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Thread: MP.net Auto Service Center

  1. #136
    trying to be celibate
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    I noticed a metal clicking sound on my rear driver tire when I drive...I dont think its a rock because it is not a constant clack. It comes and goes. I had my brakes inspected last month and I have 45% left...so it shouldnt be my brakes.

    Any clue?

  2. #137
    Grease Monkey shocker1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shorty View Post
    My dads Silverado Z71 (2000), has a very distinctive electrical whine when it gets below a 1/4 tank. Could that be related? He is also having very, very crappy gas mileage. I'm thinking either that or injectors need a good clean.
    The pump could be going out but those do make some whine. If it loud though it is most likely on it's last leg. The fuel injectors and pressure regulator are inside the intake on Vortec CPI engines. You have to remove the plastic upper phlenum to get at the assembly. The fuel pressure regulator is a rubber diaphram and it will leak at some point and cause loss of fuel milage, miss, thin oil and run rich. This is a very involved diagnosis and really should be taken to a trained technician. There is a kit to change the injectors from a poppet valve(CPI) system to a multiport electronic injector. I will try and dig up some pics and post them later.

    Quote Originally Posted by †Seraphim† View Post
    I noticed a metal clicking sound on my rear driver tire when I drive...I dont think its a rock because it is not a constant clack. It comes and goes. I had my brakes inspected last month and I have 45% left...so it shouldnt be my brakes.

    Any clue?
    Does this clicking occur while turning and accelerating? If it is then one or both axles are bad. Check the axle boots and if one os busted thats the bad one. If not take a pair of channle locks and grip the axle shaft while holding the wheel. Any free play in the joint means it is bad. Let me know.

  3. #138
    trying to be celibate
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    How loud is this clicking sound if my axle is bad? I havent had time to jack my car up, I'll try and do it tomorrow.

    It is a very subtle clicking, I have to turn of my music and kind of stick my head out the window to hear it. Unlike if it was a rock, you can hear it while driving fast...but I can only hear it if I am going very slow.

  4. #139
    Aquafina scrybe's Avatar
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    If it is dragging on the ground making sparks your axle is bad.

  5. #140
    Senior Member tuercas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by †Seraphim† View Post
    How loud is this clicking sound if my axle is bad? I havent had time to jack my car up, I'll try and do it tomorrow.

    It is a very subtle clicking, I have to turn of my music and kind of stick my head out the window to hear it. Unlike if it was a rock, you can hear it while driving fast...but I can only hear it if I am going very slow.
    what kind of car are we talking about? rear wheel drive? Front wheel? all wheel? independent rear suspension?

    If your car is rear wheel drive, a tooth may have sheared off the gear in your differential.to check , you may want to drain your differential fluid to check for metal shavings . if you find longinsh metal shards in your fluid, those are pieces of the differential gears, your diff will have to be serviced/rebuilt

    front wheel drives dont have too many components in the back that will click, except for worn suspension linkage bushings and often neglected rear strut mounts, chech for crack in the rubber components

    if your car has independent rear suspension, and is either RWD or AWD, you may have a bad CV joint. youy would check as you would FWD cv joints, look for broken rubber boots and if you find one, that specific cvjoint is suspect. grasp the axle and try to twist it, there should be sligt play but not so much that it can be considered turning, if it turns too much by hand, one of the CV joints is worn.

  6. #141
    Grease Monkey shocker1's Avatar
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    2000-2005 3.4L GM (Impala, Malibu, Grand Am, Grand Prix ect...)

    This engine seems to have an issue with carbon build up in the EGR ports. This condition may also cause condensation at the EGR valve damaging the valve. Even low mile vehicles have this problem. Techs often make the mistake of only replacing the valve and ignoring the possible carbon build up in the ports of the upper phlenum(upper intake).

    The book calls for removal of the upper and lower intake, soaking in varsol and removing the carbon. You can avoid all this extra work and not remove the intake. Remove the throttle body and EGR valve. Once these are removed you can get at both sides of the port between the EGR and the Intake. Use a shop vac and place the business end inside the intake through the opening where you removed the throttle body. Use a section of solid core wire to break up the carbon from the EGR side of the port while vacuuming up the trash inside the upper intake. You will have to clear out the intake side of the port from the inside with a pick or like tool while removing trash with the vac.

    If the carbon has heated to the point of turning white the intake is shot and will need to be replaced. White carbon is rock hard and cannot be completely removed. The ports must be completely clear so the EGR flow is within specs. I will be performing this repair on a Malibu this week and will post some pics then for reference. This is an advanced repair and is not for the tender hands of those who break stuff.

  7. #142
    Senior Member tuercas's Avatar
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    on the subject of carbon buildup on the intake, i would like to add a classic do-it -yourself decarbonisation method. for those not familiar, it involves letting the engine suck chemicals that will break up the deposits allowing it to be burnt in the combustion chamber. there is a special kit that looks like a medical intravenous drip for this but the operation can be manager with simple tools found in the typical home. here is the process.

    tools needed
    16oz can of Seafoam engine Treatment

    a small clear jar or dish that will hold 6 oz of liquid
    an open work area

    procedure
    1.warmup engine to operating temperature
    2.once warm and idling, disconect brake booster vaccum line from the booster. other vaccum lines will work as well but the booster line is most convenient most of the time.
    3.add 6oz of Seafoam to jar and slowly let the engine suck the fluid trough the disconected vaccum line. this step is crucial! take your time . take small 1 second slurps of the fluid at a time, DO NOT suck up the fluid all at once. if you do, you will hydrolock your engine and break or bend a valve!. the best method is to dip the vaccum line for an instant and pull it out. take your time doing this, making sure the engine does not shut off. until all the fluid is gone. you will only use 6 oz of Seafoam, about 1/3 of the bottle.
    4. shut off the engine and let it rest for 15 minutes but no longer than 30 minutes so the engine remains relatively warm.
    5. restart engine. there will be a crazy amount of white smoke coming from the exhaust . this is the carbon being burnt in the combustion chamber. the smoke will last for about 10 minutes, let the car run untill the exhaust is clear.
    done!
    this will take care of most carbon buildup in the intake and egr passages. this procedure is best done every 30,000 miles.

    variations
    some mechanics will use a mixture of ATF+3 and water instead of Seafoam . there are also dedicated chemicals for this proces . but in my experience, Seafoam works very well and is relatively inexpensive and available to warrant experimentation.

  8. #143
    Grease Monkey shocker1's Avatar
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    Seafoam is a wonder worker. Keeps my 2 stroke 225 hp outboard tip top. In the case of the engine I mentioned the piss poor engine tolerances cause way to much blowby and nothing can stop it. Unless you rebuild the engine with proper ring gap. The Malibu I will be repairing only has 47,000 miles on it with loads of oily carbon. Such should not be on an engine with that low of miles. You can just about bet every 3.4 GM has this going on.

    But yeah Seafoam is about the best additive and has more uses than WD40
    Oh yeah using ATF mix will damage converter.

  9. #144
    Purveyor of Milwaukee Iron RECON DOC's Avatar
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    Hey Shocker,
    I have a 94 chevy Suburban with a 350. 150'000 miles It's super clean, dependable and a real workhorse. I take really good care of it and keep up with the maintanance.

    I am having issues with the AC. Every time I turn it on and let it run for about 10-15 minutes under a load, the transmission seems to overheat and starts to act up and doesn't shift propperly. When I turn it off the ****** cools off and works fine.

    The ****** fluid is full, clean and pink, no burnt smell. I had the ****** flushed about 50'000 miles ago and it could probably stand another flush about now.
    I'm thinking the compresser is shot and effecting the flow of fluid to the ****** cooler as the lines to both appear to be connected. Maybe?

    Have you ever heard of a connection between AC and transmission issues?
    When I tell mechanics about this they just shrug and say "Idunno".

    Thanks,

    Doc

  10. #145
    Grease Monkey shocker1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RECON DOC View Post
    Hey Shocker,
    I have a 94 chevy Suburban with a 350. 150'000 miles It's super clean, dependable and a real workhorse. I take really good care of it and keep up with the maintanance.

    I am having issues with the AC. Every time I turn it on and let it run for about 10-15 minutes under a load, the transmission seems to overheat and starts to act up and doesn't shift propperly. When I turn it off the ****** cools off and works fine.

    The ****** fluid is full, clean and pink, no burnt smell. I had the ****** flushed about 50'000 miles ago and it could probably stand another flush about now.
    I'm thinking the compresser is shot and effecting the flow of fluid to the ****** cooler as the lines to both appear to be connected. Maybe?

    Have you ever heard of a connection between AC and transmission issues?
    When I tell mechanics about this they just shrug and say "Idunno".

    Thanks,

    Doc
    Sounds like the fan clutch is bad. The connection to the two is the need for the fan clutch to lock up to cool both systems. The engine may run hot too but the fan may be just enough to keep it down. Start it up and let it warm up, if the fan never starts blowing harder even after turning the AC on. You can also spin the fan by hand to make sure it stops instantly. if it spins one turn or more replace it.

    Also check and make sure the fins on the radiator, trans cooler and ac condenser are clean and unobstructed.

  11. #146
    Senior Member Andrew116's Avatar
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    Ok, I got a 94 Toyota Camry, and the problem is, I dont have airconditioning, and with temps in the 80's in my area its kinda getting bad.

    I think I have the older freeon in the system, can I just get a recharge or do I have to get a whole new system and whats that gonna cost me?

    Its like completly dead.

  12. #147
    Tom Waits is my Batsignal ronnieraygun's Avatar
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    Here's a fun one that's got me pretty much crippled with anxiety. 2003 Ford Focus, 54k miles. I don't have garage space and am not much of a wrench beyond the basics. I got the transmission fluid changed and asked for the oil to be changed, as well. The engine started to sound a little louder about a month ago, like an extemely mild clatter. Wouldn't you know it? They must have never changed the oil and I am kicking myself because I should have never taken anyone's attention to detail for granted. I wondered why the engine temp gauge would shoot up to halfway within several minutes of running the car, whereas before it took a while. I opened the hood and the oil was DIRTY. So I got the oil changed right away and went full synthetic.

    In the meantime, if at idle, I can hear a small rattle when I give it some gas and let it back down to lower RPM. I now also hear a little clatter sometimes. I'm worried that the rattle is maybe a slightly loose head gasket and the occassional clatter I hear is piston slap.

    Would anyone suggest taking it to a place where they can look at it and give some sort of real diagnostic? What could you do, get a compression test or check the head gasket somehow?

    I could be overreacting a little...I had an Escort on it's second engine that got to about 260k and some of the noises sound familiar, but finding out your car had gone so many miles without an oil change is enough to freak you out and outside some new bad noises, it seems to run a lot hotter now. It's only a 4 year-old car with 54k.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated.


    EDIT-So apparently dirty oil does not mean much. I guess oil can get dirty-looking at 200 miles, let alone 2000...I should probably have someone take a look, but I should know what to ask for...
    Last edited by ronnieraygun; 05-09-2007 at 07:24 PM. Reason: followup

  13. #148
    Tom Waits is my Batsignal ronnieraygun's Avatar
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    Follow-up: I have not taken it in to get looked at.
    Could be:

    bad idler pulley?
    heat shield on exhaust pipes coming loose?
    the water pump is showing its Fordness?

    I think I will go have them test for exhaust gases in the coolant about the head gasket concern.

  14. #149
    Senior Member tuercas's Avatar
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    the noise could be sticky lifters from the burnt oil.check your coolant for oil contamination, if none is found the head gasket should be fine. next check you oil for coolant. the oil is the easyest to check, if it looks like the level is magically going up or the oil looks like cofee with milk(opaque ligth brown) that means there is oil in the coolant. if ok then check for blowby by runing vehicle to operating temperature and when at idle, carefully open the oil cap. you should feel gases coming out but not be able to see them, if you see any visible smoke that is blow by from bad rings or bad valves. the next step is a compression test with a compression gauge.

  15. #150
    Senior Member tuercas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew116 View Post
    Ok, I got a 94 Toyota Camry, and the problem is, I dont have airconditioning, and with temps in the 80's in my area its kinda getting bad.

    I think I have the older freeon in the system, can I just get a recharge or do I have to get a whole new system and whats that gonna cost me?

    Its like completly dead.
    In the US, the transition to R134 started around 95 so the best way to check is first to look for a sticker under the hood or by the radiator that indicates the type of refrigerant and the amount. the other way to find out is to look at the low and high pressure valves, if the valves are the same size and are threaded like tire valves, you have R12, if the valves are the quick disconect type with two grooves and no external threads, you have R134. if you did have R12 and you system is empty, you can have your system professionally purged and upgraded to R134. if you want to do it yourself, first you need to check for leaks at the hose and compressor junctions and use new gaskets if needed. you need to add Esther oil to convert the mineral oil to R134 , then add 2 or 3 cans of R134. there are kits available at autozone and wallmart that have everything you need

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