Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 35

Thread: Germany - Man looking for mushroom finds AT-Rocket

  1. #16
    buck duck huck luck muck puck ruck suck tuck yuck fuuuuuuuu muck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Beim Barte des Proleten!
    Posts
    14,803

    Default

    I think it was totally demined, and as far as I know, even by the NVA themselves when they merged in the Bundeswehr.
    Some parts of the Eifel are not demined yet and will probably never be, too, because of mines made of glass. They are not detectable and cause very serious injuries.

  2. #17
    Senior Member Invisigoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muck View Post
    I think it was totally demined, and as far as I know, even by the NVA themselves when they merged in the Bundeswehr.
    Some parts of the Eifel are not demined yet and will probably never be, too, because of mines made of glass. They are not detectable and cause very serious injuries.
    Hmm nasty...remind me not to go to the Eiffel

  3. #18
    buck duck huck luck muck puck ruck suck tuck yuck fuuuuuuuu muck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Beim Barte des Proleten!
    Posts
    14,803

    Default

    It's the Eifel National Park, very close to the border with Belgium. The main concentration of the fields is around the Urftalsperre Dam if I remember correctly. The concerned area is probably not that big, maybe some hectares.

    I've been there once. Very beautiful countryside and some interesting locations, among them the only memorial site an enemy of WW2 has installed for another enemy...Some story with a German soldier who died in late 1944 when he tried to save a wounded American GI from a German minefield. A true hero if you ask me.

  4. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default

    dude thats some pretty intense stuff man

  5. #20
    buck duck huck luck muck puck ruck suck tuck yuck fuuuuuuuu muck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Beim Barte des Proleten!
    Posts
    14,803

    Default

    Indeed it is. His name was Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld. The wounded GI was lying in an heavily mined area called "Wilde Sau" (Wild Sow) and pleading for help. Lengfeld ordered cease fire to his men to provide the Americans time to save their wounded comrade, but when they weren't able to reach him he formed a medical evacuation group of his own medics to bring him to a first aid station. Only metres away from the GI he stepped on a landmine when he crossed a street and sustained fatal injuries.

    May he rest in peace.


  6. #21
    Loadmaster General Laworkerbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    California Über Alles
    Age
    44
    Posts
    42,366

    Default

    Thanks for posting that Muck

  7. #22
    Senior Member Ghelp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    0331-Accuracy by volume of fire
    Posts
    4,380

    Default

    Must be alot of munitions in Germany with two world wars and the build up during the Cold war.

    Thanks for posting that story.

    R.I.P

  8. #23

    Default



    Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld

    (from the www.22ndinfantry.org website)

    The Hürtgen Forest Monument

    In the October 22, 1995 issue of "The Arizona Republic" newspaper, Steve Wilson wrote the following article:

    One of the longest, bloodiest and least publicized battles of World War II was fought in the dense fir trees along the German - Belgian border called the Hürtgen Forest.

    Thirty thousand Americans were killed or wounded in six months of fighting that began in September 1944 and lasted far into the bitter winter. Thousands more were disabled by combat fatigue and exposure. An estimated 12,000 Germans were killed.

    "Whoever survived Hürtgenwald must have had a guardian angel on each of his shoulders, " wrote Ernest Hemmingway, who covered the battle for Collier's magazine.

    One soldier who got out alive is retired Major Gen. John F. Ruggles of Phoenix, 86. He was then a Lieutenant Colonel serving with the 22nd Infantry Regiment.

    Last year (1994) to mark the battle's 50th anniversary, Ruggles organized an effort among veterans of the Regiment to place a monument in the forest.

    It's a very different monument. Unlike other World War II tributes, this one doesn't honor our own soldiers. This one honors an unheralded act of humanity by a 23 year old German Infantry Lieutenant.

    Ruggles wasn't interested in media attention last year, and the monuments dedication received no news coverage in this country. But a friend recently convinced him that others would like to hear the story, so last week he talked about it.

    On November 12, 1944, Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld was commanding a beleaguered German rifle company. Like most units on both sides, he had suffered heavy casualties.

    Early that morning, a wounded American could be heard calling from the middle of a German minefield in a no man's land separating the combatants.

    "Help me" the man cried. His unit had withdrawn , however, and no U.S. troops were close enough to hear.

    Lengfeld ordered his men not to shoot if Americans came to rescue the man. But none came. The soldiers weakening voice was heard for hours.

    "Help me" he called, again and again. At about 10:30 that morning, Lengfeld could bear the cries no longer. He formed a rescue squad, complete with Red Cross vests and flags, and led his men toward the wounded American.

    He never made it. Approaching the soldier, he stepped on a land mine, and the exploding metal fragments tore deeply into his body. Eight hours later Lengfeld is dead. The fate of the American is unknown.

    Much of this story, unpublished in any American books on the war, is based on the eyewitness account of Hubert Gees, who served as Lengfeld's communications runner.

    Speaking at the monument's dedication in Germany last October, Gees said : " Lieutenant Lengfeld was one of the best soldiers of the Hürtgen Forest. He was an exemplary company commander, who never asked us to do more than he himself was ready to give. He possessed the complete confidence of his soldiers.

    Ruggles said Lengfeld's sense of duty went far beyond the call. " You can't go to any greater extreme than to give your life trying to rescue someone you are fighting as your enemy in war " he said. " Compare that to the indifference most people feel about each other today."

    The bronze and concrete monument is believed to be the only one placed by Americans in a German military cemetery. In both German and English, the plaque reads :

    Here in the Hürtgen Forest, on Nov. 12, 1944, Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld, a German officer, gave his life while trying to save the life of an American soldier lying severely wounded in the 'Wilde Sau' minefield and appealing for medical aid."

    To the young Lieutenant, the voice crying out that day did not come from an enemy. Nor from an American, nor a stranger. It came from a human being in need. Something inside Lengfeld compelled him to act - a feeling so strong and enduring not even the madness of war could block it.

    In the heavy silence of the German forest, where thousands upon thousands met death, that glorious impulse for life is now honored.
    Last edited by Shakey; 10-15-2007 at 06:06 PM.

  9. #24
    Banned user
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    7,849

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muck View Post
    I would not want to search for mushrooms in the forests here. In autumn, these people are permanently in the news because they have found something - non-starters, dead bodies, crocodiles, and heaven knows whatsoever else...
    In Germany?

  10. #25
    Pusser
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Two mouthfuls away from Heaven
    Posts
    4,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calanen View Post
    In Germany?
    Yeah, they would be freezing their crocodile bollocks off...

  11. #26
    buck duck huck luck muck puck ruck suck tuck yuck fuuuuuuuu muck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Beim Barte des Proleten!
    Posts
    14,803

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calanen View Post
    In Germany?
    Yep. It happens incredibly often that people legally/illegallly acquire wild animals and then abandon them in wilderness when they can't handle them anymore. Reptiles, Snakes and so on.
    Just a week ago someone searching for mushroom in Northern Germany came across a three metre long crocodile.

  12. #27
    Banned user theholeinthedonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Invisigoth View Post
    Hmm nasty...remind me not to go to the Eiffel
    Quote Originally Posted by muck View Post
    It's the Eifel National Park, very close to the border with Belgium. The main concentration of the fields is around the Urftalsperre Dam if I remember correctly. The concerned area is probably not that big, maybe some hectares.

    I've been there once. Very beautiful countryside and some interesting locations, among them the only memorial site an enemy of WW2 has installed for another enemy...Some story with a German soldier who died in late 1944 when he tried to save a wounded American GI from a German minefield. A true hero if you ask me.
    There are many corners with Glasminen and otherstuff still lying around, there was just too much of the stuff to find all of it....I found mines (all of them american though) on several occasions in my district alltough it was the quitest sector of the Rundstedt offensive, in athe gap that separated the LXXXV Korps of the 7th Army(Kniess) and the LXXX Korps of the 7th Army (Beyer). By now all te mines are harmless ....you have to be carefull with mortar and artillery shells though.
    RESPECT FOR LEUTNANT LENGFELD!!!!!!!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by muck View Post
    Yep. It happens incredibly often that people legally/illegallly acquire wild animals and then abandon them in wilderness when they can't handle them anymore. Reptiles, Snakes and so on.
    Just a week ago someone searching for mushroom in Northern Germany came across a three metre long crocodile.

    I will start carrying my service gun again...you have to wonder what goes on in those peoples minds

  13. #28
    fap, fap, fap, mousegiggle, fap, fap, fap toki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    14,843

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghelp View Post
    Must be alot of munitions in Germany with two world wars and the build up during the Cold war.

    Thanks for posting that story.

    R.I.P
    The airwar left an incredible amount of duds. If they rebuilt something in any place, especially inner cities, they have to clear it first. They find duds all the time. I've been 'evacuated' once (at work anyway), but it happens alot.

    Btw the Ardennes, Hürtgen-forest and Eifel in general are very beautiful regions.
    They are the recreational areas of the region i live. Just been to the Ardennes and Hürtgen-Forest over Eastern. Worth it. Yes we have deep woods in NRW as well. Not only southern Germany.
    [SIZE="1"][*******"Silver"]I know the Ardennes are in Belgium[/COLOR][/SIZE]

  14. #29
    Banned user theholeinthedonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by toki View Post
    The airwar left an incredible amount of duds. If they rebuilt something in any place, especially inner cities, they have to clear it first. They find duds all the time. I've been 'evacuated' once (at work anyway), but it happens alot.

    Btw the Ardennes, Hürtgen-forest and Eifel in general are very beautiful regions.
    They are the recreational areas of the region i live. Just been to the Ardennes and Hürtgen-Forest over Eastern. Worth it. Yes we have deep woods in NRW as well. Not only southern Germany.
    [SIZE="1"][*******"Silver"]I know the Ardennes are in Belgium[/COLOR][/SIZE]
    Where in the Ardennes have you been if you do not mind me asking?

  15. #30
    Senior Member nemowork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,432

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muck View Post
    Yep. It happens incredibly often that people legally/illegallly acquire wild animals and then abandon them in wilderness when they can't handle them anymore. Reptiles, Snakes and so on.
    Just a week ago someone searching for mushroom in Northern Germany came across a three metre long crocodile.
    On the plus side it was probably cold and wouldnt move fast but finding one of those must make you wonder what to get first, a psychiatrist or new underwear?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •