Page 5 of 89 FirstFirst 123456789101112131555 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 1324

Thread: Thai Armed Force Photo Gallery- RTAF:RTN:RTA:RTP

  1. #61
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bala_Mg View Post
    Yea too many(buddhist) thai troops got murdered already by islamic militants. Hope they'll find a way to get rid of those animals. Those militants would kill anyone who's not muslim. They even beheaded some migrant workers from Myanmar cuz they're buddhists also.
    I'm a buddhist myamar and I support the thai troops and pray for their safty.
    Learn The History


    The Kedah Blockade

    http://www.sabrizain.org/malaya/kedah.htm


    History Benua Islam Siam Nagara Kedah Pasai Ma

    http://naim-firdausi.blogspot.com/

    http://sejarahnagarakedah.blogspot.com/

    http://www.selftechgroup.blogspot.com/

  2. #62
    Banned user
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HangPC2 View Post
    Oh wow ignorant me!
    Now that I learnt the history.. all that current beheading, bombing, killin of cilivians, teachers, monks, migrant workers done by those crazy murderers is justified. I got it now. They got the right to behead a father in front of his daughter. Kill a teacher infront of his/her class..etc.. very justifed.
    thanks so much for the education

  3. #63
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bala_Mg View Post
    Oh wow ignorant me!
    Now that I learnt the history.. all that current beheading, bombing, killin of cilivians, teachers, monks, migrant workers done by those crazy murderers is justified. I got it now. They got the right to behead a father in front of his daughter. Kill a teacher infront of his/her class..etc.. very justifed.
    thanks so much for the education




    Conspiracy In South designed by Thaksin

  4. #64
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Off Topic





    [size=4]The Persian Influence Over Ayuthiya (Ayutthaya)[/size]

    Narai Castle







    TEHRAN (Fars News Agency)- Tehran's Ambassador to Bangkok Mohsen Pakaein said the roots of Iran-Thailand cultural ties date back 400 years to the time when Sheikh Ahmad Qomi, an Iranian scholar, traveled to Ayutthaya and later was appointed to a very high position in the Thais Court.

    Speaking in an exclusive interview with FNA to mark the commemoration day of Sheikh Ahmad Qomi who, the envoy said, had played a very important role in the strengthening of ties between Iran and Thailand, Pakaein said the most renowned reign of Ayutthaya (previous capital of Thailand) was that of King Prasartthong, who introduced great changes in the Thai society.

    "Sheikh Ahmad Qomi came in this period, which saw several Muslims holding important posts in the Thais Court, the army, navy and civil service," he said, adding, "As a result, Ayutthaya became a place where mosques were located near Buddhist temples and many Muslims married Buddhists. These persons became the ancestors of many respected Thai families , for example, the Bunnag, Singhaseni, Siphen, Chularat and Bunyaratklalin families."

    The diplomat further underlined the crucial role of cultural interactions in creating mutual understanding and friendship between two peoples.

    "The Persian influence over Ayutthaya also cover architecture, arts, food and sweets," he said.

    "The arches in the old buildings in present-day Ayutthaya are Islamic pointed arches. Bricks are laid so that the weight is transferred down to the walls on both sides. This type of arch can be seen in the front gate of King Narai's Palace in Lop Buri, and at Wat Worachettharam temple in Ayutthaya. The pagoda at Wat Yai Chaimongkol temple in Ayutthaya was also built in the style of the Persian dome," he added.

    According to the Iranian ambassador to Bangkok, Persian influence is also discernible in the Thai vocabulary.

    "Modern Thai does contain several words of Persian origin which are in current use, such as the Thai words for kulaap ('rose', from Persian golaab), or kalam plii ('cabbage', from Persian kalam(," he concluded.

    Sources: http://www.farsnews.com/English/prin...?nn=8603060408

    http://naim-firdausi.blogspot.com/20...1_archive.html

  5. #65
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Off Topic


    [SIZE=4]"Islamic Epigrafi-The King Of Ayuthia Dynasty Kedah Pasai Ma Gangga Nagara"[/SIZE]


    Ramathibodi I
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramathibodi
    (Redirected from Ramathibodi)
    Jump to: navigation, search

    Ramathibodi I (b. 1314, d. 1369) was the first king of the kingdom Ayutthaya (now part of Thailand), reigning from 1351 to 1369. He was known as Prince U Thong before he ascended to the throne on March 4, 1351. A native of Chiang Saen (now in Chiang Rai Province) he claimed descent from Khun Borom and propagated Theravada Buddhism as the state religion.
    Scholar Charnvit Kasetsiri hypothesized that U Thong might have actually been born to a Chinese merchant family operating in the area of Phetburi. At least one royal chronicle identifies U Thong as the son of one ChodŁksethi, apparently a leader of the Chinese merchant community.

    New information from Kedah, Malaysia clearly state Rama Tibodi I by his Muslim name of Sultan Mad Zafar Syah III ruler of the Siamese Kedah Pasai Ma, probably part of the Ayuthaya Empire or by its Muslim name. Records in Iran state that he has in his royal court a Muslim scholar known as Sheikh Ahmad Qomi. He is the son-in-law of Chinese Siamese Muslim King descendent by the name of Nayuan (Bee Father). A golden coin with his name inscribe on it has been found in the island of Langkawi and is now kept in the Kedah State Museum.
    During his reign he built Ton Sun Khlong Tue Mosque in Bangkok which still stand today. Apart from that France still have records in the form of a map of 21 Mosque built in Ayuithia during his reign and drawn by Shari Nao. The Mosques however were destroyed during the invasion by Sukhotai of Myanmar. Meanwhile local villages in Kedah people still speak Siam daily, a language spoken by their former King. The Siam (Muslim) language is different from the Thai language although they are very similar.

    Apart from the above information, various tomb of Ayuthia Kings such as Rama Tibodi II is located in Kubang Pasu Kedah. The tombstone is inlaid with Ayyuthians decorative motives, shape as per alphabet 't'. The tomb of Rama Tibodis II son, Khun Woran Wang Ser is also located in Alor Setar, Kedah. His decsendent lives in Kedah and carries the title Nai Long before their given names.



    Ramathibodi's position was likely secured by political marriage and family ties. He was married to a daughter of the ruling family of Suphanburi, and may have also married into an alliance with the rulers of Lopburi- it was likely the king of Lopburi that he was initially chosen to succeed. He appointed both his brother-in-law and son to positions of leadership in Suphanburi and Lopburi, respectively, and established his own capital in the new city of Ayutthaya. Ramathabodi's reign bound together the Khmer rulers of Lopburi, the Tai in the west, and the Chinese and Malaysian merchants who inhabited the coastal areas.

    Ramathibodi's death sparked a conflict over succession; initially, his son Ramesuan became ruler of Ayutthaya, but Ramesuan later abdicated in favor of Ramathibodi's brother-in-law, Borommaracha. Some sources indicate that the abdication occurred peacefully, while others indicate that Ramesuan's abdication followed a bloody civil war.

    Sources


    Wyatt, David K., Thailand: A Short History, New Haven (Yale University), 2003. ISBN 0-300-08475-7
    Associate Professor Srisak Vallipodom, Sheikh Ahmad Qomi and the History of Siam, Cultural Center of the Islamic City, Republic of Iran, Bangkok 1995, page 209
    Assoc Professor Plubplung Kongchana, "The Persians in Ayutthaya", Director, Institiute of Asia Pacific Studies, Srinakharinwirot University.
    Tuanku Nai Long Kassim ibni Almarhum Tunku Nai Long Ahmad, "Islamic Epigrafi-The King of Ayuthia Dynasty Kedah Pasai Ma Gangga Nagara"

  6. #66
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Off Topic[*******Black][SIZE=4]

    Historian campaigns to rename Thailand Siam
    [/SIZE]

    THAI TAKES
    By PHILIP GOLINGAI



    THE view from Bangkok’s Thammasat University of a wooden rice barge floating down the Chao Phraya River evokes a scene from a postcard of Siam.

    The image is enhanced by the antique architecture of the university, which was inaugurated in 1934 when Thailand was called Siam.

    On a Tuesday afternoon, at the office of the South-East Asian Studies Programme at the university by the river, a 66-year-old historian who was born two years after Siam was renamed Thailand passionately talks about his one-week-old campaign.

    Charnvit Kasetsiri, the programme's senior adviser and lecturer, wants Thailand to be renamed Siam.

    Two weeks ago, Charnvit’s decades-long “Siam not Thailand” passion was re-ignited when he pondered on the violent conflict in his country’s restive southern provinces.

    “Thailand means the land of the Thai (an ethnic group). That is a narrow definition as there are more than 40 ethnic groups in the country, including Thai (who make up 80% of the kingdom’s 65 million population), Chinese, Hmong, Akha, Karen, Laotians, Khmer and Mon,” explains the historian who is of Mon and Teochew blood.

    “The people in the south do not think that they are Thai. They consider themselves Malay or Pattani people. If we want our country to be more inclusive, the name Siam is more appropriate.”

    Charnvit, however, admits that a name change is only a small step towards resolving the Muslim insurgency in the south.

    Internationally, won’t a name change be confusing?

    “You’ve heard of Siamese cat or Siamese twins but you’ve never heard of a Thai cat,” quips the former rector of Thammasat University.

    “Thailand has been in use for 68 years, but Siam was used for thousands of years.”

    Historical records state that the Chinese referred to the country as “Sian,” which was sometimes spelled as “Hsien.” Siam is an anglicised spelling.

    On the meaning of “Siam,” the prominent historian says some people claim it means “dark.” But he disagrees, guessing that it is just a name of a place.

    During the rise of militarism, Nazism and fascism, Prime Minister Phibul Songgram changed the country’s name from Siam to Thailand in 1939 on the grounds that “we are the Thai race, but ? the name Siam does not correspond to our race.”

    However, Charnvit contends that the change was because the nationalistic government had militaristic and expansionist ambitions.

    A History of Thailand by Chris Baker and Pasuk Phongpaichit states that a military lecturer claimed that the Burmese, Annamese, Khmer and Malay were all of “original Thai stock” and should be united with Siam.

    In 1939, the Ecole Francaise d’Extreme-Orient presented Thailand’s chief ideologue Wichit Wathakan with a map showing Thai-speaking people scattered across South-East Asia and southern China, wrote Baker and Pasuk. Wichit reportedly exclaimed: “If we could recover the lost territories, we would be a great power.”

    To recover his country’s former name, Charnvit launched a media campaign and an Internet petition last week to persuade the constitution drafters to revert to the name used in the kingdom’s first constitution, which was promulgated in 1932.

    In 1949 and 1968, constitution drafters discussed the issue of renaming Thailand. And the results, says the historian, was “Siam lost and Thailand won.”

    As of Thursday, the week-old petition had more than 565 signatures. Charnvit finds the comments in the website reveals that Thais are no longer suppressing their non-Thai ethnic background.

    For example, he reveals, through Thailand’s anti-Chinese campaign during the Cold War, many of his countrymen denied that they had Chinese blood.

    Though the number of petition signatories is increasing, the historian is realistic that success is very slim.

    “My target is for the drafters of the country’s new constitution to debate the name change but they will probably sit on it,” he explains.

    The other obstacle is that most of his fellow citizens were born after Siam was named Thailand. The younger generation is familiar with the word “Thailand” so they probably don’t care about the word “Siam”, he observes.

    But the younger generation’s favourite shopping mall is Bangkok’s Siam Paragon, I said, playing the devil’s advocate.

    That’s the contradiction, says Charnvit, explaining that Thais use “Siam” occasionally as culturally it means something that has a good tradition.

    -The Star-

    [/COLOR]

  7. #67
    Banned user HangPC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Off Topic





  8. #68
    Senior Member IraGlacialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Gittin' mah edumakashuns... in the land of temples and bad traffic.
    Age
    26
    Posts
    8,465

    Default

    That is pretty interesting, albeit off-topic, info.
    I myself am a supporter of putting the elephant back on the flag, on an international scale changing Bangkok to Krung Thep, and I also support Thailand going back to Siam.
    Besides the cultural value of the name reversions, the gay-guy-in-airport jokes get old pretty quickly, and it's annoying when people mistake my heritage as Taiwan instead of Thai.
    Last edited by IraGlacialis; 07-02-2007 at 11:34 PM.

  9. #69
    Senior Member Skyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand.
    Age
    29
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Southern Thailand Insurgency

    Royal Thai Army troop in southern region.












    Last edited by Skyman; 07-02-2007 at 09:02 PM.

  10. #70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skyman View Post
    I got only this.

    How many RTAF's fighter(F8F,SB2C,F-84G,F-86F/D,F-5A/B)in South Vietnam's losed ? And RTAF in South Vietnam's AFB are Da Nang,Bien Hoa,or Tang San Nut?

  11. #71
    Senior Member Skyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand.
    Age
    29
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jackie yu View Post
    How many RTAF's fighter(F8F,SB2C,F-84G,F-86F/D,F-5A/B)in South Vietnam's losed ? And RTAF in South Vietnam's AFB are Da Nang,Bien Hoa,or Tang San Nut?
    No RTAF fighter in vietnam. (I think because RTAF must concentrade on war on communist in Thailand and Laos) RTAF sent 3 C-47, victory wings unit, to southern vietnam for air lift operation.

  12. #72

    Default

    OK!Thanks!

    And RTA sometimes used Thai-Boxing to anti VCor NVA.

  13. #73
    Senior Member Skyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand.
    Age
    29
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Procurement Update

    This is the old news in 2005 about the upgrade program on RTN's P-3T Orion. 2 were already upgraded while another one is due to upgrade in no time.

    Royal Thai Navy P-3T Arrives At Pax For Upgrade

    Posted on June 02, 2005 http://somd.com/news/headlines/2005/2113.shtml



    By Renee Hatcher
    PMA-290 Public Affairs

    A Royal Thai Navy (RTN) P-3T arrived at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in April for a radar upgrade that will benefit Thailand as well as the United States in the global war on terror.

    NAVAIR’s Maritime Surveillance Aircraft (MSA) Program Office (PMA-290) is responsible for the upgrade under the auspices of a foreign military sales (FMS) case. A combined NAVAIR/Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) team at NAS Patuxent River will replace the antiquated APS-80 radar system with a Raytheon commercial off the shelf (COTS) SeaVue radar. This radar will provide enhanced capabilities such as Inverse Synthetic Aperture, as well as a replacement for the functions that were provided by the obsolete APS-80 radar.

    “Thailand is a coalition partner in Iraq with the United States,” said Capt. Steve Eastburg, MSA program manager. The more allies we have with advanced capabilities who can gather and share information and intelligence with the United States, the better poised we all are to win the war on terrorism.”

    The NAWCAD team will take about eight to 10 weeks to install, integrate and test the COTS SeaVue radar. Ground and flight-testing will be performed at NAS Patuxent River, including a functional check flight, and four five-hour test flights. The upgraded P-3T will be used to train an RTN crew consisting of two pilots, a flight engineer, two naval flight officers, one in-flight technician, and one radar operator prior to ferrying the RTN P-3T back to U-Tapao, Thailand.

    “We are by no means a production facility, but here at NAVAIR/NAWCAD we have assembled a team of exceptionally talented and skilled professionals who can handle, on a limited basis, a unique upgrade such as this,” said John Patterson, PMA-290’s deputy program manager for Thailand.

    In 1994, the RTN bought five P-3As from the United States via FMS. Three are currently in use flying operational and logistics missions. One was eventually disassembled for spare parts while the other is used solely as a T56-A-14 engine test bed. The U.S. Navy provided maintenance and aircrew training, and also conducted follow-on training. The RTN uses its fleet of P-3s for maritime surveillance, counter-drug operations, VIP flights and to fight piracy. A three-Phased Depot Maintenance (PDM), the first major maintenance conducted on this aircraft since delivery in 1995, was performed at a Lockheed Martin Aircraft Center (LMAC) in Greenville, S.C. prior to arrival at NAS Patuxent River. A NAVAIR Depot Jacksonville ferry crew flew the aircraft from Greenville to Patuxent River.

    In December 2003, the RTN decided to pursue depot level maintenance and a radar upgrade for its P-3T. To get a better idea of the structural integrity of the airframe, the NAVAIR/ NAVAIR Depot Team conducted a Material Condition Inspection (MCI) on all three aircraft in U-Tapao, Thailand prior to the three-phase PDM and radar upgrade.

    “Since the delivery of the aircraft, the RTN has been mostly self-sufficient with respect to maintaining their P-3 aircraft in spite of having a limited maintenance capability,” Patterson said. “The aircraft were in surprisingly better condition than we initially expected, considering the climate in Thailand and that the aircraft had not received a major maintenance overhaul for nine years.”

    The RTN plans to upgrade all three operational aircraft. Based on the successful execution of the first upgrade effort, the RTN is currently budgeting for the other two aircraft. The second upgrade could begin as early as October 2005. The RTN is also considering additional avionics upgrades in the future.

    “My team and I have been working very closely with Capt. Worapol, RTN Air Division Wing One commander,” Patterson said. “We have been extremely fortunate in that Capt. Worapol has been supportive and thoroughly involved from the beginning of the program.”

    Not everything, however, was smooth sailing. On the six-day journey from Thailand to the United States, Worapol led the first all-RTN crew to fly from U-Tapao, Thailand to the United States. It was the longest flight ever for the RTN P-3T and for its flight crew.

    Just before arriving at their final destination at LMAC in Greenville, the RTN had a scheduled stop in NAS North Island, Calif. and discovered the main landing gear on the P-3T had developed a gas/hydraulic leak. Through an interpreter, PMA-290s’s Tom Wilson, of RBC Inc, talked a non-English speaking, 18-year-old RTN maintenance technician, Prapat Yaibua, through the steps necessary to trouble shoot and re-service the leaking landing gear.

    “This young kid had his Wing Commander hovering over him saying ‘this has to get fixed now’ and he pulled it off,” Wilson said. “When I finally met Prapat Yaibua in Greenville, I gave him a great big hug because I knew how scared he must have been.”

    The courage and dedication of that young man represents the strength of his proud nation as it recovers from the tragic effects of a tsunami caused by an earthquake under the Indian Ocean on Dec. 26, 2004. The earthquake caused giant, deadly waves to crash ashore killing tens of thousands. The USN sent several of its P-3Cs to assist Thailand in its recovery by patrolling the devastated area looking for survivors and providing real time communications with aid agencies, directing badly needed relief supplies to those most in need.

    “Thailand has expressed its appreciation for US aid following the tsunami but would have loved to have had the capability to do it themselves,” Wilson said. “With the upgrades to this P-3T, the U.S. Navy will deliver an aircraft that’s fully capable of performing tsunami relief missions and much more. We’re helping them to help themselves in more ways than one.”


    ==========================================================

    This is the second aircraft during the landing in America. Upgrade will be conducted to one remaining airframe.

    Photo by Mike Wilson
    A Royal Thai Navy P-3T arrives at Naval Air Station Patuxent River on April 28 for a radar upgrade.










    Last edited by Skyman; 07-03-2007 at 09:47 PM.

  14. #74

    Default

    nice pics, thanks!
    question about the soldiers with the maroon beret, i assume all wearing this beret are from the Special Forces Divisions, Lopburi right?
    how many soldiers per Division, coz 2 divisions of SF seems like a lot (even more than Indonesia?)

    -aneep-

  15. #75
    Senior Member Skyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand.
    Age
    29
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aneep View Post
    nice pics, thanks!
    question about the soldiers with the maroon beret, i assume all wearing this beret are from the Special Forces Divisions, Lopburi right?
    how many soldiers per Division, coz 2 divisions of SF seems like a lot (even more than Indonesia?)

    -aneep-
    Yes. The maroon beret indicates that they are come from the Airborne unit. But I don't have the actual no. of them.

    Air force special commando also wear the red beret too.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •