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richardben23
05-27-2003, 01:51 PM
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/content.2.1.html

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/content.2.2.html

Loke
05-27-2003, 02:15 PM
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/content.2.1.html

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/content.2.2.html

Yep, you really need to be a rocket scientist to post pictures, good thing I am one:

http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/british.intro.jpg
http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/interactive/special.operations/sas.jpg

catalyst
05-29-2003, 12:41 AM
Do u really find it appropriate for the future safety of such operators to post the pics without having the decency to bloke the eye area out! Fuk..U obviously visit this site because u enjoy military subjects, this is just something that a couch potato would do. All it would take is 5 mins(tops) of work to blacken the area.
U may have indeed placed these blokes lives at risk....lucky u aint SAS hay!
**** Snap :bash:

hood
05-29-2003, 02:48 AM
Yeah i guess it doesn't matter that these photos are coming from CNN, which has millions upon millions of people from all over the world looking at them. Let's modify them just for this site that gets a couple hundred at most. That's using your noodle.

Chris1
05-29-2003, 07:24 AM
Do u really find it appropriate for the future safety of such operators to post the pics without having the decency to bloke the eye area out! Fuk..U obviously visit this site because u enjoy military subjects, this is just something that a couch potato would do. All it would take is 5 mins(tops) of work to blacken the area.
U may have indeed placed these blokes lives at risk....lucky u aint SAS hay!
**** Snap :bash:
Here's a joke for ya
Theres this place right, called Britain right, and in it there are these people, called soldiers
Heres the punch line
none of them carry a sign saying 'I'm in the SAS'
None of them walk around with a permenant black mark in front of their eyes
There are also these other people (about 59/60 million of them)
who couldn't give a ****.
He looks strangely enough, like a man in his 20's - 40's medium build medium height, there does happen to be quite a few million other people fitting the same description.
In the US I believe its called PERSEC
does this photo give you his name?
No
Does this photo give you his address?
No
Does this photo even confirm that this man is in the SAS?
No
If someone wanted to kill some SAS would they search the net for photo's?
Or the pubs in Hereford?
Or better yet sit outside their barracks and watch who comes out?

use a bit of common sense please, I know its in short supply these days.

catalyst
05-29-2003, 08:28 AM
Then why when the SAS release photos does it black out the eye area?
I wasnt meaning to be so blunt but i guess I was. It is just that I wouldnt want it on my conciounce that a guy got killed because his intergrity in NI was flawed by some PC geek on a website. Remembering that the SAS is still involved with the NI campaign

cut
05-29-2003, 08:33 AM
he's covering his face that's enough..

Loke
05-29-2003, 09:09 AM
Do u really find it appropriate for the future safety of such operators to post the pics without having the decency to bloke the eye area out! Fuk..U obviously visit this site because u enjoy military subjects, this is just something that a couch potato would do. All it would take is 5 mins(tops) of work to blacken the area.
U may have indeed placed these blokes lives at risk....lucky u aint SAS hay!
**** Snap :bash:

Argle blargle...ain't we the angry ones.

Trigger
05-29-2003, 11:53 AM
@3RAR: You sound like a total wannabe starting with your screen name. You write like a middle school dropout. At least learn to spell and form complete sentences if you want to be taken seriously. :slap:

cut
05-29-2003, 01:51 PM
trigger give the guy a break I think he got the point.

hood
05-29-2003, 02:45 PM
love the sig trigger...

Trigger
05-29-2003, 04:38 PM
I made it up all by myself :D

@cut: fine, ruin all my fun :D

Silverado
05-29-2003, 08:14 PM
I'll hazard a guess and say that even if the guys face was totally exposed the chances of beiing able to ID somebody from a grainy lo-res pic on the web is all but impossible anyway. Give him an Armani suit a decent haircut and a briefcase and you would never pick him for soldier previously seen working in Afghanistan.

BiZ
05-30-2003, 11:38 PM
3RAR yet you are from Melbourne? Just a user name no doubt.

Chops
05-31-2003, 08:04 AM
Was gonna ask the same BiZ my old boy. Good to see you back. Howz tricks? May be coming through Sydney for a few days in August on a job-will drop you a line if you're about for a few Crownies...

rgds

Chop Chop

mrmadb
06-10-2003, 04:13 PM
I have a book from the library called "Secret [or special] Operations of the SAS" by Chris Ryan that has a couple of pics of that same bloke with more of his face showing without eyes blocked out.

But I wouldn't recognize him if I bumped into him on the street anyway.

12-20-2003, 10:34 PM
http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault10.jpg

http://www.specwargear.com/images/photo-SAS-1.jpg

http://students.engr.scu.edu/~jabraham/specwar/specops/uk/sbs/sbsgroupgrey.jpg

http://news.bbc.co.uk/furniture/in_depth/uk/2000/iranian_embassy_siege/home_main_pic.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault8.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault7.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault5.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault6.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault3.jpg

http://students.engr.scu.edu/~jabraham/specwar/specops/uk/sas/sas-collage2.jpg

http://www.the-sas-uk.com/endu3.jpg

http://www.expeditionexchange.com/action/01.jpg

http://students.engr.scu.edu/~jabraham/specwar/specops/uk/sas/sas-collage3.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/jungle1.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/jungle2.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/jungle.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/gpspic.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/blackkit1.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/blackkit4.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/guard.jpg

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/patrol1.jpg

Guttorm
12-20-2003, 10:36 PM
Very nice!!

I've been looking for pic's of theese guys!

ChuckThunder
12-20-2003, 10:44 PM
http://www.specwargear.com/images/photo-SAS-1.jpg

Those are airsofters. :roll:

Ratamacue
12-20-2003, 10:46 PM
I'm not really doubting your assessment, but what exactly makes you figure or know that?

ChuckThunder
12-20-2003, 11:06 PM
I'm not really doubting your assessment, but what exactly makes you figure or know that?

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2268

NcDeuce
12-21-2003, 01:18 AM
http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault5.jpg

Confucious say...mask make man look like alien.

DE_Six
12-21-2003, 01:31 AM
http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault7.jpg




Italian NOCS.

wholagun
12-21-2003, 03:12 PM
damn airsofters. **** they make things difficult for us. we need to debate whether or not pics are genuine or not.. ****e. I couldn't tell its airsoft looks real too me. meh,

ogukuo72
12-21-2003, 09:10 PM
Hints that these are not the real articles:
1. No slings on primary weapon.

2. 3 varieties of pistols, including a very un-British Colt .45 on the guy kneeling in front.

3. Respirator straps are exposed and not tucked neatly under a Nomex hood. Respirator straps are not fireproof on the first versions of S10's.

4. Finger on trigger (!)

5. And what is the point man doing? Is he peeping through the glass panes on the door and inviting someone to shoot his head off? Even if his body is hidden, his MP5SD's tip would probably be seen from the inside, warning any terrorist that someone is about the come in through the door.

6. Look at how loosely stacked these three people are. There must be at least two seconds interval between them if they go in like that.

7. Where's the guy watching the six?

8. And is the third man leaning against the wall? You NEVER lean against the wall when stacked for dynamic entry. You body MUST be angled and ready to go.

9. How do they propose to go in? Knock politely and turn the door knob? Where is the flashbang? Where is the Hutton loaded shotgun? Where is the dynamic entry tool?

If these guys are the real thing, you can just imagine the Staff shouting: "SLOPPY!"

Royal
12-22-2003, 05:27 AM
http://www.the-sas-uk.com/endu3.jpg


http://students.engr.scu.edu/~jabraham/specwar/specops/uk/sas/sas-collage3.jpg

The first shot looks like an old shot of a member of the RM M&AWC from the early 80's set to look like a phot of selection.

The second is an old MoD publicity shot of a member of Pathfinder Pl, back when 5 Abn Bde existed.

The CRW shots speal for themselves... :cantbeli:

Saranof
12-22-2003, 08:04 AM
damn airsofters. **** they make things difficult for us. we need to debate whether or not pics are genuine or not.. ****e. I couldn't tell its airsoft looks real too me. meh,


Thats the point, we like to make it look realistic :)

You don't have to debate them, just don't take the pics of airsoft pages and you'll be fine ;)

marktigger
12-22-2003, 10:07 AM
Royal if you look carefully at the right arm of the pic of the guy comming of the with the Bergan and M16 there is what looks like a DZ falsh ??23PFA

fantassin
12-22-2003, 11:57 AM
Could be one of the multiple pictures taken for the "SAS types" books like "SAS the illustrated story" by Barry Davies in which they used loads of made-up pics.

The worst such pic is on page 117 of that book where the so-called "SAS" on the left in the Lynx helicopter is "armed" with an M16 replica, an italian-made Jaeger 74 with its plainly visible 22 long rifle magazine hidden in a false, fixed 20 rounds mag...plus the guy on the right is wearing GSG9 Adidas boots, not the best for a "green" mission.

Royal
12-23-2003, 04:31 AM
Royal if you look carefully at the right arm of the pic of the guy comming of the with the Bergan and M16 there is what looks like a DZ falsh ??23PFA

Could be, but no Pegasus/Screaming Chicken on the other side. M16's or their variants have never (to my knowledge) been used on the hill phase of selection (it used to be DP SLR's and now it's L85's - to blend).

I said M&AWC becuase I think remember the phot from somewhere, he looks familiar as an ML I knew way back when (now commissioned), and he's wearing yeti gaiters and there was a fashion for them in the Corps back then, you still see them arround, but not as much.

marktigger
12-23-2003, 05:25 AM
had a look at it blown up with picture viewer and inclined to agree with you. There isn't a DZ flash but the way the DPM on that arm is looks like one is there.

Would concur about it not being a selection pic. Your knowledge of the cadre is better than mine.

Have see pics on old army photo library of pathfinder selection and the guys doing a hill phase with SLR's.

Uncle Chô
12-23-2003, 08:37 AM
Hints that these are not the real articles:
1. No slings on primary weapon.

2. 3 varieties of pistols, including a very un-British Colt .45 on the guy kneeling in front.

3. Respirator straps are exposed and not tucked neatly under a Nomex hood. Respirator straps are not fireproof on the first versions of S10's.

4. Finger on trigger (!)

5. And what is the point man doing? Is he peeping through the glass panes on the door and inviting someone to shoot his head off? Even if his body is hidden, his MP5SD's tip would probably be seen from the inside, warning any terrorist that someone is about the come in through the door.

6. Look at how loosely stacked these three people are. There must be at least two seconds interval between them if they go in like that.

7. Where's the guy watching the six?

8. And is the third man leaning against the wall? You NEVER lean against the wall when stacked for dynamic entry. You body MUST be angled and ready to go.

9. How do they propose to go in? Knock politely and turn the door knob? Where is the flashbang? Where is the Hutton loaded shotgun? Where is the dynamic entry tool?

If these guys are the real thing, you can just imagine the Staff shouting: "SLOPPY!"

Not to mention that wooden houses are not a common sight in the UK... This single little detail would have gave away even the best reenacting guys ;)

BTW, what is the difference between airsofters and reenactors ?

Sirpad
12-28-2003, 12:38 AM
http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault8.jpg
this photo has one very interesting feature: the MP5-PDW held by the closest operator (w. hooligan bar) has absolutely no sights. double-checked it with a larger printed version of this photo and with the video of the assault (can be found around the net). also asked HKPRO's webmaster - he had no idea why. no signs of laser marker, either.

Mace
12-28-2003, 05:33 AM
Well the reason i understood weapons like this to have no sights was so they can be quickly and easily drawn without the sights gettng caught on clothing etc in bodyguarding situations, but i dont know why they would use it in this situation.

MANSUR
12-29-2003, 05:21 AM
The man who is aiming his gun at the camera, holds his mp5k very unprofessional in one hand. Another thing is that he has a hooligan bar in his other hand and won't be able to shoot as accurate when nessecary. I think that is something you won't see very much with real sf.

HooyahCQB
12-29-2003, 09:35 AM
SAS (at least) didn't use there sights on there CQB weapons back in the day (I don't know about now). They opted to forced the gun against their slings for a stable shot and aim down the barrel, especially when wearing gas masks as shown. SEAL Team Six did this back in the day and i'm sure Delta/CAG thought about it too.

Gringo
12-29-2003, 09:37 AM
Don't they zero the flashlights attached to their weapon to where the bullets will go. So they use the flashlight's beam as an aiming device?

HooyahCQB
12-29-2003, 02:12 PM
That seems like a possibility Eagle, since they did put flashlights on top. They'd have to focuse the beam a lot though

CX20
12-29-2003, 08:47 PM
Don't they zero the flashlights attached to their weapon to where the bullets will go. So they use the flashlight's beam as an aiming device?

True. Also quite common (and in some places an SOP) on UK police firearms teams.

With regards to that sightless MP5K, it is a special varient specifically modified for close protection and covert duties, used by UKSF, close protection teams and even UK police forces. If you read the book "The Operators" by James Rennie, you will see several photos of these weapons. They are commonly worn under a jacket in a shoulder rig, the idea is that the lack of sights and other protuding items enables the weapon to be brought to bear quicker, without parts getting caught on clothing.

Just because they aren't on HKPro, doesn't mean that they don't exist! :lol:

I have seen these weapons first hand, as we have some on the Unit for our lads that are CP trained. However our versions are semi-auto only as per standard UK ACPO regulations, so basically for us they are just a bigger, heavier, more cumbersome and less accurate pistol. Much better to just carry a pistol and keep a HK53 in the footwell of the car. ;)

CX20
12-29-2003, 10:25 PM
This was the best pic of a sightless MP5K that I could find on the net, shame it is of an airsoft reproduction, but I can assure you that it is 100%identical to the real thing.

http://members.at.infoseek.co.jp/toygun/mp5k.jpg

Spike
12-30-2003, 12:16 AM
Why would Airsofters have gas masks on anyway... :roll:

Tane Angle
12-30-2003, 12:39 AM
About MP5K's/PDWs, there is a sling that works well with the folding stock, which automatically unfolds the stock as the weapon is brought to bear. Fairly popular for EP work. Have a good one, just some thoughts...

Minjin
12-30-2003, 01:13 AM
Why would Airsofters have gas masks on anyway... :roll:

We call them gear ****s, and they have all sorts of crazy gear.

ogukuo72
12-30-2003, 01:32 AM
this photo has one very interesting feature: the MP5-PDW held by the closest operator (w. hooligan bar) has absolutely no sights. double-checked it with a larger printed version of this photo and with the video of the assault (can be found around the net). also asked HKPRO's webmaster - he had no idea why. no signs of laser marker, either.

This is the A2 version of the MP5K, and it does have a pistol-like sight. Where the front sight should be is the stubby blade of the front sight. You will find the notch of the rearsight machined into the frame over the notches where you clamp the optics.

[AFSOC]
12-30-2003, 01:48 AM
Why would Airsofters have gas masks on anyway... :roll:

We call them gear ****s, and they have all sorts of crazy gear.

Why dont you just call them straight out NERDS......DUH!

Gringo
12-30-2003, 08:27 AM
]

Why would Airsofters have gas masks on anyway... :roll:

We call them gear ****s, and they have all sorts of crazy gear.

Why dont you just call them straight out NERDS......DUH!

For F***s sake, why is it when someone even mentions the word airsoft, everyone takes the piss. Not all of us r "gear whores". Not all of us are "nerds".

MolliG
12-30-2003, 08:53 AM
Eagle, I think these guys only know of, like, 'American' Airsoft... Just ignore the comments. Hopefully one day they'll see British and Japanese Airsoft side of things... I'm an Airsofter, but I don't run around the woods in camo' every weekend...

:)

Note: No offence intended for Minjin, [M14] etc :hug:.

woot

[AFSOC]
12-30-2003, 11:18 PM
http://www.specwargear.com/images/photo-SAS-1.jpg

There NERDS...

BECAUSE they wasted there time taking a gay picture like that. Just look at them jeez

oooo badASS!

Operation Ivy
12-31-2003, 12:12 AM
Off topic

Mr. M14 did you actually use a M14 when you were in the service?,just wonderin cause your sig is awsome, and your name is M14 :D

Zach R.
12-31-2003, 12:35 AM
About MP5K's. The A1 and A3 version of the K has no sights.
The K, A2, and A4 all have sights, just different trigger markings. Same for the sightless model. A3 and A4 are just single fire and burst, A1 and A2 are single and full auto. And ofcourse the K and A1 have burst, full auto, and single. BTW, they all come with safeteys (duhhhhhh).

MolliG
12-31-2003, 01:36 PM
]http://www.specwargear.com/images/photo-SAS-1.jpg

There NERDS...

BECAUSE they wasted there time taking a gay picture like that. Just look at them jeez

oooo badASS!

So, because of one picture you feel the need to call every Airsofter a 'nerd' and 'gay'? Be it a 24 year old Skirmisher, to a 54 year old ex-SAS site owner/organiser, to a 16 year old, like me, who just collects and likes the look of AMS/BBIPSC...

:roll: :hug:

Ayura
12-31-2003, 02:11 PM
Im hoping to actually succeed in being part of the SAS/SBS sometime.

Heres a couple of sites about them:

http://britishsas.8m.com/

http://www.stuff.themutual.net/index.htm

redhawk_six
12-31-2003, 06:40 PM
]http://www.specwargear.com/images/photo-SAS-1.jpg

There NERDS...

BECAUSE they wasted there time taking a gay picture like that. Just look at them jeez

oooo badASS!

they're not trying to look badass, they're just having some fun

lossen up for christ sakes

just because you don't understand something doesn't make it "gay"

the arrogence and intolerance of some people....

EvanL
12-31-2003, 06:47 PM
Gay

Haiw
12-31-2003, 08:37 PM
I agree, don't call 'em gay...that would be an insult to every ********** on earth. ;)

Zach R.
12-31-2003, 10:52 PM
I agree, don't call 'em gay...that would be an insult to every ********** on earth. ;)

rofl

Ayura
01-02-2004, 12:55 PM
I would love to see 10 seals against 10 SAS/SBS in MILES (or any other type of laser type practise shooting.)

That would be the *****

If ya ask me, I think SAS/SBS would win. Believe me, these guys are seriously hard.

Zach R.
01-02-2004, 02:45 PM
No way dude. Stick em' up against CAG or the SM and you've got a real compitetion. Don't kill me because I didn't mention ST6.

Haiw
01-02-2004, 04:15 PM
:cantbeli:

Ayura
01-02-2004, 06:09 PM
No way dude. Stick em' up against CAG or the SM and you've got a real compitetion. Don't kill me because I didn't mention ST6.


CAG? SM?

Who are they?

Ayura
01-02-2004, 06:21 PM
Oh, and by the way
Us Brits were ranked 2nd in the 50th top elite forces, two places above the U.S.A

Dont believe me?

http://www.frenchforeignlegion.org/database/data/dta057.html

intelligenzija
01-02-2004, 06:28 PM
excuse me but what is SBS ? :oops:

S'13
01-02-2004, 06:48 PM
excuse me but what is SBS ? :oops:

Special Boat Service.

Zach R.
01-02-2004, 10:44 PM
Oh, and by the way
Us Brits were ranked 2nd in the 50th top elite forces, two places above the U.S.A

Dont believe me?

http://www.frenchforeignlegion.org/database/data/dta057.html

Uh, how the ***** did Germany come in third? But I can definately see how Israel came in first. But, first off, how did they gather a signifigant data-set to make these acusations? Hostage situations have declined by nearly 27% since the early ninety's, and experts say it will continue to decline over the next few years. Terrorists have finally relized that taking hostages is a bad idea, knowing they will either get too tired to carry on, or they will be blown away into a little pile of blood and guts. But I do think it's hilarious how Russia beat out France and Canada. If I had to judge the world on how well they're CT forces ranked, I would say that you can't really make an acurate judgment considering the fact that everything could turn south at any second. Besides, this conclusion was based on events PRIOR to 1996.

Haiw
01-02-2004, 11:36 PM
Oh, and by the way
Us Brits were ranked 2nd in the 50th top elite forces, two places above the U.S.A

Dont believe me?

http://www.frenchforeignlegion.org/database/data/dta057.html

That is about the crappiest list I have ever seen... The Netherlands isn't even listed while the BBE action after a train hijacking back in the 70's was a textbook example of how it should be done.

Besides its just a crappy list made up by some crappy paper. About as 'official' and 'real' as a top 10 movie list made by MSN.

Zach R.
01-03-2004, 03:43 AM
That MSM movie list was a wagon load of bulls***. :bash: :fork: :-*$

Spike
01-28-2004, 12:22 AM
Dont flame me for this but i thought the SAS didnt use slings. Got it from the book "Delta Force" by the founder Col. Charlie Beckwith... :(

Sir Zach of R.
01-28-2004, 12:56 AM
That book was written in 1983....... :cantbeli:

obd
01-28-2004, 01:49 AM
hey all you guys dissing the men in these pics as airsofters. I hate to burst your bubbles but these "unprofessional looking" dudes are real SAS men and I can prove it: The pictures are from a book called "SAS: The Illustrated History" written by former SAS trooper Barry Davies who served with the SAS for 18 years. Many of the pictures are his own including a picture of himself just after being shot through the leg by the Adoo in Oman!! I highly recomend this book. It has good pics of very brave men who are little known. For example: Pics of the famous "Gordie" Barker who fought heroicly in Oman but was tragically killed in a para accident. Also Captain Richard Westmacott who was killed in N. Ireland by an M60 machine gun manned by IRA at Antrim Road. Coincidently, this was only three days before the storming of the Iranian Embassy. I repeat, these pics are not Airsofters but real SAS so try not to judge too much and be armchair generals (although Im guilty of that too heheh). By the way, if you want this book, its published in Great Britain by "Virgin Books". I got it back in 1997 but it should still be available. Im looking at it right now hehe as I knew I'd seen those pics before and they sure are right here in front of me!!!!!

Nizark
01-28-2004, 03:07 AM
http://www.angelfire.com/wa/cagiva2/images/sasassault5.jpg creepy lookin f**kers right there....wheres the **** probes?

Royal
01-28-2004, 08:00 AM
hey all you guys dissing the men in these pics as airsofters. I hate to burst your bubbles but these "unprofessional looking" dudes are real SAS men and I can prove it: The pictures are from a book called "SAS: The Illustrated History" written by former SAS trooper Barry Davies who served with the SAS for 18 years. Many of the pictures are his own including a picture of himself just after being shot through the leg by the Adoo in Oman!! I highly recomend this book. It has good pics of very brave men who are little known. For example: Pics of the famous "Gordie" Barker who fought heroicly in Oman but was tragically killed in a para accident. Also Captain Richard Westmacott who was killed in N. Ireland by an M60 machine gun manned by IRA at Antrim Road. Coincidently, this was only three days before the storming of the Iranian Embassy. I repeat, these pics are not Airsofters but real SAS so try not to judge too much and be armchair generals (although Im guilty of that too heheh). By the way, if you want this book, its published in Great Britain by "Virgin Books". I got it back in 1997 but it should still be available. Im looking at it right now hehe as I knew I'd seen those pics before and they sure are right here in front of me!!!!!

OBD - sorry to burst your bubble, but just because photos are from a book by an ex-SAS man and about the Regiment does not mean they show SAS troopers. Most of the junk like this produced uses staged photos from image librarys - mostly because they're clearer than snapshots taken 'at the time'.

The trooper on the right is carrying a MAC10 (a weapon abandoned by the Regiment in the 70's) while wearing an S10 respirator - an item that was not produced until the end of the 80's....

Argyll
01-28-2004, 08:18 AM
No spare mags in the mag pouch on the 1st guy either ;)

it is common knowledge to use ex Mil types to dress up to look the part as well as use Re enactment groups,as the real operators don't have time to pose for the public,even for an ex member like Barry davies!!

obd
01-28-2004, 11:14 AM
yeah I know that alot of these books use "stock" available images that are traded around in virtually every book you see. Just get the book or take a look at it and you will understand what Im saying. In his book credit is given for each photograph. Not every one of the pics are his but every one is authentic and, if staged, is staged by SAS men for that purpose. Anyway, its still a great book with lots of operational photos from Malaysia, Oman, Iranian Embassy, etc..

obd
01-28-2004, 11:16 AM
Also, isnt it entirely possible that an SAS man might just prefer a Mac-10. If I remmember correctly, and I could easily be wrong, wasnt the Mac-10 one of the very first "modern" SMG's to be used by the regiment. (Of course exclluding WW2 models).

Steve Andrews
01-28-2004, 11:27 AM
He prefers a Mac-10 to a Hockler?

Riiiiiiiiight.

DeltaWhisky58
01-28-2004, 11:52 AM
Also, isnt it entirely possible that an SAS man might just prefer a Mac-10. If I remmember correctly, and I could easily be wrong, wasnt the Mac-10 one of the very first "modern" SMG's to be used by the regiment. (Of course exclluding WW2 models).

SAS Troopers don't get to "prefer" Mac-10s - the SAS/SBS use Heckler & Koch MP-5s, full stop. Any concept of using preferred weaons is just not correct, they use what is issued and deemed best for the job. As Royal says, the Mac-10 was dropped from the armoury a long time ago, well before Op. Nimrod.

Argyll
01-28-2004, 12:58 PM
The MAC 10 is a gangster weapon,not an SF weapon,it has too high a rate of fire and is not as easily controlled as an MP5!

01-28-2004, 03:24 PM
The MAC 10 is a gangster weapon,not an SF weapon,it has too high a rate of fire and is not as easily controlled as an MP5!

I've seen pictures of SBS operators with silenced UZI's before....

Royal
01-28-2004, 03:46 PM
I've seen pictures of SBS operators with silenced UZI's before....

1. The Uzi is considerably more controllable and accurate than the Mac10.

2. Like the Mac10, it has long been binned for all but familiarisation/recognition purposes.

CX20
01-29-2004, 12:52 PM
Like everyone has said, MAC10s, UZIs, etc were dropped quite some time ago. UK Police TFUs constantly run exchange programs with the Hereford mob and also learn a great deal from them in terms of ideas and equipment. If you see photos of any respectable, well-equipped modern Police TFU, you can usually get a very good impression of what the lads from Hereford are using/wearing. All TFUs should train with them at some point and may even get to go on a visit to see the lads "in situ". My team is also lucky in that we have ex-Hereford and ex-Poole SC lads on board.

Once again I can't believe that the kids on here are trying to "out-knowledge" those who either have real life "friends from Hereford" or those who are serving UK Forces and have worked with them. I just find it incredible that they think they can know every detail from seeing a photograph, which may or may not be genuine, and may be from quite a few years ago. :cantbeli:

Ballistic
05-03-2004, 12:07 AM
Like everyone has said, MAC10s, UZIs, etc were dropped quite some time ago. UK Police TFUs constantly run exchange programs with the Hereford mob and also learn a great deal from them in terms of ideas and equipment. If you see photos of any respectable, well-equipped modern Police TFU, you can usually get a very good impression of what the lads from Hereford are using/wearing. All TFUs should train with them at some point and may even get to go on a visit to see the lads "in situ". My team is also lucky in that we have ex-Hereford and ex-Poole SC lads on board.

Once again I can't believe that the kids on here are trying to "out-knowledge" those who either have real life "friends from Hereford" or those who are serving UK Forces and have worked with them. I just find it incredible that they think they can know every detail from seeing a photograph, which may or may not be genuine, and may be from quite a few years ago. :cantbeli:

Didn't you know ?? It's the internet, everyone's an expert !! :D

Graeme
05-03-2004, 11:21 AM
Hints that these are not the real articles:
1. No slings on primary weapon.

2. 3 varieties of pistols, including a very un-British Colt .45 on the guy kneeling in front.

3. Respirator straps are exposed and not tucked neatly under a Nomex hood. Respirator straps are not fireproof on the first versions of S10's.

4. Finger on trigger (!)

5. And what is the point man doing? Is he peeping through the glass panes on the door and inviting someone to shoot his head off? Even if his body is hidden, his MP5SD's tip would probably be seen from the inside, warning any terrorist that someone is about the come in through the door.

6. Look at how loosely stacked these three people are. There must be at least two seconds interval between them if they go in like that.

7. Where's the guy watching the six?

8. And is the third man leaning against the wall? You NEVER lean against the wall when stacked for dynamic entry. You body MUST be angled and ready to go.

9. How do they propose to go in? Knock politely and turn the door knob? Where is the flashbang? Where is the Hutton loaded shotgun? Where is the dynamic entry tool?

If these guys are the real thing, you can just imagine the Staff shouting: "SLOPPY!"

I'm aware that this post is quite old, but I'm gonna say this anyway.

You make a point about slings on primary weapons, or a lack of. I have undergone certain training courses held by Stirling Services(a training company run by ex-sas soldiers). We underwent CQB and hostage rescue, patrolling techniques in open areas etc. Our intrusctors where John Mac(one of the first men into the Iranian embassy, he is on that balcony.), and John Edwards(I know little of his back ground I'm afraid.). One of the first thing John Mac commented on, was the fact that we all had slings. He then told us to REMOVE our slings, as they would only get in the way. While he did say that they are useful to push the primary weapon away on, to use a side arm or what not, he told us to remove our slings. Your point about slings on primary weapons is invalid.

One more point:
The finger on the trigger. I got chewed up for NOT having my finger on the trigger while readying myself to move into a room with my team. As Mac put it, "It won't go bang if you don't pull it, put your *****ing finger on the trigger."

Uncle Sam
05-03-2004, 12:50 PM
REMF's rule, #1, A+ !!!!!!! They totally beat SAS, SEALs, SF, Delta and all those other high speed Spec Ops units in the world !

REMF lead this pack !!! All the rest are in the back !


***REMF = Rear Echelon Mother Fu*ker"***

Uncle Sam
05-03-2004, 01:00 PM
I have found a picture of this elusive "REMF" in Iraq. Note: The dorky smile, and the small unform gives him away.

http://www.xbox-connection.com/hostedimages/REMF.jpg

Gringo
05-03-2004, 03:38 PM
"In the Rear With The Gear"

Quite a few meaning's to that.

Kingtabed3
09-18-2005, 01:29 PM
Scintillating :lol:

Patricia 23U
09-18-2005, 02:06 PM
Do u really find it appropriate for the future safety of such operators to post the pics without having the decency to bloke the eye area out! Fuk..U obviously visit this site because u enjoy military subjects, this is just something that a couch potato would do. All it would take is 5 mins(tops) of work to blacken the area.
U may have indeed placed these blokes lives at risk....lucky u aint SAS hay!
**** Snap :bash:man you need to take a rest dude, do you honestly think anyone of us on this forum or anywhere else for that matter could ID anyone of these pics and use it to our advantage. ah...don't think so.

Kingtabed3
09-18-2005, 02:16 PM
Do u really find it appropriate for the future safety of such operators to post the pics without having the decency to bloke the eye area out! Fuk..U obviously visit this site because u enjoy military subjects, this is just something that a couch potato would do. All it would take is 5 mins(tops) of work to blacken the area.
U may have indeed placed these blokes lives at risk....lucky u aint SAS hay!
**** Snap :bash:man you need to take a rest dude, do you honestly think anyone of us on this forum or anywhere else for that matter could ID anyone of these pics and use it to our advantage. ah...don't think so.


hmmm...

Argyll
09-18-2005, 02:22 PM
as is resurrecting two year old topics

Brookes
09-18-2005, 02:34 PM
as is resurrecting two year old topics

Yeah! wat's with that?? (oh, guess i'm doing it now...)

mshnell
02-25-2010, 09:03 PM
Would like to start with the most famous one of all.

111753

Special Air Service (SAS) - Loughgall, Northern Ireland

The SAS ambush of IRA gunmen at Loughgall has been hailed as their most successful anti-terrorist operation of the entire Troubles.
When, in May 1987, British Intelligence got wind of a planned IRA attack on a Police Station in Loughgall, County Armagh, the SAS prepared to intercept and ambush the attackers.
An IRA attack the previous year had used a JCB digger, its front bucket packed with explosives, to ram into a Police Station before exploding. Reports of a stolen JCB, combined with other intel (probably a mole within the IRA Active Service Unit planning the attack), convinced the authorities that a similar attack was imminent in the area.
The RUC's covert intelligence unit, E4A had located the stolen digger and suspected that the IRA East Tyrone Active Service Unit (ASU) were involved. Reports of a blue Toyota van being stolen by masked men also surfaced. Such a van would probably be used to carry IRA gunmen to cover the assault on the Police Station. Further signals intelligence confirmed the time and place of the planned attack.
On Friday, the 8th of May, the stolen JCB was seen being retrieved from its hiding place in a local farm. It looked like the IRA operation was on. Several RUC & SAS men stayed in the Police Station to act as decoys. Outside, the SAS took up ambush positions, concealed behind a row of trees behind a fence that ran alongside the road past Loughgall Police Station. Apart from the main ambush force, several cut-off groups were put in place to cover possible escape routes.
The SAS were mostly armed with Heckler & Koch G3 assault rifles (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/g3.php). The 7.62mm round fired by the G3 had greater stopping power than either the M16 rifles or MP5 sub machine guns usually carried by the SAS.
At 7pm, the stolen blue Toyota van was seen driving past the Police Station, presumably scouting the area ahead of the main attack. A few minutes later, it returned, followed by the stolen JCB, with 3 hooded men in its cab and a large oil drum in its front bucket.
The hidden SAS ambush party bided their time and watched as the JCB crashed through the wire fence around the Police Station. They watched as the 3 hooded men jumped from the cab, one of them lighting the fuse on the oil drum. As the 3 IRA men ran from the JCB, 5 armed men leaped out of the Toyota van and started firing at the station.
Loughgall Police Station after the attack.

Now the SAS ambush was sprung. The troopers opened fire, riddling the gunmen, the bombers and the Toyota van with bullet holes. It only lasted a few seconds, but the hail of gunfire had killed all 8 IRA men. In the midst of the ambush, the explosives packed into the JCB's bucket exploded, decimating the Police Station.
With unfortunate timing, a car carrying 2 innocent civilians drove into the ambush zone. The 2 men, returning from work, were dressed in boiler suits similar to those worn by the IRA gunmen. In an understandable attempt to escape, the driver began to rapidly reverse away from the shooting. Thinking them to be an IRA back-up unit, one of the SAS cut-off groups opened fire on the car, killing the driver and wounding his passenger. A later investigation determined that neither men had any connection to the IRA and the family of the dead man was subsequently compensated by the British government.

In pure military terms, the SAS operation at Loughgall had been a dramatic victory. It was the largest and most ferocious firefight between the SAS and the IRA and a decidedly one-sided result. Politically, its effect was less clear. Some saw the action as a firm line in the sand that signaled the UK's determination to hold its ground and meet the terrorists head on. Some even believed it would deter people from joining the IRA, whilst others thought quite the opposite. The incident seemed, at least temporarily, to rattle the IRA, who were troubled by the breach of security that led to the ambush. The British authorities were criticised for the lack of a proper investigation into the incident. The European Court Of Human Rights determined that the lack of investigation constituted a denial of human rights to the slain IRA men.


source: www.eliteukforces.info (http://www.eliteukforces.info)

[WDW]Megaraptor
02-25-2010, 10:23 PM
I don't understand the IRA's response to this incident:

When IRA members were in prison, the IRA said they were soldiers, not criminals, they were at war with the UK, etc.

Yet when the British act like it's a war and conduct a spectacularly successful ambush, all of sudden the IRA claims they are being summarily executed and their human rights are violated?

Which is it people?

Dominique
02-26-2010, 12:42 AM
[QUOTE='Megaraptor;4785435'Which is it people?[/QUOTE]

The IRA are terrorists who'll say whatever is convenient, as long as they feel it's to their advantage.

OldRecon
02-26-2010, 10:17 AM
I remember traveling through NI a few years afther the Loughall incident. Wall grafitti anouncing rather gleefully "SAS 8 - PIRA 0" were still up here and there :lol:. Presume these were "prot-areas"?
IMO this incident, in all its brutality, was but one of many steps along the way towards the Good Friday agreement.

Old_Boy_Steve
02-26-2010, 10:21 AM
Good drills p-)

mshnell
02-26-2010, 10:42 PM
14 Company - 'The Det'

Before 14 Company was created, undercover military surveillance in Northern Ireland was carried out by a unit known as the Mobile Reconnaissance Force or MRF. The MRF had some success, but it's operations were eventually compromised. 2 IRA double-agents that the MRF had turned were discovered by the Provos and interrogated, spilling the details of a covert operation based around the Four Squares laundry in Belfast. Using information gleaned from the interrogations, the IRA ambushed a MRF laundry van, killing one undercover soldier.


With the MRF compromised, it was decided that a dedicated force of highly-trained plains-clothes surveillance operatives should be established for operations in Northern Ireland. 14 Intelligence Company - sometimes referred to as 14 INT, 14 Company, or 'The Det' - was to be selected and trained by a specially setup training wing of 22 SAS (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/). Additionally, SAS officers would form the unit's command. In 1973, 3 Detachments, or 'Dets' were setup, each within its own sector of Northern Ireland
During the Troubles, men from the SAS and SBS would serve tours with 14 Company. It was good experience for the special forces soldiers, who would not only enhance their assigned Det with their particular skills, but they also would, on completing their tour, return to their units with invaluable operational experience.
Selection

Selection to 14 Company was open to all members of the armed services and to all genders. For the first time, women could become members of a UK Special Forces unit. Candidates were required to pass a rigorous selection process, designed to weed out anyone without the necessary qualities to deal with the unique challenges of life as a an undercover operative. Excellent observational abilities, stamina and the ability to think under stress are vital for undercover surveillance work. Since many operations require the operative to work alone, a sense of self-confidence and self-reliance is also a prerequisite.
Training

The relatively small Walter PPK was used by a backup weapon, often in a ankle-holster, or as a primary weapon for female operatives with especially small hands. With its magazine of 8 .22 rounds, the PPK lacked the stopping power of the Browning HP, but its concealability made it more suitable for use when wearing certain outfits.


The training of 14 Company covered all the skills required of a surveillance operators.

Advanced driving courses were taught, including sustained high speed driving, using a vehicle as a weapon, controlled crashes, skid recovery and anti-ambush skills.
Photography is a vital skill and the candidates first learnt the basics then moved onto advanced nighttime Infra-red photography. They also learnt how to conceal still and video cameras in their clothing and in cars.
The demanding disciplines of surveillance - from hiding in ditches or attics, to following on foot , to surveillance from vehicles - were all taught. The ability to observe, follow and communicate over the radio network, all covertly, were ingrained in the operators.
Operators also learnt how to plant electronic eavesdropping devices (bugs) and covert video cameras. They also practiced planting tracking devices on cars, in weapon caches and even on people. Breaking into houses and businesses and planting bugs and gathering intelligence without being detected was also taught, as were the arts of lock-picking and key-copying.
Whilst trained to avoid direct contact, 14 Company members were highly skilled in close quarters combat (CQB). Members become experts at using pistols (usually browning high powers (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/browning-high-power.php) or Walter PPKs), sub machine guns such as HK MP5ks (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/mp5.php), carbines (HK53 (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/hk33.php)) and assault rifles (G3KA4 (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/g3.php)). 14 company members were taught how to employ their weapons from within vehicles as part of anti-ambush drills. It was not uncommon for det operatives to have an extra pistol - often another browning hp with extended 20 round magazine - stowed within easy reach in their vehicles. A remington 870 shotgun (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/remmington-870.php) was also hidden inside Det cars. The remington could be used to blast out the windscreens of their vehicles, allowing the operatives inside to fire their other weapons.
Unarmed combat was taught to Det operatives, particularly techniques to disarm and neutralise knife or gun-weilding assailants.
Special Equipment

Though not quite up to James Bond standards, the Det employed some specialised equipment. Operators wore microphones and earphones hidden in their clothing to enable them to talk on 'the net' whilst in public. Special covert holsters were worn that allowed an operator conceal their pistols in their waistbands.

14 Company drove a range of cars that from the outside looked like everyday civilian saloons, but in fact had some special features built-in.
The modified Q cars driven by 14 Company operators in Northern Ireland had many suprises hidden beneath their seemingly ordinary exteriors.


These so-called 'Q' cars had covert radios with hidden speakers and microphones that could not be easily spotted from the outside.
Video and still cameras were often secreted about the vehicles, allowing the operators to film surreptitiously.
The brake lights on Q cars could be disabled by a switch so as to allow them to covertly pick up or drop off fellow operatives at night.
Engine cut-off switches were fitted as an hijacking countermeasure.
Operator's cars would also be fitted with systems to detect any tampering with the vehicle's electronics - a sign that a car bomb had been planted.
Q cars were fitted with covert kevlar armour plating. Gaps were left in the armour to allow operatives to fire through the bodywork - a requirement in some anti-ambush drills.
A flashbang dispenser was sometimes secreted beneath a Q car. When triggered by a foot switch multiple stun grenades would fly out in all directions before detonating. The flashbangs were for emergencies such as escaping a terrorist roadblock or dispersing a hostile crowd.
What's in a name?

The many pseudonyms of the unit included:

NITAT
Intelligence and Security Group (NI)
Int & Sy Group
14 Intelligence and Security Company
14 Intelligence Company
14 Company
14 Int
The Det

A flight of Army Air Corps (AAC) Gazelles, nicknamed the 'Bat flight' were frequently used on 14 Company operations. The Gazelles carried sophisticated surveillance gear well suited for supporting 14 Company operations. These video and Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) cameras were slaved to a sight usually used to fire wire-guided missiles. At least one Det operator would ride in the helicopter and follow suspects through the sighting system, usually high up, out of sight or sound of anyone below. Det helicopter passengers would usually be armed with Hk53 carbines or G3 rifles, ready to engage ground targets from the air, if required, although there is no public record of this ever happening.
14 Company Operations

From their inception until the Troubles played out, 14 Company carried out numerous operations, mostly following and observing suspected terrorists. These painstaking intelligence gathering efforts often led to the arrest of terrorists by the RUC as well as discoveries of weapons caches.
In addition to simple surveillance, they also liaised with SAS teams from whichever squadron was active in Northern Ireland at the time, acting as addition eyes and ears and often providing covert transportation for SAS operations. In the early 80s, a dedicated SAS troop was eventually attached to 14 Company, Together the 2 units formed the Intelligence and Security Group (NI) otherwise knowns Int & Sy Group or just 'the Group'.
read more on 14 Company / SAS activities in Northern Ireland (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/history/northern-ireland/)
On rare occasions 14 Company members would end up in firefights with terrorists, usually the result of their covers being compromised. Tragically, several 14 Company operators lost their lives in Northern Ireland.
It's believed that during the nineties the role of 14 Company was expanded to include operations outside of Northern Ireland. It is thought that, amongst other activities, the unit supported NATO efforts to arrest suspected war criminals in the former Republic of Yugoslavia. In such a role, it is likely that 14 Company identified and tracked targets for SAS arrest operations such as Operation Tango (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/sas-operations/operation-tango/).
The unit has now been absorbed into the recently formed Special Reconnaissance Regiment (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-reconnaissance-regiment/) (SRR), with a remit to fight the global war against terror.

mshnell
02-26-2010, 10:48 PM
Also like to add this one.

OPERATION FLAVIUS - The SAS IN Gibraltar

In March of 1988, British Intelligence became aware of an IRA plot to attack a parade of British military bands in Gibraltar. An SAS unit was tasked with intercepting the IRA cell. The SAS mission was code-named 'Operation Flavius'.


The IRA plot

Based on intelligence, the British believed the PIRA planned to set off a bomb in Gibraltar. For some weeks, Spanish security services had been watching a 3-person cell as it gathered in Spain. The PIRA Active Service Unit (ASU) was made up of 2 men and a woman - Danny McCann, Seán Savage and Mairéad Farrell. It is believed that they planned to cross over into the British Territory of Gibraltar, place explosives in the boot of a car at the assembly point for a scheduled parade and detonate it remotely. To guarantee the best spot, the ASU reserved a suitable location by parking a 'clean' car in it until they were ready to replace it with the one rigged with explosives. The location was next to Inces Hall, where the band and soldiers for the parade would be mustered.
Operation Flavius

On March 5th, Savage was spotted parking a white Renault car, arousing suspicions that it might be carrying explosives. This intel was quickly followed by reports that McCann and Farrel had crossed the border from Spain into Gibraltar and were heading into the town. They were kept under surveillance by intelligence operatives. Some reports suggest that 14 Intelligence Company (http://www.eliteukforces.info/the-det/)were involved in tailing the IRA cell around Gibraltar.
At around 14:50, Savage was seen linking up with McCann and Farrell . They were observed conversing and looking intently towards where the white Renault had been parked. The trio eventually moved away from the area but soon returned and were again observed paying close attention to the parked car.
The IRA team then split up again with Savage heading back into town and the others heading towards the border with Spain.
When the IRA cell were clear of the parked car, an Army explosives expert did a walk-by to look for tell-tale signs of a car bomb (exposed antennas, wires or depressed axles from a large weight in the boot). No such signs were visible, although the car still could have been rigged with a light-weight plastic explosive such as semtex. The car's radio aerial did arouse some suspicions.
The suspected site of the planned IRA car bomb attack in Gibraltar
photo : www.gibnew.net (http://www.gibnew.net)

Those overseeing the operation made the decision that the parked Renault probably contained a bomb. Once the identities of the 3 suspected IRA members had been positively confirmed the local police chief signed over control of the operation to the SAS who were to move in and attempt to arrest the IRA unit.
The SAS troopers were dressed in civilian clothing. They were fitted with covert radios and carried 9mm Browning High Power (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/weapons/browning-high-power.php) pistols concealed beneath their clothing. The SAS team split into groups in order to follow both Savage and McCann and Farrel.
As the SAS teams prepared to move in, a local police officer, caught up in traffic and running late, put on his car's siren. The sound of the siren caused McCann and Farrel to react, glancing around nervously. It was at this moment that McCann reportedly made eye contact with one of the SAS men who were shadowing them, not much more than ten meters away. According to the trooper's account, he drew his pistol and was about to issue a challenge when McCann made a move with his hand across the front of his jacket. Fearing the IRA man was either going for his own gun or for the car bomb's remote detonator, the SAS man opened fire at once. McCann went down, hit with several shots. Farrel was said to have gone for something in her bag, resulting in her also being shot. A split-second after the initial engagement, a second SAS man had drawn his pistol and shot both McCann and Farrel.
Further down the road Savage, alerted by the sound of the shooting, turned and was issued a challenge by the other 2 SAS troopers who had their pistols trained on him. According to the SAS men's statements Savage ignored the challenge and moved to reach inside his jacket. He was killed by a volley of shots as both SAS troopers opened fire on him.
As police cars approached the scene of the shootings, the SAS put on Berets and arm-bands to identify themselves.
Aftermath
Praise over what was at first seen as a highly successful mission to stop a terrorist attrocity quickly turned into controversy. It transpired that none of the 3 IRA members had been armed and no remote bomb trigger was found. Furthermore the Renault that Savage had parked in town contained no explosives.
What was now seen by some as a summary execution by the Army of unarmed terrorists was a propaganda coup for the IRA.
A bomb full of explosives and linked to the IRA trio was eventually found in Spain. It's now thought that Savage had been using the Renault to reserve the spot for the actual car bomb to be later parked in.
A subsequent inquest found that it was technically possible for the IRA cell to have remotely triggered a car bomb from the location of the shootings.
The families of the Savage, McCann and Farrel took the case to the European Court of Human Rights. In 1995 the court found that the British Government had violated Article 2 of the Convention. It also ruled that the three had been engaged in an act of terrorism, and consequently dismissed unanimously the applicants’ claims for damages and costs.

mshnell
02-26-2010, 11:10 PM
Counter Sniper Operations - Northern Ireland
Between 1990 and 1997 an IRA sniper team operating in South Armagh, Northern Ireland, killed 7 soldiers and 2 policemen before a joint SAS and 14 Company operation put a stop to their reign of terror.


Following intelligence that the IRA were using farms as bases of operations / weapons caches, the Police, assisted by Army intelligence operatives, began a series of surveillance and search operations. A farm complex by the village of Crossmaglen in South Armagh fell under suspicion and was put under surveillance. A Mazda 626 car from the farm complex was also put under surveillance via attached hidden tracking devices.
In February 1997, British soldier, Stephen Restorick, was shot at a Crossmaglen Vehicle Checkpoint (VCP) by a large caliber bullet. 14 Company had been electronically tracking the Mazda and had realised that it had been stationary and in range at the time of the shooting. A subsequent close reconnaissance of the Mazda confirmed that it had been adapted for use as a mobile sniper platform. These modifications included a sliding armoured plate in the boot, through which the rifle could be aimed and fired, the gunman laying hidden within the car.
The IRA sniper unit used a Mazda 626, like the one pictured above, as a mobile shooting platform
The.50 caliber Barrett Light Fifty fired rounds that could penetrate body armour from a long distance away.

The Army's 14 Intelligence Company (http://www.eliteukforces.info/the-det/) (the DET) began a painstaking intelligence gathering operation to ascertain the identities of the snipers and locate their weapon. Hidden cameras were secreted around the suspect farm. Over a period of several weeks, the identities of the IRA cell were established and they were all closely monitored.
On the 10th of April, 1997, 4 IRA suspects were observed preparing the Mazda for an operation. It was decided to move in and arrest the team. An SAS unit drove at high speed into the farm complex aboard a transit van, leaped out and arrested the 4 IRA men at gunpoint. The sniper rifle, a .50 caliber Barrett (L82a1) (http://www.eliteukforces.info/weapons/barrett/) was found hidden in the roof of a horsebox. Supplies of ammunition for the weapon were also discovered.
The men arrested, Micheal Caraher, Bernard McGinn, Seamus McArdle, and Martin Mines were convicted of various terrorist offenses but were later released early under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement.
« SAS operations (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/sas-operations/)

mshnell
02-26-2010, 11:13 PM
http://www.stuff.themutual.net/ni.htm

mshnell
02-26-2010, 11:27 PM
from Wikipedia

111852

111851

Robert Nairac31 August 1948 – 15 May 1977Place of birthMauritius (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius)Place of deathRepublic of Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Ireland)Allegiancehttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svgdotpng (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) United Kingdom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom)Service/branchhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Flag_of_the_British_Army.svg/23px-Flag_of_the_British_Army.svgdotpng (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_of_the_British_Army.svg) British Army (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Army)Years of service1972 – 1977RankCaptain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_(OF-2))UnitGrenadier Guards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grenadier_Guards)Battles/warsOperation Banner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Banner)AwardsGeorge Cross (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cross)Captain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_(OF-2)) Robert Laurence Nairac GC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cross) (31 August 1948–15 May 1977) was a British Army (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Army) officer who was abducted and killed by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provisional_Irish_Republican_Army) (PIRA). He was posthumously awarded the George Cross (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cross).
Background

Nairac was born in Mauritius (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius). His family name originates from the Gironde (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gironde) area of France (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France). His father was an eye surgeon who worked first in the north of England (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England) and then in Gloucester (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloucester). He was the youngest of four children, with 2 sisters and a brother.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-0)
Nairac, aged 10, attended prep school at Gilling Castle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilling_Castle), a feeder school for the Roman Catholic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Catholic) public school (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_school_(UK)) Ampleforth College (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampleforth_College) which he attended a year later. He gained nine O levels and three A levels, was head of his house and played rugby for the school. He became friends with the sons of Lord Killanin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Morris,_3rd_Baron_Killanin) and went to stay with the family in Dublin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin) and Spiddal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiddal) in County Galway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Galway).[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-1)
He read medieval and military history at Lincoln College, Oxford (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_College,_Oxford), and excelled in sport; he played for the Oxford rugby 2nd XV and revived the Oxford boxing club where he won 4 blues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_(university_sport)) in bouts with Cambridge. During this time he was in a boxing competition which placed him against Martin Meehan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Meehan_(Irish_republican)), later a senior IRA commander, with whom he went three rounds. He was also a falconer, keeping a bird in his room which was used in the film Kes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kes).[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-2)
He left Oxford in 1971 to enter Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Military_Academy_Sandhurst) under the sponsorship of the Grenadier Guards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grenadier_Guards) and was commissioned (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commissioned_officer) with them upon graduation.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-3)[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-4)[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-5) After Sandhurst he undertook post-graduate studies at Dublin University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin_University), before joining his regiment.[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-6)
Nairac has been described by former army colleagues as "a committed Roman Catholic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Catholic)"[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-7) and as having "a strong Catholic belief".[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-8)
Military career in Northern Ireland

Nairac's first tour of duty in Northern Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Ireland) was with No.1 Company, the Second Battalion of the Grenadier Guards. The Battalion was stationed in Belfast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast) from 5 July 1973 to 31 October 1973. The Grenadiers were given responsibility first for the Protestant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestant) Shankill Road (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shankill_Road) area and then the predominantly Catholic Ardoyne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardoyne) area. This was a time of high tension and regular contacts with paramilitaries. The battalion's two main objectives were to search for weapons and to find paramilitaries. Nairac was frequently involved in such activity on the streets of Belfast. He was also a volunteer in community relations activities in the Ardoyne sports club. The battalion's tour was adjudged a success with 58 weapons, 9,000 rounds of ammunition and 693 lbs of explosive taken and 104 men jailed. The battalion took no casualties and had no occasion to shoot anyone. After his tour had ended he stayed on as Liaison officer for the replacement battalion, the 1st Battalion of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argyll_and_Sutherland_Highlanders). The new battalion suffered a baptism of fire with Nairac narrowly avoiding death on their first patrol when a car bomb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_bomb) exploded on the Crumlin Road (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Crumlin_Road&action=edit&redlink=1).[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-9)
Rather than returning to his battalion, which was due for rotation to Hong Kong (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong), Nairac volunteered for military intelligence duties in Northern Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Ireland). Following completion of several training courses, he returned to Northern Ireland in 1974 attached to 4 Field Survey Troop, Royal Engineers, one of the three sub-units of a Special Duties unit known as 14 Intelligence Company (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/14_Intelligence_Company) (14 Int). Posted to South Armagh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armagh), 4 Field Survey Troop was given the task of performing surveillance duties. Nairac was the liaison officer among the unit, the local Army brigade, and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Ulster_Constabulary).[11] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-10)
However, he also seems to have taken on tasks which were outside his jurisdiction as a liaison officer – working undercover, for example. He apparently claimed to have visited pubs in republican strongholds and sung Irish rebel songs and acquired the nickname "Danny boy". He was often driven to pubs by now-Conservative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservative_Party_(UK)) MP Patrick Mercer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Mercer), who was then an Army officer.[12] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-11) Former SAS officer Ken Connor, who was involved in the creation of 14 Int, wrote of him in his book, Ghost Force, p.263:
“Had he been an SAS member, he would not have been allowed to operate in the way he did. Before his death we had been very concerned at the lack of checks on his activities. No one seemed to know who his boss was, and he appeared to have been allowed to get out of control, deciding himself what tasks he would do.”Nairac finished his tour with 14th Int in the summer of 1975 and returned to his regiment in London. Nairac was promoted to captain on 4 September 1975.[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-12) Following a rise in violence culminating in the Kingsmill massacre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsmill_massacre), army troop levels were increased and Nairac accepted a post again as a liaison officer back in Northern Ireland.
Colin Wallace, in describing Nairac as a Military Intelligence Liaison Officer (MILO) said "his duties did not involve agent handling". Nevertheless, Nairac "seems to have had close links with the Mid-Ulster UVF, including Robin Jackson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Jackson) and Harris Boyle". According to Wallace , "he could not have carried out this open association without official approval, because otherwise he would have been transferred immediately from Northern Ireland" [14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-13) Wallace wrote in 1975; Nairac was on his fourth tour of duty in 1977.
Robin Jackson was implicated in the Dublin and Monaghan bombings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin_and_Monaghan_bombings) of May 1974, and Harris Boyle was blown up by his own bomb during the Miami Showband massacre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_Showband_massacre), in which Nairac was also alleged to have participated.
Nairac on his fourth tour was a liaison officer to the units based at Bessbrook (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessbrook) mill. It was during this time that he was killed.
Shooting by the PIRA

On the evening of 14 May 1977, Nairac arrived at the The Three Steps pub in Drumintee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drumintee), South Armagh, by car, alone. He is said to have told regulars of the pub that his name was Danny McErlaine, a member of the Official IRA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Official_IRA) from the republican Ardoyne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardoyne) area in north Belfast.[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-14) Witnesses say that he got up and sang a song with the band who were playing that night. At around 11.45 p.m., he was abducted following a struggle in the pub's car park and taken across the border into the Republic of Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Ireland) to a field in Ravensdale, County Louth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Louth). Following a violent interrogation that lasted for over an hour, Nairac was shot dead. He did not admit to his true identity at any time.
Terry McCormick, one of Nairac's abductors, posed as a priest in order to try to elicit information by way of Nairac's confession (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confession#Catholicism). Nairac's last words according to McCormick were: 'Bless me Father, for I have sinned'. [16] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-15)
An edition of Spotlight (NI) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotlight_(NI)) broadcast on June 19th, 2007, claimed that his body was not destroyed in a meat grinder (as is widely believed). McCormick, who has been on the run in America for thirty years because of his involvement in the killing (including being the first to attack Nairac in the car park), was told by a senior IRA commander that it was buried on farmland, unearthed by animals, and reburied elsewhere. The location of the body's resting place remains a mystery.[17] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-16) Nairac is one of nine IRA victims, whose graves have never been revealed and who are collectively known as 'The Disappeared' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disappeared#Northern_Ireland.27s_.22Troubles.22). The cases are under review by the Independent Commission for the Location of Victims' Remains (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_Commission_for_the_Location_of_Victims%27_Remains).
Events after Nairac's death

In November 1977, Liam Townson, a 24-year-old PIRA member from the village of Meigh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meigh) outside Newry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newry) was convicted of Nairac's murder. Townson was the son of an Englishman who had married a local Meath girl. He confessed to killing Nairac and implicated other members of the gang involved. Townson made two admissible confessions to Gardaí (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garda%C3%AD) officers. The first was made around the time of his arrest, it started with "I shot the British captain. He never told us anything. He was a great soldier." The second statement was made at Dundalk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dundalk) police station after Townson had consulted a solicitor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solicitor). He had become hysterical and distressed and screamed a confession to the officer in charge of the investigation.[18] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-17)
Townson was convicted in Dublin's Special Criminal Court (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Criminal_Court) of Nairac's murder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder) and sentenced to life imprisonment. Townson served 13 years in prison and was released in 1990.
In 1978, the RUC arrested five men from the South Armagh area. Three of them - Gerard Fearon, 21, Thomas Morgan, 18, and Daniel O'Rourke, 33 - were jointly charged with Nairac's murder. Michael McCoy, 20, was charged with kidnapping (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnap), and Owen Rocks, 22, was accused of withholding information. Fearon and Morgan were convicted of Nairac's murder. O'Rourke was acquitted but found guilty of manslaughter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manslaughter) and jailed for ten years. McCoy was jailed for five years and Rocks for two.
Two other men, Terry McCormick and Pat Maguire, wanted in connection with this incident remain on the run.[19] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-18)
In May 2000 allegations were made claiming that Nairac had married, and fathered a child with a woman named Nel Lister. (Also known as Oonagh Flynn, or Oonagh Lister). In 2001, DNA testing revealed the allegations to be a hoax [20] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-19)[21] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-20)
Criminal case

On 20 May 2008, 57-year-old IRA veteran Kevin Crilly of Jonesborough, County Armagh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonesborough,_County_Armagh) was arrested at his home by officers of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_Service_of_Northern_Ireland). He had been on the run in the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) but had returned to Northern Ireland under an alias after the 1998 Belfast Agreement (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast_Agreement). He was charged the following day with the kidnapping (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnap) and false imprisonment (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_imprisonment) of Nairac. [22] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-21) In November 2009, Crilly was also charged with the murder of Robert Nairac at Newry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newry) magistrates' court during a bail hearing on the two counts on which he had been charged in 2008.[23] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-rte-murder-charge-22) Though the prosecution objected, bail was granted on the grounds that Crilly had met all requirements for bail since his arrest in 2008.[23] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-rte-murder-charge-22)
George Cross award

On 13 February 1979, Nairac was posthumously awarded the George Cross (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cross).
Captain Nairac's posthumous (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posthumous_recognition) George Cross citation reads, in part:[24] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Nairac#cite_note-23)
“[...] On his fourth tour Captain Nairac was a Liaison Officer at Headquarters 3 Infantry Brigade. His task was connected with surveillance operations.
On the night of 14/15 May 1977 Captain Nairac was abducted from a village in South Armagh by at least seven men. Despite his fierce resistance he was overpowered and taken across the border into the nearby Republic of Ireland where he was subjected to a succession of exceptionally savage assaults in an attempt to extract information which would have put other lives and future operations at serious risk. These efforts to break Captain Nairac's will failed entirely. Weakened as he was in strength-though not in spirit-by the brutality, he yet made repeated and spirited attempts to escape, but on each occasion was eventually overpowered by the weight of the numbers against him. After several hours in the hands of his captors Captain Nairac was callously murdered by a gunman of the Provisional Irish Republican Army who had been summoned to the scene. His assassin subsequently said 'He never told us anything'.
Captain Nairac's exceptional courage and acts of the greatest heroism in circumstances of extreme peril showed devotion to duty and personal courage second to none

timetraveller
02-27-2010, 08:00 PM
Respect to the 22

timetraveller
02-27-2010, 08:09 PM
The times I was over in NI .. it was kinda surreal seeing the area's of difference ... and the placards of the straving crew .. placed on boths sides of the road when I visted Londonderry and that place I shall never forget the view from my hotel room .. and the walk through centre and the heavy growls I got when I come across a stall selling scum gear ..

And the taxi driver asking what I thought of the walls and his reply " we'd blow the ... .ing things up "

rgjbloke
02-28-2010, 11:53 AM
Patrick Mercer MP wrote an account of Robert Nairac's last day or two before he was murdered.

"I was with him the night before he was killed. I drove him to a rough cellar bar in Crossmaglen. He handed me his Wingmaster pump-action shotgun and radio and went inside, despite the fact the Army was banned from going there because it would have been seen as inflammatory."

I remember the bar because there was only one cellar bar in Crossmaglen. For some reason, when we were patrolling the village, I always seemed to get sent into the bars to try and suss out some of the locals. The first time I visited the cellar bar, I was asking the barmaid some questions and when she spoke back to me, I was rather bemused by the fact that she had a broad Brummie accent. I asked her where she came from and she confirmed she was from Birmingham and she also told me that she was married to the owner of the bar. It was an almost almost surreal situation chatting in hard core Crossmaglen to a girl from Birmingham, not that she had much to say to this then very young Royal Green Jacket. It was also strange over thirty years later reading Mercer's account of Robert Nairac's last day or so alive and realising I knew the bar he was talking about.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1227861/PATRICK-MERCER-MP-I-Robert-Nairac-night-IRA-killed--justice-done.html#ixzz0gqTesTCh

mshnell
02-28-2010, 07:05 PM
THe SAS In Northern Ireland - A History

Part one : the 70s

The SAS's controversial involvement in the Northern Ireland Troubles began in 1973 and mostly took the form of small teams/individuals advising regular units.
1973 - 14 Intelligence Company
Following a series of controversial incidents involving the Mobile Reconnaissance Force (MRF), the SAS are tasked with setting up a new undercover unit for surveillance operations in Northern Ireland, which becomes known as 14 Intelligence Company, or the Det. A special training wing of the SAS selects and trains candidates for 14 Company. SAS officers form much of the command staff.
more info on 14 Intelligence Company » (http://www.eliteukforces.info/the-det/)

1976 - Official Deployment
With the crisis in Northern Ireland worsening, the then British Prime minister, Harold Wilson publicly announces that the Special Air Service are to be formally deployed to Ulster. In many ways, the Regiment, with its tendency to rely on aggression and heavy firepower, is seen by many as un-suited for the rather delicate task of policing the troubles.

In January, 1976 a 12-man troop of SAS is deployed to Bessbrook, the scene of a recent terrorist attack on a bus. The deployment is publicized, placing the usually-secretive SAS in the public glare and in the center of politics. This initial deployment is soon bolstered by all of D squadron. The initial role of the squadron is surveillance and intelligence gathering, usually by way of foot patrols and covert observation positions (OPs). As with the counter-terrorist role, A,B,D & G squadrons would subsequently rotate in and out of Northern Ireland deployment on a 4-6 month schedule.

March 1976
Suspected IRA commander, Sean Mckenna, is abducted from his home in Eire by the SAS and dropped across the border where he is promptly arrested by a regular army unit.

April 1976
Another suspected IRA man, Peter Cleary, was arrested by an SAS team who had been manning OPs overlooking his house. Cleary is killed by the SAS during an alleged attempt to escape custody.

May 1976
An SAS team in an unmarked car 'stray' across the border and are arrested by Irish police. 2 further SAS cars full of armed troopers are also apprehended, in a controversial and politically embarrassing incident.

April 1977
Acting on a tip-off, the SAS ambush and kill IRA man, Seamus Harvey, and engage but fail to capture several of his accomplices.

Febuary 1978
The SAS ambush a 2-man IRA team as they attempt to access a weapons cache in a County Tyrone farm. Paul Duffy is killed. The other terrorist is wounded but manages to drive away.

June 1978
A 4-man IRA team attempt to firebomb Ballysillan Post Office depot. A joint SAS/RUC team had been tipped-off about the IRA operation and, as the 3 of the IRA men approached the target, an ambush was sprung. All 3 IRA men were killed. 2 innocent bystanders came onto the scene and were challenged by the SAS. One of these men, William Hanna was shot dead when he ran from the challenge.

July 1978
In a tragic turn of events, a local teenage boy, John Boyle, discovers an IRA arms cache in churchyard in Dunloy, County Antrim. The police soon learn of the discovery and the SAS set up covert OPs to watch the cache. Early on the morning of the 11th, Boyle returns to the cache, presumably full of curiosity of what he had previously found. Mistaking him for IRA, a 2-man SAS OP team open fire and killed the boy. The human tragedy aside, the incident was a propaganda bonanza for Sinn Fein, the IRA's political wing. The 2 SAS soldiers are eventually tried and acquitted.


Part two : the 80s

1980s - The Group
In the early 80s, Special forces in Northern Ireland are restructured. Rather than an entire squadron, a smaller troop of around 20 SAS men would deploy for year-long tours. They are organized, along with 14 int, under the umbrella command of Intelligence and Security Group (NI) or Int & Sy Group, or just 'The Group'. The longer tours mean that the SAS men can acquire better local knowledge than those who were in the 6 month squadron rotation. The Special Projects anti-terrorist team at Hereford are put on-call to provide reinforcement to the NI troop if necessary.
May 1980
When an IRA team are cornered in a Belfast residential neighborhood, an SAS unit move in in unmarked cars. The SAS storm the wrong house and the IRA are able to engage the SAS with an M-60 machine gun, mounted in a bedroom window. SAS caption Richard Westmacott was killed as his SAS team exit their vehicle. Soon after, the IRA team surrenders to regular units.
September 1980
The SAS arrest 2 IRA men as they attempt to retrieve weapons from a hidden cache in County Tyrone. The weapons had been 'jarked' (made-inert) by army specialists and the 2 IRA men are arrested without shots fired.

January 1981
Sinn Fein politician, Bernadette McAliskey and her husband are shot by Loyalist gunmen at their home in Coalisland. It later transpires that an SAS OP was watching the house but did not arrest the gunmen until after they had carried out the shooting.

March 1981
Following a painstaking surveillance operation by 14 int, 4 IRA men surrender to the SAS when they are surrounded in a farmhouse.

December 1981
The SAS ambush 3 IRA men as they go to fetch a cache of firearms from a hedgerow near Coalisland. 3 Covert SAS OPs are put in around the cache, following a tip-off by an informer. The 3 IRA members arrive by car. 1 stays with the car as the 2 other men go to the cache. The SAS challenge the 2 men as soon as they have their hands on the cached weapons. Opening fire, the SAS kill Col McGirr outright and fatally wound Brian Campbell. The other IRA man flees the scene. Even though he drives through an SAS cut-off unit who open fire at the car, he manages to escape. His shot-up and blood-stained car is later found some distance away. At least one of the members of the cut-off unit is subsequently RTU'D (returned to unit) for failing to stop the escape.
July 1984
Tipped about a planned IRA attack on a kitchen fittings factory in Ardboe, Tyrone, an SAS unit set up an ambush. Following a challenge, the SAS open fire, wounding one man who is pursued into a field and shot dead. 2 other IRA men are arrested at the scene whilst a fourth escapes.

October 1984
Special Branch receive a tip-off about IRA plans to kill an off-duty Ulster Defense Regiment (UDR) man near Dungannon as he drove past a road junction that opened into a haulage yard. The SAS set up OPs and cut-off or stop-groups around the suspected ambush area. Several SAS lay in wait in unmarked 'Q' cars. On the morning of the 18th, an IRA unit hijacks a van which it plans to use in the attack. As the van drove into the ambush area, the SAS attempted to block its way but the van pushed through. The SAS opened fire at the van. Frederick Jackson, an innocent bystander, was driving out of the haulage yard and was struck by a single round. He later died from his wound. An SAS Q car gives chase to the van, its occupants firing through the windscreen with HK53s and an IRA gunman returning fire out the back of the van with a G3 assault rifle. Despite the SAS hot on its tail, the IRA gunmen manages to escape.

December 1984
On the night of the 1st of December, following a tip-off about a planned IRA bomb ambush, 2 Q cars carrying SAS begin looking for a Toyota van believed to be involved. Spotting a suspicious van, the 2 cars form a road block at both ends of the road where the van is parked. Unbeknownst to one 3-man SAS team, they had stop right next to where an IRA unit were preparing a roadside bomb, behind a hedge. The IRA men open fire on the armed SAS men as they de-buss and approach the van. The hail of gunfire kills SAS Lance-Corporal Alistair Slater. The IRA gunmen then make a run for it across the fields. The SAS fire a flare and return fire but 2 of the gunmen escape across the border. A third islater found drowned in a river. A fourth IRA man who had been with the Toyota van is shot and killed by the SAS - a controversial act as he is found to be unarmed.

December 1984
Following a tip-off about IRA plans to kill a UDR reservist who worked at Gransha hospital in Londonderry, the SAS, along with 14 Company and Special Branch, put the area under surveillance. The undercover soldiers wait in unmarked 'Q' cars for the IRA to make their move. After several nights of patient surveillance, on the night of December 6th, the soldiers spot 2 IRA men on a motorcycle enter the hospital grounds. Seeing the pistol in the pinion passenger's hand, a Q car rams into the motorbike, causing him to to fall off. As the motorbike rider attempts to ride off, 3 soldiers engage both him and his fallen passenger with Browning pistols, HKMP5ks and HK53 carbines. Once the firing ceases, the 2 IRA men, Daniel Doherty and William Flemming lay dead.

Febuary 1985
A 3-man SAS OP is set up overlooking a suspected IRA arms cache near Strabane. On the night of the 23rd, 3 IRA men, returning from a fruitless hunt for an ambush target, head to return their assault rifles, petrol bombs and anti-armour grenades to the cache. The SAS engage them with their HK53 carbines, killing all 3.

February 1986
The SAS shoot dead a man handling a weapon from a cache located in the garden of a house in Toomebridge. It later transpires that neither the man shot, or the 2 other men who had driven him to the cache were IRA or INLA. It is speculated that they might have been coerced by the Provos into retrieving the weapons due to suspicions that the Army had the cache under observation.

April 1986
An IRA bomb is discovered by a regular army patrol. A 4-man SAS OP is put in place overlooking the command wire running to the bomb. On the night of the 26th, 2 armed IRA men approach the position. The SAS engage the 2 men, killing Seamus McElwaine and injuring Sean Lynch.

1987 Loughall
Acting on intelligence received, the SAS ambush an IRA active service unit as it attacks Loughgall Police Station.
more info on the Loughgall operation » (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/sas-operations/loughgall/)

1988 Gibralta
In its first action against the IRA outside of Ulster, the SAS shoot dead an IRA Active Service Unit on the streets of Gibralta.
more info on the SAS Gibraltar operation » (http://www.eliteukforces.info/special-air-service/sas-operations/sas-gibraltar/)
August 1988
3 IRA men are ambushed and killed by an SAS unit near the town of Drumnakilly, County Tyrone. The IRA Active Service Unit (ASU) was attempting to gun down an off-duty UDR as he repaired his broken down lorry. The UDR man was in fact an SAS trooper and the breakdown was designed to lure the IRA unit into an attack. Intel received had warned the security services of the planned attempt on the UDR man's life. When the IRA ASU were observed retrieving weapons from a hidden cache, the plan to bait them into an attack was put into place. As the IRA unit drove up to the scene of the breakdown, 1 gunman leant out of the car window, firing an AK47 towards the SAS man, who dove for cover behind a gate post. 8 SAS men, some secreted in the hedgerows, armed with G3 rifles, others manning a GPMG situated in a derelict farm building, opened fire on the IRA men. Up to 236 shots were reportedly fired during the operation. The IRA team, Gerard Harte, Martin Harte and Brian Mullin were all killed.

goat89
02-28-2010, 07:15 PM
^I actually heard of the August '88... didnt know they were attached to the 14th Int then. Talk about a trap. ><

mshnell
02-28-2010, 07:24 PM
112076 The Hurt Locker it ain't.

goat89
02-28-2010, 07:25 PM
112076 The Hurt Locker it ain't.
The one pic that reminds me of the Troubles for years to come... I saw it in Black and White though. Any1 know the story behind this?

mshnell
03-01-2010, 08:34 PM
Overview of Loughgall ambush site.112165

Loken
03-01-2010, 08:50 PM
Amusing enough it was alleged that one of the provos killed in the ambush Tony Gormley was an Informant. Would it be surprising? No. What has stopped every Irish bid for 'freedom'? The Informant/supergrass/whatever you want. They're always infiltrated.

razorback 7.62x51
02-08-2012, 09:27 PM
Is there a SAS thread?


The SAS or Special Air Service was originally a Special Forces unit of the British Army. Many countries have adopted the name, insignia, and training originally developed for the British SAS. These include Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), Australia, New Zealand, and others.
Post post post.

razorback 7.62x51
02-08-2012, 09:30 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCMUlYy1CZY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1I3FVlCUvfc&amp;feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8Y0oWLLSVI&amp;feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncTCzcybkdg&amp;feature=related

digrar
02-09-2012, 10:28 PM
Is there a SAS thread?


The SAS or Special Air Service was originally a Special Forces unit of the British Army. Many countries have adopted the name, insignia, and training originally developed for the British SAS. These include Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), Australia, New Zealand, and others.
Post post post.


40 pages. http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?139509-Post-your-Aussie-SASR-4RAR-2CDO-1CDO-SOTG-pics-in-here
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?2753-New-Zealand-SAS
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?3903-22-sas

Along with the image thread for 22 that your thread has been merged into.

razorback 7.62x51
02-09-2012, 10:35 PM
Merged why.

digrar
02-09-2012, 10:43 PM
Because we need another SAS thread like we need a hole in the head. Australia has a big thread already, there were already three Brit SAS threads and there is a Kiwi thread. You're not a unique snowflake, you don't need your own SAS thread.

razorback 7.62x51
02-09-2012, 11:17 PM
All I did was ask why I dont need the insults.

razorback 7.62x51
02-09-2012, 11:45 PM
1 of 4 episodes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmt0EYL9-7o

Ravage
02-10-2012, 03:51 AM
I've seen CIA members with no PERSEC posted here (they still are). It looks like people no longer give a fcuk about their safetyReally?...........
Here's a joke for yaTheres this place right, called Britain right, and in it there are these people, called soldiersHeres the punch linenone of them carry a sign saying 'I'm in the SAS'None of them walk around with a permenant black mark in front of their eyesThere are also these other people (about 59/60 million of them)who couldn't give a ****.He looks strangely enough, like a man in his 20's - 40's medium build medium height, there does happen to be quite a few million other people fitting the same description.In the US I believe its called PERSECdoes this photo give you his name?NoDoes this photo give you his address?NoDoes this photo even confirm that this man is in the SAS?NoIf someone wanted to kill some SAS would they search the net for photo's?Or the pubs in Hereford?Or better yet sit outside their barracks and watch who comes out?use a bit of common sense please, I know its in short supply these days.

kayaker
02-10-2012, 07:59 AM
Class..! It doesn't take a rocket surgeon to open google maps and find the Hereford Hooligans' base.

wwjs
02-10-2012, 08:25 AM
Really?...........
What I just said?

Royal
02-10-2012, 08:31 AM
Drop it children...

Ravage
02-10-2012, 05:37 PM
Lies, all lies.

No its not!


www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&amp;v=THKseIq5xBY#t=466s

wwjs
02-10-2012, 06:16 PM
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?64604-MPnet-s-Fire-Support-Base-Vengeance-Dry-Mess-amp-Canteen

razorback 7.62x51
02-10-2012, 11:21 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x57XJWmlfp4
1/4

lopez
02-14-2012, 05:10 PM
Hey guys apologies for interruption.

I have a related question that I feel doesnt deserve its own thread.


I am having a (heated) discussion with an acquaintance of mine (read individual of limited intelligence) who is of the opionion that Nigel 'Spud' Ely is a walt. In so much as that he believes Spud was never in the SAS. All because he cant find a picture of him wearing an SAS beret. Anyone here care to rubbish that claim? Or even better provide a publicly avalable pic of Spud with a Sandy berry atop of his head.

I don't believe it.


Thanks in advance

gaz
02-14-2012, 05:15 PM
He's the guy that nicked Saddam's ****? It was pretty widely reported in the mainstream press that he was in the SAS, I imagine if he was full of **** somebody would have outed him by now.

wwjs
02-14-2012, 05:17 PM
http://www.specialforcesroh.com/image-3761.html

deagle
02-15-2012, 12:22 AM
Hey guys apologies for interruption.

I have a related question that I feel doesnt deserve its own thread.


I am having a (heated) discussion with an acquaintance of mine (read individual of limited intelligence) who is of the opionion that Nigel 'Spud' Ely is a walt. In so much as that he believes Spud was never in the SAS. All because he cant find a picture of him wearing an SAS beret. Anyone here care to rubbish that claim? Or even better provide a publicly avalable pic of Spud with a Sandy berry atop of his head.

I don't believe it.


Thanks in advance

if you really wanted to prove authenticity, just ask what color was the boathouse at hereford