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Thread: WW2 Captured Japanese Aircraft - Photos

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    Default WW2 Captured Japanese Aircraft - Photos














































































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    Those are fantastic. Where did you get those?

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    Junior Member a2003868's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drakegoodman View Post


    This looks like the German Ju-88... anyone?

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    Last of the Mohicans boone's Avatar
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    This also looks slightly familiar.
    Background?

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    Member GrinchWSLG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    This also looks slightly familiar.
    Background?
    http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/3279/218812719o1580045zw1dotjpg
    Here's what I found.

    On February 24, 1938, a Japanese manufacturer, Mitsui (a subsidiary of Nakajima Hikoki), purchased the production rights and technical data to the DC-3 for $90,000. Unknown to the United States at the time, the sale was directed behind the scenes by the Imperial Japanese Navy (who was planning on using the type in the invasion of the East Indies). They saw the potential in the DC-3 to serve as a military transport. Mitsui and Showa Hikoki, another manufacturer, made many engineering revisions to take advantage of standard Japanese parts and raw materials. Japan also purchased and imported some machinery from the U.S. to speed up production. The first Japanese-produced DC-3 appeared in September 1939. By May 1941, the fifth DC-3 left the Showa factory, this one using the last Douglas-built fuselage. By July 1941, the factory was producing one DC-3 transport per month, far short of the one airplane per day demanded by the Imperial Japanese Navy.71 Finally by 1942, the production quota was reached. (See Appendix H.)

    Although ostensibly purchased for civilian use, the Japanese DC-3s were given a Navy designation L2D2 (L-transport, 2-second Navy type, D2-second Douglas design). L2D1 became the designation for imported DC-3s. The Japanese built eight separate sub types in two basic configurations, straight airline type, and cargo planes.

    Japan modified the transport design for easier production. In addition, they replaced the Pratt & Whitney 1,000 hp engines they imported with 1,000 hp Mitsubishi Kinsei 43 radial engines.

    After two years of manufacture, Nakajima had built 71 C-47 type aircraft (designated L2D2 Navy Type 0 Transport Model 11) and switched to manufacturing combat aircraft. Meanwhile, Showa built 416 DC-3 type aircraft, including 75 cargo versions with the "barn door" and reinforced floor (designated L2D2-1). The first Japanese military version with wide cargo doors, remarkably similar to the U.S. C-47, appeared about the same time as the C-47. There are strong suspicions that it was a copy, and not the product of an independent design. The Japanese manufactured 75 cargo versions of the DC-3.
    Source

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    Last of the Mohicans boone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrinchWSLG View Post
    Here's what I found.
    Source
    Nice catch buddy! Cheers!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by a2003868 View Post
    This looks like the German Ju-88... anyone?
    Japanese anti-submarine copy Kyushu Q1W Tokai (Eastern Sea).

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    Unicus Ac Immortalis II Dark Avenger's Avatar
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    Named "Lorna" by the Americans.

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    Member Briggs's Avatar
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    What happened to these planes? Scrapped?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Briggs View Post
    What happened to these planes? Scrapped?
    Evaluated, then scrapped I'd presume. The luckier ones may have gone on to be museum pieces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drakegoodman View Post
    Evaluated, then scrapped I'd presume. The luckier ones may have gone on to be museum pieces.
    It's a shame really. Wouldn't mind having had the opportunity to get my hands on a Spitfire/Typhoon/Ta-183/Go-229

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    Senior Member commanding's Avatar
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    1 photo of a pontoon aircraft Japanese WWII that is housed at the Nimitz museum in Fredericksburg, Texas:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photos3_0002.jpg 
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    and a crashed and jungle rotted Japanese aircraft at same location:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photos3_0001.jpg 
Views:	157 
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ID:	172382

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    This also looks slightly familiar.
    Background?
    I do not remember if Mitsubishi manufactured under license the DC-3 in their plants, otherwise it could be a Lisunov-2, which also would be very strange

  14. #14
    L O L A JCR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by commanding View Post
    1 photo of a pontoon aircraft Japanese WWII that is housed at the Nimitz museum in Fredericksburg, Texas:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photos3_0002.jpg 
Views:	115 
Size:	410.6 KB 
ID:	172381

    and a crashed and jungle rotted Japanese aircraft at same location:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	photos3_0001.jpg 
Views:	157 
Size:	316.2 KB 
ID:	172382
    The first one is called Kyushu N1K1 Kyofu or "Rex", about the only purpose designed fighter floatplane ever.
    It was followed by a successful land plane version, the N1K1-J/2-J Shiden/Shiden-Kai "George".

    The scrap heap is a D3A "Val" dive bomber, of Pearl Harbor fame.
    Sad to see it in such a state, they should restore it as it is probably the only one left in the world.
    Much has been made of even worse scrap heaps.

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