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Thread: US Civil War Veterans

  1. #1
    Pisswreck
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    Default US Civil War Veterans


    Mt. Morris, PA veterans in front of Civil War Monument: Joseph Ritter 4th from left, Spencer Stevens 6th from left, Basil Lemley 7th from left, Coleman Lewellen, 2nd from right, Elisha Stewart, far right.
    [SIZE=1]http://www.greenepa.net/~mmrc/mmorris/history/historyday2003/



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    This collage was created on Decoration Day, 1915
    [SIZE=1]homepages.rootsweb.com/.../images/oldvets.html[/SIZE]
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    10th Regiment, Uniontown, Pennsylvania.
    Photo taken June 13, 1914.
    [SIZE=1]www.dataoptions.com/Family/civilwar.htm


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    Cannelton, IN
    [SIZE=1]www.cannelton.k12.in.us/.../history.html

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    Co. B 10th Michigan
    The above photo was donated by Ted McKissack relative of Jim Gruet pictured on the right. Although most of these men were from Isabella Co. to the north of Gratiot, Jim Gruet's roots lie in St. Louis, MI.
    [SIZE=1]www.mfhn.com/gratiot/31cwvets.html


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    [FONT=Bookman Old Style, Book Antiqua, Georgia, Arrus BT][SIZE=2]30th Reunion of Company "A" 12th W.Va. Infantry.
    Taken around Memorial Day 1910.[/SIZE][/FONT]
    [SIZE=1]www.lindapages.com/1wvi/1wvi-pics.htm


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    Old courthouse, Wheeling, WV
    [SIZE=1]www.lindapages.com/1wvi/1wvi-pics.htm
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    Civil War Vets Knit in Central Park, 1918




    The Civil War Veterans and Sons of the Union Veterans in parade. The year is unknown.

    Chowan County, Edenton, N.C. June 3, 1908 or 1909
    First row left to right - Josiah Harrell, A. Bateman, Andrew Briggs, William Dorsey Pruden, ___ Holloman, Andrew? J. Ward, W.D. Rea, ___ Potter; second row left to right - George A. Bowen, John Hollowell, Mrs. Louisa Badham (widow of William Badham), Abram T. Bush; third row left to right - John D. Par[r]ish, Joel White, J.M. Deanes, Martin Jones, Thomas Davis Warren, Jeremiah Jones, J.H. Kipps (Blacksburg, VA), William B. Shepard, P.H. Bell, W.T. West, Arthur Collins (Somerset, Washington County), ___ Cittison. Neg. 86-72. Original print owned by Rebecca Warren.

    Lenior County, Kinston, N.C. A Confederate veteran of the battle of Kinston fought on May 8, 1865. Photograph possibly made on May 10, 1920, at dedication ceremonies for a monument commemorating the battle. Photographic print by Mary Grace Canfield. Neg. 79-157. NCC vault VC917 C22, p. 13.

    Lenior County, Kinston, N.C. "Veterans of battle of Kinston." The battle was fought on March 8, 1865. Photograph possibly made on May 10, 1920, at dedication ceremonies for a monument commemorating the battle. Photographic print by Mary Grace Canfield. Neg. 79-442. Mary Grace Canfield Collection (41), board 2.

    Lenior County, Woodington, N.C. Confederate Memorial Day celebration at Woodington Universalist Church, 1920. Photographic print by Mary Grace Canfield. Neg. 79-165. NCC vault VC917 C22, p. 18.

    Macon County, Franklin, N.C. Reunion of Confederate veterans at Franklin about 1905. The photograph was made in front of the courthouse. Neg. 750-nc. Collection 31, series 1.

    Transylvania County, Brevard, N.C. Reunion of Confederate veterans, probably at Brevard, N.C., 1911. Photographic print. Neg. 83-23. FP3-C748-V58.


    "Reunion of Forrest's Guard in Lynchburg,TN" [SIZE=2]Donated by Beth Sarney[/SIZE]

    Moore County, TN

    Moore County, TN

    This picture was taken at Mulberry, Tennessee Confederate Monument in 1909.

    Moore County, TN

    Booneville, TN
    [SIZE=1]Above 6 Pictures from http://www.knology.net/~jparkes/genealogy/mooretn/moore/moorcivl.htm
    (alot more info there)[/SIZE]

  2. #2
    Grease Monkey shocker1's Avatar
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    Julius Howell


    Click the button above to hear a recording of Confederate soldier Julius Howell talking about his capture and imprisonment at the Union prison camp at Point Lookout, Md. Howell was born in 1846 near the Holy Neck section of Suffolk, in the Holland area. He was the youngest of 16 children, the son of a prominent Baptist minister. His daddy wouldn’t allow him to join the army until he was 16½, he says in his account. He saw action guarding the Blackwater River against Yankees until his regiment was called to help defend Richmond in 1864. By then, he was a corporal and courier for two generals.
    In April 1865, Howell was taken prisoner at the battle of Sailor’s Creek and was transported to Point Lookout, Md., a notorious Union prison. He was there when he heard about the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
    “I arose pretty early,” he says. “There were 20,000 of us there. I saw a flag pole, and a flag stopped halfway.”
    The youth, a slightly built man with bright red hair, knew what it meant.
    “I stuck my head in a tent and said, 'Boys, there must be some big Yankee dead.’ ”
    A guard told the men later that the president had been shot. Howell says he felt no hatred toward Lincoln, only kindness.
    “We didn’t fight for the preservation or extension of slavery,” he says. “It was a great curse on this country that we had slavery. We fought for states’ rights, for states’ rights.”
    After the war, Howell taught at Reynoldson Institute in Gates County, N.C. He soon left teaching and went to the University of Pennsylvania, graduating with a history degree. From there, he went on to Harvard and got a doctorate in history.
    Howell was a history professor at the University of Arkansas. He eventually headed the department. In 1901, he was named president of Virginia Intermont College in Bristol, where he served for 50 years.
    Howell was forever loyal to the South. He became state commander of the Tennessee Confederate Veterans and, in 1940, was named commander-in-chief of the national United Confederate Veterans.
    In 1942, Life magazine did a spread on Howell. Several photos of the old gentleman show him dressed in his Confederate uniform. Because legislators wanted to hear more from the Confederate veteran, Howell addressed the combined Congress of the United States in Washington in 1944, when he was 98, and that is when it is believed this tape was made.
    Four years later, in February 1948, on his 102nd birthday, the city of Bristol threw a party. His old friend, actress Mary Pickford, and her family attended.
    Howell, who had never been sick a day in his life, died the following June.
    Julius Howell was the great-great-uncle of former ANV Commander Russell Darden.
    http://www.scv.org/JuliusHowell.php
    Be sure to click the link and listen to Mr Howell talk about his capture and imprisionment in a union camp. You will have to go to the site because the flash player will not copy. You might want to ask to move this to the history section so this thread is not lost.

  3. #3
    Minister of Propaganda mattnwnc03's Avatar
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    i love reading about all this stuff. all these locations are near where i live . keep it coming!!!!!!!!

  4. #4
    Suspended for infractions Anthony91's Avatar
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    Cool pics, thanks Bombtrack.

  5. #5
    Pisswreck
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    No problem guys
    I'll try and find more pics another day, in the meantime check those links under some pictures, they have some interesting info about the pics

  6. #6

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    Excellent pics Bombtrack, thank you for posting. I live in Va and have been to some of the battlefields, Harpers Ferry is about a 40 minute drive from where I live. I have never seen so many pictures of Civil War vets.

  7. #7
    Member jontew's Avatar
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    Very nice pictures and very interesting!

  8. #8
    Member el_kab0ng's Avatar
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    Too bad what either side was fighting for no longer exists. Right or wrong, both sides believed in our Constitution which, at this point, might as well be used to wipe Bush's ass with.

    THE SOUTH SHALL RISE AGAIN!

  9. #9
    Pisswreck
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    Small update but interesting pics

    Gettysburg Reunions

    [IMG]http://www.*******************/files/images/819.jpg[/IMG]
    A Confederate Veteran and a Union Veteran at the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

    3d Brigade, 2d Div., XII Corps,
    Reunion at Culp's Hill



    [QUOTE]Three veterans here visited the 26th Wisconsin Monument on the 50th Anniversaryin 1913/QUOTE]

  10. #10

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    Very nice, in my town, there is a grave yard where a Union Soldier is laid to rest, probabaly came here after the war.

  11. #11
    Pisswreck
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherni_95 View Post
    Very nice, in my town, there is a grave yard where a Union Soldier is laid to rest, probabaly came here after the war.
    Maybe not, tens of thousands of Canadians (British North America at the time) volunteered in Union and Confederate armies

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