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View Full Version : Did anyone do ROTC/is currently doing ROTC in college?



Sierra
01-02-2004, 10:59 AM
I am currently a sophmore in high school and am very interested in the military. I will be heading to college in 2 years and I was wondering, did anyone do ROTC or are you currently doing ROTC? If so, how did it prepare you for the military and would you recomend. (if you are wiling to say, what is your current status in the military if you are still enlisted) Also, if your mother really doesnt want you to enlist, is this common? Is there a way ro make her feel better about it? Any info is appreciated.
Thanks!

ShotOver
01-02-2004, 01:03 PM
Yeah man, ze mothers never seem to want their kids to go to the Army.

Ask TF160SOAR about ROTC

Vance
01-02-2004, 01:21 PM
I told her it'll pay for my college (Which won't work for you, obviously) and she was ok. Ha.

Durandal
01-02-2004, 01:47 PM
ROTC was a great experience. Though I think now, looking back over the last 15 years I would have gone to college then OCS (which I assume they still have available).

Not being the best student in the world, I personally found balancing a heavy full time class schedule and trying to do as much ROTC work as possible was extremely difficult.

I would be curious to see today what ROTC students experiences on campuses today is like. I ayyended Ohio State, which was a relatively conservative campus as a whole but we got our share of heckling because of the policies towards **********s (keep in mind this was before Bill Clinton's don't ask don't tell...which never really solved anything in the first place).

There were times that ROTC frustrated me as well. It is afterall a college academic science department and suffered from NOT being a quasi-DOD department. There were commanding MS3 and 4 officers coming back from LNXs discussing scoring a bag of weed and BS like that...which I never approved of. We got stuck using National Guard equipment, which was never taken care of properly which meant we needed to field ***** everything before using it to clean and reconstitute. There were training excercises that were screwed up because the "ranger" portion of our ROTC unit (keep in mind that we had nearly 200 cadets spread between 3 "companies", a "ranger" company, and the "Pershing Rifles" drill squad) had their heads up their asses.

You also end up getting to go on field trips. Which sounds silly, but when they include tplaces like the Lima Tank Plant to see how an M1 was built and to test drive it around their track...well, it was nice. Something you would not normally see on the more business end of the military if opted for OCS instead.

I guess it depends on who you are. It takes a lot of effort for me to study and test, so college was task in itself. ROTC was easy. I think I should have done College and OCS independently, focusing on one, than the other. It all depends on who you are.

NcDeuce
01-02-2004, 02:08 PM
PERSEC

crazyman
01-02-2004, 02:12 PM
I'm in my last semester of college and army rotc, so maybe i can help you out on this one. doing rotc is much like a varsity sport in college. it eats up a LOT of your time. Once you hit Jr. year, you'll find yourself spending more and more time working on various rotc-related functions. ranger-challenge, drill teams, etc. There are definetly ups and downs to the program. the weekend "field trips" are often interesting. In my Bn, we often use paintball as a cheaper way to teach the freshmen and sophmores some of the basics of squad tactics, but thats just us. programs differ greatly from one school to another, as i learned this summer at NALC. only advice I can give ya is to go and try it your freshman year (before you contract) and really see what you think. talk to some of the seniors and cadre, and decide if its really for you.

Durandal
01-02-2004, 02:20 PM
#3 Get your degree while you are at it (I'm majoring in Political Science w/ a minor in Military Science).

I know this is off-topic...

Is this Military Science or Military History? Ohio State only offered Military History and ONLY as a minor in addition to ANOTHER history degree...like Modern European. Military Science, for us, was ROTC...and was considered neither a major or minor...


Just curious.

NcDeuce
01-02-2004, 02:23 PM
PERSEC

Sierra
01-02-2004, 02:40 PM
Thanks for the info guys. So if I join ROTC, that doesnt mean I am contracted to the military? (and ROTC will give me a very good idea of what military life is like?) I can still drop it and go on my way. Also, what is OCS? I see you talking about it but I have no idea what it is.

Tane Angle
01-02-2004, 03:04 PM
I finished ROTC in 1973, so I am a little outdated. Pretty much everything I could put in was already said. ROTC does not contract you into the military, provided that you don't take any money from them. OCS is Officer Candidate School. Non-ROTC/Academy people, such as enlisted men, go there to become officers. Also, I think Military Science is now technically an additional minor, just by taking the four years of ROTC. Have a good one, just some thoughts...

Apogee
01-02-2004, 03:33 PM
Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

ChuckThunder
01-02-2004, 03:38 PM
Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

As is the Naval Academy... ;)

Sierra
01-02-2004, 03:53 PM
Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.Yes I know. I used to be really interested in the Air Force Academy. I visited it when I went to Colorado and I realized thats not for me. Its not the college life that I want.

Apogee
01-02-2004, 04:02 PM
As is the Naval Academy... ;)

I ment the REAL academy, but the swabbies aren't too bad either.

Tane Angle
01-02-2004, 04:12 PM
Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

Shameless plug :D . Seriously though, the Academies are worth thinking about. If the Army is your thing, West Point is an excellent school. have a good one, just some thoughts...

Apogee
01-02-2004, 04:17 PM
Extremely Shameless, but I think you would have been disappointed with anything less.

NcDeuce
01-02-2004, 04:23 PM
So if I join ROTC, that doesnt mean I am contracted to the military? (and ROTC will give me a very good idea of what military life is like?)

They always tell us: 75% of the officers come from ROTC. 25% come from the Academies. This is probably outdated but oh well.


Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

Man, when are you guys gonna beat Navy?! :D Neh, it's all in good fun, we're all on the same team. I left my West Point buddy a voice mail on the 6th or whenever during the Army-Navy game screaming," You guys better kill Navy...etc."

ChuckThunder
01-02-2004, 04:31 PM
So if I join ROTC, that doesnt mean I am contracted to the military? (and ROTC will give me a very good idea of what military life is like?)

They always tell us: 75% of the officers come from ROTC. 25% come from the Academies. This is probably outdated but oh well.


Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

Man, when are you guys gonna beat Navy?! :D Neh, it's all in good fun, we're all on the same team. I left my West Point buddy a voice mail on the 6th or whenever during the Army-Navy game screaming," You guys better kill Navy...etc."

Never. ;)

Durandal
01-02-2004, 05:05 PM
Man, when are you guys gonna beat Navy?! :D

No doubt. I was Army, my old man was Navy. You want to talk about a divided household during the game. Our family is sort of split down the middle and it does not seem as if anyone of the younger kids is going to join any service soon. I was Army (via ROTC). Dad was Navy (via OCS after college in '68). My Uncle was Army (West Point in '56 career + three tours in 'Nam). Grandpa was Army (volunteer 1942) my other grandpa was OSS (lawyer, recruited) his wife's first husband was Navy (shot down at Midway). Then there are various "greats" that served in the Revolutionary War, Civil War (both sides), War of 1812, Franco Prussian war (before they emmigrated out of German States), the battle of Culloden (both sides), and the Napoleonic Wars (Black Guard and common foot).

The last three generations have all been officers and done each route with the exception of getting a :Mustang" and NONE of us have been airforce though everyone in the Navy was an aviator. Go figure.

Either route you take is perfectly acceptable. OCS was (and may still be, not too sure) open to non-enlisted civilians with college degrees. That may have changed. If it hasn't, you can do a four year college stint an then go OCS. It is a bit more demanding but it gives a chance to focus on each path rather than both simultaneously and, in theory, excel at both.

Either path you take, good luck. There are risks, even if you are never in a combat zone, so it is natural that your mother would be worried. It is however a fantastic opportunity to grow, serve your country, and come out a better person.

Durandal
01-02-2004, 05:31 PM
I finished ROTC in 1973

Hmmm, I thought I was one of the "old guys" here. ;)

Seiyuuki
01-02-2004, 05:38 PM
Thanks for the info guys. So if I join ROTC, that doesnt mean I am contracted to the military? (and ROTC will give me a very good idea of what military life is like?) I can still drop it and go on my way. Also, what is OCS? I see you talking about it but I have no idea what it is.

OCS is Officer Candidate School...I think.

This is my Air Force ROTC program, I am not sure if it is universal for the other services:

ROTC is break down into two parts. The General Military Course (GMC) is the first half of the program, usually taken during your Freshman and Sophomore years. You are under no obligation during your first two years, sort of like a "try out" to see if you will like it or not. If you are on an ROTC's scholarship, then you are definitely obligated to do the entire program.

The last half, your Junior and Senior years is the Professional Officer Course (POC), this is competitive and you are obligated with this part.

Field Training (FT) is require for all cadets who want to go in to the POC. FT is done during the summer between your Sophomore and Junior years. The nice thing is that during the summer of the GMC, you can do some really fun stuffs. Either this summer or next summer, I might get a chance to go down to the Air Force Academy to go skydiving or learn to solo a glider.

If you decide not to do the GMC, but somehow later on, you wants to do the POC and join the service, you will have to do extended FT and take additional courses into military customs and courtesies.

Scrim
01-02-2004, 08:55 PM
Please dont think Im ragging anyone here, this is just a question Ive always been curious about. Why does one choose to go the ROTC route, or even to one of the Academies. I know its four years of damn hard work, balancing your acedemics with your military responsibilities. Why not go to a regular college, have fun for four years, then go to OCS?
Of the Officers I got to know over the years, none went to the Academy, a handfull were ROTC, a few Mustangers(God bless them!), but most just went to regular colleges. Once again, not ragging anyone, just playing the Devils Advocate.

Tane Angle
01-02-2004, 09:18 PM
I'm not even the oldest, Durandal. p-) Here's to the being old! woot

11F5S
01-02-2004, 09:28 PM
I finished ROTC in 1973

Hmmm, I thought I was one of the "old guys" here. ;)

Old guys! rofl

11F5S
01-02-2004, 09:37 PM
Please dont think Im ragging anyone here, this is just a question Ive always been curious about. Why does one choose to go the ROTC route, or even to one of the Academies. I know its four years of damn hard work, balancing your acedemics with your military responsibilities. Why not go to a regular college, have fun for four years, then go to OCS?
Of the Officers I got to know over the years, none went to the Academy, a handfull were ROTC, a few Mustangers(God bless them!), but most just went to regular colleges. Once again, not ragging anyone, just playing the Devils Advocate.

ROTC is offered at "regular colleges". Unless times have changed ROTC is offered at every land grant college in the country. There was a time that every swinging richard at a land grant college/university) was required to take four semesters of ROTC. ROTC is a great way to earn a commission.

AFACadet
01-02-2004, 10:49 PM
Don't forget that the military academy is always an option as well.

As is the Naval Academy... ;)

AND the Air Force Academy... :D

DPGLAW
01-02-2004, 10:50 PM
Although I was not in ROTC I think I my advice may help someone in college going full-time and doing ROTC. As I said, I did not do ROTC, unfortunately, bec. it was not offered but I did work 50 hours a week at my law firm and maintained a B average.....I did it by never going to class, honestly, if you can think of good enough excuses and are charming with the teachers, you don't have to go. Just do the reading on your own time and you will be fine. All I did was tell my teachers about my job, which is rather important at the firm I work at and most, if not all had no problem letting me not come to class as long as my work was done and correct. I am telling you this bed. this would apply to those who want to do ROTC and school full-time.

By doing ROTC you are preparing do join the military which is very important and all teachers will respect that so if your load is full you should be able to make it easier by missing some class time in school, it's not that necessary anyway.....most of college is like a repeat of Senior year in H.S., the only thing that is different are your classes for your Major, your Core classes are such a joke and do not require much time....The best excuse I found was that I would type a letter on my firm's letterhead saying I had a deposition or had to be in court and had my friend (the senior partner) sign it...I NEVER had a teacher give me a hard time or even question it for that matter in all four years of college....

I am telling you this to illustrate the point that you CAN do two things that require alot of time during college if you are creative....just my .02

NcDeuce
01-03-2004, 01:42 AM
PERSEC

NcDeuce
01-03-2004, 01:44 AM
PERSEC