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warshak
03-31-2006, 12:29 PM
http://www.philippinemarinecorps.mil.ph/pmcmedal.html

Just want to honor our countries' soldiers who have received the highest honor for bravery in combat and performance beyond the call of duty...

warshak
03-31-2006, 12:30 PM
post your's to

CPL Trevoga
03-31-2006, 06:35 PM
post your's to

Hero of Soviet Union

http://www.soviet-awards.com/titles1.htm

Zapp Brannigan
03-31-2006, 11:41 PM
There really is no Medal of Honor equivalent, as criteria for awards differ from country to country. If you refer only to the highest award for valor of a country, some, such as France, have no equivalent. France's highest award, the Legion of Honor, may be awarded for merit as well as valor, and may be awarded to civilians as well as military. Germany, too, has no separate valor award. And the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, the premier German award in World War Two, was awarded for leadership as well as for valor; as was the Order Pour le Merite, Germany's (actually Prussia's) highest military decoration in World War One.

The Philippines is a little different, since its awards system was patterned after the US. So a Medal of Valor is roughly equivalent to a US Congressional Medal of Honor.

I trust you are also familiar with Jose Calugas, the Philippine Scout decorated with the Congressional Medal of Honor? Here is his citation: http://www.homeofheroes.com/moh/citations_1940_wwii/calugas_jose.html

Also worth mentioning is Philippine Army Air Corps fighter pilot Jesus Antonio Villamor. He received two Army Distinguished Service Crosses, the second highest valor award after the Medal of Honor, for his actions fighting the Japanese in the skies over the Philippines in December 1941. He returned to the Philippines in December 1942 to coordinate guerrilla activities. President Magsaysay later awarded him the Medal of Valor. Some more information: http://www.paf.mil.ph/history/villamor.html

Quite a number of Filipino soldiers earned the Distinguished Service Cross during the campaign against the Japanese invaders, but I believe Villamor is the only one to earn two and possibly the only one to receive the Medal of Valor as well.

towelie
04-01-2006, 01:59 AM
I guess Germany's would be the Iron Cross, but that can only be instated during a time of war.

warshak
04-01-2006, 05:58 AM
yup i'm familiar with them...those i posted though are more of the present day recipients...by the way thanks for the info on different awards...

Marmot1
04-01-2006, 06:17 AM
Polish Virtuti Militari medal


According to the new statute, crosses of each class could be awarded to a different class of soldiers and for various deeds:
Grand Cross with Star, I Class: "for a commander who has achieved victory in a battle of strategic importance, resulting in total defeat of the enemy, or a successful defense that has decided the fate of a campaign."
Commander's Cross, II Class: "for a commander who has achieved a notable tactical victory or a valorous and successful defense of a difficult position."
Knight's Cross - III Class - For officers, NCOs or ordinary soldiers, awarded previously with the Golden Cross, for acts of outstanding bravery, risk of life or outstanding command over his troops
Golden Cross - IV Class - For officers who commanded their troops with outstanding bravery and valor or for NCOs and ordinary soldiers previously awarded with the Silver Cross, for acts of outstanding bravery and risk of life on the field of battle
Silver Cross - V Class - For officers, NCOs or ordinary soldiers, for acts of outstanding bravery and risk of life on the field of battleNote that higher clases can be only awarded to people who earned lowest class first... so you must distinguih yourself in the field first..

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/b3/Virtuti_Militari.jpg/160px-Virtuti_Militari.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Virtuti_Militari.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Virtuti_Militari.jpg)
Virtuti Militari


The Virtuti Militari (Latin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin): "For Military Valor") is Poland's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poland) highest military decoration (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_decoration) for valor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valor) in the face of the enemy. Foreign decorations equivalent to the Virtuti Militari include Britain's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) Victoria Cross (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Cross) and the U.S. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Medal of Honor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medal_of_Honor). It is awarded either for personal heroisim or sometimes to commanders representing their units.
Awarded in five classes, the order was created in 1792 by Poland's King (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_of_Poland) Stanisław August Poniatowski (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanislaus_II_of_Poland). Soon after its introduction, however, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish-Lithuanian_Commonwealth) was destroyed (1795) in the partitions of Poland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partitions_of_Poland), and the partitioning powers abolished the decoration and prohibited its wearing. Since then, it has been reintroduced, renamed and banned several times, with its fate closely reflecting the vicissitudes of the Polish people. Throughout the decoration's existence, thousands of soldiers and officers, Polish and foreign, several cities and one ship have been awarded the Virtuti Militari for valor or outstanding leadership in war.

JoeBlack23
04-01-2006, 11:04 AM
I guess Germany's would be the Iron Cross, but that can only be instated during a time of war.


Are they still using the Iron cross......cause ive seen some handed to some german soldiers and they didnt look like an iron cross.....more like some modern bull**** with no piece of history in it!

driver
04-01-2006, 02:07 PM
I believe that the Iron Cross could be worne after the waryears if the swastika was taken off the cross. I Believe that Eric Hartmann was wone of those pilot ho wore wone.;)

towelie
04-01-2006, 02:53 PM
Are they still using the Iron cross......cause ive seen some handed to some german soldiers and they didnt look like an iron cross.....more like some modern bull**** with no piece of history in it!
Id assume in a time of war they would use the EK since its like the most traditional medal we have. But it can only be instated during a time of war. I've seen some of the medals that look like the EK but I think they tried to change it up some so that it wasnt a exact replicate of the EK.

sp2c
04-02-2006, 05:07 AM
the Netherlands



The military Willemsorder is the highest Dutch millitary award; since 1940 this award can also be given to civilians.

The order is granted for acts that display "courage, Leadership and Loyalty". For indigenous from the KNIL there was a "cross for Courage and Loyalty". Many felt this was some form of discrimination. The Military Willemsorder was first created on the 30th of April 1815 and was awarded for the first time in the same year. The MWO is the highest award and can only be awarded in times of war, though this is not a formal demand; it has to be "in battle". After the war in Korea 1950-1954, the MWO has not been awarded. Remarkable abot this braverycommendation is that a soldier can request it for himself.

H.M. The Queen is grandmaster in this rare order

There are four grades within the Willemsorder:

* The Grandcross
* Commandeur
* Knight 3e klasse
* Knight 4e klasse

The order was created on april 30th 1815 by King Willem I: "to reward outstanding acts of courage, leadership and loyalty, committed by those, both at sea or on land, in whatever way, and without distinction between class or rank, have served our fatherland. This order may however also be awarded to foreign soldiers, not serving the Netherlands."

The law that accomedates the Willemsorder has after that only been altered once on the 30th of april 1940

Grandcrosses in the Military Willemsorder:

Princsess Wilhelmina

King George VI

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Emperor Haile Sellassie van Ethiopie

Zapp Brannigan
04-03-2006, 12:13 PM
Regarding the Iron Cross, a couple of points:

The Iron Cross is not a Medal of Honor equivalent by any stretch. It was, in fact, the basic bravery medal of Prussia. It was held in high esteem by its recipients, at least until late-World War One awards lowered its value, but it was the basic award of the state, not the highest. Over 5 million Iron Crosses 2nd Class were awarded in World War One, along with 218,000 Iron Crosses 1st Class. If you peruse the Navy rank list of 1918, for example, you will see that virtually every Navy officer had the 2nd class and about 80% had the 1st class.

The same was the case in World War Two, even though a lesser award, the War Merit Cross, was created for lesser acts of valor and merit, especially by rear area soldiers. There were about 3 million awards of the 2nd class and between 300,000-575,000 of the 1st class.

Imperial Germany

During the Imperial era, each state had its own awards, so there was no highest "German" decoration. Also, awards were primarily based on rank, so officers would often receive an order while NCOs and enlisted men received a medal. These are the highest military decorations of the main German states:

Prussia: Order "Pour le Merite" for officers and Golden Military Merit Cross (Goldenes Militär-Verdienstkreuz) for NCOs and enlisted men.
Bavaria: Military Order of Max Joseph (Militär-Max-Joseph-Orden) for officers and Golden Military Merit Medal (Goldene Militär-Verdienst Medaille) for NCOs and enlisted men.
Saxony: Military Order of St. Henry (Militär St. Heinrich-Orden) for officers and Golden Medal of the Military Order of St. Henry (Goldene Medaille des Militär St. Heinrich-Ordens) for NCOs and enlisted men.
Württemberg: Order of Military Merit (Militär-Verdienstorden) for officers and Golden Military Merit Medal (Goldene Militärverdienstmedaille) for NCOs and enlisted men.
Baden: Military Merit Order of Karl-Friedrich (Militärischer Karl-Friedrich-Verdienstorden) for officers and Merit Medal of the Military Merit Order of Karl-Friedrich (Verdienstmedaille des Militärischen Karl-Friedrich-Verdienstordens) for NCOs and enlisted men.These were the cream of Imperial German awards and were fairly rare. In World War One there were created 253 knights of the Military Order of Max Joseph, which conferred nobility (a Bavarian received a patent as "Ritter von"). There were about 1,000 awards of Bavaria's Golden Military Merit Medal, but sources differ on the exact number.

For Prussia, there were 687 awards of the Pour le Merite, and about 122 of the oakleaves indicating a second award. There were about 1,770 awards of the Golden Military Merit Cross.

The Kingdom of Saxony created about 2,728 Knights of the Military Order of St. Henry and awarded just 150 of the Golden Medal of the order.

The Kingdom of Württemberg awarded 2,183 knight's crosses of its Order of Military Merit and about 4,234 Golden Military Merit Medals.

The Grand Duchy of Baden awarded 288 knight's crosses of its Military Merit Order of Karl-Friedrich, along with 1,282 Merit Medals of the order.

Nazi Germany

When Adolf Hitler reestablished the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German rather than Prussian award he did not bring back Prussia's Pour le Meite. Instead, he created a Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross as a neck badge. Higher grades were later created for those who had received the lower grade already (like the oakleaves for the Pour le Merite). These were the Oakleaves (883 awards), Oakleaves and Swords (159 awards), Oakleaves, Swords and Diamonds (27 awards), and Golden Oakleaves, Swords and Diamonds (1 award).

Because of the progressive nature of this system, it is hard to compare awards. Someone with the Oakleaves is not necessarily braver than someone with just the Knight's Cross; he just was brave on more occasions.

As noted, there was only one recipient of the Golden Oakleaves - Stuka pilot Hans-Ulrich Rudel. Diamonds recipients include some of the more well-known names from WW2 German military history: field marshals like Erwin Rommel, Albert Kesselring and Walther Model and ace pilots like Erich Hartmann, Werner Mölders, Adolf Galland and Hans-Joachim Marseille. Most of the non-aviator awards were to generals, though, indicating that at that level the decoration was more an award for inspired leadership than for bravery.

Modern Germany

As noted, there is no Iron Cross or Iron Cross equivalent today. There is no specific bravery award. The Honor Cross of the Armed Forces (Ehrenkreuz der Bundeswehr) is more of a long service award than a merit/bravery award. The Merit Cross of the Federal Republic (Bundesverdienstkreuz), like the French Légion d'Honneur, is more of a general merit award, and can be given to civilians.

France

As noted, the Légion d'Honneur is France's highest award, but it is a civilian award as well. The list of recipients ranges from war heroes to celebrities like Martin Scorsese and Jean Reno. The Médaille Militaire is an exclusively military award, and ranks just after the Légion d'Honneur and the Ordre de la Libération, but it is not rare. 1.4 million were awarded in World War One (though a great many of these were posthumous) and 500,000 in World War Two.

Don Pascual
04-04-2006, 02:56 PM
Here in Brazil, we also doesn't have an Medal of Honor equivalent... matter of fact, we do not have any bravery medal...

Field_Gunner
04-05-2006, 10:59 AM
Victoria Cross, but canadians havent earned one since korea. the best part of this medal is that at least 5 people need to witness your actions befor you can get it.

bluffcove
04-07-2006, 01:45 PM
Im not so sure that the Victoria cross can be compared with the medal of honour. But each to their own I suppose!

3,400 MOH's have been awarded in 145yrs
1,355 VC's have been awarded in 150 years. Bearing in mind that the VC is awarded to soldiers of every commonwelath nationality not just to the soldiers of one state, the events undertaken to attain such an award are much "greater" for want of a better word than those performed to gain a Medal of honour.

I am not claiming commonwealth forces are braver than anyone elses, merely that the apparent rarity of this award in such a large body of men marks it apart as being more unique than the MOH.

Bombtrack
04-07-2006, 02:05 PM
Here in Brazil, we also doesn't have an Medal of Honor equivalent... matter of fact, we do not have any bravery medal...

You have no awards for valour? That's pretty strange. Are your medals only for service?

Don Pascual
04-07-2006, 02:44 PM
You have no awards for valour? That's pretty strange. Are your medals only for service?

Well, basicaly, this is our reality, we only achive medals for service (usualy long service time, service in Amazonic region,, and service in combat units), and for military merit. In WW2, we had 2 types of valour medals: the combat cross of 1st and 2nd class (the 1st class for acts of bravery performed alone, and the 2nd class for acts performed in groups). We also had an wounded medal: the Blood of Brazil medal. But those decorations were only isued during WW2, I belive.
Whoever, the Brazilian Army issues a decoration called The Peacemaker Medal (Peacemaker is the nickname of one of our greatests Generals, Duque de Caxias, who is the Patron of our Army, too), that is a medal for exceptional military services, and has a version called Peacemaker Medal With Palm. The Peacemaker Medal with Palm is issued for civilians or military personal, during peacetime, performing military missions, for acts of abnegation, courag and bravery, with risks against life. It is the closest we have of a medal for valour we have, and is VERY rarely given, unlike US, that have the Silver Satar, Bronze Star, Distinguished Service Cross and others that represents diferents "degrees" of valour in combat.

Hutz
04-07-2006, 03:51 PM
There it is in all it's glory.
http://toronto.cbc.ca/gfx/Toronto/photos/victoria_cross.jpg

Ratamacue
04-07-2006, 06:34 PM
Im not so sure that the Victoria cross can be compared with the medal of honour. But each to their own I suppose!

3,400 MOH's have been awarded in 145yrs
1,355 VC's have been awarded in 150 years. Bearing in mind that the VC is awarded to soldiers of every commonwelath nationality not just to the soldiers of one state, the events undertaken to attain such an award are much "greater" for want of a better word than those performed to gain a Medal of honour.

I am not claiming commonwealth forces are braver than anyone elses, merely that the apparent rarity of this award in such a large body of men marks it apart as being more unique than the MOH.Keep in mind that during the American Civil War, and for long after, the MOH was essentially the only medal for combat valor in the US Military. Out of the 3460 medals awarded since its establishment, 1522 were from the ACW. The Distinguished Service Cross and Silver Star weren't established until 1918, the Navy Cross in 1919, and the Bronze Star in 1944. As a result, it's only really been since the beginning of World War II that the MOH has taken its role as being for only the most conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty.

Zapp Brannigan
04-07-2006, 07:05 PM
3,400 MOH's have been awarded in 145yrs
1,355 VC's have been awarded in 150 years. Bearing in mind that the VC is awarded to soldiers of every commonwelath nationality not just to the soldiers of one state, the events undertaken to attain such an award are much "greater" for want of a better word than those performed to gain a Medal of honour.

I am not claiming commonwealth forces are braver than anyone elses, merely that the apparent rarity of this award in such a large body of men marks it apart as being more unique than the MOH.

As I believe I noted elsewhere, you cannot reliably compare the same award in different periods (e.g., a Civil War Medal of Honor versus a World War Two one), as criteria and politics and other factors change, much less reliably compare different awards of different states.

But while I generally agree that for most of its history the VC has had more restrictive award criteria than the CMH, a simple comparison of aggregate awards over the entire history of both decorations is highly misleading.

Of the just over 3,400 awards of the Medal of Honor, more than 2,400 were pre-World War One awards, when the Medal of Honor was for all intents and purposes not merely the highest US award, but the only US award (the Army's Distinguished Service Cross was created in 1918, the Navy Cross in 1919, and the Silver Star in 1932). By contrast, the British Empire had knighthoods and other honors for officers and the DCM/CGM for enlisted men and NCOs (the MC and MM were added in WW1).

Looking forward from World War One on gives a slightly different picture: approximately 1,000 Medals of Honor to just over 800 VCs.

The big difference for the VC, of course, is World War One, where over 600 VCs were awarded. But does this really tell us anything? Was the VC degraded in World War One compared to other conflicts, or was World War One just so much bigger a conflict for the British Empire than any other conflict? There were more than three times as many VCs awarded in WW1 than WW2, but the British Empire also took about 2.5-3 times as many military casualties in WW1 as WW2.

So taking into account the difference between pre-WW1 awards and WW1 oneard, the difference in award numbers is actually not as significant as it might appear. The VC is generally rarer, but the difference is not as great. One simple test, since all are available on-line: pick a random sample of VC citations and Medal of Honor citations, and see if it is not rather apparent that with few exceptions both groups of men are far more deserving of comparison than of contrast.

Zapp Brannigan
04-07-2006, 07:09 PM
Keep in mind that during the American Civil War, and for long after, the MOH was essentially the only medal for combat valor in the US Military. Out of the 3460 medals awarded since its establishment, 1522 were from the ACW. The Distinguished Service Cross and Silver Star weren't established until 1918, the Navy Cross in 1919, and the Bronze Star in 1944. As a result, it's only really been since the beginning of World War II that the MOH has taken its role as being for only the most conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty.We cross-posted. ;)

For clarity: the Silver Citation Star was created in 1918 as a device, like a Mention in Dispatches device, to be worn on the campaign medal. The Silver Star Medal was created in 1932, along with the Purple Heart, and those who had received the Silver Citation Star were eligible for the Silver Star Medal.

bluffcove
04-07-2006, 07:11 PM
I dont want to get into one-up-man-ship.

But the percentage of troops recieving medals of honour is much higher than the percentage that recieve Victoria crosses. Consequently it is safe to assume that the vicotria cross is more rare than other medals in issue today.

During ww2 the USA awarded 443 medals of honour.
5 of the 9 allied powers during WW2 were Commonwealth yet we did not award five times as many VC's

Zapp Brannigan
04-07-2006, 10:14 PM
I dont want to get into one-up-man-ship.

But the percentage of troops recieving medals of honour is much higher than the percentage that recieve Victoria crosses. Consequently it is safe to assume that the vicotria cross is more rare than other medals in issue today.

During ww2 the USA awarded 443 medals of honour.
5 of the 9 allied powers during WW2 were Commonwealth yet we did not award five times as many VC's
As near as I can tell, you are the only one engaging in one-up-man-ship. As I previously stated, "...for most of its history the VC has had more restrictive award criteria than the CMH." But if you are going to once again use numbers so badly...

1. Where do you come up with 9 allies? There were far more than 9. There were at least 8 from the Commonwealth alone (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Nepal, New Zealand, Newfoundland, South Africa and Tonga). For your five I assume you mean the UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa.

2. How do you compare a percentage to an aggregate number? 5 countries to 1 = 5 times the percentage of troops? The U.S. may be one country, but U.S. military strength in World War Two was over 16 million, almost twice that of the UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa (8.5 million). So, if you really want to reduce heroism to mere numbers:

181 VCs for 8.5 million soldiers = 1 for every 46,961 soldiers
464 CMHs for 16,354,000 soldiers = 1 for every 35,246 soldiers.

So the CMH to VC ratio in WW2 was about 1.33 to 1. As I said at the outset, the VC is indeed less common, but the difference is not as huge as you would imply.

But I am not interested in debating numbers where heroism is concerned. I seriously doubt any VC or CMH holder would engage in petty one-up-man-ship, and, as I suggested, reading the citations would show that almost all these men were of a rare breed.

MARINO
04-08-2006, 07:47 PM
Cruz Laureada de San Fernando

http://www.ejercito.mde.es/ihycm/datos/imagenes-instituto/ins_cur_cond_laureada.jpg

warshak
04-09-2006, 04:50 AM
But I am not interested in debating numbers where heroism is concerned. I seriously doubt any VC or CMH holder would engage in petty one-up-man-ship, and, as I suggested, reading the citations would show that almost all these men were of a rare breed.

you're correct on that one...

Zapp Brannigan
04-10-2006, 08:05 PM
Also worth mentioning is Philippine Army Air Corps fighter pilot Jesus Antonio Villamor. He received two Army Distinguished Service Crosses, the second highest valor award after the Medal of Honor, for his actions fighting the Japanese in the skies over the Philippines in December 1941. He returned to the Philippines in December 1942 to coordinate guerrilla activities. President Magsaysay later awarded him the Medal of Valor. Some more information: http://www.paf.mil.ph/history/villamor.html

Quite a number of Filipino soldiers earned the Distinguished Service Cross during the campaign against the Japanese invaders, but I believe Villamor is the only one to earn two and possibly the only one to receive the Medal of Valor as well.
Another name worth mentioning is Capt. Conrado Yap, posthumously awarded the Philippine Medal of Valor and the U.S. Distinguished Service Cross in the Korean War. Here is the citation for his DSC:


The Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to Captain Conrado D. Yap, Army of the Philippines, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the Tenth Combat Battalion, Philippine Expeditionary Force to Korea, on April 22 and 23, 1951, at Yuctong, Korea. Shortly before midnight on April 22, 1951, his company, occupying defensive positions, came under a vicious hostile attack which seriously penetrated the perimeter. Exploiting the breach, the enemy launched successive, determined assaults throughout the night. Constantly exposed to machine-gun, mortar, and artillery fire, Captain Yap crawled from foxhole to foxhole, steadying his men and encouraging them to hold firm. Learning that his First Platoon had been overrun, and despite orders from his battalion commander to withdraw his unit, he fearlessly led a daring charge in a determined effort to reach the beleaguered platoon. Overwhelming enemy strength and heavy fire received from flanks and to the front notwithstanding, they relentlessly pressed the assault, regained the hill, evacuated the casualties, and rescued the isolated unit. Observing a stricken soldier on the slope of the hill, Captain Yap immediately started toward the man but was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy fire. Inspired by his heroic conduct, his men continued the fight with such determination and skill that the enemy attack was contained and numerous casualties were inflicted.

S'13
04-11-2006, 07:18 PM
http://www.zahal.org/decorations/medals3a.jpg

http://www.yairmalachi.org/MedalsOfIsrael/Decorations.htm

Field_Gunner
04-12-2006, 01:06 AM
the MOH is from 1861ish the Victoria cross is from 1900ish you guys have us beet by around 30-40 years. befor the vic cross there was the Victorian sash only 5 were ever given out I believe 2 to canadians

Bombtrack
04-12-2006, 01:11 AM
the MOH is from 1861ish the Victoria cross is from 1900ish you guys have us beet by around 30-40 years. befor the vic cross there was the Victorian sash only 5 were ever given out I believe 2 to canadians

Victoria Crosses have been given to events as early as the Crimean War in the 1850's.

Bombtrack
04-12-2006, 01:12 AM
http://www.zahal.org/decorations/medals3a.jpg

http://www.yairmalachi.org/MedalsOfIsrael/Decorations.htm
No offence to what they stand for, but those look like modern art.. which isnt a good thing.

digrar
04-12-2006, 01:29 AM
http://www.awm.gov.au/people/226.asp

Albert Jacka is an Australian who I reckon deserves a mention, VC and Military Cross with bar. Members of his battalion reckon he should have got 2 bars to his VC (earned at Gallipoli) in France. As a JNCO and later Junior Officer, other members of the AIF would refer to his battalion as Jacka's mob.
On his death in 1931 his coffin was carried by 8 other VC winners, "the only men good enough to take such a champion to his grave."

redfox0035
04-12-2006, 01:42 AM
No offence to what they stand for, but those look like modern art.. which isnt a good thing.

And I like 'em very much - simple and straight they are.

Field_Gunner
04-12-2006, 03:49 AM
my bad....guess I should read a little befor I mouth off

GrimReaper
04-12-2006, 04:10 AM
my bad....guess I should read a little befor I mouth off
You've got the entire data on each of the medals design in the link above.

bluffcove
04-12-2006, 01:42 PM
True courage editted by Sir Peter de la Billiere is an awesome text if you are interested in the history of the VC.

S'13
04-12-2006, 06:34 PM
No offence to what they stand for, but those look like modern art.. which isnt a good thing.

Personal taste isn't something which can be argued about. I can tell you that I don't find anything to wow about when it comes to Commonwealth medals, in terms of their design. They all seem to be in the shape of a cross or feature people's faces.

However in the end what defines a medal isn't its design, but the acts of those who recieved it.

I myself like the humility and the simplicity that characterize our medals.

danmuzi
04-15-2006, 05:19 PM
Taeguek Order of Military Valor and Merit [South Korea]

established in 1950 few months after the start of Korean War.
Taeguek class of the medal has been awareded to 85 people.

Zapp Brannigan
04-17-2006, 07:59 PM
In reviewing the thread, two things jump out: we've not even mentioned a lot of countries, and there is not much of a consensus on what "Medal of Honor equivalents... " means.

As to the latter, as I noted before, you can't be too rigid about the word "equivalent" because there are no real equivalents for awards from time to time and country to country. But basically, countries seem to fall into one of three categories:

Those that have a separate award for bravery that is considered the country's highest honor.
Those that have a military honor that is considered the highest award, but is not necessarily limited to bravery. It can also be awarded for acts of distinguished leadership in wartime.
Those that do not have such an award. In many cases, their highest honor is awarded to both military and civilians, and for merit and service as well as bravery.

Countries in category #1 include the United States (Medal of Honor) and countries influenced by the US like the Philippines (Medal of Valor) and El Salvador (Cruz de Oro al Heroismo en Acción de Guerra, Cross of Gold for Heroism in War). Category #1 also includes the United Kingdom (VC) and countries influenced by the UK like India (Param Vir Chakra) and Pakistan (Nishan-e-Haider). The USSR (Gold Star of a Hero of the Soviet Union) and countries influenced by it also would appear to belong in this category.

Category #2 includes a number of states of Imperial Germany such as Prussia (Order "Pour le Merite") and Bavaria (Military Order of Max Joseph), as well as the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross of Nazi Germany. It also includes a number of other central European and nearby countries such as Poland (Order "Virtuti Militari"), Austria-Hungary (Military Order of Maria-Teresa) and Hungary (Vitezi Rend). Finland's Mannerheim Cross also could probably be included here. I am not sure about the Romanian Order of Michael the Brave (Ordinul Mihai Viteazul) - does anyone know if it is or was limited to bravery, or also given for combat merit?

Category #3 includes a fair number of countries, such as Belgium, France, countries influenced by France, and others, some of which have already been mentioned in this thread.

I have no idea how far this is from complete, but here is a list of VC "equivalents" from various Commonwealth states (the letters are the postnominal letters a recipient may use):
Antigua and Barbuda - The Most Excellent Order of the National Hero (KNH)
Australia - Victoria Cross for Australia (VC)
Bangladesh - Bir Sreshtho (The Most Valiant Hero) (BS)
Barbados - Barbados Star of Gallantry (SG)
Belize - The Order of National Hero
Brunei - Bintang Pahlawan Perwara (Star of Supreme Gallantry) (PP)
Canada - Victoria Cross / Croix de Victoria (VC)
Fiji - President's War Cross (PWC)
Guyana - Cacique's Crown of Valour
India - Param Vir Chakra (PVC)
Jamaica - Medal of Honour for Gallantry (MG)
Malaysia - Seri Pahlawan Gagah Perkasa (The Supreme Gallantry Award) (SP)
New Zealand - The Victoria Cross for New Zealand (VC)
Pakistan - Nishan-e-Haider (Sign of the Lion) (NH)
Papua New Guinea - Cross of Valour (of the Order of Logohu) (CVL)
Rhodesia - Grand Cross of Valour (GCV)
Samoa - Malietoa Cross (MC)
Sierra Leone - The Bai Bureh Star (BBS)
Singapore - Bintang Tamasek (Star of Tamasek) (BT)
South Africa - Nkwe ya Gauta (Golden Leopard) (NG)
South Africa - Honoris Crux Diamond (never awarded) (HCD)
South Africa - Honoris Crux Gold (HCG)
Sri Lanka - Parama Weera Vibhushanaya (PWV)
United Kingdom - Victoria Cross (VC)
Zimbabwe - Gold Cross of Zimbabwe (GCV)

Some of these are obsolete. Obviously Rhodesia's. The various classes of the Honoris Crux were replaced by the Leopard decoration. Burma's version of the VC was the Aung San Thuriya, or Sun of Aung San, but it was a decoration named after the leader whose daughter remains under arrest. I have no idea if the current junta, which changed the country's name to Myanmar, also changed the medal's name.

saline
04-26-2006, 04:07 PM
Singapore's

http://www.pmo.gov.sg/images/img1_staroftemasek.jpg
BINTANG TEMASEK (Star of Temasek)

http://www.pmo.gov.sg/images/img6_pingatkehormatan.jpg
PINGAT KEHORMATAN (Medal of Honour)
http://www.pmo.gov.sg/images/img7_gagahperkasa.jpg
PINGAT GAGAH PERKASA (Conspicuous Gallantry Medal)