Page 51 of 186 FirstFirst ... 41434445464748495051525354555657585961101151 ... LastLast
Results 751 to 765 of 2779

Thread: Falklands 30

  1. #751
    Avoiding Asshats, Lying Low DeltaWhisky58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Feeling The Hate®, Jockistan
    Posts
    14,642

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by [WDW]Megaraptor View Post
    I may have mentioned it earlier, but the book "Twilight Warriors" by Martin Arostegui has an account of the struggle for Mount Kent between the SAS/Royal Marines and Argentine 601/602 commando battalion, beginning with the ambush described above and ending with the battle of Top Malo House.
    Just picked up a a copy for £0.01 + £2.75 postage on Amazon.co.uk

  2. #752
    Banned user theholeinthedonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,495

    Default

    I just came across the following pic on the MOD site, to me it looks like the Soldiers of the Falkland Islands Defence Force are using the Steyr Aug.Can anybody confirm this please?
    http://www.defenceimagedatabase.mod....777C28AEF58384

  3. #753
    Avoiding Asshats, Lying Low DeltaWhisky58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Feeling The Hate®, Jockistan
    Posts
    14,642

    Default

    This is very old news. The FIDF have been using the Steyr AUG for many years, and this has been covered in numerous threads here on MP.Net.

    The reason for the adoption of the AUG is that the FIDF is funded directly by the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office and not the MoD, and was thus able to choose its own weapons.

  4. #754
    Banned user theholeinthedonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,495

    Default

    Thanks a lot, never heard about that, just wondered.

  5. #755
    Senior Member sp2c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden
    Posts
    10,535

    Default

    what does the UK have on the islands militarily anyways?

  6. #756
    filthy Lucre EsoognomEhT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    6,937

    Default


  7. #757
    Time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted kayaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    @wall table of a greasy spoon cafeteria with a battered,red Mini outside...longing to return to Mary
    Age
    69
    Posts
    4,513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaWhisky58 View Post

    .... and the monumental balls up by Guards officers resulting in the huge casualties on RFA Sir Galahad following the bombing of 8th June...
    Where can I learn more about this incident?

  8. #758
    Avoiding Asshats, Lying Low DeltaWhisky58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Feeling The Hate®, Jockistan
    Posts
    14,642

    Default

    Despite being one of the best known incidents in the entire Falklands Conflict, it is without doubt one of the most poorly documented.

    It is covered in the latter part in Reasons In Writing by Ewan Southby-Tailyour, and in part in the various books by Simon Weston, a well known victim of the bombing, however there is no other detailed account of what happened and why that I know of.

    In short, the other ranks of 1st Welsh Guards plus personnel from an RAMC unit were kept aboard the RFA Sir Galahad at anchor in Port Pleasant harbour despite the specific orders of a Royal Marines officer who was i/c amphibious operations in the area. There is much theory and opinion on the matter, but it has never been fully investigated officially or otherwise, and despite blame being apportioned by some and a number of Guards officers mentioned by name on a recent TV documentary, we are really no closer to knowing what really happened and why, or who was really to blame.

    There have also been accusations of a cover up, but again there is no evidence one way or the other. Many have opinions, but no-one seems willing to go into print.

  9. #759
    filthy Lucre EsoognomEhT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    6,937

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaWhisky58 View Post
    A TV heads up for those of you with Access to BBC2 (UK/Europe), and I believe this series is being shown in the US/Canada.

    [SIZE=4]Peter and Dan Snow: 20th Century Battlefields - 1982 Falklands[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=3]Mon 16 Jul, 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm 60mins[/SIZE]

    25 years ago Argentina triggered the last battle on British territory when it invaded the Falkland Islands. In this episode father-and-son presenters Peter and Dan Snow fly 8000 miles to the South Atlantic to tell the story of how the British Task Force fought back to regain control.

    With his high-tech graphic mapcase, Peter shows the challenges faced by the British, thousands of miles from home or even friendly bases. Dan feels the force of the Sea Harrier fighter jets, so crucial to the survival of the British fleet in these icy waters. And he goes on a night-fighting training exercise under live fire to experience for himself the tactics used by the British ground troops in their fight to dislodge the Argentinians.

    BBC TV

    Previously there have been WW1/WW2/Korea/Vietnam, and last week the 1973 Yom Kippur War. The week after next is the final programme on Gulf War 1.

    This has been a superb series with fantastic access to those who fought on both sides, fantastic visual aids etc.

    For those not having direct access, these shows will hopefully turn up on YouTube before long. Sorry, but such technical wizardry is way beyond me.

    Bump! .........

  10. #760
    Senior Member PaulClift's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    4,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMongoose View Post
    There delaying replacing the F3's with the eurofighter apparently, they want to use the eurofighters they have for getting the air to ground capablitys sorted as far as I'm aware.

  11. #761
    Time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted kayaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    @wall table of a greasy spoon cafeteria with a battered,red Mini outside...longing to return to Mary
    Age
    69
    Posts
    4,513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaWhisky58 View Post
    Despite being one of the best known incidents in the entire Falklands Conflict, it is without doubt one of the most poorly documented.

    It is covered in the latter part in Reasons In Writing by Ewan Southby-Tailyour, and in part in the various books by Simon Weston, a well known victim of the bombing, however there is no other detailed account of what happened and why that I know of.

    In short, the other ranks of 1st Welsh Guards plus personnel from an RAMC unit were kept aboard the RFA Sir Galahad at anchor in Port Pleasant harbour despite the specific orders of a Royal Marines officer who was i/c amphibious operations in the area. There is much theory and opinion on the matter, but it has never been fully investigated officially or otherwise, and despite blame being apportioned by some and a number of Guards officers mentioned by name on a recent TV documentary, we are really no closer to knowing what really happened and why, or who was really to blame.

    There have also been accusations of a cover up, but again there is no evidence one way or the other. Many have opinions, but no-one seems willing to go into print.
    Thanks for writing that DW58. And I will keep a lookout for the book.

  12. #762
    Avoiding Asshats, Lying Low DeltaWhisky58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Feeling The Hate®, Jockistan
    Posts
    14,642

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaWhisky58 View Post
    A TV heads up for those of you with Access to BBC2 (UK/Europe), and I believe this series is being shown in the US/Canada.

    [SIZE=4]Peter and Dan Snow: 20th Century Battlefields - 1982 Falklands[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=3]Mon 16 Jul, 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm 60mins[/SIZE]

    25 years ago Argentina triggered the last battle on British territory when it invaded the Falkland Islands. In this episode father-and-son presenters Peter and Dan Snow fly 8000 miles to the South Atlantic to tell the story of how the British Task Force fought back to regain control.

    With his high-tech graphic mapcase, Peter shows the challenges faced by the British, thousands of miles from home or even friendly bases. Dan feels the force of the Sea Harrier fighter jets, so crucial to the survival of the British fleet in these icy waters. And he goes on a night-fighting training exercise under live fire to experience for himself the tactics used by the British ground troops in their fight to dislodge the Argentinians.

    BBC TV

    Previously there have been WW1/WW2/Korea/Vietnam, and last week the 1973 Yom Kippur War. The week after next is the final programme on Gulf War 1.

    This has been a superb series with fantastic access to those who fought on both sides, fantastic visual aids etc.

    For those not having direct access, these shows will hopefully turn up on YouTube before long. Sorry, but such technical wizardry is way beyond me.
    A superb documentary - hope it reaches YouTube for those of you who haven't seen it.

  13. #763
    Member Irish Eyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Dublin,Republic Of Ireland
    Age
    36
    Posts
    480

  14. #764
    Member Charly84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    103

    Default “Fighting british comandos”

    …"At 0800 Lieutenant Rivas saw a British platoon coming from the right flank, walking in front of his position. He ran up hill and informed major Rico: “why you didn’t shoot at them?” he asked “I thought I shouldn’t, I was waiting more of them” answered the Lieutenant
    Rico sent him to his position and ordered captain Ferrero to warn the men forward. The captain could see the enemy soldiers going between the rocks, in front of his position.
    Before he could reach to his men, an explosion broke the silence. The British have taken the offensive and were attacking to those who have tried to ambush them.
    The number of the enemy force was calculated between 18 and 30 men. Later, it was known that they were SAS operators, the famous British Special Forces. Without doubt, they have noticed the movement in the command position of the argentine company, probably with their powerful NVG.

    Four british soldiers advanced quickly to the lower corner occupied by the argentines, and opened fire with a 66mm LAW. The grenade exploded against the body of the Perro Cisnero, killing him instantly and destroying his MAG that fired some shots due to the impact. 1st lieutenant Vizoso was affected by the explosion wich made him drop his rifle and caused injuries in his head. Reacting to the shocking surprise, the officer in an instinctive reaction, looked for the MAG, but verified it was disabled. He heard some british soldiers talking and thought “I’m lost”…he played dead but the enemy saw his movements and advanced to verify the fate of the commandos: they fire in automatic against the two bodies.
    Up hill, major Rico didn’t know what was happening, and shouted to Perro. The reply came from a SAS soldier trying to imitate him “Cisnerou, Cisnerou”.

    Vizoso wasn’t dead: the enemy soldier who shot him did it in full automatic at short range, so his fire wasn’t very accurate. Only the first bullet hit the argentine commando in his shoulder, made it trough his back, tearing muscles and flesh and ended in his neck but without touching his spine. He was conscious and felted how the bullets hit the rocks near but he stand still.
    Then the man who was shooting kicked violently the commando’s leg, but Vizoso kept his eyes opened like Cisnero and stayed still with “anger” due to the kick.
    The brits were changing ideas between them while Rico shouted from his position the name of the NCO. Vizoso didn’t dare to breath. But the argentine commandos started to fire causing brits soldiers to turn round and retreat to their positions but without firing. Vizoso could see where his rifle was and when the enemy started to go down hill, he took it, stand up and from the hip opened fire in automatic. Some of the british were hit and fell down but Vizoso thought the were taking cover, so he changed the magazine and continue firing in semi automatic. Probably the four soldiers were death or injured, he didn’t know but then he felted the hot blood coming from his head to his chest and back. “I’m a strainer” he thought.
    Al this happened in very few minutes. Later the wounded commando informed to major Rico what happened while both side continue firing. He told to Rico “major, I’m going to change my position in your direction” Then he was sent back, in order to be checked by the medic.

    The british volume of fire was tremendous, thick, with machineguns, grenades and rifles, and this ones with tracers that caused colorful sparkles when they hit the rocks. In the darkness, the only thing they could see were barrels spiting fire. “It looks like all England was firing” thought medic captain Ranieri. Captain Tomás Fernandez noticed from the left an enemy soldier throwing a smoke grenade to cover his position and hide them. The argentine commandos returned fire to the positions. The battle at that moment was really violent.

    All argentine echelons were fighting, and the example of courage and serenity given by his commander in the middle of the british fire transmitted some kind of safe felling to his men. “The major gave us a lot of courage” said 1st sergeant Orlando Aguirre and captain Villaruel added: “Everything gets complicated in the emergency and the first hit was given by the brits, but Rico’s credit was to push his men to the fight”.

    All the argentine commandos were firing t the SAS, and behind them, at the top, they were supported by machinegun fire from the 4th Regiment under the order of sub lieutenat Llambías.
    The company commander fired magazine after magazine until 1st Lieutenant Lauría warned him “major, we are going to run out of ammunition”. Both kneeled, fired and shouted to the enemy. This was Lauría’s way to disturb the enemy. Rico was cursing them.
    A second later they were looking at each other face: a 66mm rocket passed between them. “We laughed … because in the heat of the battle you relax and don’t think about the risks”

    Up hill, british mortar fire started to fall 500 meters to the right of them, but then it was corrected, and fall in the area occupied by the security echelon under the order of captain Villaruel, but miraculously no one was hit. The two machineguns of the SAS were firing from left to right, to keep the argentine commandos in their positions, but the fire fight continued.
    Lauría was firing PDF rifle grenades together with 1st sergeant Oviedo. Behind them, Rinieri fired his Weatherby .300 Magnum with intense dedication. Vizoso reach him:” How I am doc? How is this? Can I continue fighting?” The medic checked the injured, touching his back and neck and told him what he was expecting to hear: “macho(dude?), you have a big hole, but grab your rifle and keep on firing, because here we have to shoot”
    “I saw a guy 40 or 50 meters from my position” said Vizoso “he was firing against the shadow of the rock were I was taking cover, with tracers; well instructed, well trained. I went over the rock and opened fire in that direction. He was silenced”.

    The British Special Forces didn’t stop either. Captain Villaruel expressed me “I noticed the brit fire superiority. Bullets passed over my head and didn’t allow me to stand up and return fire. For one moment I thought we could we over passed”.
    Captain Ferrero relato: “I remember ordering Lauria and Aguirre to shoot over a machine gun that was aiming to us, and saw how it exploded. We noticed that our fire was giving results because enemy fire started to reduce”. The fierce clash continued: “we could see our impacts where the enemy machine gun was” remembered 1st Sergeant Aguirre; “it looked like the hole was going to blow up because of the explosions”.

    Major Rico criticizes himself: “Honestly, the man in charge should be disarmed” he told me “because it’s inevitable to be attracted by the fight, so you stop giving orders, until you react and realize what should be done”.

    As the company’s chief, he fought along with the others officers: his instructions to captains Fernandez and Ferraro’s sections (platoons) and the men in charge of the MAGs and Grenade Launchers (7, 62 FAL with PDF grenades), were constantly. Rico ordered 1st Lieutenant Rivas to come along him, because his main concern was to be surrounded.

    At that moment fatality hit the commandos again: a 66mm LAW rocket hit the Gendarmería’s position, killing the brave sergeant Ramón Acosta and wounding another NCO.

    The right flank was without protection. Rivas fired with his MAG until he run out of ammunition, and when he was looking for more bullets belts he realized that his MG servant have left the boxes in other position…with the 1st sergeant Oviedo they protected that flank.

    From mount Kent the british artillery started to open fire and in front of the argentine commando’s positions it could be heard: “come on, come on”.
    The SAS chief was calling his men, so their fire started to decrease, it was clear that the british soldiers were retreating from the area, under the protection of their support guns.

    Major Rico main concern was to become the target of the brits big guns, so he ordered the withdrawal of Fernandez and Ferraro’s sections, but not to leave the terrain or allow the enemy to escape: It was time for our own artillery to play it role previously coordinated the day before. “Before leaving the position” expressed captain Ferrero, “major Rico ordered me to check Acosta’s position, in order to bring his body back; he was an excellent man, commando, he was my instructor and had a great professional formation. He was against a rock. I crawl to him and touched his head: he was cold. I moved him and didn’t fell anything. I turned back and informed the major”

    Some men wanted to recover Cisnero’s body. “No” said major Rico, with great pain because of the respect and friendship that joined with “El Perro”. He preferred to take out his men from that area, but one man didn’t want to abandon his fallen comrade body at any cost, 1st Lieutenant Lauría: “Why we are withdrawing” he said very exalted “we kicked the british out of the hill, we should pursue and take them down”. Rico put the officer in his place: “he almost punches me in the face” remembered Lauría; and not only he stopped his impulsive officer but also put him in charge of the withdrawal of that sector.

    Some stayed to cover the commando’s withdrawal. Between them were major Rico, and the captains Ferrero, Fernandez Funes and Ranieri; the last one remembered the unit motto to his partners: “God and Country or Death”

    Meanwhile the 602nd company commander started to guide the friendly artillery fire with his radio, but 1st Lieutenant Lauría wasn’t convinced at all with the idea of withdrawing; his plan was to disobey major Rico’s order, pursue the retreating enemy forces and recover Cisnero’s body. He told his idea to the eight men that were under his charge:
    “Gentlemen: my intention is to counter attack and we are going to do it. Before this, check your ammo”
    Rivas, Maqueda and the others NCOs didn’t answer, but the ammunition count gave as a result only 5 or 6 rounds per men: very common in night operations, these men have emptied most of theirs magazines in the fierce fight described previously. Lauría was the only man with enough ammo, but the idea of pursue the enemy was now impossible. “Rico was right” said the lieutenant.

    Using 1st Lieutenant Stel as a link, major Rico asked artillery support, previously convened with Lieutenant Colonel Balza (Chief of the 3rd Artillery Group equipped with 105mm M-56 Oto Melara pack howitzers) over “Charlie 101”, the area programmed the night before.
    The orders were give by major Rico, playing the role of the forward artillery controller; although artillery units don’t use other branch men to direct they fire, an exception was made: “He will send it because it’s only you” said Stel.

    Artillery rounds started coming while Rico tried to correct the fire concentrations, bringing them near his position and then sending it according to the SAS withdrawal.
    It was a risky and precise innovation on the commando’s tactics. Naturally, for the communication were used code words to avoid being identified by the enemy . The code was rather easy: Rico was “Ñato” (because of his nose), Balza was “Flaco” (skinny) and Stel was “Oreja” (ear)(very well chosen nicknames by the way). The conversation was in a common slang, to avoid Oxford and Cambridge educated listeners.

    - “chocamos 96, confites” (we crashed 96, candies) said major Rico to point out the area where the enemy was.

    - “Salió merca” (merchandise out) answered Martín Balza, translated meant that his guns were firing.

    - “Favor víbora huevo, muchas” (favour snake egg, a lot) asked Rico, correcting the trajectory; “short 50, efficacy” meant.

    The 3rd Artillery Group chief realized that the coordinates required were almost over the commando’s position and with nervousness asked Ñato:

    - “¿Querés merca en testa?” (Do you want merchandise in “testa” – do you want it over your position?)

    - “¡Si flaco, rapidito!, tengo una suprema para usted.” (Yes skinny, quickly! I got a “suprema” for you) º.

    The orders proceeded:

    - “Más merca, ¡más merca!” (more merchandise, more merchandise!)

    Until the cease fire order was given:

    - “Corte” (cut!)…"

    º) Note: “suprema”: British “C” ration made with chicken.

    From the book “Comandos en Acción” written by I. J. Ruiz Moreno.

  15. #765
    Senior Member PaulClift's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    4,648

    Default

    Thanks for the translation Charly84, really well translated aswell, 'felted' should be 'felt', but thats being picky

    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaWhisky58 View Post
    A superb documentary - hope it reaches YouTube for those of you who haven't seen it.
    Agreed, I was worried that fitting the entire conflict into a 1 hour program would dilute it some what, but they managed to squeeze in the major actions really well.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •