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    Default VERA passive sensor


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    Czech radar company sold

    U.S. company now owns highly advanced radar systems

    By František Bouc
    Staff Writer, The Prague Post
    November 15th, 2006 The most formidable Czech military defensive tool — the Vera surveillance radar, which is the only system that can detect the "invisible" U.S. Stealth bomber — is now owned by Americans.
    U.S. surveillance and flight tracking developer Rannoch Corporation has taken over ERA, the Pardubice-based company that developed Vera.
    The deal took place in late October, but the daily Mladá fronta Dnes reported it Nov. 11.
    "The ERA facilities are truly world-class," said Rannoch President Dave Ellison in an official statement. "We realize the potential of the combined teams to offer the most comprehensive and technically advanced solutions."
    Defense Ministry representatives and east Bohemian regional officials were unaware of the development.
    ERA Vice Chairman Milan Bernard confirmed the transaction, adding that ERA's management first wanted to notify the company's shareholders. The terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Bernard said that they would be announced later this month.
    Defense Ministry spokesman Andrej Čírtek said the takeover was "a strictly private matter," and the government would not interfere in it.
    ERA's Multilateration Surveillance System (MSS) is the best-selling technology around the globe for tracking civilian airplanes, and also the most advanced and proven wide-range multi-altitude radar. The company's main asset, however, is the radar system Vera.
    Traditional radar sends a signal that bounces off a target, letting the radar operators know that something is there. Vera uses "passive location," a unique way of identifying a target without sending out that signal. The technology allows the radar system to be unidentifiable and thus unjammable.
    Vera can simultaneously monitor up to 200 aircraft, and it is able to precisely determine their distance and altitude.
    The ERA company has received orders for Vera from many countries, including Pakistan, China, Malaysia and Egypt.
    The U.S. government has repeatedly expressed concern about the Czech radar being sold to countries it deems unfriendly.
    As a result, ERA had to give up a planned transaction with China in 2004, after the Czech Defense Ministry banned the deal. So far, Vera radar has been sold to the United States and Estonia, and leased to Pakistan.
    Vera is expected to become a key tool in NATO's new air control system, according to Marshall Billingsley, NATO's investment department director.
    http://www.praguepost.com/articles/2...mpany-sold.php

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    Senior Member Kippari's Avatar
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    I bet the owners never have to work a day in the rest of their lives.

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    Member adamicz's Avatar
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    i have a question about this system

    normal radar uses something it sends out bounced off target and returns to installation, so far im following ,

    but what and how does passsive radar pick something up ??

    the target must send something out for this passive radar to pick up right ???

    because when something is sent out to the target it becomes active and seizes to stop being passive right ?

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    Senior Member oldsoak's Avatar
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    Is a great pity that its passed out of Czech hands. We were very impressed with Czech ESM. Czech capabilites were very very good indeed. They pin pointed our radio emitters with incredible precision over quite a distance - and no, dont ask me for figures.

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    eye candy of death 2Sheds_Jackson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nougabol View Post
    i have a question about this system

    normal radar uses something it sends out bounced off target and returns to installation, so far im following ,

    but what and how does passsive radar pick something up ??

    the target must send something out for this passive radar to pick up right ???

    because when something is sent out to the target it becomes active and seizes to stop being passive right ?
    An excellent question (and I wondered the same thing myself) - so I looked it up. Found this on the system's Wiki entry;

    The current generation sensor can only detect and track pulsed emissions, due to the requirement to measure the time of arrival of pulses. The receivers operate in the frequency range of 1-18 GHz and typically exploit secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders, identify friend or foe (IFF) transponders, airborne radars, weather radars, tactical air navigation (TACAN) transponders, distance measurement equipment (DME) beacons, digital communications signals and pulsed jamming signals.

    Some reports in the media refer to VERA, and its predecessors, as "counter-stealth radars". This is untrue and probably stems from an ambitious Czech marketing campaign from the early 1990s. As the technology relies upon the detection of high-power pulsed emissions from the target it would be unable to detect any form of stealth target, unless that target was emitting. Stealth targets are designed to not, for obvious reasons, transmit any form of high-power signal when in battle. The presence of such system on the battlefield, however, does deny the enemy the ability to use their other radar and ECM systems without being detected.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VERA_passive_sensor
    Seems entirely reasonable. There's more info there about how the system processes these emissions in order to form the 3D target location (it uses a Time Delay Of Arrival schema and multiple receivers much like cell phone location technology).

    So in short - the system would appear to not emit any RF, but simply receives what the target itself is emitting and triangulates using that information. If an aircraft is running "radio silent" with nav, targeting, weather, IFF, and ECM all "off" - the system couldn't detect it. Still, a very cool idea and a brilliant twist on current technology.

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    sum on beat me 2 it
    Last edited by johny901; 05-23-2007 at 02:49 PM. Reason: already posted

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    USA want create smaller version of this system for airplanes and helicopters.

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    Member Lamer's Avatar
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    Its not a radar. Stealth planes can still turn their radars, iff and radio off and they are invisible.
    Of course this renders planes like the raptor useless since it is next to impossible to shoot things down without a radar (you could just blindly fire HOJ aim-120's but that would soon lead to a lot of friendly fire). But this is true even if you dont have the VERA sensor because the RWR's on most of the non-stealth planes can detect radar emissions and thus denying raptor its stealth. Raptor is good for other reasons than just beeing stealth.
    Stealth is important for bombers which can get along without a radar to do their missions and so their stealth is not compromised by VERA (it DOES make bombing harder though).

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    eye candy of death 2Sheds_Jackson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lamer View Post
    Its not a radar. Stealth planes can still turn their radars, iff and radio off and they are invisible.
    Of course this renders planes like the raptor useless since it is next to impossible to shoot things down without a radar (you could just blindly fire HOJ aim-120's but that would soon lead to a lot of friendly fire).
    I get what you're saying here...but I don't think it's completely accurate. One of the "other" features of the Raptor is it's high-bandwidth datalink capabilities with both AWACs and ground-based radars. It could ingress an area in stealth mode with all RF emitters off, close to a position where it had a good firing solution on a target....and I have to think that when flaming aircraft start falling out of the sky, the enemy would already suspect something was afoot.

    I don't know much about the system (or about the tactics that Raptor drivers use for that matter)...but common sense tells me that VERA's positional information would only be as good as the last RF emission from a target. If the Raptor lit up only intermittently, it's position would only be known intermittently.

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    Member AKS's Avatar
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    I was a 13 year old kid when I saw a program on CTV1 (Czech 1st channel) about these radars and from what I remember they were basically saying that it picks up radio transmissions.

    And looking at that wiki entry it seems I remember correctly. So basically if the plane stops emitting any radio signals it should be able to fly by no prob.

    But whatever it is this thing makes the enemies job harder

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    Senior Member Rumcajs's Avatar
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    Last edited by Rumcajs; 05-24-2007 at 06:24 AM.

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