill wars end. I also have a UBoat Christnening picture that he "Lifted" from the Captains Cabin of a Surrendered Uboat he toured in London.

Infact I am the second generation in my family that hasnt had to fight in any war of any kind in a few hundred years.

Temnyy_Voyin
11-26-2005, 01:47 PM
My great grandfather in WWI fought as a British soldier. He chased the Germans out of France, and he had 3 hand grenades thrown at him. When he got back from the war, he had shrapnel still in the back of his neck.:)

Azrael
12-07-2005, 11:53 AM
My Grandfather from my dad's side was a pow/forced labour in germany in ww2. He saw the russians come into berlin, where they almost shot him thinking he was a german. He came back to Holland with schrapnel in his underarms. They didn't have enough bandages, so they used paper and cloth to bandage his arms.
My grandad from my mothers side was in a jap camp in japan. There he was ratted out once with his buddy for getting bread off some villagers through the fence. The japanese made him and his buddy stand opposite each other and hit eachother with flat hands on their ears. Thats how he became deaf. I still have a US canteen and US a spoon and fork which he got when the americans came into the camp. My mom lost the knife after the war cutting flowers, dropped it in a ditch full of water... Some dutch entertainer (Wim Kan) was in the same camp and whenever my grandad saw him on the telly after the war, he'd almost throw the telly out the window. Was only years later that it became known that yer man was a bit too fond of children. It was a mixed camp with childeren and all.

Thats about all in know. Unfortunatly...

b.scheller
12-13-2005, 11:32 PM
My father's sister's husband's step-brother, was a technician aboard a U-boat during the Second World War. I don't know much about his life history, other than the fact that he served in the North-Atlantic and after the war emigrated to South Africa.

Rafter_Man
12-14-2005, 02:41 PM
My great grandfather on my mother’s side was a soldier in the 6. Armee of the Wehrmacht, which was part of the Heeresgruppe B and therefor assigned to take Salingrad and the Volga. He was drafted already in 1940 and send to East Prussia so I guess he also took part in Operation Barbarossa. But nevertheless he never reached Stalingrad because in 1942 he luckily got a russian grenade fragment right thru his left knee. Otherwise I guess he would have joint the the fate of his comrades and buddy’s, except the 5000 that survived the russian imprisonment.

Arbeitsdienst
12-15-2005, 08:09 PM
My grandfather was in the SS in the east

Flounder
12-17-2005, 11:17 PM
My grandfather on my mother's side of the family served with the American Expeditionary Force in France in World War I. He was an engineer of the railroad variety, driving trains in France. After the war he emigrated to Canada, married my grandmother and continued to work for the railroads in western Canada. We found a box with all his service documents that he kept from his time in the Army, also a German Iron Cross medal that he brought home as a souvenir. I have another of his souvenirs at home, a letter opener made out of an old 30-06 round with the enscription "Verdun".

My grandfather on my father's side was a career soldier with the Royal Canadian Engineers, an engineer in the classic military sense. He fought in both World War Two and Korea, eventually retiring after the war as a senior non-commissioned officer. He was stationed in England for a time where his work included defusing unexploded German bombs. He landed at Juno Beach but I suspect this was after the beachheads had been secured.

One of the few wartime stories of this grandfather that I know is from his time in Korea. As the story goes, he and his troops were building a bridge when they were mistakenly attacked by an American fighter aircraft. As the American aircraft returned for a second pass my grandfather ordered his troops to fire on the airplane, and succeeded in shooting it down, for which he was reduced in rank, later on regaining his rank.

I have 2 souvenirs of this grandfather's wartime service. The first is a field dressing dated June 1944. The second is a cigarette case which he brought home from Korea, although from the artwork on it I think he must have purchased it in Japan either on his way to or on his way home from Korea.

joe mama
12-20-2005, 04:22 PM
My father and his older brother were both in the USMC during WW2. My dad got sent to the Pacific as infantry, but never saw combat, never heard a good explanation of why, but he got out of the service before the war ended. I belive my uncle did fight though. Both joined the Boston Police Department in the early 50's, my dad retired as a Lieutenant in 73, my uncle made it to sargeant and retired in the early 80s. Their father was in the USN sometime around WW1, but don't know anything more about his service. My maternal grandfather was in the Army in WW2 and was in Italy for part of it, my mom thinks the only thing he did was get into trouble. He claimed that he saw Mussolini's body hanging when he was killed, but the family thinks that half the soldiers in Italy at the time claim that and doubt it's true.

Don't have any good military service stories about them, but do have one from when my dad was a cop: when he died, in his house we found a starter pistol and some paperwork. Apparently sometime in the 60's, he and his partner answered a call one night and a guy confronted them and pointed this gun at them - they talked him into dropping it. They didn't know it was a starter pistol until after they had him cuffed. My dad somehow was able to get the gun once it wasn't needed as evidence after the guy was convicted.

Scyth
12-28-2005, 12:25 PM
My great grandfather was an artillery officer in the Ottoman Army, he died during the Balkans War. My grandfather was a submarine admiral. He helped create Turkey's modern submarine fleet. My father almost went to Cyprus during his military service. I had a very quiet and peaceful military service myself in Armor School.

EsoognomEhT
01-01-2006, 09:59 PM
A (distant) cousin of mine got a silver star (methinks) in WW2 for capturing 3 German Officers or something like that.
His brother was an artillery commander in Nam and now works for whoever designed/made the patriot missile system

guest
01-26-2006, 05:56 AM
hi,
my both grandfathers served the wehrmacht (the german army) in ww2.
the one fought in normandy but was captured soon after the invasion.
the other one was 17 when he had to go to the front in 1944. He was surrendering with some mates to the american army. my one grandma was very active in the party (i am ashamed for that) the other one was a volentuere medic on the eastern front, what was really hard for her.

khukuri
01-27-2006, 07:33 PM
grand grand father fought the brits in iraq during colonial times, father fought many many ,

Ezekiel25:17
01-27-2006, 07:55 PM
My dad and Uncles fought the Pathet Lao in Laos during the Vietnam War. One of my uncles got shot down near the Plane of Jars, Body was never found. One was killed in Northern Laos, body was never found. When the Pathet Lao took over my dad had to stay low so the communist didn't know he fought them. My uncle from my mom's side died in a "reeducation" camp. People at the same camp he was at said he was put in a bamboo cage and tortured for 5 years till he died of starvation. In 1981 we sneaked across the Mekong and ending up in a refugee camp on the border. The US government gave are family political asylum and we arrived in the US in 82. Been here ever since.

jameshr4
03-22-2006, 08:42 AM
My great grandfather fought with the Manchester Regiment in WW1 and was killed in the later stages of the Battle of the Somme in 1916. Another great grandfather was also killed in WW1 I was told in 1917 but I don't know any more details.
My one grand father served in the Royal Artillery and served in N. Africa, Italy and N.w Europe.

LazerLordz
03-23-2006, 05:50 AM
My late grandfather served for a while with the SSVF(Straits Settlement Volunteer Rifles) during WW2 in Singapore.He was shot in the shin and carried fragments of that for life.He told me many tales of how the locals tried to eke out a decent living during the Kempei-tai reign of terror during the Occupation.They survived the purge out of pure chance and he witnessed many of his mates dragged away never to be seen again.Till the day he passed on, he never really forgave the Japanese for what they did.

For my dad, he served in the SAF as a Amphibious Engineer (Recce).They were part of the first few intakes of males for National Service, one notable incident in his NS life was rescuing and evacuating villages in rapidly rising floodwaters during the early 70s.Those were commonplace and they were under-equipped, often having to use alumnium recce boats and ropes to form a evacuation route.

nothing fancy, just thought I might share some history here.

little fatso
03-24-2006, 12:31 AM
my grand father was a pilot for the greek airforce in world war 2....due to failling eyesight he had the choice of going in the police force or becoming a grease monkey....he chose police. he served the rest of the war as a greek police officer. We also had alot of thoer relatives in the greek army and in the greek resistance...but i have no details.

my other grandfather on my mothers side was a african-canadian and served in the canadian medical corps as a ambulance driver.

my father was in the Grenadier Guards of canada (guys with big hats and red coats). He joined to pay for his education and for the experiance. He left due to the lack of pay (somtimes every three months!) and because he payed his dues for collage where he studyed police tech and became a police officer in laval, quebec (my father was the first greek police officer in laval's history and a celeb in the ethnic area of chomedy in laval (very large greek population). Also my father,2 months after he left the army, found out from a corporal that was in his unit, That my father was recomended for promotion to Lieutenant before they knew he left.lol

Switek
03-31-2006, 04:46 PM
My grandfather from my mother side wad an upriser who fought against Germans in 1919-20. After that he fought against bolshevik (Russian-soviet) army in 1921-22. In 1945 as a Volunteer fought to Liberate Poznań (one of five biggest cities in Poland)

My grandfather from my faher side was very independent person. He was socialist (not communist) - before WW2. Becouse of it he was arested by Polish Police and released after few days. This time Poland was govern by right-wing government. During WW2, and ocuppation he was arested by German Police becouse he was Polish patriot. My grandpa escaped. After WW2 in 1945 or 46 he was arrested by NKVD because he was both socialist and patriot. Thanks money collected by neighbours (for bribe) he was released...

What a Times

WolverineBlue
03-31-2006, 05:25 PM
Dad retired as a brigadier general (one star) in the US Army. He was a draftsman for the Navy during and after high school in WWII, until he enlisted in the Army in 1945 (I think). He was at an American POW camp for German soldiers at the end of the war. A German woman recently contacted my sister because the German woman found papers of her father showing that my dad signed him out of the POW camp to go free. Pretty weird.

He became a lieutenant and won the Distinguished Service Cross, Bronze Star and Purple Heart in Korea at Chipyong-Ni. He got mixed up with my mom, had my sisters in the 50's, and served in various infantry positions until Vietnam.

First time in 'Nam (now about a major), he was with MACV, mid 60's. On a show on PBS about Viet Nam (can't remember name of the special), there's a bombing by the VC at the Brinks Hotel in Saigon, my dad's quarters at the time -- my dad is in the footage helping out with the rescue efforts.

Then he was at Heidelberg (Army Europe staff), and then got promoted and moved to 3ID where he was a brigade commander. Yours truly was born in Wurzburg during this stint (1969). He ended up being the chief of staff for the 3rd Infantry Division commander before we moved back to CONUS. He was at the Pentagon working for the Army Chief of Staff but then went back to Viet Nam to serve as the advisor to the ARVN general in charge of the Saigon area.

He came back to Virginia, worked again at the Pentagon, and was promoted to BG. We moved to Fort Lewis where he was the assistant division commander for operations of the 9th ID. There for two years, he was assigned to FORSCOM in Fort McPherson. He retired in 1977, worked for a law firm in Washington, DC, and he died in 1991, buried in Arlington Cemetery.

CSAR
03-31-2006, 05:27 PM
My grand mother told me some stories of WW2 just couple weeks ago. Maybe the most exiting was when she told what happened in 1944. She was just 16 back then, when the whole Karelia was ordered to be evacuated because the Soviets had just begun their attack against Finnish lines. They had only a couple of hours time to prepare, and my grand mother with a couple of other young girls had to move familys cattle to trainstation so that it could be transported away.

This took some time, and the Soviets were advancing rapidly. From the trainstation they traveled 60km to Viipuri with their fathers, and this took almost a week. During this time they were attacked numerous times by Soviet ground attack planes, that were dropping bombs on them and making strafing runs shooting with their cannons and MGs. One bomb shrapnel landed so close that she almost lost her leg. She doesn't remember anyone dying, but many were wouded and vast number of cattle was lost. They had to stay in the woods and cross larger open areas at night. When they finally arrived to Viipuri, they couldn't get to train anymore since the city was so badly bombed. So they had to bypass the city, and continue on foot.

After a couple of weeks they finally arrived to some small village near Turku where the rest of the family was allready waiting for them. After the war they got a piece of forrest and some rocky fields, and had to start over again. Most of their property was left behind, and at first they had almost nothing exept each others (two of her brothers were KIA though) and some cattle. It eventually turned ok though, but my grand mother still misses her home in Karelia where they had a huge farm, a mill and a long piece of sand beach by the sea.

Wojsko Polskie
05-20-2006, 09:06 PM
My great uncle was in the Warsaw Uprising. My uncle didn't tell me anything about it other than that. But he did show me my great uncle's pistol (I'm pretty sure it was a ViS).

SrB-23Q
05-24-2006, 12:00 PM
My Grandfather from my dads side was in WW2, he was a partisan in Yugoslavia. My father and my uncle were in the recent Balkan conflicts in Croatia 1991-1995.
When my dads buddies from the war come over there are always stories, which i always listen to ofcorse because they are so interesting. They have funny stories and sad stories, which is all part of war i guess. There are good times and the bad times. I wish my grandfather was still alive, i would of loved to hear stories from WW2.

Bandeirante
05-27-2006, 05:55 PM
I am also a genealogist !

My forefathers have been in Brazil for more than 5 Centuries. They and their relatives have fought almost every war and armed movement that Brazilians took part here and in Europe in the Second World War.

João Ramalho – 15th G-Father
The Portuguese João Ramalho, who had been living in these lands for some time, even before the arrival of Martim Afonso de Sousa in São Vicente (1532), can be considered, in fact, the real father of the so called Planalto Paulista (São Paulo’s Plateau).
He was the o­ne who made way for the Jesuit priests and taught them how to reach a region of “cool and temperate air like that found in Spain”. It was João Ramalho who beat the Indian resistance and became Lord of the Piratininga fields, where, o­n the 25th of January, 1554, the priests Manoel da Nóbrega and José de Anchieta founded São Paulo’s Royal School (Real Colegio).
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/Gen/jramalho.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/Gen/JoaoRamalho.jpg


Amador Bueno – 11Th G-Father
Important authority in São Paulo in 1640. Organizer of many Bandeirante Expeditions
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/Gen/Aclamacao_amador_bueno2.jpg



Manuel de Azevedo Marques - 6th G-Father
Capitão-Mor da Colônia do Sacramento. Fought against the Spaniards in the Southern Wars, in 1762
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/avulso/AM2.jpg


Ancestor's signatures in a Colonial Document from 1787
Ordenanças – Colonial Militias from Brazil. Fighting Indians, Pirates and fugitive Black Slaves
4 Direct ancestor's signatures here . One 5th G-Father and three 6th G-Fathers signatures below:
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/familia1/Assinaturasfirmes.jpg

Imperial Uniform of my 4th G-Father in Rio de Janeiro, about 1860
Cavaleiro da Ordem de Cristo. His Brother-in-law, my 4th G-Mother's Brother, was killed in Paraguai’s War in 1867.
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/Gen/JMCBA.jpg

Great Father, 1930 Movement
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/Gen/1930a.jpg

Father
Brazilian Air Force, early 50’s training flight
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e372/Babitonga/familia1/JVGO1.jpg

meatpuppet
05-29-2006, 08:48 PM
Both grandfathers served in ww2.....left in 39 back home 46....never got leave eaither...both were send from fronts inland to storm normady....said is was slaughter from what they saw......sprung threw thier beach, came around to flank the germans on omaha and where ever the english where... to help out.Said the english were running down all the beaches offering tea...now thats funny in battle.Said they probably gave alot of soldiers the wrong legs and arms when they were screaming for them...but guess they needed them to die?.Germans fought well...disiplined.But we owed them for dieppe!!!!!.....you can guess the rest...went on and on...met with russins..had drinks in the line...christmas had drinks with germans????.....then killed them...moved on...finnished war....came home,went back to old jobs..lived out thier life....(minus the screams at night....still gives me chills)......lived happly ever after...The end!

Solis
06-20-2006, 01:57 AM
June 19, 2006
I just joined a few days back. Never served in the military, BUT have lots of heritage of father, grandfather, great-grandfather and so on serving in the Army- all of them! In fact, I joined this web site to ask for some help. My grandfather passed away. He was a Staff Sergeant in the Army. Was drafted in 1939 into the Army and served until 1943-44. He was very quiet about his service in the military, so I don't have much to go on other than places he was stationed and so forth. He was in the 81st according to some pictures I have found. Fought on some Islands, Guadalcanal, Philipines and Hirasaki Japan. His name was S Sgt Iren "Ike" Tobler. If you are reading this and know of a sure fire way to locate some information on him, please reply!! So far I haven't much to go off of. Trying to learn more of my heritage.....
Solis....

(Great-Grandfather served in Europe during WWI. Father served during Vietnam.)

James
06-21-2006, 02:15 PM
June 19, 2006
I just joined a few days back. Never served in the military, BUT have lots of heritage of father, grandfather, great-grandfather and so on serving in the Army- all of them! In fact, I joined this web site to ask for some help. My grandfather passed away. He was a Staff Sergeant in the Army. Was drafted in 1939 into the Army and served until 1943-44. He was very quiet about his service in the military, so I don't have much to go on other than places he was stationed and so forth. He was in the 81st according to some pictures I have found. Fought on some Islands, Guadalcanal, Philipines and Hirasaki Japan. His name was S Sgt Iren "Ike" Tobler. If you are reading this and know of a sure fire way to locate some information on him, please reply!! So far I haven't much to go off of. Trying to learn more of my heritage.....
Solis....

The 81st fought in the Palaus in 1944; that was their first action.
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/lineage/cc/081id.htm

Army units on Guadalcanal were the 25th and Americal.
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/brochures/72-8/72-8.htm

Some stuff about the Philippines...
http://www.army.mil/cmh/brochures/leyte/leyte.htm
http://www.army.mil/cmh/brochures/luzon/72-28.htm

And WWII in the Pacific...
http://www.army.mil/cmh/online/Bookshelves/WW2-Pac.htm

James
06-26-2006, 05:21 PM
So, this weekend I was helping my dad and Aunt and Uncle clean out my Grandmother's house. SHe's still with us, but now lives in an assisted living place. I inherited some trinkets that belonged to my grandfather who was a pilot in WWII (Europe) and Korea, where he was MIA.

His flight school graduation photo (1940), a piece of German shrapnel that hit his plane (1944 or 1945), his pay card from 1951, and his instrument certification from 1946. Pretty cool.

http://img391.imageshack.us/img391/7114/0626060083fy.jpg

Thanks to ImageShack for Free Image Hosting (http://imageshack.us)

Ivo
06-29-2006, 03:55 AM
My grandfather from my father's side fought in the first world war in Austro-Hungarian navy as a cook and his three other brothers fought in the Austro-Hungarian army of which one of the brothers didn't come back, our family doesn't even know where he died or is buried. Most of my uncles fought the second world war with the partizan army in Croatia, I think they all fought with the prvi Dalmatinski brigade (I do know one of them did for sure, not sure about the others.)

On another note the family house from my mother's side is one of the oldest buildings in the town we originate from (Blato na Korcula) and was used as a fortress/strongpoint by the Greeks when they fought the Turks for control of the island, it still has the weapon pits in the sides of the building where the Greek defenders made places for them to shoot from.

Kerpan
07-01-2006, 01:26 AM
I've got 3

1) My grandfather grew up on a farm in poland. When the nazis invaded he was 14 and placed in the hitler youth. when he was old enough he was enlisted into the german army where he trained. he could still recall the strict training given to him Wehrmacht.
When his training was through he was sent off to battle near italy. His tour of the nazi army is little known to me but i do know that at one point during a skirmish of some type he surrendered to allied forces. I believe they were british units. The surrendered poles formed there own military unit to assist the allied forces in fighting the Germans.
The germans had taken a defensive position atop the hill at the battle of Monte Casino. Though british and us forces tried to take it, they were pushed back by the germans. My grandfather fought with the polish unit that punched through the german defenses and captured the hill of monte cassino.
The real interesting story is how he got home but thats not a battle...
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f19/luvnplster/poles.jpg

2) My second story is about my other grandfather. He was from croatia but he was 2nd gen. so that really has nothing do do with it. His career as a photographer led him to enlist into the army during korea. he served as a photographer in as he referred to it as "the bubble" in a P-51. He took pictures of strategic positions and even saw some combat time. He could recall the feeling during a napalm drop. He described it as: "Pretty Damn Hot!" He actually took a few photos on an airfield where ted williams was stationed and liked to tell the story of when ted made an emergency landing leaking fuel skidding back and forth against the runway. after landing he stands up and lights a cigar.
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f19/luvnplster/tedd.jpg

3) Final story... My great uncle, the soon of the second story also fought in korea. he found that he had been very successful in the armed forces and when the vietnam war broke out and the us intervened, he volunteered for service. He served 3 tours in vietnam and was known to have a bit of a violent streak. From the stories i've heard, it wouldn't surprise me if the guy from platoon was in his unit and based Sgt. Barnes off of him. Of course my uncle died from cancer that was probably caused by agent orange so the ending may not be accurate.
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f19/luvnplster/viet.jpg

shocker1
07-06-2006, 01:15 AM
I want to tell you about a December night in France as told to me by my grandfather. He served with Patton’s Third Army from early 1944 till early 1946 in France. One night near Bastogne he was awakened by a friendly dog which after leaving considerable slobber on his face ran away. Pappy (that’s what I call him) still lying in the ditch scanned around and thought he was alone. At that moment the flash of distant explosions revealed what he thought was a German solider just a few feet away. Sweating bullets he decided to wait out the German and then get the hell out of there. The hours went by as the cold December air made him feel one with the earth but the German stood his ground like a hickory in a storm. As the dawn started to break ole Pappy readied himself for the confrontation he knew would come with this German solider. He admired the dedication of his enemy to his post, like rock the German would not be moved. With the light of the morning stealing his precious cover he arose to confront the dedicated enemy. Heart racing he collapsed to his knees having the laugh of his life. The light of the morning revealed the fence post, sporting a fine German helmet. His buds had a laugh too, since they put that darn helmet there.

goat89
07-06-2006, 02:04 AM
Damn! That's an ultra-jag! Funny prank to play on your pappy!

Jarhead
07-06-2006, 06:06 AM
hehe, nice story, with a happy endrofl

Jarhead

JORDAN
07-18-2006, 09:47 PM
Father in law..French Foreign Legion KIA 1952 Viet Nam
Step Father..US Army KIA ...Viet Nam
Father..retired US Army 22 yrs..E7
Brother retired US army 22 yrs E9

Psycomore
07-19-2006, 12:49 PM
Long time lurker 1st time poster , so i better make this a good one.

my great uncle served in the 17th Indian infantry division Royal Artillery in Burma, WWII, he was in the survey party with a squad of Gurhkas attached to him to get coordinates for the guns & witnessed Lachiman Gurung who was in his unit earn his V.C whilst they was being attackd by a battalion of Jap troops. He is stil alive today & has passed down to me all the things he brought home from the war like a japanese blood stained flag he took from a corpse , his old combat jacket, dog tags ect. His Father also served in the army in the Boer war in South Africa 1901

I also have an Uncle in law who is in 42 commando Royal marines who serverd a tour in Iraq back in 2003 & is due to deploy to A-stan in October.

Grandfather on my mothers side was a National Service man (bad lads army lol) & served in Egypt (Suez Canal).

Grandfather on my dads side didnt serve in the armed forces but was an Fireman/ARP warden in WW2.

Canman
07-21-2006, 11:05 AM
My great great uncle was a rear admiral in the royal navy in the 1870s. his son was in the navy during ww2 and was shot down the back wilst trying to shoot down a stuka with a .38. Another one of my Uncles was killed in the HMS Hood when it was sunk by the bismark.
One grandfarther serverd as a pilot in the RAF 1939-1944 in Europe, africa and was eventualy shot down in in india in 1944. The other grandfather joined The Royal Norfok Regiment in 1938 and at the outbreak off WW2 joined No4 commando. Served in Norway during reece and raids,he then fought with No4 under the famous lord lovat at the dieppe tradgedy and some how survived. He then Served inthe mediterainian during 1943.

His next major operation was on june 6 1944. He was later wounded in the back of the head by shrapnel on the 8th of August while assualting a german strong point in a farm house on the outskirts of the city. Aparently the germans in the farm house put out the white flag so there wounded could be removed and taken into britsh care, they then continued the fight to the last man. After the was he worked in the MoD for the rest of his carrer. My farther emigrated to Australia in 1967 just in time for the veitnam war ( bad timing) and server with 3rd battalion RAR (paras).

Psycomore
07-25-2006, 02:12 PM
p-) Aaaahhh yes i almost forgot , apparently i had a very distant reletive something like a great great great great great great great Uncle who wasan ANZAC & was KIA in Gallipoli in 1915.

CPL Trevoga
07-25-2006, 07:07 PM
I just got back from Russia, my father showed me my grand-grandfathers military discharge papers from 1915. My grand-grandfather was an infantry private in Russo-Japanese war of 1905. He was wounded in December of 1914 in WWI, his left arm was amputeted and he was discharged in 1915.

I'm still trying to disipher the name of his regiment and place where he was wounded.

Ordie
08-07-2006, 01:34 AM
My Great Great Aunt (mom's side) was a Col. in Pancho Villa's Northern Army. She help set up auxiliary forces and intelligence networks in Sinaloa, Sonora, and Baja California.

My Great Uncle (dad's side) an Italian defector, fought with Tito's Partizans, his brother was in Mussolini's Army's in Sardinia shooting AA at British and American aircraft. My dad was in the Argentine Army during one of the many coups attempts in the late 50's during which he went AWOL.

MARINO
08-08-2006, 09:39 AM
Paternal Grandpa: When the Spanish Civil War began he was in Barcelona ( Republican Zone)doing his military service, he passed the enemy lines and joined the National side, he served the whole war with an artillery regiment in most of battles. After the war he joined Blue Division( 250th Division) and fougth comunism in Russia also with an artillery regiment, his brother served in an infantry regiment.

Maternal Grandpa: he is General now retired, infantry.

Maternal Grandpa's Bother: he joined Paratroopers cuz he wasnt accepted in mountain rangers, he fought in Ifni and was killed in Netol Operation.

Maternal Grandma's father: Served fought in Morocco and took part in Alhucemas Landings.

Maternal Grandpa's father: He joined made his military service and joined then as a soldier, he became an NCO, and then a CO.When the civil war started he was in Alicante(Republican side) he was mobilised and was injured in action, he faked dead and then joined the national side at night( the told his wife he was a KIA), he joined the national army. Took part in many battles, he was killed after a 3 day attack(practically non-stop) and his wife received another KIA letter.

Greek soldier
08-08-2006, 10:56 AM
My father's older brother, Nassos, while in Lamia (Central Greece) doing his military service in 1955, he stepped on a land mine and lost his two legs. His colleagues tried to keep him alive (he lost a lot of blood) in order to be sent to Athens (back then only Athens had good hospitals). He didn't survive.

My father was forced to do at the same time his brother's job and night school. He got a permission from the Greek Army not to serve, since he lost a relative of him.

My parents named me after him.

MG 3
08-24-2006, 03:23 AM
Since we are from that part of the country that only knows 1 job. Joining the army. My great grand father was a company sargent in 1 Punjab (this regement is about 500years old and is still active as part of the Pakistan Army) of the royal indian army. This was back when Pakistan and India were one country. His cousin fought in the Iraq during WW1. He himself faught in WW2 in the north african campaign and later in Italy. Thankfully he survived and came back to raise my grandfather who again joined the army as a gunner in the 59 field arty reg. He faught in every war that pakistan was in from independence in 1942 till 82 (3 in all). Then came my dad who joined 21 punjab a light antitank battlion. He served in sachin at 18000feet, the highest battlefield in the world. Months alone in a single post with no electricity and 12 men in two rooms. he then got posted to germany where he was attached to the bundeswehr and later the US army at fort McNair, DC. as for me i cant decide to join or not to join.:|

Manu
09-04-2006, 11:13 PM
My grandfather was 16 during the second world war, he didn't serve or anything like this. But he told me that he walked from the "Bodensee" to "Stuttgart" (where he lived before the war) with his younger brother to check if their house was still standing, that's a quite long distance if you are walking. He saw arms and other human "stuff" hanging in the trees after american or british bombs hit Stuttgart and visited the bombed church where he used to go to on sundays.

My Grandma was very young too, she only told me one time about ww2, she was walking with her family and some friends from their field and they saw a small plane flying torwards them, they thought it is burning because they saw smoke but it was smoke of the machineguns of the plane ... some seconds later the plane (it was flying very deep) started opening fire on them but didn't hit.

The father of my Grandfather worked for "Heinkel" and built planes until one of those planes hit the roof of the fctory after a test-fly.

Sorry for bad English

Black_Company
09-18-2006, 07:38 PM
WWII - bombing of hamburg. this is not a relitave, but the friends of the family growing up once told me as a little girl she was huddled on a bridge during th ebombing of hamburg, and she remembers a soldier standing on the bridge shooting people who were trying to put themselves out by jumping and swimming in the river. he was weaping during the shootings, adn when he ran out of ammo (aparently) he trew his weapon into the water and jumped in himself. Odd story and defintily shocking to her bing a little girl.

WWII - itally and europe. my dad's uncle was with the black watch. he was lucky to survive the war, he had many disturbing stories, but he was so disturbed by them he drank himself to death on the west side of vancouver slums.

Custers last stand - my mothers side. her family was sioux. and after a few years of being slaughtered by the US army, they decided to move their whole tribe into canada. custers crew were ordered by congress to stop it, it aparently did not go as they planned. sittin gbull made it into alberta. a little while later congress pardoned sitting bull and the sioux nation, and told them they could come back into the states. much of the sioux people did not believe the US government, and stayed in canada. my mom's relitaves being some of them, styaed in canada. the rest were alllowed into the usa, then rounded up into a stockade and all shot.

Karo
09-18-2006, 08:10 PM
Heres a sad story about the father of my grandmother:

He was born in 1900, so he was to old to serve in the regular army. To the end of war (ca. 1943-44) an other man should get drafted into the SS, but he bribed the local commander or sth like that (my grandmother couldnt remember quite correctly about this detail), so the other man didnt have to go fighting, but my great-grandfather had now go to fighting for him. So he had been fighting against partisans in Austria. My grandmother told me that he told her about cruel stories about what there happened. (partisans were destroying whole red cross busses with handgrenades, nailing tongues on the table etc.). I actually dont know why but then he refused to fight on, and then the SS just executed him (ca. June 1944).
In the 80s (I believe it was in the 80s), my grandmother met the guy for whom my great-grandfather fought and died on a funeral. He told her the whole story how he got around the military service.
After 2-3 days of the meeting he died, i guess that he thought that he was now redeemed of his guilt and could die more pacified..

:-(

woofer
10-05-2006, 06:45 AM
I am interested to see personal photos from all nationallities of there fathers, grandfathers and great grandfathers in ww2. You know the type I mean where they are with friends in a trench sharing a brew or relaxing between battles, or posing for the family. No dead bodies please

be proud

MG 3
10-05-2006, 06:53 AM
My Great Grand daddy was with the Royal British Indian Army. Faught in North Afrika and Italy. Will post a pic when I get home.

Steelhead
10-05-2006, 07:35 AM
My mother's father enlisted at the age of 18 into the airforce in 1941. He was a Tailgunner on a B-24 "The Naughty Nan." He flew over North Africa, Italy, France, and Germany. He had to bail out a total of 4 times, twice in the ocean. Quite a hero in my eyes.

My father's father was drafted into the German Wehrmacht 15th Infantry Division. Where he fought in France in 1940, then consistently switched fronts from west to east until he was again fighting in France against Allied forces in 1944. I think he told me he was captured in the siege of Aachen. Also an interesting story.

I definetly have a few pics of these guys, when I find them I'll post em.

woofer
10-05-2006, 08:07 AM
My mother's father enlisted at the age of 18 into the airforce in 1941. He was a Tailgunner on a B-24 "The Naughty Nan." He flew over North Africa, Italy, France, and Germany. He had to bail out a total of 4 times, twice in the ocean. Quite a hero in my eyes.

My father's father was drafted into the German Wehrmacht 15th Infantry Division. Where he fought in France in 1940, then consistently switched fronts from west to east until he was again fighting in France against Allied forces in 1944. I think he told me he was captured in the siege of Aachen. Also an interesting story.

I definetly have a few pics of these guys, when I find them I'll post

em.

would be nice to see them together

Alpha Leader
10-05-2006, 08:26 AM
Interesting read.
I dug tghis up from google.
http://www.446bg.com/photos/crew/102544_4crew.jpg
4 lucky crewmen from "Naughty Nan" who flew their last mission on this day. Going home are: 1/Lt William Davenport, 1/Lt Haywood Nichols, 1/Lt James Pickett, and 2/Lt Mark Jacoby. Lt Davenport would later serve as President of the 446th Bomb Group Association and now serves as the group's official historian

http://www.b24bestweb.com/images/B24/NAUGHTYNAN-V2-1.JPG

Alpha Leader
10-05-2006, 08:27 AM
Argh double post sorry.

kazbitch
10-05-2006, 08:30 AM
Started a thread during the summer with pics of my grandad : http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=84144
enjoy.

woofer
10-05-2006, 10:30 AM
Started a thread during the summer with pics of my grandad : http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=84144
enjoy.


Thanks for the link the jeep looks like something off the A team

kazbitch
10-05-2006, 11:08 AM
Thanks for the link the jeep looks like something off the A team

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f132/Kaz*****/WWII/Picture20018.jpg

dont forget the donkey?!woot

woofer
10-05-2006, 12:24 PM
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f132/Kaz*****/WWII/Picture20018.jpg

dont forget the donkey?!woot


who could forget the donkey eeeeh aaawwwww every unit has one usualy works in the stores though

woofer
10-05-2006, 05:03 PM
repost...................................

unit299_09
10-05-2006, 05:08 PM
i posted it already..
its my grandfather
some days before he became a POW
at the easternfront

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v622/unit299_09/Harry.jpg

woofer
10-05-2006, 05:17 PM
i posted it already..
its my grandfather
some days before he became a POW
at the easternfront

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v622/unit299_09/Harry.jpg

who was he with he looks happy

unit299_09
10-05-2006, 05:42 PM
who was he with he looks happy

i guess he is drunk on the pic ;)
it was in winter '42 or'43 i cant really remember..
he was an Obergefreiter of an artillery-battery with LeFH 18


thats all i can remember..

woofer
10-05-2006, 06:04 PM
i guess he is drunk on the pic ;)
it was in winter '42 or'43 i cant really remember..
he was an Obergefreiter of an artillery-battery with LeFH 18


thats all i can remember..

eastern front POW thats some serious time..please keep sharing folks

F-14D
10-05-2006, 06:11 PM
I found this pic of my uncle Lt. Col. Lee Rayford on net.
http://www.vahistory.org/WWII/image_archive/image.php?image_id=940&page=image_archive

unit299_09
10-05-2006, 06:21 PM
eastern front POW thats some serious time..please keep sharing folks

he came back '52
he have been in workingcamps in Kamtschatka and Caucasus
but he never spoke a bad word about russians-
he meaned always "the winner decides where to go".
but he was very dissapointed about his comrades in the camp..
very much betrayal and blackmailing aso...

valdezfa18
10-05-2006, 06:22 PM
ITS NOT WW2 BUT ITS COOL

One of this guys is my great grand father, i dont know wich one because i dont know what he looked like when he was young, he was with LOS DORADOS or THE GOLDEN BODY GAURDS OF PANCHO VILLAwoot

wiking
10-05-2006, 06:27 PM
All my relatives were to young or to old to serve in WW2.

My great grandfather on my mothers side went off to enlist in April of 1940 when the Germans invaded, but they sent him home. They told him he was too old and they also knew who he was and that he had a large group of kids to take care off at home.

My grandfather told me off having witnessed\heard when the Germans came across some agents that had been landed on the coast, got lost, got discovered, were hunted and in the end were found and killed close to the farm he grew up on.

wiking
10-05-2006, 06:31 PM
I found this pic of my uncle Lt. Col. Lee Rayford on net.
http://www.vahistory.org/WWII/image_archive/image.php?image_id=940&page=image_archive

Tuskegee airmen woot I've seen the movie, and it's a brilliant story.

Is your uncle still alive?

F-14D
10-05-2006, 06:41 PM
No, RIP Uncle Lee, and to complete the facts on that site he became the operations officer of the 301FS (part of the 332FW). Aircraft he flew P40, P38 and his favorite P51B. After he retired from Army Aircorp he became a deputy marshall. I actually have a thank you card from Robert F. Kennedy thanking him for guarding his house over a holiday season.

Karo
10-05-2006, 08:06 PM
Here is the story of my grandfather:

He was the radio operator/aerial gunner in the Luftwaffe, reconaissance unit. He flew with the Ju 88, the Me 410 (like on the pic) and ..argh cant remember the name, a waterplane actually. He fought in Russia, Denmark and primary in the Medditerenean area (Italy, North Africa..). Im still owning some picture which he had made during some operations (from the landing place Salerno, Neapel, Palermo and other landing places in Italy). Interesting pics in which you can see all the small boats and the analysis of the ground crew.
On 8th Januar 1944, he flew around the city Foggia as a Spitfire appeared out of the sun and shot them down. They crashed near an allied air base, my grandfather survived with a graze wound at his head (still visible today), but the pilot got a shot in the head and then also burned to the half before allied troops/firemen arrived..always makes my grandfather very sad when hes talking about this event..
So he came to North Africa, where he was welcomed by an allied officer with the words: We have been wating for you a long time! There the allies had every detail about his life gathered..
After that he came to London, North America, Scotland and then back home in 1947 if i remember correctly. In the US and the Scotland he had to work as a farmer. He always says that he really enjoyed the time and that he was always treated good.
During the war he was decorated with the EK II+I and the Frontflugspange in Bronze, and they shot down 3-5 airplanes (my grandfather couldnt remember the exact number). At the End of war he had the rank of an Unteroffizier (NCO).

http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/5429/opa3hm9.jpg

(He is the man on the right side on the plane, the man on the left side is the fallen pilot)

and here is an additionally pic of them, making jokes at the airbase:
http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/2957/opa2ie0.jpg
(my grandfather is the one on the right side)

Good and ineresting thread btw!

farslayer1s
10-05-2006, 09:18 PM
these are pics of my uncle ,charles(chuck)s.shaw ,always with the smile,a pilot of a b-24,of the bg-458,bs-753,in front of one of his planes, and in africa.

SBL
10-05-2006, 09:27 PM
I have a couple really great photos of my great uncle who served in the AVG (the "Flying Tigers"). I'll photograph them and post them along with some background in about a week when I visit my home. I hope I can find this thread!

30Cal
10-05-2006, 09:28 PM
This is my maternal grandfather. He fought at Guadalcanal, New Britain, Peleliu and Okinawa and also through the Korean War. This picture was taken after Guadalcanal. Any guesses as to who that is in the foreground? Should be an easy one.
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/aho/%20geoaho%20halsey.jpg

This is my wife's uncle Robert Hauge (Norwegian). Classic picture.
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/upload/Norge-03-073.JPG
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/upload/Norge-03-076.JPG
"Uncle Robert never came home again. He fell over Osnabruck (sp?), January 14, 1945."

RECON DOC
10-05-2006, 09:33 PM
This is my maternal grandfather. He fought at Guadalcanal, New Britain, Peleliu and Okinawa and also through the Korean War. This picture was taken after Guadalcanal. Any guesses as to who that is in the foreground? Should be an easy one.
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/aho/%20geoaho%20halsey.jpg



Chester Nimitz?

30Cal
10-05-2006, 09:35 PM
Chester Nimitz?
Close. ADM Halsey.

Midav
10-05-2006, 10:51 PM
Some nice stuff in here!!!

Pics and documents of my family in WW2 can be found here (http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=91106&highlight=Midav%27).

Raiden
10-06-2006, 01:41 AM
Here is the story of my grandfather:

He was the radio operator/aerial gunner in the Luftwaffe, reconaissance unit. He flew with the Ju 88, the Me 410 (like on the pic) and ..argh cant remember the name, a waterplane actually. He fought in Russia, Denmark and primary in the Medditerenean area (Italy, North Africa..).Karo, do you know what unit your grandfather flew with? I'm wondering if your grandfather and my grandfather ever crossed paths.

My grandfather flew with 3.(F)/22 in France in 1940, then with 1.(F)/22 in Russia and Norway/Finland. He wrapped up the war with FAGr.5 flying Ju 290s out of France until D-Day, after that it's not entirely clear what exactly he did. There's hard evidence he was involved with flight testing a captured B-24 at Rechlin, but for what purpose exactly, nobody knows. My grandmother maintained that they wanted to use the B-24 in Allied markings to drop commandos behind enemy lines, which would have been a war crime. Anyhow here he is (on the right) with a wartime friend of his at Stavanger, Norway, 1942/43 sometime:

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_1f22_opa-lange_stavanger.jpg

May 4th, 1943, he crash-landed Ju 88 4N+JH at Bardufoss after being shot up by Allied shipping. Supposedly one of the crew had to hold an oil line together with his fingers to keep the plane flying. My grandfather is on the far left.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_04may43_4njh_bardufoss02.jpg

He had three other brothers in the war also, I know that one of them was tortured to death by partisans on the Eastern Front. Then there was his youngest brother Bernhard who was just old enough to start flying fighters when the war was getting hot. Great-Uncle Bernhard is in the middle. This is a scan of a picture postcard. I gather it was popular at the time to get postcards made out of your own photos.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/bn_singer-neumann-arnzka.jpg

Here's him hamming it up with a friend on Sicily, probably 1942 sometime.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/bn_sicily02_helmets.jpg

He was shot down and killed on October 29th, 1944, in southeastern Germany while flying a Bf 109G-14 with IV./JG 53. He's listed in the big multi-volume history of JG 53 (I've forgotten the author's name), from the sound of it he was a newbie pilot and his flight leader was less than competent. His group of planes was last seen flying straight and level through a melee that erupted when the squadron was ambushed by P-47s from the 5th AF. I understand that he crashed near a village and lived for half a day or so before succumbing to his injuries. He wasn't even of legal U.S. drinking age yet, a classic case of the new kids being thrown up against the Allied meat-grinder at the end of the war.

I don't know how to feel about all this stuff, on the one hand to my knowledge the people in my family served honorably, but... They were still on the wrong side. My grandfather took to working odd jobs and drinking after the war (trying to survive in German in 1946-56 or so was not easy) and died long before I was born, so I couldn't really ask him for details about his experiences. Most of what I know is from independent research, and talking to my grandmother (now deceased).

Interesting thread, hope we see some more cool stuff...

TR1
10-06-2006, 01:43 AM
he came back '52
he have been in workingcamps in Kamtschatka and Caucasus
but he never spoke a bad word about russians-
he meaned always "the winner decides where to go".
but he was very dissapointed about his comrades in the camp..
very much betrayal and blackmailing aso...

thank you for sharing, very interesting.
great thread.

RECON DOC
10-06-2006, 01:48 AM
Awesome pics Raiden and thanks for the personal insight of your family history, very interesting.

woofer
10-06-2006, 05:27 AM
I don't know how to feel about all this stuff, on the one hand to my knowledge the people in my family served honorably, but... They were still on the wrong side. My grandfather took to working odd jobs and drinking after the war (trying to survive in German in 1946-56 or so was not easy) and died long before I was born, so I couldn't really ask him for details about his experiences. Most of what I know is from independent research, and talking to my grandmother (now deceased).

Interesting thread, hope we see some more cool stuff...

I think its great to hear these stories its been a long time coming. Too many great stories have been hidden since the second world war from germany and other places it wasnt just the brits and yanks in the war.

MORE PHOTOS MORE TALES PLEASE

woofer
10-06-2006, 05:28 AM
Here is the story of my grandfather:

He was the radio operator/aerial gunner in the Luftwaffe, reconaissance unit. He flew with the Ju 88, the Me 410 (like on the pic) and ..argh cant remember the name, a waterplane actually. He fought in Russia, Denmark and primary in the Medditerenean area (Italy, North Africa..). Im still owning some picture which he had made during some operations (from the landing place Salerno, Neapel, Palermo and other landing places in Italy). Interesting pics in which you can see all the small boats and the analysis of the ground crew.
On 8th Januar 1944, he flew around the city Foggia as a Spitfire appeared out of the sun and shot them down. They crashed near an allied air base, my grandfather survived with a graze wound at his head (still visible today), but the pilot got a shot in the head and then also burned to the half before allied troops/firemen arrived..always makes my grandfather very sad when hes talking about this event..
So he came to North Africa, where he was welcomed by an allied officer with the words: We have been wating for you a long time! There the allies had every detail about his life gathered..
After that he came to London, North America, Scotland and then back home in 1947 if i remember correctly. In the US and the Scotland he had to work as a farmer. He always says that he really enjoyed the time and that he was always treated good.
During the war he was decorated with the EK II+I and the Frontflugspange in Bronze, and they shot down 3-5 airplanes (my grandfather couldnt remember the exact number). At the End of war he had the rank of an Unteroffizier (NCO).

http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/5429/opa3hm9.jpg

(He is the man on the right side on the plane, the man on the left side is the fallen pilot)

and here is an additionally pic of them, making jokes at the airbase:
http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/2957/opa2ie0.jpg
(again my grandfather is the one on the left side)

Good and ineresting thread btw!


You should scan these pics and sharpen them up you could even print them off then

woofer
10-06-2006, 05:29 AM
thank you for sharing, very interesting.
great thread.


would make a good book/film

Karo
10-06-2006, 08:58 AM
You should scan these pics and sharpen them up you could even print them off then

Yes, but i dont have a scanner and the first pic is in some kind of a frame which my grandfather build and which contains his awards, his shoulder boards and this pic. I think that its not possible to open this, so i dont wanna destroy his work. I could post some reconnaissance pics of him (as i said before) which i scanned if somebody is interested in.

btw i had make a mistake, on the 2. pic, he is the guy on the right side not left.

Karo
10-06-2006, 09:01 AM
Karo, do you know what unit your grandfather flew with? I'm wondering if your grandfather and my grandfather ever crossed paths.

My grandfather flew with 3.(F)/22 in France in 1940, then with 1.(F)/22 in Russia and Norway/Finland.


My grandfather served in the 2.(F)/122.

Twombly
10-06-2006, 09:22 AM
This is my maternal grandfather. He fought at Guadalcanal, New Britain, Peleliu and Okinawa and also through the Korean War. This picture was taken after Guadalcanal. Any guesses as to who that is in the foreground? Should be an easy one.
http://webpages.charter.net/tyoberg/aho/%20geoaho%20halsey.jpg

Platoon Sergeant of the 5th or 6th Marines.... Damn, with all that places, where he was, he's a real hero... (don't want to say, that the others aren't p-) ) Is he still alive?

Holstein
10-06-2006, 09:47 AM
Ill call my grandfather today and see if hes got any photos that he can send to me.

woofer
10-06-2006, 01:08 PM
Yes, but i dont have a scanner and the first pic is in some kind of a frame which my grandfather build and which contains his awards, his shoulder boards and this pic. I think that its not possible to open this, so i dont wanna destroy his work. I could post some reconnaissance pics of him (as i said before) which i scanned if somebody is interested in.

btw i had make a mistake, on the 2. pic, he is the guy on the right side not left.


Post what you like it would be good to see them...I understand about the frame but if you are careful you may save them from being destroyed by time and the light. By transplanting the awards and scanned images into a new sealed frame.

Karo
10-06-2006, 02:25 PM
So here are the pics, i had to decrease the resolution because otherwise they would have them too big to upload.



http://img524.imageshack.us/img524/1660/01badhi6.th.jpg (http://img524.imageshack.us/my.php?image=01badhi6.jpg)

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/1673/018py3.th.jpg (http://img468.imageshack.us/my.php?image=018py3.jpg)

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/5342/0333ww9.th.jpg (http://img525.imageshack.us/my.php?image=0333ww9.jpg)

Every picture has such a card on the back:

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/1760/0555mm4.th.jpg (http://img525.imageshack.us/my.php?image=0555mm4.jpg)

http://img518.imageshack.us/img518/5096/01111bj8.th.jpg (http://img518.imageshack.us/my.php?image=01111bj8.jpg)

http://img160.imageshack.us/img160/6453/01555ve8.th.jpg (http://img160.imageshack.us/my.php?image=01555ve8.jpg)

http://img518.imageshack.us/img518/7969/01888ti8.th.jpg (http://img518.imageshack.us/my.php?image=01888ti8.jpg)

On some pics there is one half missing, this why they are all overseized pictures and i had only a normal scanner, i uploaded the more interesting part ;)

wiking
10-06-2006, 04:28 PM
Karo, do you know what unit your grandfather flew with? I'm wondering if your grandfather and my grandfather ever crossed paths.

My grandfather flew with 3.(F)/22 in France in 1940, then with 1.(F)/22 in Russia and Norway/Finland. He wrapped up the war with FAGr.5 flying Ju 290s out of France until D-Day, after that it's not entirely clear what exactly he did. There's hard evidence he was involved with flight testing a captured B-24 at Rechlin, but for what purpose exactly, nobody knows. My grandmother maintained that they wanted to use the B-24 in Allied markings to drop commandos behind enemy lines, which would have been a war crime. Anyhow here he is (on the right) with a wartime friend of his at Stavanger, Norway, 1942/43 sometime:

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_1f22_opa-lange_stavanger.jpg

May 4th, 1943, he crash-landed Ju 88 4N+JH at Bardufoss after being shot up by Allied shipping. Supposedly one of the crew had to hold an oil line together with his fingers to keep the plane flying. My grandfather is on the far left.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_04may43_4njh_bardufoss02.jpg

He had three other brothers in the war also, I know that one of them was tortured to death by partisans on the Eastern Front. Then there was his youngest brother Bernhard who was just old enough to start flying fighters when the war was getting hot. Great-Uncle Bernhard is in the middle. This is a scan of a picture postcard. I gather it was popular at the time to get postcards made out of your own photos.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/bn_singer-neumann-arnzka.jpg

Here's him hamming it up with a friend on Sicily, probably 1942 sometime.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/bn_sicily02_helmets.jpg

He was shot down and killed on October 29th, 1944, in southeastern Germany while flying a Bf 109G-14 with IV./JG 53. He's listed in the big multi-volume history of JG 53 (I've forgotten the author's name), from the sound of it he was a newbie pilot and his flight leader was less than competent. His group of planes was last seen flying straight and level through a melee that erupted when the squadron was ambushed by P-47s from the 5th AF. I understand that he crashed near a village and lived for half a day or so before succumbing to his injuries. He wasn't even of legal U.S. drinking age yet, a classic case of the new kids being thrown up against the Allied meat-grinder at the end of the war.

I don't know how to feel about all this stuff, on the one hand to my knowledge the people in my family served honorably, but... They were still on the wrong side. My grandfather took to working odd jobs and drinking after the war (trying to survive in German in 1946-56 or so was not easy) and died long before I was born, so I couldn't really ask him for details about his experiences. Most of what I know is from independent research, and talking to my grandmother (now deceased).

Interesting thread, hope we see some more cool stuff...


Awesome pics from Norway mate, I always like to see war-time pics from Norway. Got any more?

thunderw
10-06-2006, 05:45 PM
Amazing how our grandfathers were fighting and trying to kill each other, then 60 years later we are sharing their pictures and stories with one another.
Cheers

Raiden
10-07-2006, 02:12 AM
Awesome pics from Norway mate, I always like to see war-time pics from Norway. Got any more?I almost said "no" because the photos are all 1500 miles away at my family's home right now, but then I checked my old archive folder and found that there were some in JPG from back when I was researching all this stuff.

Here's another from the crash-landing. I never noticed the bigass hole in the front greenhouse. I think it's from the gondola crushing the framework during the belly landing, not enemy fire, but it's hard to be sure.

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_04may43_4njh_bardufoss03.jpg

I've gone to Airliners.net and looked through all the photos of Bardufoss in the present day. I know it's currently a helicopter station, and there are occasional airshows there. I've also seen pictures of RAF Jaguars in winter camo at Bardufoss. It doesn't look like much has changed except the runway. I've read that a new runway was added, and the old Luftwaffe runway is now the ramp. It's really cool to see it in color in the 21st century, it makes my grandfather's photos more real.

1.(F)/22 aircraft at Banak:
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/en_4nnh-d1_banak.jpg

The rest are from a "squadron scrapbook" of Norway. I think only a couple of these were taken by my grandfather - it was a reconnaisance unit after all, they didn't lack for cameras. I've heard that all the pilots had hand-held Leicas, supposedly my grandfather's is still around somewhere. I'm certainly not posting the entire album, but I'll put up the landscape photos. :)

Unknown airfield
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_airfield.jpg

Nice coastal scene from the gunner's bubble
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_coast01.jpg

Cold!
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_crew_cold.jpg

I'm pretty sure my grandfather took this one. He liked to take walks and photograph nature.
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_falls.jpg

Bardufoss ramp, definitely. The mountain is distinctive.
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_flightline.jpg

Ships in harbor, Axis from the look of the camo
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_harbor.jpg

Islands, I have no idea where
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_islands.jpg

Rough northern coast, I want to say near Spitzbergen?
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_ju88-cowl-coast.jpg

Go down here and they'll never find you again. My grandfather's logs record at least one search operation in a Fieseler Storch for a squadron aircraft that went down in terrain like this.
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_ju88-cowl-mtns.jpg

Desolate rivermouth, might be Finland?
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_rivermouth.jpg

Look at this and keep in mind that life expectancy for downed crews in the water was 20 min. according to the commander of KG 30 (who's name escapes me at the moment). Convoy duty was ugly business for everybody involved, on both sides. There's a whole lot of loss records for the reconnaisance units that show an aircraft taking off, and then just... Never coming back. At least when your ship went down, somebody probably knew about it.
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_shipping01.jpg

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_shipping03.jpg

http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_shipping04.jpg

Oddly picturesque note to end with
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_waterfall.jpg

By the way the aircraft currently being restored by the Norwegian Aviation Museum, 4N+EH #1203, was flown by my grandfather on one flight, according to his logbooks. It was in Russia somewhere in late 1942 and it wasn't an operational mission, just a ferry flight from one base to another, but it's definitely #1203 because he flew the first 4N+EH. The second 4N+EH was a replacement for the one that crashed later in Norway. :)

KillerBD
10-07-2006, 02:20 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/00/Hitler-triumph.JPG
Here is a photo of my great, great..........



I'm just messing with ya all, I don't have any photos of WWII relatives.rofl rofl



Don't take this offensive anyone, I realize that this is Adolf Hitler and he was a very sick and evil man.

wiking
10-07-2006, 02:34 AM
Awesome stuff Raiden, incredible pictures. There's a site called www.nuav.net , it's a Norwegian run site about Norway during WW2. If you'd like to get some of those pics and storys out there, and maybe get some more info you should contact them.

You ever been to Norway?

Oh, and the Norwegian coastline is the longest in the world, it's generally rugged and has thousands of islands. Most of those scenery pics could be from anywhere between Lindesnes and Nordkapp :)

goat89
10-07-2006, 04:30 AM
Holy c*ap...Those sure are history. RIP to the fallen.

Chris
10-07-2006, 06:57 AM
My grandpa fought for the germans in WW2. He got shot in the chest in russia. I have a lot of pictures, but most of them are family ones. On a couple of them, he and his buddies are posing for the camera.

Its quite moving for me to look at all that stuff he left behind. I have a couple of documents. Older ones show how he passed school, and what he learned. Then the enlistment, and finally the handwritten letter of his commander when he died, and the official copy by the militar as well as the death certificate.

Its like holding the whole life of a person in one hand...

I also found a small book where his friends wrote their adress, and some parts are like a diary.

Maybe I'll scan the pictures if I am in the mood.

woofer
10-07-2006, 08:09 AM
CLASSIC WINTER SHOT

Cold!
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_crew_cold.jpg

THAT IS ONE ANGRY RIVER...NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE THAT
http://www.theforbiddenjungle.com/offsite/w_en_nb_falls.jpg

GREAT PHOTOS

woofer
10-07-2006, 11:51 AM
Maybe I'll scan the pictures if I am in the mood.


get in the mood, join the party

woofer
10-07-2006, 02:09 PM
Amazing how our grandfathers were fighting and trying to kill each other, then 60 years later we are sharing their pictures and stories with one another.
Cheers

Suppose thats what makes this a good site to be on...Wonder if our sons/daughters will be doing the same in 50 years with the sons/daughters of Iraq

Hypno85
10-07-2006, 07:30 PM
My family has a small history in military of what i know of. My Great Grandfather fought in WW1. He wrote a diary when he was there which my Grandfather then re-done with a typewritter after he died. I have read it but i was a while ago. It pretty much started when he signed up and he wrote about his time and what he done. The main parts which stick with me is the first time he came under gas attack (I think by a plane but i cant be sure). He also wrote about a German Soldier making it to his trench and being confronted with enemy up close for first time, As he wrote it was him or me! all i remember is seeing his face with pain shocked over it. The most intresting part is we have all the German soldiers belongings Photos of his family, money, booklet i think it was ID, Some sort of choclate bar, Bayonet and a few other things. He fought in the somme. Sorry but thats all i can remember from the diary. I will try to get some photos but it means asking my grandfather and as it was his dad i dont want him think that he meant nothing to me.

I had a great uncle in WW2 he was in the royal navy. All i no of him was that he took US soldiers on to Omaha beach on d-day and lost half his ear to a bullet.

My Grandfather served due National Service RAF. He was first in the cook houses but asked to be moved due as he says now im not a cook lol. He was moved into something he loved which was Engineering was based in Germany and the UK building runways etc.. which he then took over to civvie job after.

Other then those 3 i dont know of any others im sure if i looked on the family tree i could find out loads more.

I will be the first to go into the military out of my family since my grandfather.

red dragon
10-08-2006, 12:12 PM
My grandfather, a general in the Ottoman Empire in WW1

http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n179/red__dragon/grandfather.jpg

red dragon
10-08-2006, 12:16 PM
My family has a small history in military of what i know of. My Great Grandfather fought in WW1. He wrote a diary when he was there which my Grandfather then re-done with a typewritter after he died. I have read it but i was a while ago. It pretty much started when he signed up and he wrote about his time and what he done. The main parts which stick with me is the first time he came under gas attack (I think by a plane but i cant be sure). He also wrote about a German Soldier making it to his trench and being confronted with enemy up close for first time, As he wrote it was him or me! all i remember is seeing his face with pain shocked over it. The most intresting part is we have all the German soldiers belongings Photos of his family, money, booklet i think it was ID, Some sort of choclate bar, Bayonet and a few other things. He fought in the somme. Sorry but thats all i can remember from the diary. I will try to get some photos but it means asking my grandfather and as it was his dad i dont want him think that he meant nothing to me.

He fought at the Somme and lived! lucky guy!

30Cal
10-09-2006, 12:54 PM
Platoon Sergeant of the 5th or 6th Marines.... Damn, with all that places, where he was, he's a real hero... (don't want to say, that the others aren't p-) ) Is he still alive?

5th Marines. He died in 1975.

xeoran
10-09-2006, 07:24 PM
My family has a mixed military history.

One side is mostly German, Norwegian and Danish soldiers about whom I know nothing until they reach Britain. There I know many of them were sailers on various warships though many werent above pirating and smuggling. My great grandfather on that side was in the Bicycle Corps in Egypt and my Grandfather was in the trenches. The only harm (despite intensive combat) was to my grandfather who walked into No Mans Land to relieve himself and accidentally did so in a shell hole with poison as at the bottom. This scorched his lungs but he survived despite a constant cough. He later joined the Commandos in WW2 but was discharged after a leg accident in training.

On the other side are a mix of life long Hussar and Royal Artillerymen (many of whom reached Officer status). I know little about them in WW1 or before (although there was famous Privateer in the family and apparently the family came in 1066 with the Normans as soldiers).

In WW2 my grandfather was in the Royal Indian Army commanding a company of Indian artillerymen. He was at Singapore where he was captured twice but escaped. Finally having fought his way out he swam out to a passing smallboat under fire (leaving two sailors who couldnt swim on the bank). The smallboat made it to Java in the Dutch East Indies in 10 days although only 3 men survived the starvation and heat (all they had left by the time they reached land was a can of powdered milk). There he ended up commanding a rag-tag Dutch unit in the defense before beign forced to retreat again. He then rejoined the British Army and was posted to another Indian unit (his previous company was almost entirely captured or killed on Singapore). He fought all through the retreat through Burma and into India before continuing in the invasion of Burma under Slim. Despite beign an artilleryman he fought the entire war as an infantryman in thick jungle. His one wound was a machine gun bullet that slashed one shin during an ambush. That sadly is nearly all I know as he never liked to talk about the war. Being a front line soldier, losing most of his friends and men (some of whom he found when liberating Japanese P.O.W. and Labour camps) and having to fight continuously in jungle he did so for obvious reasons. All I do know of details was that he once killed Japanese P.O.W.'s (humanely) during a mission that would have failed had he carried them along (I should note that he did this from necessity and kindess, he was a very moral man and his discovery of Japanese camps and massacres of civilians disgusted him. In fact he later darkly said they should drop an atom bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki every year in remembrance). H eis also known to have fought hand to hand combat several times with just revolver, machete and shovel. Finally I also know that he several times conducted surgery, particuarly amputations using only a bayonet without any form of anaesthetic for his man. All these details are from 30 years of occasional remarks. He served with the Indian Army until Indias secession from the Empire and direct British control.

DieselPower
10-10-2006, 01:21 PM
My Great Grandfather, Flynn, was in the seventh(?) lighthorse division and fought. I have a really old cool picture of him somewhere.
My grandfather, fought in the second world war, was in the Royal Australian Air Force.He was stationed in Papua New Guinea in Madang, and was a kind of quartermaster for the spitfires. He would replace engines and manage stock for aircraft components. If only I had a scanner I have heaps of pictures...

He told me a story about one night in the Jungle, he was doing airfield patrol, and it was about 4 am in the morning, and he could hear the japanese off in the distance, he climbed up inside the bomb bay of a bomber and laid his rifle between his legs, pointed at the opening, and drifted of to sleep.

My grandfather on my mothers side, joined the Army, but was to late, and missed the war, however, he did recieve training on interogating Japanese pilots/POWs. I dont really know where that fits in. But after his duty, he joined the Australian Merchant navy and I dont really know what he did....

sorry for the spelling guys I am reaaaaaaaaalllly tired

Dieselpower

DeltaWhisky58
10-14-2006, 07:33 AM
OK, where to start - probably way back ... ...

My gggg Grandfather James Arbuckle (b. 1776) served in the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) from 1794-1815 retiring after 21 years just before Waterloo. I have copies of his attestation and discharge papers - he was in the same troop as Sgt. Charles Ewart who captured the French Eagle at Waterloo. Another relative died at Corunna in Jan. 1809.

A considerable number of relatives fought in WW1, and quite a few lost their lives. My great Uncle s/22024 Pte. John Alexander Churchill MacLachlan was one of the very last Gordon Highlanders killed in 1918.

My Great Uncle William Young, joined the 1st Bn. The Seaforth Highlanders in 1928. He went out to the "Shanghai Station" in Hong Kong in 1930 where the battalion served until 1940 - he then went to India and fought down through Burma and then on into what is now Indonesia not returning home until 1946. By this time he was Regimental Sergeant Major of the 1st Bn. He was later RSM Highland Training Depot, and later on the senior RSM of the Highland Division. He was commissioned in 1952 and retired a Major around 1960. From being posted to China in 1930 until returning in 1946, Willie was only in the UK once - for a BREN instructor's course in early 1939 at the Small Arms School at Hythe. He managed a weekend at home in Scotland - the only home leave he had in sixteen years, many didn't even have that!

My Maternal Grandfather James "****ie" Donaldson served with the Seaforth Highlanders as a Territorial pre-WW2 and was called up before war broke out, he served in France 1939-40 and was one of the few from the Highland Division who got away purely as the result of having been sent north to collect supplies. He transferred to the RASC post-Dunkirk and then served in North Africa, returning home for the invasion of France in 1944 - he returned home from Germany in June 1946.

My Father served with the REME and was para trained, his brother served in the Royal Artillery for 22 years. I served with the RAF, and I have a cousin currently with 4 SCOTS recently returned from Iraq. Another cousin was seriously wounded in GW1.

Many other relatives and ancestors have served, these are the close one.

Gluten
10-14-2006, 08:55 AM
great stories guys, really great. Im from sweden so my family dosent really have any military tails but i do know that my ancestors on my fathers side foughty in som war in the 18/19th century :P, my grandfather on my mothersside were calld to serve in the amry during ww2 and was on the border to finland so if the evil ruskies/germans had invaded us id had something to tell about... or not

cbreedon
10-14-2006, 01:51 PM
My grandfather was in the 8th Army in North Africa and Italy during WWII. My other Grandfather was a farrier not sure what regiment..was in Belgium at some point where is ear was bitten off by a horse! One of my Great Uncles was on HMS Hood when it went down :-(

My father was in REME and was involved in the Suez Crisis in 1956.

Name Taken
10-14-2006, 01:54 PM
I come from a split family, so I have 3 WWII stories from my family members. My father-in-law's father was a tanker in the 23rd Hussars and advanced through Europe. He died before I could ever meet him, but I have the regiments official history that was published in April 1946, a wonderful book full of pull-out maps and pictures. The 23rd was among the first regiments to get the Comet tank.

My biological father's father was a radar operator on board HMS Kempenfelt, and saw action in the Atlantic, the Med, the Normandy invasion and in the Pacific. I have his war diary that he wrote up later, it quite a fascinating read.

My mum's father was in the Army, and I believe was a mechanic. He served in North Africa and in Sierra Leone, he hasn't really spoken about what he did but he has some great stories about the locals stealing tires from the depot.

Anthony91
10-14-2006, 02:15 PM
My great grandfather was one of a handfull of US Marine Paratroopers in WWII.

Mr Kaizer
10-20-2006, 06:56 AM
Well, my family have not been to war as far as I know, but my great grandfather was imprisoned by the germans during the ocupaiton(sp?). He ran a store right next to an important bridge. The germans placed demo charges in the bridge, and told him to detonate them if the english invaded. He refused to cooperate, and was sendt to prison.

askDNA
10-29-2006, 11:25 PM
Way down the line on my mother's side someone fought in the Revolutionary War and another on the Union side of the Civil War. Her father was a Lt. in the US Army Signal Corps stationed in N. Africa and Italy. The only stories I know is that the one man my grandfather killed was an Italian trying to steal a tire off of his jeep, and that is how he brought back a Beretta after the war. The sad thing is my mom gave it away when he died.

Labud
11-03-2006, 10:33 AM
Well, where can I start...

My grand-grand-grand....father was hajduk harambasa* on the second half of 17th century in Serbian province Hercegovina, where he was fighting against Ottoman opressors. He is in history known as Limo Barjaktar. In Serbian national poems he's known as Limo harambasa or Limun trgovac (Limun the trader).
*hajduci - Serbian rebels during the period of Turkish slavery (1459-1804). After the liberation of Turks, the road bandits took this name. Harambasa was the unit commander.

Paternal grandfather of my paternal grandfather took part in Serbian rebellion against Turks in Hercegovina and Bosnia, also known as "Nevesinjska puska" (Nevesinian rifle) in 1875.

WWI
My grand-grandfather (son of this who was in Nevesinjska puska) was with two of his brothers escaped from Austro-Hungeria and become volunteer in Serbian Army. His brothers didn't make it in Albanian Golgotha. The fourth brother joined him from America in Thesaloniki. He was in glorious 1st Army which reached over 500 km for month in liberating Serbia. The fifth brother was on his military duty in Austro-Hungarian army near Gyor. That's why he wasn't able to escape to Serbia.
Paternal grandfather of my maternal grand mother from Banat province, wasn't able to escape to Serbia, so he was mobilized in Austro-Hungarioan Army. Soon, he lost his feet-fingers on Russian front.
My grand-grandfather (father of my maternal grandfather), also form Banat, wasn't able to escape to Serbia, too. He was mobilized in Austro-Hungarian Army and sent to Italian front, where soon he surrendered himself. He wanted from Italy to join Serbian Army, but Italians didn't want to let him from POW camp.

WWII
Maternal grandfather was on his military duty since 1939 in Virovitica, Croatia. When, in 1941., Germany invaded Yugoslavia (the April war), his unit was ruined (as whole Yugoslav army) and he was captured near Zvornik. He was transported to POW near Hamburg where he spent the rest of the war.
Paternal grandfather was a 14-yaer old kid when, in 1941. war started and Hungarians banned him from Backa back to Hercegovina. By luck, he was not killed in genocide slaughterers done by ustasas (Croatian forces). When Cetniks (royalistic resistance) raised the rebellion in the area, he was the shepherd for them. When, in 1944. Partizans (communist resistance) beated Cetniks in hercegovina, he joined them. By the end of the war he became second liutenant in Partizans. He stayed in Army after the war and he resigned in 1952. in the rank of captain.

Few of my uncles took part in wars during 1990-ies. Today, I'm a recruit in ARJPVO (artilery and rocket units of anti-aircraft defense), and I'll do my military duty for one or two years, when I finish my university. :)

Zathras
12-09-2006, 11:56 AM
My great grandfather fought in world war two for the British in Burma he was part of the Indian Army.

For his services he was given a piece of land in a part of Pakistan now called Sahiwal, back then it was called Montgomery.

Also some of the family say he actually fought in world war one, so not 100% sure on the details.

My maternal grandfather was a chief warrant officer of the Pakistani Air Force, he served in the 65 war against India.

Limeyfellow
12-11-2006, 06:06 AM
My great grandfather fought in world war two for the British in Burma he was part of the Indian Army.

I have respect for those brave people. My grandmother lost both her brothers in Burma, one in a Chindit operation, the other in a Japanese prisioner of war camp.

Psycomore
12-11-2006, 12:16 PM
I have respect for those brave people. My grandmother lost both her brothers in Burma, one in a Chindit operation, the other in a Japanese prisioner of war camp.

As do i, my great uncle served in the royal atrillery in the 17th indian division throughout the campaign in Burma & witnessed the heroic actions of a Gurkha when their position was attacked by large number of Japs, wich later resulted in him being awarded a V.C i think his name was Lachiman Gurung or along those lines. After the war he vowed never to buy any thing from Japan because of all the atrocities their troops commited throughout the war.

DeltaWhisky58
12-11-2006, 12:25 PM
Havildar Lachiman Gurung VC of the 8th Gurkha Rifles is still alive and was present at the recent 150th anniversary celebrations of the VC in London.

http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/08BB14FE-00D3-41EB-9F23-7F1B4855B4B8/0/20060627UVetsDayWA.JPG

Mod News Online (http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/DefenceNews/HistoryAndHonour/BrowneVeteransDayHereToStay.htm)

Lachiman Gurung VC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lachhiman_Gurung)

Psycomore
12-11-2006, 02:07 PM
yea thats the 1 , from what i remember my great uncle said tht he was on a patrol to get ranges for the guns as he was in the survey party & he had a section of gurkhas to protect them. As his job was quit important his orders were not to get shot basically lol. So throughout the ensueing attack he & his party had to stay down & not take any un-nessesary risks , but he was in viewing distance of Gurungs trench & witnessed his actions. Although i might have partly mixed this up with another story he has told me i think this is the right 1. Every time i see him he tells me he would not of survived the war if it wasn't for the gurkhas as all the other survey parties didn't have gurkhas as protection & many of them were wiped out by Jap ambushes.

Chounch McGavin
12-22-2006, 03:34 AM
My Dad served in 'Nam in an artillery unit, near Da Nang; hes told me stories of his compound patrols, sapper damages, sappers that killed his friends, Cobra strafes, friendships with his buddies, a few drunken fights, horror stories of foward observer teams never coming back, a lot of stuff, I know there's a lot more, but I'm careful not to ask - which I never do..

His father however, was a drunk, but his grandfather, my great grandfather, competed for power during the Mexican revolutions in the early 19th century with infamous sects involved with Pancho Villa and executing many "Government" forces..

SBL
12-22-2006, 04:44 PM
First off, I'll apologize for the quality of the pictures as I don't have a scanner and am not much of a photographer.


Anyway, I've been meaning to write a little on my great uncle for some time. Lt. Marvin Balderson was my grandfather's brother, and they both had joined up with the armed forces at roughly the same time, my grandfather in the Navy, and my Great Uncle in the Army Air Corps. (I have an article in my parent's home somewhere from one of the old military publications, describing how the Balderson boys were going to bring the fight to the enemy.) Anyway, my great Uncle wound up in the 75th Tactical Fighter Squadron of the famed "Flying Tigers". Long story short, He was flying a mission in Southern China when he ran out of fuel and was forced to crash land. According to one source I read he died of a massive head wound due to his hitting his skull impacting with the instrument panel. Unfortunately, there is not a whole lot to be found on my Uncle save for a few internet articles and a breif mention in the book "Into the Teeth of the Tiger" by Donald Lopez (all of which say basically the same thing) My grandfather and great aunt remained rather tight-lipped about him when I was a kid and both died when I was in my late teens, so I never had a chance to talk about him. The following is from an an article I was able to pull up a couple of years ago, but remains to be the extent of my knowledge on him. There are however, a handful of photographs (two of which I've provided) which lend a face to our family hero.


Another instance was his description of Marvin Balderson's emergency landing at Changsha. He wrote the account as though Marvin had misjudged his landing and as a result ran into a pill box at the end of the street he was landing on. I came through Changsha a few days after this tragedy. Malcom Rosholt who witnessed Marvin's attempt to land on the street told me how it happened; There were as usual, many people on the street and in an attempt to clear the street, Marvin made several very low flights the length of the street. The people seemed to think it was a big show and stayed right there. About half way down the length of the street on his last pass his fuel ran out and he crashed. He could have bailed out earlier, but wanted to save the plane, as they were always in short supply...


...The other instance with which I'm familiar is when Marvin Balderson ran low on fuel and attempted to land of the main street of Changsha. It was an exceptionally wide street for a Chinese city and we had been told that it would be possible to land a P-40 on it. Balderson buzzed the street in an attempt to get the pedestrians to get off the street, but this only attracted more people. Eventually his engine ran out of gas part way down the street and with not enough street left for landing, and no fuel left for another pass, he crashed into a "pill box" gun emplacement at the end of the street. At the first indication of the problem, Marvin could have bailed out, but we were always short of planes, so he tried to save it. Our squadron received the message from Malcolm Rosholt who maintained a radio station at Changsha, that Balderson had crashed. There happened to be a C-47 at Hengyang at the time, so they flew Doc Jones Laughlin over Changsha and he bailed out with some medical supplies, but Balderson had died from a severe head injury from his head hitting the gun sight when the plane hit the concrete pill box.



http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i228/Captainbadd/random0010.jpg

Somewhere in China.



http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i228/Captainbadd/random0006.jpg

With his "ship".

stoddy9311
01-07-2007, 12:14 AM
My Grandfather worked in the Mines before WWII, and was also a member of the Territorials, to supplement the family income in our home town of Castleford, west yorkshire, england.He did his training with the east yorkshire regiment at beverley, near Hull.

in 1939 he came home from work, to find a policeman at home, and my grandmother laying out his uniform.the next day he report for duty, and was sent to france!

"you'll be home by christmas!" the policeman told him. they were right, christmas 1946!:)

well, he never talked about his service much, he escaped from Dunkirk, then he ended up in the desert with "Monty's Mob!" as he always called it.
He had a lot of respect for the German soldiers, and for Rommel.

He also fought at Monte Cassino, and went "the Back Alleyway to Europe" as he used to joke with us.

when he finally got home, he was 5 stone lighter! and 7 years had gone by!


my wifes Grandfather flew for the Fleet Air Arm during WWII and actually saw the Bismarck, my wife recalls him saying he was on HMS victorious, he flew Swordfish Torpedo bombers.
her dad has his logbook from the war, and the entry for 24 may 1941 states
"attacked Bismarck today, torpedo missed" which made me chuckle when I read it.

he later went on to fly Corsairs, and took part in raids in Japan.

BoabDilDK
01-07-2007, 12:40 AM
"attacked Bismarck today, torpedo missed"

No disrespect, quite the contrary actually, but that one really made me laugh.

stoddy9311
01-07-2007, 01:21 AM
made me laugh too!

he was a funny bloke. he also had two more takeoffs in his logbook, than landings:) which he also joked about.

one said something like (if my memory is correct) good take off , but landed in the Ogin!:) , which is an old navy term for the sea.

Molli
01-22-2007, 10:57 AM
my wifes Grandfather flew for the Fleet Air Arm during WWII and actually saw the Bismarck, my wife recalls him saying he was on HMS victorious, he flew Swordfish Torpedo bombers.
her dad has his logbook from the war, and the entry for 24 may 1941 states
"attacked Bismarck today, torpedo missed" which made me chuckle when I read it.

My great-grandfather served as a Stoker on HMS King George V which helped, with it's Mk. VIIs, and the Rodney, finish the Bismarck off. He and her then went on to Japan, via OP Husky and being Churchill's personal transport (from Tehran).

krasnayaarmiya
02-01-2007, 05:07 AM
*My Filipino grandma worked for the US brass in Manila before WW2, then worked for the Japanese brass during occupation. She smuggled documents out of the Japanese base for Filipino insurgents. She also remembers feeding American POW's on the sly with provisions by the insurgents. When the Americans attacked the Japanese garrison in Manila, they used alot of artillery and carpet bombing, and the Japanese angrily massacred civilians. Between the two, over 100,000 Filipinos died in Manila, mainly in the 16th century old city. In the month-long battle, the Americans and Japanese inflicted worse destruction on Manila than the German Luftwaffe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luftwaffe) had visited upon London, which resulted not only in the destruction of the city, but in a death toll comparable to that of the Tokyo Firebombing or the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.
The battle for Manila was the first and fiercest urban fighting in the entire Pacific War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_War), from the time MacArthur started his leapfrogging campaign from New Guinea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Guinea) in 1942 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1942), leading to the invasion of Japan in 1945. Few battles in the closing months of World War II (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II) exceeded the destruction and the brutality of the massacres and savagery of the fighting in Manila.
A steel flagpole at the entrance to the old U.S. Embassy building in Intramuros, which was pockmarked by numerous bullet and shrapnel hits, and still stands today, a testament to the intense, bitter fighting for the walled city. In this category, Manila joined the company of Warsaw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warsaw) as the most devastated cities of World War II, as well as being the host to some of the fiercest urban fighting since Stalingrad.
Filipinos lost an irreplaceable cultural and historical treasure in the resulting carnage and devastation of Manila, remembered today as a national tragedy. Manila, once touted as the "Pearl of the Orient" and famed as a living monument to European culture and colonization, was virtually wiped out. My grandma described seeing bodies everywhere, but she cannot remember what any of them looked like, that she had pretty much blocked it all out of her memory.

*My Filipino grandpa was in the US Navy, on the USS Saratoga, the world's first aircraft carrier, and saw many friends die. He went to serve in the Navy in Korea and Vietnam. This is how my mother ended up being brought to the States from the Phillipines.

They moved to West Oakland after the war, to the old USMC barracks now know as ACORN, and their neighbor met my grandma, who was a verry simple woman, and asked, "What ARE you? Whatever it is, at least you're not a n*gger." Fun!

*On my Irish side, my grandma described the AAA ("ackackack") and the stampedes in the bomb shelters during the London Blitz.

*Had a cousin that was shot in the head by the IRA for being an incorrigible criminal. Street justice. It was called "capping", an Irish version of the term coming from "knee-capping", a gunshot or electic drilling to the knees-- or just summary execution.



great thread

KingoftheHill
02-04-2007, 05:55 AM
My Grandpa was in the USAF stationed in Witchita,KS and was stationed in England at the height of the Cold War.

His Brother went to 'Nam and was a crew member on KC-97s....

Here is a wierd one, not really family but a neighbor's son was KIA in Cambodia.

Cheers

Manishtusu
03-27-2007, 01:01 PM
My great-grandfather was a Sergeant in Romania's medical corps in World War II. After the war, he worked as a policeman.

My great-uncle (grandfather's brother) was an NCO in Romania's Military Music Service.

Other than that, no one else in my family was in the military (except as conscripts). I'm hoping to join the military this summer though.

BearInBunnySuit
03-27-2007, 01:17 PM
My dad was a liaison officer during the Korean War but he never talked about it. However, my mother told me that he was shot at by a sniper. His driver died on the spot and dad has a scar on his arm from the incident. My dad has passed away and I never got to see the scar in person. Dad never talked about his service but I heard that he wanted to stay in the military after the war but my grandfather made him go into a career that involved a desk.

Fade
03-28-2007, 03:46 PM
Grams was a Sgt. in the Canadian Women's Army Corps (CWAC) during the second world war and was an instructor of some sort. (self defense i think, Judo?), Gramps was a Merchant marine during the same war.

Had an uncle that was a Corpsman in the US Navy during the Vietnam conflict, where he met his future wife who was also a Corpsman.

Another uncle was a powder loader(?) on the USS Francis Hammond..think the closest he got to Vietnam though was when they were shelling it from just offshore....and he didnt even get to see it cause he was busy keeping the gun fed i think, doh.

Cousin was a welder in the Marines who was stationed at 29 Palms...I was a guest for a few days (thank you Uncle Sam's Misguided Children, i'll never forget your crisp hospitality and booming feel-it-in-your-chest shock waves) and got a personal tour of the base.

Wow.

Me, I applied to the USMC but was rejected because I had asthma bouts briefly as a teen. That didn't preclude me from being a firefighter though.

Good thread, great reads.