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Thread: Classical Music

  1. #46
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    Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1


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    Senior Member osnunez's Avatar
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    This thread must stay alive!

    Johann Sebastian Bach - "Air" Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major


    (conducted by Ton Koopman, perfomed by The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra)

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    part No. 6, Adagio quasi un poco andante of Ludwig van Beethoven's String Quartet in C# Minor, Opus 131

    1st of 5
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW8wdpfkpM0

    Chopin - ballade No. 1, Op. 23 In G Minor (one of my favourites)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItQFTNhUUgo

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    Senior Member osnunez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andreas View Post
    I actually saw this performed live byt the Bergen philharmonic orchestra last tuesday.. Pretty majestic seeing 200+ people on stage coming together in such a way.. Gave me chills
    Wow, being there must have been intense! Awesome video BTW.

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Betulia Liberata: Oratorio: Overture



    An oratorio is a musical drama that tells a story from the Bible. Mozart wrote only one oratorio, and for his subject he oddly chose the story of Judith. In the story, Judith sneaks into the camp of the Assyrians, who are to preparing to wage war on the Israelites. She gains access to the leader's tent and cuts his head off. Without their leader, the Assyrians disperse and Israel is saved. This gruesome story was ignored by Handel and other more prominent composers, but who was going to tell the 15-year old Mozart what was proper material for his music?

    The Overture is suitably dark and stormy. It is in three parts and the last section is thematically connected to the first. The middle section is sweet and melodic, yet contains the underpinnings of tempestuousness that characterize the rest of the overture and indeed the rest of the oratorio. To many, it foreshadows the masterful Requiem he would compose two decades later.

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    Senior Member Hadamar's Avatar
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    J. S. Bach - The Well-Tempered Klavier, Prelude and Fugue in C, BWV 847 - Sviatoslav Richter

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    Slightly random one; eurofags (), anyone know the name of the operatic piece at the start of the UEFA Champions League TV coverage?

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    Thumbs up Sirena Huang: Dazzling set by 11-year-old violinist



    http://www.ted.com Violinist Sirena Huang gives a technically brilliant and emotionally nuanced performance. In a charming interlude, the 11-year-old praises the timeless design of her instrument.

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    Senior Member osnunez's Avatar
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    Franz Schubert - Impromptu No.3, Op.90


    (played by Krystian Zimerman)

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    Modest Mussorgsky - Pictures from an Exhibition, XIV: The Great Gate of Kiev -
    Sviatoslav Richter

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    John Adams - Chorus of Exiled Palestinians



    My father's house was razed
    In nineteen forty-eight
    When the Israelis passed
    Over our street.
    The house was built of stone
    With a courtyard inside
    Where on a hot day one
    Could sit in shade
    Under a tree, and have
    A glass of something cool.
    Coolness rose like a wave
    From our pure well.
    No-one was turned away...


    No-one was turned away - except for the [American born] composer of this piece,
    who is singled out for ‘special’ treatment when trying to re-enter his home country.






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    Senior Member Hadamar's Avatar
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    Igor Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring (Le Sacre du Printemps), Sacrificial Dance (The Chosen One) (Danse sacrale (l'Élue)) - BBC Symphony Orchestra, The Finnish National Ballet, from The Riot at the Rite (BBC, 2006)

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    Ludwig van Beethoven - Coriolan, Op. 62 - Roger Norrington and the London Classical Players

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    Thanks a lot osnunez and hadamar. You dig up some familiar and some unfamiliar music. Great.

    osnunez. You gave me the impuls to dig up this. VVVV


    [SIZE=2]3.Allegro - Concerto For Four Harpsichords In A Minor BWV 1065[/SIZE]

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Apbf5lcyO-s

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    Senior Member osnunez's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op 57 (Appassionata)


    (played by Myra Hess, 1945)

    During the war years, and the blitz, Dame Myra Hess organized over a thousand concerts at the National Gallery. The Gallery had removed all their paintings, keeping just one on display each month as thousands of folks (many not regular concert goers) came to hear, be inspired, and maybe gain a little hope by these wartime concerts.

    Andrew ****son wrote in his blog at the "Guardian": "the monumental Appassionata - always associated in my mind with a wartime film of Myra Hess at the National Gallery, playing those crashing F minor chords at with a stubborn intensity that takes on all the death and mayhem around."
    Last edited by osnunez; 02-20-2009 at 02:29 AM. Reason: added video, etc

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    Johann Pachelbel - Canon and Fugue





    Dmitri Shostakovich - 5th Symphony, 4th movement


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