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Thread: Super-sticky-medic-thread

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    Default Super-sticky-medic-thread

    As an IDF medic it has interested me to know whether other militaries around the world use the same type of touniquet we use here for hemorrhage control in the arms and lower led or whether they use something else.


    So this is what we use...



    These tourniquets are 2 meters long and made of either silicon, rubber or a combination of the two.

    The rubber ones need to be pwedered with talc every once and while (else they may get torn). Silicon is the best as it doesn't tear yet it sometimes slips off blood. The army tried to create a better tourniquet by combining the two materials however the result was a tourniquet that features the disadvantages of both.
    Last edited by GiladS; 09-22-2007 at 03:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flanker7 View Post
    GiladS, can you explain how do you aply your type of tourniquet?
    A) You lay the tourniquet in an L like shape over the the limb.

    B) Wrap the tourniquet as tightly as possible while the *****s on both side of the limb are one over the other.

    B) Once you finish wrapping the limb, you tie up the two edges.





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    For Queen and Country Roy Batty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiladS View Post
    I would imagine that in your case only medics and other medical personnel traditionally carry tourniquets with them.
    2 soldiers in each 8 to 10 man section are carrying tourniquets, Israeli Bandages, Chest Decompression needles, Quick Clot and a bag of other odds and sods.

    Each other soldier carries a few battle dressings and a pocket cpr mask.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Sig View Post
    The Medics were getting alot of guys coming into the role 3 hospitals with 4 and 5 tournequets on one limb for minor wounds and multiple chest needles in. Guys in the field while meaning well were doing more harm than good in some cases.
    Dear God... While talking about medical stuff, does anyone carry tampons? I read a story about soldiers carrying them because it saved the life of one of them. The wound was so deep, the medic couldn't stop the bleeding. By chance, one of them took the wrong medical pack before leaving and there was a couple of tampons in it. The medic took one and "plug" the wound with it. Later the surgeon said it saved the soldier life.
    Last edited by Bulletproof; 09-22-2007 at 11:12 PM.

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    Talk to Chris at CTOMS. They are providing the most up to date training for Canadian CF and LE Medics. He also wrote the book on Canadian TCCC.

    http://www.ctoms.ca/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulletproof View Post
    Dear God... While talking about medical stuff, does anyone carry tampons? I read a story about soldiers carrying them because it saved the life of one of them. The wound was so deep, the medic couldn't stop the bleeding. By chance, one of them took the wrong medical pack before leaving and there was a couple of tampons in it. The medic took one and "plug" the wound with it. Later the surgeon said it saved the soldier life.
    our medics went and bought tampons for everyone in our unit, each soldier was given 4. once saw them used to treat an IP's wounds, 1 in the entry, two in the exit. seemed to work well.
    every american soldier these days have a CAT issued with their RFI kit before deploying, only thing i dont like about cats is the velcro goes to **** quick and it is not large enough for a big guys thigh.
    if i remember right the RFI medic pouch came with
    - CAT tourni
    - pressure bandage
    - surgical tape
    - latex gloves
    then we had a CLS pack for every truck, not to mention the **** the medics had on em.
    chilled fluid bags, a soldiers best friend

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    According to the new CLS (Combat Lifesaver Course) I took a couple weeks ago everyone will be issued a CAT in the new first aid pouch. It'll have some other stuff in it too but I forget. Doc Strauss, one of the medics teaching the class, said that every CLS and soldier for that mater should carry tampons of different sizes so we can plug the holes. I felt like an idiot for buying them but if that's what needs to be in my CLS bag then so be it.

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    "It's a Toyota D*ckhead" Beowulf's Avatar
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    This is a post I made in a thread that got deleted

    You don't really need a tampon, that's what kerlix is for. Use it the same way, stuff it in the hole and throw a bandage over top of it.

    Kerlix is just as absorbent (or more so) than tampons. (Extra absorbent tampons are only designed to absorb 15 to 18 grams or about .5-.6 ounces.)

    Kerlix is also supposed to help prevent infection better than a normal tampon. Plus they're free, and already in most CLS bags, just ask for extra.

    Kendall AMD dressings contain PHMB (polyhexamethylene biguanide), a bacteria-killing polymer. PHMB attacks bacteria on and within the dressing fabric, helping keep infection out of the wound and limiting cross-contamination.

    AMD dressings treated with PHMB are used like standard dressings automatically comply with your facility’s existing protocol.

    Here’s how PHMB works:

    1. PHMB binds to bacteria’s phospholipid (outer) membrane
    2. Disrupts membrane, causing cytoplasm to leak out
    3. Cell’s protective layer disintegrates
    4. Cell collapses and dies

    * PHMB works similarly to dismantle gram-negative bacteria

    Effective against:

    * Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
    * Vanocomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE)
    * Acinetobacter Baumannii (MDRAB)
    * Staphylococcus aureus
    * Staphylococcus epidermitis
    * Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    * Escherichia coli
    * Candida albicans
    * Staphylococcus coagulase
    * Proteus mirabilis
    * Serratia marcescens
    * Enterbacter cloacae
    * Klebsiella pneumoniae
    * Enterococcus faecalis
    Beowulf is online now Report Post IP
    http://www.kendallamd.com/ProductInf...HowItWorks.php

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    For Queen and Country Roy Batty's Avatar
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    Here is my issued TCCC leg bag







    The one I carry overseas is Arid Cadpat or Coyote brown. The major components? a CAT tournequet (1 time use only), 2 Ashermans chest seals, 2 packs of Quick Clot, 2 Isreali bandages, 2 Cooks chest decompression needle sets, surgical sicsorrs, Kurlex gauze for wound packing (Tampons are a no-no acording to our Medics), 2 NPAs with lube, 2 big green tri-angular bandages, a handfull of triage cards and assorted tape, gauze and bandaids.

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    Senior Member Sabre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiladS View Post
    So basically you guys use 'Russian tourniquet' (screw tourniquet) devices at any scenario.

    Here in Israel every soldier usaully carries the small and flexible tourniquets in their pockets (together with their personal dressing).

    I would imagine that in your case only medics and other medical personnel traditionally carry tourniquets with them.
    Tourniquets went out of fashion for a while, with only medics having them in their kits. Those were the old 'sangway anchor' type, which was just a rubber hose with a hook at one end to secure the live end. The rise in proportion of extremity haemorrhage in combat deaths led to the individual issue of CAT tourniquets.

    They are supposed to be an individual issue along with the compression bandage and airways. Now 1 in 4 UK troops are trained as 'Team Medics' and issued with a kit containing a CAT, hemcon dressing, compression dressings, airways, suction easy, IV cannulae and giving sets plus fluid, amongst other things.

    Thankfully the new 'doctrine' was filtered down PDQ as soon as it was generated. One PF bloke who sadly lost both legs in a mine blast was treated by his mates using the new principle of stopping massive haemorrhage first. They didn't have CATs issued at the time, so they improvised by using cable ties as tourniquets on his legs, saving his life.

    It just goes to show that knowledge is the most important bit of kit.

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    I'm taking the Operational and Emergency Medical Skills Course (OEMS) now. It is being given by one of the TCCC founding fathers. I'm willing to try and answer any related deployment medical questions you may have. For example, the A, B, C's of civilian ATLS are out as far as field medicine is concerned. They are replaced by MARCH. The acronym stands for:

    M- Massive bleeding
    A- Airway
    R- Respiration
    C- Circulation
    H- Head/hypothermia

    This is the order for treating a casualty in the field. Like TCCC, the first priority is Fire Superiority!

    I'll expand on this and be standing by for questions the rest of this week, so sound off if you have any.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    Tourniquets went out of fashion for a while, with only medics having them in their kits. Those were the old 'sangway anchor' type, which was just a rubber hose with a hook at one end to secure the live end. The rise in proportion of extremity haemorrhage in combat deaths led to the individual issue of CAT tourniquets.

    They are supposed to be an individual issue along with the compression bandage and airways. Now 1 in 4 UK troops are trained as 'Team Medics' and issued with a kit containing a CAT, hemcon dressing, compression dressings, airways, suction easy, IV cannulae and giving sets plus fluid, amongst other things.

    Thankfully the new 'doctrine' was filtered down PDQ as soon as it was generated. One PF bloke who sadly lost both legs in a mine blast was treated by his mates using the new principle of stopping massive haemorrhage first. They didn't have CATs issued at the time, so they improvised by using cable ties as tourniquets on his legs, saving his life.

    It just goes to show that knowledge is the most important bit of kit.
    Cable ties....quick thinking there.

    The last I heard the leading causes of preventable death on the battlefield were hypovolemic shock due to exsanguination (bleeding out), tension pneumothorax, or airway problems.

    Thus the new training (U.S.) places a lot of emphasis on using the tourniquet early, how to use the Nasopharyngeal Airway, and how to properly diagnose TP and do a needle decompression.

    I believe they did away with the "J" Tube, not sure why though.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Sig View Post
    I carry a couple of those in my kit when I'm working. I also carry the new and improved Kwik Clot that comes in a little pouch like a teabag.

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