Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 35

Thread: Battleships sunk in World War 2

  1. #1
    Senior Member [WDW]Megaraptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Making people mad...
    Posts
    7,782

    Default Battleships sunk in World War 2

    This post was inspired by a thread about a month ago on battleships sunk by air attack while in the open ocean. Anyways, here are the stats

    EDIT: Updated minor navy info.

    Battleships in service during WW2:

    Royal Navy - 21 total
    5 Queen Elizabeth class
    5 Revenge class
    2 Repulse class
    1 Hood class
    2 Nelson class
    5 King George V class
    1 Vanguard class

    United States Navy - 27 total
    2 New York class
    2 Nevada class
    2 Pennsylvania class
    3 New Mexico class
    2 Tennessee class
    4 Colorado class
    2 North Carolina class
    4 South Dakota class
    4 Iowa class
    2 Alaska class

    Kriegsmarine - 9 total
    2 Deutschland class
    2 Bismarck class
    2 Scharnhorst class
    3 Deutschland class (Panzerschiffe)

    French Navy - 10 total
    3 Courbet class
    3 Bretagne class
    2 Dunkerque class
    2 Richelieu class

    Italian Navy - 7 total
    2 Cavour class
    2 Andrea Doria class
    3 Littorio class

    Imperial Japanese Navy - 12 total
    4 Kongo class
    2 Fuso class
    2 Ise class
    2 Nagato class
    2 Yamato class

    Soviet Navy - 4 total
    1 Revenge class on loan from the Royal Navy
    3 Gangut class

    Danish Navy - 1 total
    1 Niels Juel class - http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/ reports that this battleship was sunk in Eckenforde by air bombing on May 3, 1945 but I can't find any more info.

    Greek Navy - 2 total
    2 Battleships, the Kilkis (formerly USS Mississippi, BB-23) and the Limnos (formerly USS Idaho, BB-24), both Mississippi class battleships.

    Royal Dutch Navy - 1 total
    Operated some coastal defense battleships such as HNLMS De Zeven Provincien.

    Norwegian Navy - 2 total
    2 Eidsvold class

    Finnish Navy - 2 total
    2 Vainamoinen class

    Battleships sunk during WW2:

    Sunk by air attack, in open water:
    HMS Repulse, sunk by Japanese aircraft off Malaya, December 10 1941 with loss of 436 crew.

    HMS Prince of Wales, sunk by Japanese aircraft off Malaya, December 10 1941 with loss of 327 crew.

    Italian battleship Roma, sunk by Luftwaffe Fritz-X glider bombs on September 9, 1943 with loss of 1,353 crew.

    INS Hiei, sunk by US Navy and USAF aircraft off of Guadalcanal, November 13, 1942 with loss of 188 crew.

    INS Musashi, sunk by US Navy aircraft during the Battle of Leyte Gulf on October 24, 1944 with loss of over 1,000 crew.

    INS Yamato, sunk by US air attacks off of Okinawa April 7, 1945 with loss of 2,475 men.

    Greek battleship Kilkis, sunk by Germany Ju-87 bombers in the Salamis Channel on April 23, 1941.

    Greek battleship Limnos, sunk by Germany Ju-87 bombers in the Salamis Channel on April 23, 1941.

    HNLMS De Zeven Provincien was sunk by Japanese bombers off of Surabaya, February 18, 1942. Raised by the Japanese and used as a floating battery, then sunk by allied bombers in 1943.

    Sunk by air attack, in port:
    USS Oklahoma, sunk by Japanese aircraft in Pearl Harbor, December 7 1941, with loss of 415 crew. Raised and re-fitted, but eventually scrapped.

    USS Arizona, sunk by Japanese aircraft in Pearl Harbor, December 7 1941, with loss of 1,177 crew.

    USS California, sunk by Japanese aircraft in Pearl Harbor, December 7 1941 with loss of 98 crew. Raised, repaired and returned to duty.

    USS West Virginia, sunk by Japanese aircraft in Pearl Harbor, December 7 1941 with loss of 106 crew. Raised, repaired and returned to duty.

    German battleship Schleswig-Holstein, sunk by RAF bombers in Gotenhaven Harbor December 19 1944.

    German pocket battleship Admiral Hipper, sunk by RAF bombers in Kiel, April 9 1945 with loss of 32 crew.

    Italian battleship Conte di Cavour, sunk by RN aircraft in Taranto, November 11 1940. Raised but never returned to active duty.

    INS Haruna, sunk by USAF bombers in Kure July 28, 1945 with loss of 65 crew.

    INS Ise, sunk by USAF bombers in Kure July 28, 1945.

    Danish battleship Niels Juel, sunk in Eckenforde by allied bombing May 3, 1945.

    Soviet battleship Marat, sunk by German Ju-87 dive bombers in Kronsdadt September 23, 1941, used as a stationary artillery battery.

    Sunk in surface combat:
    HMS Hood, sunk by German battleship Bismarck in the Battle of the Denmark Straight with loss of 1,415 crew.

    German battlecruiser Scharnhorst sunk by HMS Duke of York and cruisers HMS Belfast, HMS Jamaica and HMS Norfolk off of Norway on December 26, 1943 with loss of 1,803 crew.

    French battleship Bretagne, sunk by Royal Navy warships at Mers-el-Kebir with loss of 977 crew.

    INS Kirishima, sunk by USS Washington off of Guadalcanal November 15, 1942.

    INS Fuso, sunk by destroyer USS Melvin in the Battle of Leyte Gulf on October 25, 1944 with loss of around 1,400 crew.

    INS Yamashiro, sunk by six US battleships in the Battle of Leyte Gulf on October 25, 1944.

    HNoMSA Eidsvold, sunk by German destroyers in Narvik harbor, April 9, 1940 with loss of 175 crew.

    HNoMSA Norge, sunk by German destroyers in Narvik harbor, April 9 1940, with loss of 101 crew.

    Sunk by combination of surface and air attack:
    German battleship Bismarck, sunk by combination of RN torpedo bombers, battleships and destroyers on May 27, 1941 with the loss of around 2,200 crew.

    German battleship Tirpitz, attacked over several months by a combination of RN mini-sub attacks, RN aircraft, RAF bombers and finally sunk by RAF bombers in Tromso Harbor, Norway, November 12, 1944 with loss of 1,204 crew.

    Sunk by submarine:
    HMS Royal Oak, sunk by U-47 in Scapa Flow Naval Base, October 14 1939, with loss of 833 crew.

    HMS Barham, sunk by U-331 off of Solum, November 25 1941 with loss of 862 crew.

    INS Kongo, sunk by USS Sealion off of Formosa, November 21 1944 with loss of 1,250 crew.

    Sunk by other:
    HMS Queen Elizabeth, sunk by Italian frogmen in Alexandria harbor, Egypt December 18th 1941 with loss of 9 crew. Raised, repaired and returned to duty.

    HMS Valiant, sunk by Italian frogmen in Alexandria harbor, Egypt December 18th 1941. Raised, repaired and returned to duty.

    German battleship Schlesien, sunk by mine and Soviet bomber attack and then scuttled near Swinemunde in the Baltic, May 5 1945.

    INS Mutsu, mysteriously exploded in Oshima bay on June 8, 1943 with the loss of over 1,100 men. No cause has ever been proven although the Japanese blamed sabotage.

    Finnish battleship Ilmarinen, sunk in minefield after shelling Estonian coastal islands September 13, 1941 with loss of 271 crew.

    Battleships sunk by country:
    Imperial Japanese Navy: 10
    Royal Navy: 7
    Kriegsmarine: 6
    United States Navy: 4
    Italian Navy: 2
    Norwegian Navy: 2
    Greek Navy: 2
    French Navy: 1
    Finnish Navy: 1
    Danish Navy: 1
    Royal Dutch Navy: 1
    Soviet Navy: 1

    Total number of battleships serving: 96

    Sunk by air attack, in port: 11
    Sunk by air attack, in open water: 9
    Sunk in surface combat: 8
    Sunk by submarine: 3
    Sunk by combination of surface and air attack: 2
    Sunk by other: 5
    Total sunk: 38

    Battleships sunk as percentage of total battleship force:

    Norwegian Navy: 2/2, 100%
    Greek Navy: 2/2, 100%
    Danish Navy: 1/1, 100%
    Royal Dutch Navy: 1/1, 100%
    Imperial Japanese Navy: 10/12, 83%
    Kriegsmarine: 6/9, 66%
    Finnish Navy: 1/2, 50%
    Royal Navy: 7/20, 35%
    Italian Navy: 2/7, 29%
    Soviet Navy: 1/4, 25%
    United States Navy: 4/27, 15%
    French Navy: 1/10, 10%

    Sources:
    http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/
    http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/
    http://www.history.navy.mil/
    http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/PHcas.html
    http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/battleships/russ_dr.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_World_War_II_ships
    Last edited by [WDW]Megaraptor; 06-21-2007 at 10:55 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales were sunk by Japanese aircraft off the coast of Malaya, not Ceylon.

    http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/

  3. #3
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ruling the oceans from a landlocked rock
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by [WDW]Megaraptor View Post
    I also just realized that I left out some minor navies that had 1 or 2 old battleships (Denmark, Norway, Greece, Netherlands, etc)...it's late and i'll get to those tomorrow.
    I'll save you the trouble; the Royal Netherlands Navy, at the start of WWII, had a surface fleet of 5 cruisers, 8 destroyers and several torpedo- and gunboats. There were 2 battlecruisers on the drawingboard, modified versions of the Deutschland-class pocketbattleships, but these were not even laid down when the war broke out.

  4. #4
    Loving the wood pressed up against my cheek Fiber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    www.kiva.org
    Posts
    1,443

    Default

    Just some trivia. My father has a piece of Tirpitz in his living room. It is a part of his fireplace

  5. #5
    Senior Member Meatwad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Canada New Jersey
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    The closest thing we have to battleships today is what the Kirov Battlecruiser?

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norway
    Age
    26
    Posts
    368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiber View Post
    Just some trivia. My father has a piece of Tirpitz in his living room. It is a part of his fireplace
    My father have a Tirpitz museum

  7. #7
    Senior Member [WDW]Megaraptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Making people mad...
    Posts
    7,782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by taiaha View Post
    HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales were sunk by Japanese aircraft off the coast of Malaya, not Ceylon.

    http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/
    Thanks. Fixed.

    Here are the other battleships:

    Danish Navy

    1 Niels Juel class - http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/ reports that this battleship was sunk in Eckenforde by air bombing on May 3, 1945 but I can't find any more info.

    Greek Navy
    2 Battleships, the Kilkis (formerly USS Mississippi, BB-23) and the Limnos (formerly USS Idaho, BB-24), both Mississippi class battleships. Both were sunk by Ju-87 dive bombers in the Salamis Channel on April 23, 1941.

    The Dutch Navy
    Operated some coastal defense battleships such as HNLMS De Zeven Provincien.

    HNLMS De Zeven Provincien was sunk by Japanese bombers off of Surabaya, February 18, 1942. Raised by the Japanese and used as a floating battery, then sunk by allied bombers in 1943.

    Norwegian Navy
    2 Eidsvold class

    HNoMSA Eidsvold, sunk by German destroyers in Narvik harbor, April 9, 1940 with loss of 175 crew.

    HNoMSA Norge, sunk by German destroyers in Narvik harbor, April 9 1940, with loss of 101 crew.

    Finnish Navy
    2 Vainamoinen class

    Ilmarinen, sunk in minefield after shelling Estonian coastal islands September 13, 1941 with loss of 271 crew.

    Notes and observations:

    My list did not include battleships that were no longer being used as such by the outbreak of the war, such as the USS Utah, nor did it count battleships scuttled or grounded by their crews such as the USS Nevada or the Graf Spee as "sunk."

    Almost every battleship that saw combat received some form of battle damage.

    Only a few battleships were sunk by submarines. Most battleships could survive a few torpedo hits by sealing off the damaged compartments. Look at the torpedoing of the USS North Carolina or the Richelieu for instance.

    Sinkings while in port were the most common, accounting for 16 losses. This was also the most likely way to survive a battleship sinking (with some obvious exceptions like the Arizona).

    The most deadly sinkings were the Bismarck and Yamato, both of which were operating without friendly warship or air support, and capsized.

    This data really shows to me how obsolete battleships had become. Sure, there were still plenty of surface fights, but more than one third (38% in fact) of all battleships serving in World War 2 were sunk. Of those sunk, 57% were sunk by air attack.

    Amongst navies that saw major combat, the US Navy suffered far fewer losses of battleships as a percentage of their force. This is at least partly due to the tactics they used of not letting battleships operate alone, without air cover (unlike the British with Force Z or the Germans in Operation Rheinubung). In fact, after Pearl Harbor the US Navy did not lose a single battleship in combat.
    Last edited by [WDW]Megaraptor; 06-20-2007 at 11:44 AM.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norway
    Age
    26
    Posts
    368

    Default

    Thanks for the info.

    Interresting story behind the sinking of the of the norwegian Eidsvold and Norge. The commander of the german destroyers went onboard if i recall correctly Norge and spoke to the commander there. He said that if they did not surrender they would be sunk, but the norwegians refused.
    The german commander then returned to his destroyer, and moments later several torpedoes were fired agains the norwegian ships and they were destroyed.

    Some times it's best to just swallow your pride and give in. The norwegians knew that they would't stand a chance with their obsolete ships against the superior destroyer force, but they still refused to surrender. And almost 200 men died.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ruling the oceans from a landlocked rock
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Ehm... WDW, no offence to all the MP-members with minor navies in WW2, but I don't think the warships you mentioned in your second post, can really be counted as battleships (except for the Greek). Most cruisers of the USN, RN or KM were bigger and more powerful, so then they should be taken into account in your first post as well...

    Nevertheless: interesting posts.

  10. #10
    Member Hecatonchiros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Finland
    Age
    30
    Posts
    708

    Default

    I donīt know how flexible the term "Battleship" is, but I would not call the two finnish Ilmarinen- class ships battleships, myself. They were called "Panssarilaiva" ("armored ships") by the finns, and I believe the the english term would be "coastal defence ship".

  11. #11
    Senior Member [WDW]Megaraptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Making people mad...
    Posts
    7,782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    Ehm... WDW, no offence to all the MP-members with minor navies in WW2, but I don't think the warships you mentioned in your second post, can really be counted as battleships (except for the Greek). Most cruisers of the USN, RN or KM were bigger and more powerful, so then they should be taken into account in your first post as well...

    Nevertheless: interesting posts.
    I debated whether or not to include them, but if I excluded them I might have to exclude other old, slow battleships such as the Schleswig-Holstein so I decided to include them. Sometimes they are labeled "coastal defense battleships", other times simply "coastal defense ships."

  12. #12
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ruling the oceans from a landlocked rock
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    What really is a battleship?

    - Big, at least somewhere near 600 ft
    - Heavily armoured, displacing at least 25,000 tonnes
    - Multiple turrets with big guns; at least 10"
    (rough estimates)

    And to make things worse: originally, the Battleship was just a prototype for the ultimate warship of the early 20th century, the Battlecruiser (same as above, but faster and generally with a slimmer hull). Unfortunately, politicians liked the squat, bulkier (and cheaper) Battleship so much, that the Battlecruiser became a sub-species of Battleship. Bet you didn't see that one coming, oi, Jacky?

    Well, I have time off anyway here (being on a peacekeeping mission is great when it's actually peace ) so why not scuttle the original posting a bit further:

    RN: HMS Vanguard was commissioned in 1946, so you can scrap her from your WW2 list

    KM:
    - The three Deutschland-ships (Graf Spee, Scheer & Lutzow) are really too light to be considered a battleship (12.000 - 16.000 tonnes); even Ze Dzjermans themselves considered them Heavy Cruisers once they got real Battleships.
    - Same goes for the earlier Deutschland class ships; they were outdated by the time WW1 broke out.

    As for the smaller navies, except for the American battleships operated by the Greeks: none of the described ships are anywhere near a proper size, adequatly armoured or sufficiently armed battleship. I for one wouldn't like to fight the 772 ft, 38,000 tonnes Scharnhorst with a less than 300 ft, just over 4,000 tonnes Eidsvold...

    Minor navies may have called their light cruisers battleships, but What's In A Name? Likewise the Coastal Batlleship: it doesn't have the prefix Coastal for nothing; littoral ships are by default smaller because of the shallow waters...

    Notwithstanding the appraise for this interesting thread; the fate of small vessels is no less tragic or heroic than their bigger sisters'.

  13. #13
    Senior Member [WDW]Megaraptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Making people mad...
    Posts
    7,782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    And to make things worse: originally, the Battleship was just a prototype for the ultimate warship of the early 20th century, the Battlecruiser (same as above, but faster and generally with a slimmer hull). Unfortunately, politicians liked the squat, bulkier (and cheaper) Battleship so much, that the Battlecruiser became a sub-species of Battleship. Bet you didn't see that one coming, oi, Jacky?
    I counted battlecruisers as battleships for the purpose of this post. Hence the Hood, Alaska, etc are up there. Also, you have to remember the "Fast Battleships" of the US Navy (North Carolina class, Iowa class, South Dakota class) that had the speed of a battlecruiser but the size, armor and armament of a battleship.

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    RN: HMS Vanguard was commissioned in 1946, so you can scrap her from your WW2 list
    My bad, I read the date launched instead of date commissioned.

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    KM:
    - The three Deutschland-ships (Graf Spee, Scheer & Lutzow) are really too light to be considered a battleship (12.000 - 16.000 tonnes); even Ze Dzjermans themselves considered them Heavy Cruisers once they got real Battleships.
    But they were over 600 feet long and had 11" guns so they hit 2 of 3 on your chart...

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    - Same goes for the earlier Deutschland class ships; they were outdated by the time WW1 broke out.
    Most battleships at the start of WW2 were outdated to some degree or another, including the USS Arizona, most of the battleships at Pearl Harbor, the Royal Oak...

    Anyways, it seems I missed some Soviet Navy vessels...

    3 Gangut class (including Sevastopol)

    Marat, sunk by German Ju-87 dive bombers in Kronsdadt, used as a stationary artillery battery.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Minardiau View Post
    I think many people have the misconception that the battleship was obsolete. I beg to differ.
    It is not misconception but proven fact that was demonstrated time and time again during WWII. Battleship without proper air cover was sitting duck for any aircraft carrier.

    Quote Originally Posted by Minardiau View Post
    As stated before. The amount of resources a single modern state of the art battleship could tie up more then made up for any shortfall against air attack.
    I think you have to consider the resource that went into building one of these ships and hiding it from enemy. By second world war a seizable chunk o GDP was required to build these ships. Take for example the King George V class. I think I read somewhere that building these ships cost GB 5 percent of its GDP during construction period. Can you imagine spending that kind of money today. You can also ask your self why Germany didn't build more of them. Because they didn't have resources to support war machine and build battleships. They opted for cheaper solution, submarines which proved to be much more affective then fleet of battleships they possessed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Minardiau View Post
    Whilst Germany still had the Tirpitz and Scharnhost in service even if they were pretty much confined to the Norwegian Fjords the Royal Navy could not afford to reduce it's fleet in significant amounts to counter the Japanese when the US Navy was at it's knees.
    By the time only Tripitz and Scharnhost where left, US navy was on offensive and Japanese fleet in retreat. US Navy was never at it's knees. It's battleship fleet was. It's carriers where live and kicking and they proved that just few months later when they sunk first Japanese carrier. And only 7 months after Perl harbor they destroyed cream of Japanese carrier fleet at battle of Midway and turned tied of war in Pacific. From that moment on Japanese fleet was in retreat and not beacuse of lack of battleships but but beacuse of lack of aircraft carriers.

    Also by that time large part of royal fleet was operating in other theaters like Mediterranean sea, fare east or just escorting convoys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Minardiau View Post
    As a strategic asset a battleship has never been matched. Even in combat a modern battleship could simply take and take and take massive damage yet still be a formidable fighting force. The sinking of Bismark, Scharnhorst, Yamato and Musashi. Huge resources were spent in defeating these 4 ships.
    Again I would disagree. Battleship was quite clearly trumped by aricraft carrier in WWII and it took over roll of of strategic asset that keeps even today.

    Much smaller resources where spent in sinking most of them then in building them. Aircraft carriers where cheaper and loss of airplane while paynfull in loss of life is insignificant in comparison to material and human losses suffered in sinking single battleship.

    Quote Originally Posted by Minardiau View Post
    I would argue that if modern Anti-Aircraft technology had of been available much sooner then Battleships may still be with us.
    Do you mean WWII battleship with aegis combat system and SM II missiles? Noppp losing propossion.
    Last edited by z0rr0101; 06-21-2007 at 03:02 PM.

  15. #15

    Default

    Great thread Megaraptor, I can spend hours debating Battleships...

    Some comments:

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    What really is a battleship?

    - Big, at least somewhere near 600 ft
    - Heavily armoured, displacing at least 25,000 tonnes
    - Multiple turrets with big guns; at least 10"
    (rough estimates)
    Agree, Good estimates, but I also purpose at least 12'' guns beacuse both Germany and US had large cruisers (pocket battleships) with 11'' and 12 '' guns. We have to remember that most of so called battleships that served in WWII where build before, during and just after WWI. So


    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    And to make things worse: originally, the Battleship was just a prototype for the ultimate warship of the early 20th century, the Battlecruiser (same as above, but faster and generally with a slimmer hull). Unfortunately, politicians liked the squat, bulkier (and cheaper) Battleship so much, that the Battlecruiser became a sub-species of Battleship. Bet you didn't see that one coming, oi, Jacky?
    Battlecruisers where invented before WWI. They where distinct class of ship that where faster, more agile then WWI battleships, had same armament as battleships but much thinner armor. Concept was great on paper but it failed the moment it came in range of battleship guns. Because of thin armor they where easy pray for more heavily protected battleships. The most tragic example is a Hood. Hood started its life as a Battlecruiser and later was modernized and upgraded with thicker armor and reclassified as Battleship. Unfortunately armor wasn't thick enough which doomed Hood when it meet Bismark.

    Most ship that started as Battlecruisers where upgraded with thicker armor and reclassified as battleships between the great wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    KM:
    - The three Deutschland-ships (Graf Spee, Scheer & Lutzow) are really too light to be considered a battleship (12.000 - 16.000 tonnes); even Ze Dzjermans themselves considered them Heavy Cruisers once they got real Battleships.
    - Same goes for the earlier Deutschland class ships; they were outdated by the time WW1 broke out.
    Also known as Pocket battleships, armored ships or large heavy cruisers. Deutschland class where probably most modern heavy cruiser in the world at the outbrake of WWII. They where some of the first ships to be equipped with the radar. For intended roll as a raiders they where perfect. Nothing smaller then battleship could fight them and there where precious few fast battleships at that time that could catch up with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by [WDW]Megaraptor View Post
    I counted battlecruisers as battleships for the purpose of this post. Hence the Hood, Alaska, etc are up there. Also, you have to remember the "Fast Battleships" of the US Navy (North Carolina class, Iowa class, South Dakota class) that had the speed of a battlecruiser but the size, armor and armament of a battleship.
    Alaska class should be classified as very large cruiser. While very large and quite heavily armed, it has much weaker armor then even battlecruiser. Preciesly as Deutschland class it should be classified as large heavy cruiser intended for raiding and not for slagging match of ships of the line.

    Norwegian and Finnish where classified as (bad translation) coastal defense ships.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •