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ZeroZen
05-02-2005, 10:26 PM
United States Journey to the dark-side....
In the history of Amerca's most brutal conquest. The past betrayal for what America stand for...In the eyes of the world, "Philippine-American War" but in the Unites States version, " Philippine Insurrection". Over 126,000 US troops andmore than 5,000 casualties. over 100,000 Phil-troops and a million cilivians died.

It All start, Dec 10,1898 after the filipinos declare their independence on June 12--same year from Spain. The Treaty of Paris (http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/diplomacy/spain/sp1898.htm) which United States entered to the world as a Colonial Powers. The Phil-Revolutionary Gov't protested but ignored. San Juan del Monte Inccident: The tension between the Americans and the Filipinos was so great that it was easy to precipitate a war. On the night of February 4, 1899, as described in Aguinaldo: A Narrative of Filipino

Ambitions, (E. Wildman 1901, Norwood Press, Norwood, MA) an American sentry, Private William W. Grayson, with another soldier, encountered three armed Filipinos on a bridge in San Juan del Monte near Manila.

Recalling the incident, Grayson said:

About eight o’clock, Miller and I were cautiously pacing our district. We came to a fence and were trying to see what the Filipinos were up to.

Suddenly, near at hand, on our left, there was a low but unmistakable Filipino outpost signal whistle. It was immediately answered by a similar whistle about twenty-five yards to the right. Then a red lantern flashed a signal from blockhouse number 7. We had never seen such a sign used before. In a moment, something rose up slowly in front of us. It was a Filipino. I yelled “Halt!” and made it pretty loud, for I was accustomed to challenging the officer of the guard in approved military style. I challenged him with another loud “halt!” Then he shouted “halto!” to me. Well, I thought the best thing to do was to shoot him. He dropped. If I didn’t kill him, I guess he died of fright. Two Filipinos sprang out of the gateway about 15 feet from us. I called “halt!” and Miller fired and dropped one. I saw that another was left. Well, I think I got my second Filipino that time....

The Filipino troops fired back at the American lines and before the night was over, fighting had broken out between Filipino and American forces. Most of the Filipino commanders at that time were attending a dance in Malolos, Bulacan Province. When told of the outbreak of hostilities, they rushed back to their units, which were already shooting it out with American troops.

When war finally came, Aguinaldo still tried to stop it by sending an emissary to General Otis to appeal for an end to the fighting. But Otis responded, “fighting, having begun, must go on to the grim end.”

Asia's First Republic was destroyed.....


http://nmhm.washingtondc.museum/exhibits/past/Span_Am_WAr/philippine_insurrection/SAW32.jpg
http://nmhm.washingtondc.museum/exhibits/past/Span_Am_WAr/philippine_insurrection/SAW81.jpg
http://www.ngb.army.mil/gallery/heritage/images/sunsoldiers.jpg

1st North Dakota Infantry
San Isidro, Luzon, Philippine Islands -- May 6, 1899
http://www.ngb.army.mil/gallery/heritage/images/utah_battery.jpg

Utah Light Artillery
August 13, 1898, Manila, Philippine Islands
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/miscster/figures/I0047798B.jpg

Locomotives and Cars wrecked by Insurgents at Bamban Bridge, Luzon, Philippine Islands.
http://huachuca-www.army.mil/USAG/BTROOP/4Cav2.JPG
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/miscster/figures/I0047768B.jpg

"There goes the American Soldier and all Hell can't stop him." P. I..
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/miscster/figures/I0047760B.jpg

Co. I, 22nd U. S. Infantry, encamped at Malolos, Philippine Islands.
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/miscster/figures/I0047800B.jpg

The necessary Result of War -- an Insurgent killed in the trenches at the Battle of Malabon, P. I..
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/miscster/figures/I0047762B.jpg

A Sixth Artillery Gatling Gun, driving Insurgents out of the brush, Pasay, P. I..
http://www.angelfire.com/pa/sergeman/issues/foreign/filipinos.jpg

Trenches -The Battle Of Tirad Pass.
http://www.oldgloryprints.com/I_Would_Rather_Die_at_the_Front.jpg

I Would Rather Die at the Front...: Colonel J Franklin Bell The Medal of Honor Winner leads his 36th Volunteer Infantry in the Philippine Insurgency.
http://www.nps.gov/prsf/history/buffalo_soldiers/images/9th_cav_sf.jpg
http://www.what-means.com/encyclopedia/images/thumb/7/7c/200px-Aguinaldo.JPG

General Emilio Aguinaldo - First President of the Republic of the Philippines, At the age of 29
http://www.ashp.cuny.edu/video/images/acts-6-7a.jpg

"Filipino soldiers." The Filipino army included many teenagers, and was sustained by broad popular support.
http://www.ashp.cuny.edu/video/images/acts6-7b.jpg

"Civilization Begins At Home." Political cartoon from an 1899 newspaper. What do you see in the cartoon? What was the cartoonist trying to say?
http://www.historycentral.com/images/spanish_manila_capt.jpg
http://alumni.imsa.edu/~bruce/projects/images/occupation/battle1.jpg

First Battle Between Americans and Filipinos, February 4-5, 1899. When the smoke cleared, the Americans lost less than 50 men with 300 wounded, while the Filipinos lost over 3,000 killed and wounded.
http://alumni.imsa.edu/~bruce/projects/images/occupation/insurgem.jpg

Attempting to Burn Manila, February 22, 1899. Filipinos attempted to destroy parts of Manila, setting fire to three quarters of the City--Santa Cruz, San Nicolas, and Tondo. Nearly 1,000 houses were burned and the entire city might have been destroyed until American firemen extinguished the flames.
http://alumni.imsa.edu/~bruce/projects/images/occupation/aguinal.jpg

General Emilio Aguinaldo in military uniform, February 1899.
http://alumni.imsa.edu/~bruce/projects/images/occupation/fireline.jpg

American firing lines such as this, poised before the general advance, proved more than a match for the Filipinos.
http://alumni.imsa.edu/~bruce/projects/images/occupation/pows.jpg

The number of Filipinos captured by the American army numbered into the thousands--but they were more fortunate than the equal amounts who perished.
http://165.29.91.7/classes/humanities/worldstud/97-98/imper/Philippines/MORO_SM.GIF

After the Battle of Mount Dajo, March 9, 1906. Photo from the National Archives. Copies of this photo, which was later described as "the most hideous Philippine picture . . . published in the United States during the subjugation of the islands," were distributed to the press by the Anti-Imperialist League
http://www.temple.edu/history/images/luzon1899.jpghttp://www.temple.edu/history/images/phamwar.jpg
http://www.univie.ac.at/Voelkerkunde/apsis/aufi/pop/pop0035l.jpg
http://www.univie.ac.at/Voelkerkunde/apsis/aufi/pop/pop0036l.jpg
http://www.univie.ac.at/Voelkerkunde/apsis/aufi/pop/pop0031l.jpg
http://www.univie.ac.at/Voelkerkunde/apsis/aufi/younghb/young51.jpg

American picquet bivouacking in the Escolta, the Bond Street of Manila
http://www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/mhchome/philip/images/band.jpg

Maximo Abad on his way to surrender, accompanied by Henry Hill Bandholtz, Boac, Marinduque Island, Philippines, Apr. 1901, from the Bandholtz papers

[AFSOC]
05-02-2005, 10:35 PM
great pics.....

love my peoples history

http://www.what-means.com/encyclopedia/images/thumb/7/7c/200px-Aguinaldo.JPG

tru warrior

Wildc@rd
05-03-2005, 04:03 AM
Philippine-American War 1899-1903 " The Forgotten War

"..Older Filipinos still call this brutal period the “Filipino-American War,” a phrase not seen in the history texts American school children read"

taken from this article

http://dailycal.org/article.php?id=15328

--WC

MARINO
05-03-2005, 04:12 AM
<img src=http://personal.telefonica.terra.es/web/sanpedromallo/Imagenes/ultimos.jpg>


At the church of Baler (Aurora province) there is a metalic plaque where was placed in 1939 by President Quezón. That remembers the gesta of three dozen of Spanish soldiers who, surrended by filipinos patriots, didn't know that the war had ended in 1898.

In that church they resist the siege until June 2nd 1899, when the filipinos patriots were continuing with the war, but no now against the"kastilas" but against a much more powerful enemy: USA.


I prefer those Heros

hughdotoh
05-03-2005, 05:21 AM
Not to put anything down (all of these men were heroes, except those who killed unnecessarily), but some facts are:

The Filipino Army also included Spanish defectors, Cuban nationalists, and Afro-American deserters.

The Filipino Soldiers were equipped with Spanish Mausers (better than US Army Krag-Jorgensens), but they removed the sights because they considered them unnecessary. Lack of training, gents.

Filipinos, due to that lack of training, thought it more manly to shoot and fight standing up, as against shooting from the ****e position or behind cover.

Gen. Antonio Luna, the Nationalists' most able commander, was murdered by a faction of the Filipino Army who despised his disciplinarian methods. :cantbeli:

Japan agreed to supply the revolutionaries with their version of the Mauser. Never got to it, though.

Filipinos gave the Americans their first real taste of jungle warfare against a guerilla army. woot

Many Filipino Nationalists fled to Japan and returned to the Philippines in 1941. Artemio Ricarte returned as a "Shogun", but he despised the Japanese occpation forces and their brutal behavior.

Generalissimo Aguinaldo honored the Spanish troops at Baler and allowed them to leave as soldiers and gentlemen.

tenda
05-03-2005, 05:59 AM
that's an interesting post....every day we can learn something more... ;) ;) ;) ;)

Cygnus
05-03-2005, 08:34 AM
The Filipino Army also included Spanish defectors, Cuban nationalists, and Afro-American deserters.

True, I saw a book in National Bookstore about the Spaniards that fought in the Philippine side during the revolution


Japan agreed to supply the revolutionaries with their version of the Mauser. Never got to it, though.

We did get the first shipment... After that none..... I remember reading about it during History class back in High School...

mi35d
05-03-2005, 09:47 AM
Lest you forget the number of US dead defending and then liberating The Phillipines from the Japanese Empire.

jasonglh
05-03-2005, 10:24 AM
United States Journey to the dark-side....
In the history of Amerca's most brutal conquest. The past betrayal for what America stand for...In the eyes of the world, "Philippine-American War" but in the Unites States version, " Philippine Insurrection". Over 126,000 US troops andmore than 5,000 casualties. over 100,000 Phil-troops and a million cilivians died.

That sounds vastly different from this:


The United States, aided by Filipino rebels, snatched the Philippine islands away from a Spanish empire in decline. When the Filipinos realized their Spanish masters were to be replaced by American ones, they erupted into full rebellion against their new occupiers. The subsequent violence left 4,234 American soldiers and 16,000 Filipino soldiers dead. Some 200,000 civilians, neglected by occupier and rebel alike, died from famine and disease.

Source:

http://dailycal.org/article.php?id=15328

hughdotoh
05-03-2005, 11:14 AM
Lest you forget the number of US dead defending and then liberating The Phillipines from the Japanese Empire.

Which of course made the US vastly different from most other colonizers.

The Americans built in the Philippines a fully functioning government run by the Filipinos themselves in positions of responsibility (came to a point that the locals could openly dispute with their American counterparts) that the Filipinos realized that the Yanks at the least were a better deal than the Spaniards, who were very racist towards them.

A Filipino was just as good as an American during the Philippine Commonwealth, and this was the greatest thing that the Americans ever gave to the Filipinos, and the greatest that ever happened to the Filipinos' national psyche: that he could be anybody's equal despite his humble background.

This is what made the Filipinos consider WW2 to be their fight as well as the Americans'. Folks from that time have fond memories of Americans

Given the anti-Americanism of the later generations, it would be damned fecal to think that their right to protest anything was watered with GI blood. Damn ingrates. :fork:

MARINO
05-03-2005, 11:18 AM
who were very racist towards them. :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash:
That's false, many Spanish Generals where Filipinos, and they had important tsk in the government during Spanish Period(something like 350 years ;)

Hammy
05-03-2005, 11:42 AM
interesting! i never knew about the war! Thahs for the info!! :hug:

Warlord
05-03-2005, 01:45 PM
]great pics.....

love my peoples history

http://www.what-means.com/encyclopedia/images/thumb/7/7c/200px-Aguinaldo.JPG

tru warrior

In the end, betrayed by his own kind.

Warlord
05-03-2005, 02:18 PM
Also discussed here http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=45909&sid=85cf7bbc5644f78eb2ba5a3eb6bb9ac0


Battle of Zapote Bridge






Battle of Zapote Bridge
Conflict Philippine-American War
Date June 13, 1899
Place Luzon, Philippines
Result U.S. victory
Combatants
United States Philippine Insurgents
Commanders
Henry W. Lawton ?
Strength
3,000 5,000
Casualties
75 525




The Battle of Zapote Bridge also known as the Battle of Zapote River was fought on June 13, 1899 between 3,000 American soldiers and 5,000 Filipinos. It was the largest battle of the Philippine-American War.

The battle started when Companies F and I, 21st Infantry were ambushed by 1,000 Filipinos, where there was terrific fighting, but the Americans running low on ammunition had to break through the enemy's flank. American gunboats also silenced a Philippine artillery piece which had been harassing them.

After hours of heavy fighting, the superior arms of the Americans drove the enemy out of their defensive lines; a Filipino rear guard, however held off the Americans long enough for the main Filipino force to withdraw inland.

Both sides suffered heavily: the American suffered 75 casualties 15 of which KIA, and the Filipinos sufferd over 500 casualties, between 140 and 150 of which were deaths.

The New York Times reported that it was "the largest and best organized body of men which has yet to meet American troops."

Source: http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2222&dekey=Battle+of+Zapote+Bridge&gwp=8&curtab=2222_1





http://onfinite.com/libraries/442214/2a2.jpg

Masthead of La Independencia, the newspaper of the independence movement. From Edwin Wildman, Aguinaldo. Boston, Lathrop Publishing, 1901.

http://onfinite.com/libraries/442215/bb1.jpg
After the Battle of Mount Dajo, March 9, 1906. National Archives Photo No. 111-SC-83648.

http://onfinite.com/libraries/442216/1aa.jpg

Filipino casualties on the first day of war, National Archives Photo No. 111-RB-1037.

Cygnus
05-03-2005, 02:28 PM
who were very racist towards them. :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash:
That's false, many Spanish Generals where Filipinos, and they had important tsk in the government during Spanish Period(something like 350 years ;)

Just giving the facts...

There were no Filipino Spanish Generals? Most of what mother Spain sent the Philippines were the unwanted or exiled ones. Officials that were not favorable to the Spanish Court and Military. In the Philippine Islands they were given promotions.

Had Spain sent good men to watch over or rule our nation, a revolution was not necessary. The abuses by church, military and colonial government pushed the Filipinos to the limits until the call for freedom spread like fire.

Dr. Jose Rizal the National Hero called for equal representation in the Spanish Court, he really did not call for a revolution. A chance to be part of the Government, to be able to serve our fellow Filipnos.

Filpinos never really got any high posts unlike in the American Period. There it was shown that we had rights that of Americans and were treated as equals not inferior to.

Spanish General that is a Filipno, that is fiction. The only positions Filipinos got in the Spanish Army [or Colonial Army] was as troops under Spanish Officers.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Spanish General... There were some that were loved like General Inocensio Junquera. He opened Cebu's first theater named in his Honor. Tiatro Junquera at Colon St, he also allowed more Filipinos to be part of the Government in Cebu. This was not done in most of the country...

MARINO
05-03-2005, 03:23 PM
An American lecture ;) not very reliable.


BTW and other prove that Spaniards aren't and weren't racist just look how they remind us. :)


GOING BACK TO BALER, TO ILOILO AND TO ZAMBOANGA
Por Guillermo Gómez Rivera
Manila, 10 de julio de 2003
The first commemoration of the Filipino-Spanish day of friendship just happened last June 30, 2003. And, as the Edgardo Angara law points out, by way of an explanation, this day of friendship is anchored on what transpired after some thirty-five Spanish soldiers held their ground for a year in the stone church of the municipality of Baler in 1899.


The Spanish commander, Saturnino Martin Cerezo, thought that the Filipino revolution against Spain had not ended even with the coming of the Americans in 1898. He and his men, were still resisting the siege of Filipino revolutionary troops under Luna Novicio in that isolated stone church in a likewise isolated town locked in a small valley between the impenetrable Sierra Madre mountain range and the vast Pacific Ocean somewhere in the mid-eastern side of Luzon near Nueva Ecija and La Isabela.



When Martin Cerezo at last learned that Spain had already lost her far-flung over-sea province to the República de Filipinas, he capitulated to the army of Presidente Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy.What was surely unexpected was the magnanimous decree of Presidente Aguinaldo declaring these Spanish soldiers not as enemies but as honored friends for which they were given military respect and safe-conduct to Manila and subsequently allowed to return to Spain in spite of the raging U.S. war of invasion against the already well-organized Unang República ng Filipinas, ----the first to be established in Asia and Oceania.



Aguinaldo’s élan, as the Spanish-speaking gentleman that he was, proved to the world that the Filipinos of that time were not the g-stringed savages, ****e to head-hunting, torture and robbery, that a later colonization tried to show in the pre-war II St. Louis exposition to the exasperation of one Manuel Luis Quézon from Baler’s small "Sector de Mestizos".


In short, Filipinos and Spaniards parted as friends and not as enemies. And this is what the Filipino-Spanish day of friendship is all about. A focus on the fact that Spain did not leave as the hated enemy that many history textbooks tend to subjectively teach the new generations of Filipinos to this day.



Emilio Aguinaldo’s government was still free from the new colonial influence in the present-day educational system and he was, therefore, free to think of the future friendship and cooperation that the Filipino people were to enjoy with a Spain that would eventually raise to prosperity and into a new role in a future World-order. But the bloody interruption in the life of the Unang República and the subsequent over-Americanization of education in English, succeeded in delaying for a century that futuristic vision of great Filipino statesmen and truly free policy-makers like Emilio Aguinaldo, Apolinario Mabini, Felipe Agoncillo, Antonio Luna Novicio, Rianzares Bautista Lim, Pedro Paterno and so many others.
E

Present during this first commemoration were some descendants of the honored Spanish soldiers of Baler who became known as "los últimos de Filipinas", ----the last defenders of the Philippines for Spain.


One of them, Jesús Valbuena, came all the way from Madrid with his wife Ana to attend with another group of descendants who came from other points of Spain. Jesús opened a website called www.baleriana.com. Baleriana meaning everything with reference to Baler, now the capital of the Province of Aurora.



Senator Edgardo Angara has not only done a good job in bringing back to the senses of present-day Filipinos an historical fact that was purposely buried by our education in English. He has also done a good job in correcting Philippine History aside from opening a new door for a future cooperation with the Spain of today, -----a country that, unlike the Philippines, has economically recovered and has even turned investor.



Senator Edgardo Angara went to Spain and found ‘new constituents’ of Baler out of the numerous descendants of those 50 Spanish soldiers that held out in the old church. They are now economically capable of coming back to Baler as tourists and, possibly, even as investors.



Another unnoticed symbol of friendship between our two peoples today is Spanish Ambassador Ignacio Sagaz who married a Filipina from Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, and has a daughter that reminded many Taga-Baler folk of Rizal’s Maria Clara.



The good looking lady provincial governor of Aurora, Mrs. Chit Pastores Ong, the charming Congresswoman Bellaflor Angara-Castillo and the hyper-active Mayor Ectubañez of Baler town Really went out of their way, with the full cooperation of the common people of this emerging province, to aptly celebrate the First Commemoration of the Filipino-Spanish Friendship Day.



with a reenactment of the 1899 siege and the friendly parting, fireworks, the colorful inauguration of the beautiful ‘Museo de Baler’ next to the reconstructed Quézon house, a floral offering to the symbolic tomb of the Filipino and Spanish soldiers that fell and the public reception given to the mentioned descendants of the Spanish soldiers that came with their ambassador and the Spanish Minister of International Cooperation, the young Don Rafael Rodriguez Ponga, that gifted Senator Angara with two gold-plated Toledo Fencing swords in the pavilion of a sea-side spa called "Bahía de Baler’.

Another Filipino province that could also commemorate the Spanish-Filipino Day of Friendship is Iloilo. Filipinos and Spaniards also parted as friends in Iloilo City’s old Plaza de Alfonso Trece, (later Plaza Libertad), at a slightly earlier time, December 25, 1898, in comparison to the 1899 surrender of the then Spanish Detachment at Baler.


It was in the name of the last Spanish Governor-General, Don Diego de los Ríos, that Spanish Brigadier-General and Politico-Military Provincial Governor, Don Ricardo Monet, and Teniente-Coronel Don Agustín Solís, formally surrendered to the trimphant army of our Unang República, that was under the command, in Iloilo City, of General Martin Teófilo Delgado in representation of Presidente Emilio Aguinado.


Data about this historical event in Iloilo City is given by Capitán Epifanio de la Concepción, in his book "Memorias de un Revolucionario" (paginas 18-22, impreso por "National Press’, Ciudad de Iloilo, 1949). Don Epifanio de la Concepción, a grand-uncle of this writer, was born in Calinog, Iloilo, but resided in his city ancestral house that still stands to this day by Calle Del Rosario in Iloilo City.



From Iloilo, the Spanish Governor-General, Don Diego de los Ríos, transferred to Zamboanga City and eventually left for Spain.
De Iloilo, el Gobernador General Diego de los ríos se trasladó a Zamboanga y de allí partió para España.

Like Baler, Iloilo City can also reenact that surrender at Plaza Libertad and invite the descendants of the last Spanish Governor- General and his staff and soldiers, to visit this hollowed Ilongo ground and establish a series of city and town sisterhoods with correspondingly pertinent cities and towns of Spain.



It is, therefore up to the Governor of Iloilo Province and the Mayor of Iloilo City, to take the necessary steps toward the yearly commemoration of this event where Filipinos are at least the winners in their struggle for freedom. That would make the yearly commemoration of Spanish-Filipino Friendship Day really nation-wide because it would also be celebrated in Iloilo Province and City, in the Visayas, aside from Baler and Aurora Province in Luzón.


As a matter of fact, Zamboanga City, from whence the last Spanish Governor General, Diego de los Ríos, parted in peace with the Filipino people, can also become another focal point where Filipino-Spanish friendship day could be aptly celebrated.. Are we to expect a favorable reaction from both Iloilo and Zamboanga cities in this regard?

Wildc@rd
05-04-2005, 05:57 AM
United States Journey to the dark-side....
In the history of Amerca's most brutal conquest. The past betrayal for what America stand for...In the eyes of the world, "Philippine-American War" but in the Unites States version, " Philippine Insurrection". Over 126,000 US troops andmore than 5,000 casualties. over 100,000 Phil-troops and a million cilivians died.

That sounds vastly different from this:


The United States, aided by Filipino rebels, snatched the Philippine islands away from a Spanish empire in decline. When the Filipinos realized their Spanish masters were to be replaced by American ones, they erupted into full rebellion against their new occupiers. The subsequent violence left 4,234 American soldiers and 16,000 Filipino soldiers dead. Some 200,000 civilians, neglected by occupier and rebel alike, died from famine and disease.

Source:

http://dailycal.org/article.php?id=15328

yeah...which of the two actually tells the truth?

-WC

swordsman
05-04-2005, 06:13 AM
Good Old America,conquering nations in the guise of freedom,and self-interests. During this war they BUTCHERED our forefathers and thousands more... That is the cost of freedom, and it is clearly happening all over again in places like Iraq,Afghanistan.. Who knows,your country might be next... :(

hughdotoh
05-04-2005, 08:20 AM
who were very racist towards them. :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash: :bash:
That's false, many Spanish Generals where Filipinos, and they had important tsk in the government during Spanish Period(something like 350 years ;)

Again, not to put anything down, things must be clarified:

In the Spanish Colonial days, "Filipino" meant Los Insulares (Spanish born in the Philippines), and Creoles. These were treated differently from Indios, who were the natives, and the Mestizos (half-breeds). Spanish not of the Insulares were called Peninsulares.

Many Insulares and Indios who became rich sent their sons to study in Europe, and these were the Ilustrados. They were initially loyal subjects of Spain amd wanted their country elevated to a Province and not a mere colony, and petitioned for direct rule (up to 1821 the Philippines was governed through the Viceroy of Mexico; after 1821 it was governed by the Ministerio de Ultramar).

Why did they seek direct rule? Because:
1. The Governor General was replaced too often that corruption had become common in the colonial bureaucracy.
2. The Church had become too powerful, interfering even in the appointment of Governors and bureaucrats. The Indios wanted less churching and more work.
3. The Peninsulares were corrupt, haughty, and rude to the Insulares and Indios, taking all of the important jobs and getting rich before going back to Spain. There was little or no advancement for Insulares and absolutely none for Indios.

Take note that in the Guardia Civil of Manila, the Comandante and other senior posts was always given to Peninsulares, the junior and field grade officers were Insulares and the lower ranks were Indios.

300+ years, and no Indio was ever appointed to any major post above gobernadorcillo (village chief), and at least on two occasions, the Peninsulares and clergymen in Manila murdered the Governor General who wanted to improve the lives of the natives by giving them more opportunities. No Insular was ever appointed to Governor General or Arzobispo de Manila, despite knowledge of the country. In fact, a Peninsular bishop said of the Ilustrados: "Usted puede vestir un mono en un juego, él todavía sigue siendo un mono."


And then, in 1872, the Governor General ordered the execution of three priests who promoted the appointment of Indio priests over parishes. He also ordered the arrest and execution of several influential educated Indios in Cavite. In 1896, the Spanish tried and executed Jose Rizal, a prominent Ilustrado author and doctor (he was arrested after he volunteered to be a doctor in the Spanish army in Cuba), despite strong proof of his loyalty and innocence. Up to that point, Filipinos and Indios remained loyal to Spain. But when thay saw that their loyalty was getting them nothing, they decided to look for independence. So from that time, there was no more Insular, Indio, and Mestizo: only Filipino.

Most of the leaders of the Philippine Revolution were Ilustrados from Insular, Mestizo, and Indio families. On the other hand, there were no Filipino generals in the Spanish Army, whether Insular, Mestizo, or Indio. All of the officers in the Spanish Army in the Philippines in 1898 were Peninsulares. I challenge you to name just ONE Filipino general in the Spanish Army.

SO, the Filipinos sought independence from Spain because of that policy of exclusion, brought about by the racist attitudes of the Peninsulares and their corruption of the government.

BUT, Spain was good to the Philippines also. 300+ years was not wasted on the country; however, it was the fact that the King and Queen of Spain and the Cortes had too many problems at home that they could not attend to the Philippines properly. This was

And many Filipinos (mostly Insulares like Andres Soriano) supported Franco in the 30's, because they had strong ties with Spain. Also many Filipinos today have great respect for Juan Carlos II (at least those who heard of him), because he is the face of Spain that the Filipinos never got the chance to see.

There is still a strong Spanish presence in the Philippines. The oldest trading companies are still owned by Spanish Filipinos.

No te :bash: me, chico: Sé mi historia probablemente mejor que usted sabe el tuyo.




Good Old America,conquering nations in the guise of freedom,and self-interests. During this war they BUTCHERED our forefathers and thousands more... That is the cost of freedom, and it is clearly happening all over again in places like Iraq,Afghanistan.. Who knows,your country might be next...

Odd, most Filipinos have that affinity you don't have for the US. Matter of fact, they might prefer a US invasion now than having the institutionally corrupt/cowardly/ingrate/appeasement-oriented government that Filipinos have now.

Besides, Phil-Am War was motivated by Manifest Destiny. I don't need to explain this to you.

Gulf War 2 is far more complicated than that and very far removed from it that we cannot compare both wars and conclude them to be motivated by the same cause, no matter how many are the similarities.

MARINO
05-04-2005, 08:39 AM
JA JA JA :slap: i KNOW the history of my country and how we are and we aare all but racist.That's just an antiSpanish Lobby in Phillippines. I have a lot of Filipino friends here in Spain, and they are proud of Phillipines Spanish Period.

swordsman
05-04-2005, 08:44 AM
Odd, most Filipinos have that affinity you don't have for the US. Matter of fact, they might prefer a US invasion now than having the institutionally corrupt/cowardly/ingrate/appeasement-oriented government that Filipinos have now.

Besides, Phil-Am War was motivated by Manifest Destiny. I don't need to explain this to you.

Gulf War 2 is far more complicated than that and very far removed from it that we cannot compare both wars and conclude them to be motivated by the same cause, no matter how many are the similarities.

Affinity? Come to the Philippines my friend,particularly down south and you'll know the meaning of the word. We Filipinos revolted from Spain because we could no longer take then the oppression brought about by the colonizers. If our country weren't composed of a thousand islands and was only a single mass of land,both colonizers(Spaniards&Americans) would've had a hard time dealing with the revolt. With regards to your comment that the Phil-Am war was motivated by Manifest Destiny,that's textbook crap man,both colonizers had one thing in mind,we are a country rich in its natural resources. Try to look at all the foreign wars that America fought,and you'll find out that somehow it all were motivated by one thing,and to what that thing is,i guess you're intelligent enough to know it.

swordsman
05-04-2005, 08:52 AM
By the way hughdotoh,I appreciate that icon you are using my friend,my forefathers used to confer that to their bretheren who have travelled 32miles afar off.

[AFSOC]
05-04-2005, 09:28 AM
eee its getting hot in here...

i must ssay though im a mestizo...

lets keep it down

hughdotoh
05-04-2005, 09:33 AM
]eee its getting hot in here...

i must ssay though im a mestizo...

lets keep it down

ole!

Wildc@rd
05-05-2005, 05:04 AM
I've been to the South, and here are a few facts I have gleaned:
1. Maranaos hate Tausugs hate Visayans, and this has been the fact since God was a pup.
2. English is spoken in Cebu over Tagalog; speak Tagalog there and you're sold to the highest bidder.
3. Land reform in Mindanao is a joke, because government surveyors from Manila need bodyguards and bribe money just to get through the Dimaporo clan wars.

1.) Actually down south,specially Basilan...they hate everything...from Bisaya to Tagalog.
2.) exactly hehehe. How did you know this? woot
3.) Not in this lifetime will push through. Land reform is only for the rich politicians...not for the Moro people.

--WC

hughdotoh
05-05-2005, 05:52 AM
2.) exactly hehehe. How did you know this? woot
--WC


I'm from waaaay up North, and the going rate for Tagalogs is two cases of beer per male. p-)