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Thread: Beautiful submarines

  1. #586

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    Thanks Jetsetter for that type21. Very nice. Do you have any of the mod type 21 Wilhelm Bauer?
    Last edited by greenman407; 07-26-2011 at 04:09 PM.

  2. #587

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    Here we are with a few Charlies
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  3. #588

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    Ok, Here we go with some more Fleet boat related stuff.
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  4. #589

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    Perry9, thanks for those rare, rare Alpha pictures!!!

  5. #590
    Junior Member FireChief's Avatar
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    #1. [SIZE=2]Bow on view of Remora (SS-487) coming alongside a destroyer. (She had both the GUPPY II & III conversions - seen as a GUPPY II here - Later went to the Greek Navy)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#2 Cutlass (SS-478) at Genoa Italy, 29 June 1968 (GUPPY II - went to the Taiwaneese Navy)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#3 Spanish Navy SNS Isaac Peral (S-32) (ex-USS Ronquil SS-396 GUPPY IIA Type) served in Spanish Navy 1971 - 1987
    [/SIZE][SIZE=2]#4 Odax (SS-484) surfaced and underway circa 1947-51 (The first GUPPY I boat - no snorkel and only one periscope)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#5 [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Sea Robin's (SS-407) overhaul at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 1967-68 (GUPPY IA Type)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#6 Atule (SS-403) at the Charleston Yard, 1966. (GUPPY IA Type) *Strange pic, it appears ATULE is actually behind the sub kicking up the spray and it looks like a GUPPY III boat, NOTICE the 'PUFFS' sonar on the bow - ATULE was a IA - she didn't have them)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#7 Volador (SS-490) sporting the MK44 torpedo through her sail courtesy of the King (DLG-10) in August 1960 (GUPPY II Type here - later was converted to GUPPY III and went to Italian Navy) (DAMN! Would like to her the story on this one!)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#8 Bow on view of Remora (SS-487) departing Mare Island on 20 Oct 1947. She was departing for initial sea trials after her Guppy II conversion at Mare Island which ran from 14 Feb to 18 Nov 1947[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#9 Grampus (SS-523) with a fiberglass deficiency at the Norfolk Navy Yard for overhaul, circa mid 1960's. (GUPPY II Type - later went to the Brazilian Navy)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#10 The Sabalo (SS-302) comes to the aid of the Stickleback (SS-415) after being rammed by Silverstein (DE-534) off Honolulu, HI, 30 May 1958 (Sabalo was a FLEET SNORKEL MOD - Stickleback was a GUPPY IIA)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#11 Starboard stern view of the Volador (SS-490) in San Francisco Bay, 11 December 1965 (GUPPY III Conversion)[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]#12 Volador (SS-490) in drydock at Hunters Point August 61. Still a GUPPY-II at the time, just before hull was cut open at Control/Forward Battery bulkhead,slid apart 15' and a new hull section added on the Control side[/SIZE]

  6. #591
    Senior Member Halidon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireChief View Post
    [SIZE=2]#7 Volador (SS-490) sporting the MK44 torpedo through her sail courtesy of the King (DLG-10) in August 1960 (GUPPY II Type here - later was converted to GUPPY III and went to Italian Navy) (DAMN! Would like to her the story on this one!)[/SIZE]
    They were participating in an ASW exercise and bad conditions plus a cheeky technician came together to put a fish in Volador's sail:
    http://www.uss-king.com/oddities.shtml
    email to Webmaster from Dave Nesbitt:

    October 21, 2004

    To amplify what was written; the torpedo was a Mk 44 (not 46). Normally the Mk 44 had cut-off switches in it to prevent the torpedo from striking the sub and it had a limited run time. Our torpedo was slightly different, we had a NOSOPAC Technician onboard at the time that asked the question; "that sub is rigged for impact, isn't it?". When he got an affirmative response, he went into the torpedo and bypassed the cut-off switches and while he was there, he extended the run-time by 3 additional minutes.

    We had all kinds of problems that day, the sonar kept breaking down, the sonar conditions were poor, we could not hold contact on the sub except at close range. ASROC required a minimum range of 1000 yds, so when we would open up to a 1000 yds, we would lose contact. With these poor ranges and problems with sonar, Capt. Bustard was getting slightly impatient, and would call down to sonar frequently to give us words of encouragement (LOL).

    Finally, in desperation we picked up the sub on one ping, beyond a 1000 yds, and immediately started feeding the information to the computer, by the third ping the computer had a solution, we fired the ASROC on the fourth ping, and on the fifth ping the sonar broke down! We had announced to the Valador that we had a torpedo (BLOOD HOUND) in the water and a few minutes later the sub reported that he had heard nothing of our torpedo. A few seconds later he called to say he was coming to the surface "Emergency" and believed he had our torpedo on-board! The rest is history.

  7. #592
    Junior Member FireChief's Avatar
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    Thanks Halidon, interesting reading.

    Since reading that I have found that in the early days of the MK.44 torpedo, accidents like that weren't that 'rare' as you would expect them to be.

    Here is a photo of the USS GRAMPUS SS-523 taken in the 1960's. If you will note the red arrow on the pic it points to a good sized "Dent" in the after casing behind the engine exhausts that was caused by a "rogue" torpedo that was suposed to be set to go under the sub during the exercise but homed right in on it's target like it was built to. Good thing they made them tough back in the good old days.



    Another pic of VOLADOR with her "extra" equipment

  8. #593
    Senior Member xav's Avatar
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    Thnaks for sharing.

    WTF was a japanese sub doing in France in 1943 ?

  9. #594
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
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    Keep it up guys! Thank to all of you for these good photos!

  10. #595
    Junior Member FireChief's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xav View Post
    Thnaks for sharing.

    WTF was a japanese sub doing in France in 1943 ?
    Five Japanese submarines set out on "Yanagi" (Exchange) missions to German bases in France to deliver supplies of items the Germans couldn't get in Europe. Not all made the trip or return trip.

    I-30 (Kaidai Junsen Type B1 class): April 1942 (Made it to France, Made Return Trip but hit a mine outside Singapore harbor and sank. Only part of her cargo was salvaged)
    I-30's cargo of 3,300 lb (1,500 kg) of mica and 1,452 lb (659 kg) of shellac was unloaded. They also supplied the Germans with bleprints of the Type 91 aerial torpedo. In return I-30 was fitted with a Metox radar detector and a Flakvierling 38 quad 20 mm AA gun, replacing her Type 96 25 mm AA guns.

    Her return cargo included blueprints of the [*******#0645ad]Würzburg air defense ground radar[/COLOR], five German [*******#0645ad]G7a[/COLOR] and three [*******#0645ad]G7e torpedoes[/COLOR], five Torpedovorhalterechner (torpedo data computers), 240 Bolde sonar countermeasure rounds, rocket and glider bombs, anti-tank guns, a Zeiss anti-aircraft artillery director (fire control system), two hundred 20 mm AA guns, [*******#0645ad]industrial diamonds[/COLOR] valued at one million [*******#0645ad]yen[/COLOR], and fifty [*******#0645ad]Enigma T[/COLOR] coding machines.

    I-8 June 1943 (Junsen Type J-3 class): (Made Round Trip)
    The cargo included two of the famed [*******#0645ad]Type 95 oxygen-propelled torpedoes[/COLOR], torpedo tubes, drawings of an automatic trim system and a new naval reconnaissance plane, the [*******#0645ad]Yokosuka E14Y[/COLOR] 'GLEN', [*******#0b0080]quinine[/COLOR], [*******#0645ad]tin[/COLOR], and raw [*******#0645ad]rubber[/COLOR]. A supplementary crew of 48 men, commanded by Sadatoshi Norita, was also packed into the submarine, intended to man the German submarine ([*******#ba0000]U-1224[/COLOR] a [*******#0645ad]Type IXC/40 U-boat[/COLOR]) and bring her back to Japan for [*******#0645ad]reverse engineering[/COLOR].

    I-8 left Brest on 5 October, with a cargo of German equipment, such as: [*******#0645ad]machine guns[/COLOR], bomb sights, a Daimler-Benz torpedo boat [*******#0645ad]engine[/COLOR], [*******#0645ad]marine chronometers[/COLOR], [*******#0645ad]radars[/COLOR], [*******#0645ad]sonar[/COLOR] equipment, [*******#0645ad]anti-aircraft[/COLOR] [*******#0645ad]gunsights[/COLOR], electric torpedoes, and [*******#0645ad]penicillin[/COLOR]. The submarine also transported Rear Admiral Yokoi, [*******#0645ad]naval attaché[/COLOR] to Berlin since 1940; Captain Hosoya, naval attaché to France since December 1939; three German officers and four radar and [*******#0645ad]hydrophone[/COLOR] technicians.

    I-34 (Kaidai Junsen Type B1 class): November 1943 (Did not make it to France, sunk by British submarine HMS Taurus in the Malacca Straits)
    I-34 loaded a cargo of raw rubber bales, [*******#0645ad]tungsten[/COLOR], tin, [*******#0645ad]quinine[/COLOR], medicinal [*******#0645ad]opium[/COLOR] and samples of the Japanese weapons along with 11 VIP passengers.

    I-29 (Kaidai Junsen Type B1 class): November 1943 (Made it to France, sunk en route back to Japan by the US submarine USS Sawfish SS-276 in the Luzon Strait.)
    At [*******#0645ad]Singapore[/COLOR] she was loaded with 80 tons of raw rubber, 80 tons of tungsten, 50 tons of tin, 2 tons of zinc, and 3 tons of quinine, opium and coffee.

    She left Lorient 16 April 1944 with a cargo of 18 passengers, torpedo boat engines, [*******#0645ad]Enigma[/COLOR] coding machines, radar components, a Walter HWK 509A rocket engine, and [*******#0645ad]Messerschmitt Me 163[/COLOR] & [*******#0645ad]Messerschmitt Me 262[/COLOR] blueprints for the development of the rocket plane Mitsubishi J8M.

    I-52 (Momi (Type C3 class) March 1944 (Did not make it to France, sunk by a TBM Avenger from VC-69 off the USS Bogue, first use of the "Fido" acoustic torpedo.)
    Her cargo from Japan included 9.8 tons of [*******#0645ad]molybdenum[/COLOR], 11 tons of [*******#0645ad]tungsten[/COLOR], 2.2 tons of [*******#0645ad]gold[/COLOR] in 146 bars packed in 49 metal boxes, 3 tons of [*******#0645ad]opium[/COLOR] and 54 kg of [*******#0645ad]caffeine[/COLOR]. The gold was payment for German optical technology. Plus 120 tons of [*******#0645ad]tin[/COLOR] in ingots, 59.8 tons of [*******#0645ad]caoutchouc[/COLOR] (raw rubber) in bales and 3.3 tons of [*******#0b0080]quinine[/COLOR]. She also carried 14 passengers, primarily Japanese technicians, who were to study German technology in anti-aircraft guns, and engines for torpedo boats.

    U-511 (Type IXC): August 1943 (Made trip to Japan)
    U-511's final patrol took her all the way to [*******#0645ad]Japan[/COLOR], as part of the ongoing programme of technological exchange. She had aboard additional personnel, including the German [*******#0645ad]ambassador[/COLOR] to [*******#0645ad]Tokyo[/COLOR], the [*******#0645ad]Japanese[/COLOR] [*******#0645ad]Naval[/COLOR] [*******#0645ad]Attaché[/COLOR] in [*******#0645ad]Berlin[/COLOR], and German scientists and engineers plus misc technical equipment. Leaving Lorient on 10 May 1943 she sailed through the Atlantic and around the [*******#0645ad]Cape of Good Hope[/COLOR] into the [*******#0645ad]Indian Ocean. [*******#000000]The U-boat arrived at [/COLOR][*******#0645ad]Kure, Japan[/COLOR][*******#000000] on 7 August after a voyage lasting 90 days [/COLOR][*******#000000]and was handed over the Japanese Navy[/COLOR][/COLOR][*******#000000] as a gift on 16 September 1943.[/COLOR]

    Kinda of off subject - but several German U-Boats "Monsoon Groups" made the trip to the Pacific and were turned over to the Japanese Navy.

    U-181 Type IXD2 - became I-501
    U-862 Type IXD2 - became I-502
    UIT-24 Type Marcello Class (ex-Italian Comandante Cappellini) - became I-503
    UIT-25 Type Marconi Class (ex-Italian Luigi Torelli) - became I-504
    U-219 Type X - became I-505
    U-195 Type IXD1 - became I-506
    U-511 Type IXC - became RO-500
    U-1224 Type IXC/40 - became RO-501
    [*******#0645ad][/COLOR]
    [*******#0645ad][/COLOR]

  11. #596

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    Firechief, Thanks so much for ID my pictures. I am going back in to my files and renaming them based on your info. However as much as I appreciate it please dont feel obligated to do it unless you want to. Here are some more of the same.
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  12. #597

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    Firechief, That was a lot of research that you did on those Japanese subs. Thanks

  13. #598
    Senior Member Perry_9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xav View Post
    Thnaks for sharing.

    WTF was a japanese sub doing in France in 1943 ?
    After 1914, French navy bought Japanese Submarines and German Submarines. There were French U-boote, yes.

  14. #599
    Senior Member Connaught Ranger's Avatar
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    I will contribute this rare picture that I obtained recently:-



    Submarinul "Delfinul" / Submarine "Dolphin" at Constanta on the Black Sea.

    Romanian Royal Navy 1940.

    Connaught Ranger.
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  15. #600

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    Thank you greenman407!

    Please keep them coming!

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