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  1. #901

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    How are you Norgies satisfied with HK416s? Any negative comments?
    Last edited by oldschool recce; 03-01-2012 at 01:59 PM.

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    Have your guys begun transferring their roles to their Afghan counterparts or is that supposed to occur later this year? Maybe it was a few months ago where I read you guys were planning to withdraw fully by next year.

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    @oldschool recce:

    The HK416's are working very well in a variety of operational enivronments.

    There have been no major issues, and the minor ones are being fixed as we speak.

    Here is a post I made on another board:

    Hi all, wanted to share my experience with the platform, and perhaps provide a different perspective. I am a Troop First Sergeant in a Cavalry Troop in the Norwegian Army.

    The Norwegian Military has fielded 25,000 HK416 rifles, in 16.5" and 10" configurations. We have had units deployed with the rifle to Afghanistan since winter 2008, and it has performed very well, with only anecdotal FTF issues, mostly due to ammo. It has handled the operational terrain and weather factors very well, and has proven itself as a very reliable weapon for the Norwegian military.

    So far, the only issues we have had are the following:

    -Adjustable gas regulator popping out due to carbon build up underneath the selector and locking pin/spring assembly, causing short recoil/"bolt action" operation. This is a non-issue now, and started because the first instructors told everyone to not clean it.

    -Sears breaking, inducing involuntary automatic fire. This has happened to about 60 rifles. No injuries, but one incident was during a pretty heavy TIC in Afghanistan. At first they thought this happened due to poor materials used by HK, but further research by the Defence Logistics Organization discovered that the "environmental" ammo we are/were using caused the bolt to travel to the rear faster, causing the hammer to strike the sear with more force again causing more stress.

    -Wrong diameter roll pins. The weapon is constructed with European standards for the pin holes, and US standards for the pins. The result is pins smaller than the holes, sometimes wiggling out. Most prevalent on the charging handle latch and buffer, the latter causing cycling issues.

    This is a reclamation issue, and we started this October fixing these issues. We are receiving a new gas regulator, a drop in two-stage trigger group with a shield for the sear and correct dimension roll pins. This work is proceeding smoothly.

    In addition we have found signs that the "environmental" ammunition is wearing and tearing more rapidly than the ammunition used during testing (M193, M855 and SS109). Due to this fact, and the health issues regarding the eco ammo, we are currently using SS109 ammo for our guns. Works very well.

    As to my experience, I was issued my rifle in may of 2008, and have used the same rifle since then, including a trip to Afghanistan as part of an OMLT in 2009. I have close to 10000K rounds through my rifle, and I have not changed out any parts, except one handguard (an armorer said I broke the threads on the retention screw by tightening it too hard.....whatever....).

    I clean my rifle regularly, and make sure to keep all parts except barrel and bolt face properly lubed at all times.

    I have had one failure to fire, ammunition related, and one embarrassing incident where I experienced short recoil for every shot. This happened after shooting several mags pretty rapidly in a completely dry weapon during a live fire exercise. My mistake. No problems after that.

    Now to comment on issues that have been addressed in this thread.

    -Weight and felt recoil:
    Many of my colleagues and I were used to the G3, so for us the weapon is a lot lighter than what we were used to. Same with felt recoil. To me the weapon has almost no recoil at all.

    As far as fully automatic fire goes, again, we went from a full sized battle rifle in 7.62 to the HK416, so I feel that it is more controllable in fully automatic fire. We do not shoot it that way often, however. Maybe one or two times during the soldiers one year service, for motivational purposes.

    -Hot handguards during shooting:
    I must admit that I have never experienced this, not in Afghanistan during summer or here in Norway.

    -Accuracy:
    Our experience is that our current group of soldiers become better marksmen quicker than previous groups who used the G3. On KD ranges with pop-up targets, there are no issues knocking down targets at 400 meters consistently. We have had hits at further distances than that in Afghanistan with Comp M4's and 3X magnifiers. In my experience the inherent accuracy in the rifle is better than what most shooters can accomplish.

    The main issues regarding accuracy, although not weapons related, is due to faulty Comp M4's. The red dot has a tendency to get fixed in place, and not move when we make adjustments.

    -As far as parts life goes, I spoke to the head HK416 armorer in the Defence Logistics Organization, and he has yet to change an ejector or extractor, the pistons he has changed are changed because soldiers break them trying to scrape off carbon build up with sharp objects, thus removing the protective layer. No piston rods have been broken yet.

    The comments from the Royal Guardsman posted on page three are completely erroneous and exaggerated, although I agree with him that the rear BUIS we are issued is crap, the pistol grip is crap and we need a new sling.

    -The front sight "problem", is easily remedied with some cleaning and lube, so it's a non issue. I shot a couple of hundred rounds the other day, and it would still flip up and down.

    -The gas block is not supposed to be removed during 1st line maintenance, so his point is moot.

    -I have seen one loose buffer tube since I was issued a rifle, so not a very common issue.

    -The piston is supposed to turn black, a natural effect considering the temperatures of the gas it is in contact with. Never seen or heard of a "nipple" breaking. Most likely user induced if it has happened.

    -The only issued accessory that wobbles on the rail is the M3X light. That is due to the crappy mount on the light, and not the rail itself. The light does not wobble on my Glock 17.

    -As far as firing pin retaining pins coming out, that is user induced. We have the captivated pin. I have personally seen one pin come out. Never seen or heard of a firing pin breaking, probably a soldier using it for something he isn't supposed to and breaking it. Ejectors falling out sounds very strange as well.

    -The dust cover issue is only relevant during winter, and is due to not lubing the dust cover spring and rod, not a design error. If it is not properly lubed, snow catches, melts, turns to ice and when they close or open it, the spring revolves around its own axis, causing it to lose tension.

    -As far as spare parts and repairs go, the handful of weapons we turn in to the armorers are fixed within a week.

    There are of course the occasional failure to fire, failure to feed and other issues, but all in all it is a very good weapon system, and has proved itself as a worthy and reliable replacement for our G3's.

    As I stated initially, these are my experiences and I hoped to provide a different perspective on the system, coming from a military that issues it service wide. If you have any question or want clarification on any issues, don't hesitate to ask.
    The thread can be found here:

    http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=92876

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    @QuaPatetOrgis:

    We will gradually start handing over responsibility for the Faryab province in the next couple of years. The political descision is as of now to pull out police advisors by 2013, and military forces by 2014.

    Tha Latvians are handling the infantry Partnering Unit in PRT Maimana, while we are providing some Combat Support assets (snipers, mine/route clearance etc). We also still have the NAD helo medevac detachement, Med Coy and Role 2 multi national trauma unit in Maimana. These are the capacities we will deploy until we pull out.

    Also, Norwegian Army SOF are deploying in April to continue training the CRU TF24, an afghan anti-terrorist unit stood up by our SOF guys, currently being trained by NZ SOF. The length of this deployment has not been stated, but the Defence Minister did imply it might continue past 2013.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic1 View Post
    @QuaPatetOrgis:

    We will gradually start handing over responsibility for the Faryab province in the next couple of years. The political descision is as of now to pull out police advisors by 2013, and military forces by 2014.

    Tha Latvians are handling the infantry Partnering Unit in PRT Maimana, while we are providing some Combat Support assets (snipers, mine/route clearance etc). We also still have the NAD helo medevac detachement, Med Coy and Role 2 multi national trauma unit in Maimana. These are the capacities we will deploy until we pull out.

    Also, Norwegian Army SOF are deploying in April to continue training the CRU TF24, an afghan anti-terrorist unit stood up by our SOF guys, currently being trained by NZ SOF. The length of this deployment has not been stated, but the Defence Minister did imply it might continue past 2013.
    Oh okay. Thanks for the update. Your SOF guys have been in Afghanistan a ton of times by now I'd imagine. They were training the CRU before the SAS got the job right?

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    Exercise Blue Fox.



















    Pics from www.forsvaret.no

  7. #907

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    Quote Originally Posted by QuaPatetOrbis View Post
    They were training the CRU before the SAS got the job right?
    I read an article about that recently. It's in norwegian though, but I can translate some main points.

    http://www.vg.no/nyheter/utenriks/ar...artid=10069650

    Basically, it mentions that Norwegian forces have been a part of training the unit, and both NATO and afghan authorities wanted that Norway take charge of the training again when the New Zealand forces finish their period.

    The ministry of defense says the Crisis Response Unit was built up by Norwegian forces, and they were in charge of their training from March - October in 2007, and from March 2008 - October 2009

    They seem to have taken some inspiration from their Norwegian mentors. The units name is Crisis Response Unit Task Force 24, which they chose for themselves after they were given some insight into Norwegian war history. The number 24 is the agent number used by a well known norwegian, Gunnar «Kjakan» Sønsteby

    The final phase of the development is said to be important, because it will raise them to special forces level, according to Tom Bakkeli. Almost all operations are managed by the Afghans themselves, but their partners are involved in everything. Their main focus is preventing atttacks in Kabul, specially with IEDs, roadside bombs and the networks behind them in mind. They have already been successful in finding bombs and stopping some of the people involved.

  8. #908
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    [SIZE=4]"Norwegian special forces received with war dance"

    [/SIZE]Link to article in Norwegian:
    http://www.vg.no/nyheter/utenriks/ar...artid=10072900[SIZE=4][SIZE=2]

    Google translate:


    Published 02/04/12 - 12:20, edited 02/04/12

    With a Maori haka, a traditional war dance, greeted the soldiers from New Zealand Special Air Service (SAS)
    their counterparts in the Norwegian Armed Forces Special Command / Army Ranger Command.

    [/SIZE][/SIZE]
    Armed Forces Special Command (FSK) has taken over the job of mentorere the Afghan security force CRU TF 24

    - It's good to be started with the mission. I was even in Kabul during the early part of the overlap with our New Zealand
    colleagues, and met old friends from CRU-one from 2007 to 2009, says head of FSK / HJK, Colonel Eric Kristoffersen.

    It was started FSK education of strength is now called the Crisis Response Unit Task Force 24 Afghans chose to adopt
    the number 24, which was Gunnar "Kjakan" Sønsteby agent number during World War II.

    Since 2009, SAS mentorert strength. Newzealenderne have lost two of its operators in violation of the Taliban.

    Impressed

    - I am impressed with the way SAS has developed a CRU. We are humble to the mission, and know that this is not an easy task.
    First and foremost, because the security-situation in Kabul is challenging, says Eric Kristoffersen.

    COMMENT: Special Forces - a useful elite

    The threats from the Taliban and other groups that will prevent the development of democracy in Afghanistan
    remains high against the Afghan capital, and it is expected a turbulent spring and summer season.

    The operators of FSK / HJK took over the mission from their New Zealand counterparts without a break or so-called
    downtime. It usually takes at least two weeks between a country's strength ends its mission to another takes over.

    Found tone

    The management of the NATO-led coalition force ISAF leadership was very pleased with the seamless acquisition
    between the two countries' special forces, who found the tone when they operated together in the
    US-led Enduring Freedom in the aftermath of terrorist attacks against the United States in 2001.

    Norwegian FSK and MJK (Naval Forces), together with the Crisis Response Unit Task Force 24
    prevented a number of major attacks in Kabul in that they have uncovered organized attempt
    to attack the city with a buried roadside bombs or suicide bombers.

  9. #909
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    From www.forsvaret.no. Rescue training with latvian and american troops.
















  10. #910
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    Military police K-9 unit.











    Pics, as usual, from the Norwegian MoD website.

  11. #911
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    Pics of SoF soldiers from FSK, mentoring the Afghani Crisis Response Unit TF 24 in Kabul, during the fighting today:








    All pics are from this article: http://translate.google.com/translat...%2F21118617%2F
    Last edited by OstiasMoscas; 04-15-2012 at 03:37 PM.

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    F-314 Thor Heyerdahl


    HiRes


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    Photos: Navantia
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  13. #913

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool recce View Post
    How are you Norgies satisfied with HK416s? Any negative comments?
    I was very pleased with transitioning from the Ag3, The charging handle on the Ag3 is just horrible for lefties.
    And when it comes to training and exercises then the extra combat load is good.
    I do remember when we were on the shooting range with our Ag3F2's and had to share it with a troop of new guard conscripts, when it was our turn to shoot you could see that they were shocked of the difference in sound and/or power
    Some of the older guard have been negative towards it, a lot of our doctrine has been to fight in dense forests so the extra penetration of the 7.62 will be missed.

    Most conscripts are happy with it, though a lot of them are CoD kiddies(Every time I hear someone say it's like an m4 I want to cry).
    I haven't heard any bad things from our professional battallion(tmbn), Seems like every time they're in contact they have DMR's, GMG's and M2's so even more 7,62 might be redundant.
    Our SOF forces have been using C8's and G36k's until now and I believe they're very pleased with the transition.

    Though, The plans to exchange my beloved MG3 into a minimi are horrible!

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    Although there's a general discussion topic about this, I though I'd post this great news here as well

    We're buying upgrades and new CV9030's for 10 billion Norwegian Kroner (about 1.7 billion USD).
    Seeing as most of the CV90s are 20 years old, it's about time.



    Quote Originally Posted by NRK.no
    [*******#333333][FONT=arial]According to[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]the military[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial], this [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]includes better [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]protection for [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]those who use [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]armored [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]vehicles.[/FONT][/COLOR]

    [*******#333333][FONT=arial]-[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]It provides a [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]significantly [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]better protection [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]of our personnel [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]against [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]roadside bombs [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and mines.[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]At the same time [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]it' provide us with an increased [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]capacity in terms of [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]observation and sighting systems[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial],[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]so that [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]one is able [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]to engage and defeat [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]an opponent [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]faster, [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]said [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Maj.[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Christian [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Kvamme [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]at the [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Army's W[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]eapons S[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]chool.[/FONT][/COLOR]

    [*******#333333][FONT=arial]The Government [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]would like to [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]provide the Armoured [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Battalion, [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and the Telemark [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Battalion in [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Camp Rena [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]increased [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]capacity in terms of [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]medium-weight [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]armored [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]vehicles.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    [FONT=arial][*******#333333]
    [/COLOR][/FONT][*******#333333][FONT=arial]- This [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]means a lot. It means [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]that we have a [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]modern [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]fleet of [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]armored [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]vehicles [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and support [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]vehicles,[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]says [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Kvamme.

    The Army currently has 103 CV9030's which will be converted. By the end of the project it'll have 103 freshly upgraded vehicles and 41 brand new CV90s.[/FONT][/COLOR]

    [*******#333333][FONT=arial]-[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]The vehicles are[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial] now [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]between 15 [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and 20 year s[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]old,[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and is certainly [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]ready for [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]an upgrade.[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]They were produced [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]in a time when [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]digitization [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]and modern technology [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]was not as [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]prevalent in [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]such vehicles as today[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial],[/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]says [/FONT][/COLOR][*******#333333][FONT=arial]Kvamme.
    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    Link to the topic: http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums...icles-from-BAE

  15. #915
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    Soldiers from GRKP/u 1st and 2nd platoon. Ranger recruits doing some basic wintertraining at the Sør-Varanger Garrison.

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