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Thread: EF Typhoon News

  1. #1171
    Senior Member Herman the II's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sancho78 View Post
    Is Brimstone integrated? Maybe only a general statement that they going to test A2G ammo.
    Its not integrated yet, however the UK wants it and maybe they are already working on it or may be until the trials start. Why would they use "dropping precision guided munitions" and "firing air-to-ground missiles" in the same sentence if only bombs were meant? I dunno though...

    Exercises will include dropping precision guided munitions and launching air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles”.

  2. #1172
    Senior Member Rapier55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herman the German View Post
    ...I'm willing to bet that within the US of A with its large fleet you have one or two comparable incidents a day...
    I was at Nellis a few months back when a F-15 came in with a hook landing in an emergency recovery. It was at sunset and the sparks created by the arrestor hook created quite a show. The mood on base was "business as usual." I wish I had my video camera out...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kongjun33 View Post
    I mean, this s not the first time with the Typhoon!
    And what was the last time? Do you think that only happens to the EF? See Rapier55's post..

  4. #1174
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    Sure it's not the case! But just see the american F-15, this plane suffered mishaps in the past, and has been mothballed for a while since the problems have been found and solved. A recurent particular problem (with the landing gear) could show something wrong with the assembly/production line (for example), though. Perhaps it s not a good time to say Typhoons would be mothballed since the aircraft is in a stiff competition in India.

  5. #1175

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    Quote Originally Posted by Herman the German View Post
    Its not integrated yet, however the UK wants it and maybe they are already working on it or may be until the trials start. Why would they use "dropping precision guided munitions" and "firing air-to-ground missiles" in the same sentence if only bombs were meant? I dunno though...
    What about Storm Shadow, Taurus, or anti-ship, -radiation missiles? These should be more interesting for India, than the Brimstone right?

  6. #1176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sancho78 View Post
    What about Storm Shadow, Taurus, or anti-ship, -radiation missiles? These should be more interesting for India, than the Brimstone right?
    Are Indians interested in a good interceptor or a complete multirole fighter first?!

    In this contest, I don t understand why officials claimed the Eurofighter jet s leading... The Typhoon is not really a proven multirole fighter, some other contenders (US, Russian and french) have better offers.
    Last edited by Kongjun33; 02-20-2010 at 06:44 PM.

  7. #1177
    Senior Member Steak-Sauce's Avatar
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    [SIZE="4"]Saudi Arabia Buys MBDA Missiles: Sources[/SIZE]
    By ANDREW CHUTER, LONDON

    Published: 19 Feb 2010 14:39


    Saudi Arabia has signed a deal to acquire the Storm Shadow cruise missile from European weapons builder MBDA as part of a Tornado strike aircraft update package, said industry sources here.

    The weapons package also includes the Brimstone anti-armor missile, they said.

    Earlier plans to include the ASRAAM short-range air-to-air missile ended last year when the Saudis selected Diehl BGT Defence's rival IRIS-T for Tornado and the Typhoon fighter.

    French-based weapons firm MBDA, in which BAE is a major shareholder, has always refused to discuss negotiations even though a Saudi aircraft being modified at BAE's Warton aerospace complex in the U.K. was photographed taking off on a test flight carrying a Storm Shadow.

    News of the contract signing emerged as a result of an entry in BAE Systems' preliminary results for 2009.

    The document said that "significant incremental orders totalling £1.2 billion ($1.9 billion) were received in the period for the Tornado Sustainment Programme weapons contract, naval minehunter mid-life update and a multi-year naval training program."

    MBDA seemed unaware the deal had been made public. A spokesman declined to confirm any details, saying it was "up to the Ministry of Defence or the customer to comment."

    BAE revealed last year that it was upgrading three Saudi minehunters originally supplied by the VT Group in the mid-1990s.

    The British-based company employs around 4,900 people in Saudi Arabia supporting the Tornado, Hawk trainer and other programs.

    Last year, the company delivered the first eight of 72 Typhoons purchased by the Saudis and agreed on a package to support the aircraft.

    The first deliveries of the Tactica armored security vehicle for the Saudi National Guard commenced in 2009 and a support package has been secured by the company.

    BAE chief executive Ian King said Feb. 18 that future Saudi orders might include more Tactica orders, upgrades to Bradley armored vehicles, and the purchase of mine-protected vehicles.

    The company admitted, though, that it was having problems with a command-and-control, communications, computers and intelligence program it signed in 2006 with the Saudis.

    The C4I program remains "challenging and discussions continue with the aim of agreeing the definition of a solution that meets customer requirements" said the results document.

    E-mail: achuter@defensenews.com.
    Source: Defense News

    Storm Shadow and Brimstone - well I guess Saudia Arabia will use these on their future EF2000's as well.

  8. #1178
    Senior Member happyslapper's Avatar
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    Not news in the same sense as the above, but here's a pic of a Typhoon down at Mount Pleasant, Falkland Islands:



    They've recently been given the famous Maltese Cross tail marking, a symbol of the RAF's struggle to defend Malta against the Luftwaffe with 3 obsolete Gloster Gladiator biplanes named Faith, Hope, and Charity. A fourth Typhoon based at Mount Pleasant is named Desperation.

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    Nice one. Cool tradition also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyslapper View Post
    They've recently been given the famous Maltese Cross tail marking, a symbol of the RAF's struggle to defend Malta against the Luftwaffe
    Godwins Law?

  11. #1181
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyslapper View Post
    Not news in the same sense as the above, but here's a pic of a Typhoon down at Mount Pleasant, Falkland Islands:



    They've recently been given the famous Maltese Cross tail marking, a symbol of the RAF's struggle to defend Malta against the Luftwaffe with 3 obsolete Gloster Gladiator biplanes named Faith, Hope, and Charity. A fourth Typhoon based at Mount Pleasant is named Desperation.
    A big history FAIL. There were at least 9 Sea Gladiators but no more than three were usually flyable. And the were defending against the italian Regia Aeronautica, NOT against the Luftwaffe.
    And the italians usually flew biplanes themvelves, though they usually had superior numbers.
    By the time the Luftwaffe showed up in early 1941, all Gladiators were non flyable.

    Funny is once saw a Luftwaffe Eurofighter with the "Pik-As" emblem of JG 53 on the landing gear doors. JG 53 was the main antagonist of the Malta RAF fighters...
    But that was in 1941-42, with 109Fs against Spitfires, not Gladiators.
    I'm not sure which Luftwaffe unit uses the Ace of Spades, maybe one of the sub squadrons of JG 73 or their maintenance unit.

  12. #1182
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCR View Post
    A big history FAIL. There were at least 9 Sea Gladiators but no more than three were usually flyable. And the were defending against the italian Regia Aeronautica, NOT against the Luftwaffe.
    And the italians usually flew biplanes themvelves, though they usually had superior numbers.
    By the time the Luftwaffe showed up in early 1941, all Gladiators were non flyable.
    Not quite, the Italian bomber used was the Cant Z.1007 Alcione which is a medium bomber and was a monoplane. the escort fighter italy had in that period was the Fiat G.50 Freccia (again, not a bi-plane) which saw action in the Battle of Britain and the Africa campaign so it is easy to assume they would have been used in the siege of Malta.

    On your point about "Pik-As" emblem, it is commonplace to recognise historical events in emblems on aircraft, I don't understand why you think this would offend British people? As you obviously mentioned it in attempt to gain a negative response.


    On topic, that Eurofighter looks sweet!

  13. #1183
    Senior Member Herman the II's Avatar
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    The last of the four core nations has crossed the 10.000 flight hour mark. Congrats to Spain and its 28 Typhoons.

    Spain celebrates 10,000 flying hours with the Eurofighter Typhoon

    The Spanish Air Force have reached a key milestone as their Eurofighter Typhoon fleet achieved 10,000 flying hours. The event was marked in a ceremony held at Morón Air Base, in Southern Spain, hosted by Base Commander for Morón and Squadron 11, Colonel Francisco Javier Fernández Sánchez. In attendance were a variety of local companies who work on the Eurofighter Typhoon programme, including EADS CASA, INDRA and ITP, who provide engines as part of the Eurojet consortium. The 10,000th hour came during a training mission of Ala 113 at the base which received its first Eurofighter Typhoon - or C.16 as it is known within the Ejercito de l’Aire - in October 2003.

    The Typhoon aircraft is used by the Air Force for air defence and air interception roles, protecting and defending national air space 24 hours a day, fully operational seven days a week from January 2008. Morón air base operates with two Squadrons. Squadron 113 is an operational conversion unit, providing among other roles Typhoon pilot training, whilst Squadron 111 is the main front line unit to provide the Spanish Air Force with the necessary offensive and defensive capabilities to accomplish international tasks and fulfill the Spanish defense policy.

    The Spanish Air Force has received so far 28 of the 87 Eurofighter Typhoons expected. Another two Squadrons will be equipped with the C.16 in the future: 14 Wing located on Albacete Air Force Base will see the Eurofighter replace the Mirage F-1 and 112 Squadron which will be the second operational squadron in 11 Wing.

    This significant achievement by the Spanish Air Force serves to reaffirm the operational and industrial success of the Eurofighter programme as well as the importance of the aerospace industry in Spain.
    http://eurofighter.com/news/1000SpanishFlyingHours.asp


    Spanish Air Force Eurofighter Typhoons fly over the coastline.
    (eurofighter.com)

    10.000 flying hours for Spain
    (eurofighter.com)
    Attachments Pending Approval Attachments Pending Approval

  14. #1184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nepeccel View Post
    Not quite, the Italian bomber used was the Cant Z.1007 Alcione which is a medium bomber and was a monoplane. the escort fighter italy had in that period was the Fiat G.50 Freccia (again, not a bi-plane) which saw action in the Battle of Britain and the Africa campaign so it is easy to assume they would have been used in the siege of Malta.

    On your point about "Pik-As" emblem, it is commonplace to recognise historical events in emblems on aircraft, I don't understand why you think this would offend British people? As you obviously mentioned it in attempt to gain a negative response.

    I just looked it up in Shores' "Malta, the Hurricane years". The Gladiators flew against Macchi 200 Saetta monoplane fighters and later against CR.42 biplanes. The bombers were SM.79s.

    Actually I liked the idea of JG 53's insignia on a Eurofighter, I just don't know which current unit uses it, maybe it is unofficial.
    Definitely didn't mean it as some kind of provocation to the brits, just that our uber-politically correct Luftwaffe sometimes manages to slip in a veiled reference to great aces and squadrons as well, as long as it stays under the media radar
    Last edited by JCR; 02-23-2010 at 04:58 AM.

  15. #1185
    Senior Member Steak-Sauce's Avatar
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    Sorry for the lengthy article..

    [SIZE="4"]U.K. AESA Radar Drive Focuses On Typhoon[/SIZE]

    Feb 23, 2010

    By Douglas Barrie and Robert Wall



    Developing active, electronically scanned radar—with electronic attack capabilities—is at the heart of a Royal Air Force drive to accelerate the air-to-surface role for the Typhoon aircraft, as the service mulls pulling the Tornado GR4 earlier than planned.

    The Defense Ministry is aiming to fly an active, electronically scanned array (AESA) radar demonstrator on a Eurofighter Typhoon toward the end of 2013, the culmination of a four-year program which it recently contracted with radar manufacturer Selex Galileo.

    The RAF is increasingly focused on fielding only two types of fighter aircraft as soon as it can without undercutting its basic capability. At present, it operates the Harrier, Tornado and Typhoon, with the F-35 due to be introduced in 2017.

    Air Marshal Steve Dalton, the chief of the air staff, says he wants to neck down to the Typhoon and the Lockheed Martin F-35 as soon as “practicable.” This includes the provision of a “complex ground attack capability on the Typhoon.” Last week at the International Institute of Strategic Studies, Dalton also raised the issue of the remaining fatigue life in the GR4 fleet, given the higher than expected operational utilization.

    Present plans call for the Tornado to remain in service at least until 2025, though Dalton indicates this may be brought forward, pending ongoing studies. Reducing more quickly to a two-type fleet offers the attraction of significant support cost-savings, and this is likely to be closely scrutinized as part of a Strategic Defense Review (SDR), due to begin in mid-2010.

    Stepping up the Typhoon’s air-to-surface capability would also provide the air force with a backstop should present problems with the F-35 threaten the U.K. in-service date with the type.

    The Typhoon technology demonstrator program (TDP) will build on the Advanced Radar Targeting System (ARTS) TDP, for which an AESA demonstrator was flown on a Tornado aircraft. This radar was to have formed the core of the Reforger upgrade for the GR4A, but the program was canceled due to funding constraints.

    While acknowledging the ARTS program, the Defense Ministry has been unwilling to discuss it in detail, particularly with regard to electronic attack.

    The AESA TDP is a U.K.-only program, despite London’s attempt, along with its other three Typhoon partner countries—Germany, Italy and Spain— to align an AESA radar program for the aircraft. An industry executive from one of the partner states suggests the electronic-attack element of the U.K. work is a reason why the projects are being run in parallel.

    The other three countries’ electronic-attack aspirations center on the use of a dedicated platform, which they say can defeat radars over a far higher frequency range than a Typhoon AESA radar.

    The Typhoon TDP will employ the swash-plate approach used on the ARTS program to allow the antenna to be repositioned and to counter performance degradation at high off-bore-sight angles. The industry executive says the bandwidths to be used for the TDP radar will be broader as a result of the electronic-attack requirement. The swash-plate approach has already been selected by Saab, which is using the Selex Galileo ES-05 Raven AESA for the Gripen NG.

    The Defense Ministry has taken the first steps in a quicker move toward a two-type fleet. As part of a package of cuts and reallocation in Planning Round 10, it was announced at the end of 2009 that a squadron of Harriers is to be axed, with another one or two squadrons of Harriers and/or Tornados to be cut as part of the SDR.

    British Defense Secretary Bob Ainsworth told Parliament in December: “In line with our current aspirations to reduce to two fast-jet types—the Typhoon and Joint Strike Fighter—we will pursue without delay the future capability program Phase 2. This is fundamental to the development of its multirole capability and integration with the latest weapons.”

    Selex Galileo in Edinburgh is the focus of the U.K.’s industry expertise in AESA technology, on which it has been working since the 1990s with both company funds and Defense Ministry support.

    Bob Mason, Selex Galileo’s senior vice president for sales and marketing for radar, says the U.K. contract was signed “a couple of weeks ago.” The TDP work will cover both air-to-air and air-to-ground modes. Work on the latter will explore high-resolution synthetic aperture radar and ground moving target-indicator modes. Mason says he cannot discuss the question of electronic attack.

    The Typhoon partner nations are continuing to try to agree on a road map to integrate an AESA radar on the aircraft, and they now have an industry offer in hand. Mason says that while there is “no dependency” between the U.K. TDP and a four-nation program, elements of the U.K. work could be fed into the partners’ project.
    Source: Aviation Week

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