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Thread: Aircraft Carriers Intensive PIX!!

  1. #31
    Senior Member phoebus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    That star is so awesome, lots of history behind it especially on the legendary Dauntless dive bombers (imo the most sexy USN bomber of that era). Thanks for the superb images mate.

  2. #32
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    [*******#0000ff]Download HiRes[/COLOR]

    ABOARD USS NIMITZ (Oct. 12, 1997) -- Demonstrating the inherent mobility and flexibility of the forward deployed Navy aircraft carrier battle group, the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) is now operating in the Persian Gulf region. USS Nimitz will remain on station in the gulf to enforce United Nations sanctions against Iraq, by patrolling the “No-Fly” zone during operation “Southern-Watch“. The carrier battle group was directed to the Gulf early by the Secretary of Defense, after Iraqi planes breached the zone several times in the last week. Nimitz joins other naval forces already operating in the region. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Matthew J. MaGee. (RELEASED

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    At sea aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Aug. 17, 2002 -- A CH-46 "Sea Knight" helicopter from the “Gunbearers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron One One (HC-11), transports 2,000-pound Mark-84 bombs from USS Sacramento (AOE 1) to Nimitz during their first vertical replenishment (VERTREP) of ordnance since 1997. Nimitz is undergoing Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of San Diego, Calif. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Yesenia Rosas. (RELEASED)

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    At sea aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Sep. 16, 2002 -- F/A-18 “Hornet” and “Super Hornets” from various squadrons are chained to the ship’s flight deck. This is the first time Nimitz has had an air wing embarked since 1997. Nimitz is undergoing Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) Two and Three off the California coast. U.S. Navy photo by Airman Apprentice Mark Rebilas. (RELEASED)

    [*******#0000ff]Download HiRes[/COLOR]

    At sea aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Sep. 16, 2002 -- An Aviation Boatswains Mate guides an F/A-18F “Super Hornet” assigned to the “Black Aces” of Strike Fighter Squadron Four One (VFA-41) into position over one of four steam driven catapults on the ship’s flight deck. This is the first time Nimitz has had an air wing embarked since 1997 following an extensive yard period and homeport move from Norfolk, Va., to San Diego, Calif. Nimitz is undergoing Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) operations Two and Three off the California coast. U.S. Navy photo by Airman Apprentice Mark Rebilas. (RELEASED)


    At sea aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Jan. 26, 2003 -- Aviation Machinist’s Mate Airman Rachael Lee Nolan from Boston, Mass., conducts a tail rotor inspection of the elastomeric bearings located in the tail paddles on an SH-60 “Sea hawk” assigned to the “Indians” of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Six (HS-6). Nimitz is currently participating in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFX). JTFX is designed to test and evaluate a battle group’s reactions to multiple war time scenarios from small craft attacks to land-based missile attacks. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Sandra M. Palumbo. (RELEASED)

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    Naval Air Station North Island, Calif. (Mar. 3, 2003) -- Family and friends bid farewell to Sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) before the ship pulls away from her berth. Nimitz is beginning a regularly scheduled deployment to the Arabian Gulf to conduct combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Andrew J. Betting. (RELEASED)

    [*******#0000ff]Download HiRes[/COLOR]

    Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Mar. 11, 2003) -- Crewmembers aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) man the rails and prepare to salute upon entering Pearl Harbor, Hawaii while passing the USS Missouri (BB 63) and USS Arizona Memorials. Nimitz and her battle group are currently deployed conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Airman Maebel Tinoko. (RELEASED)


    Shamefully the most decorated USN ship serving in WWII, USS Enterprise CV-6. Heads for the shipbreakers ..1958. Efforts were made to save the ship but all failed.


    USS Leyte CV-32
    Crewmembers swimming over the carrier's side, using her deck edge elevator as a diving platform, at Augusta, Sicily, 27 May 1950.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-415936).

  3. #33
    Senior Member Martel's Avatar
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    A rare occurence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. In four descending columns, from left to right: ITS Maestrale (F 570), De Grasse (D 612); USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Charles de Gaulle (R 91), Surcouf (F 711); USS Port Royal (CG-73), HMS Ocean (L 12), USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), HNLMS Van Amstel (F 831); and ITS Luigi Durand de la Penne (D 560) (18th of April 2002).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Fleet_5_nations.jpg


  4. #34
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Big Daddy, excellent initiative! And great pics! (as always from you!)

    My small contribution:



    Dutch Aircraftcarrier HNLMS Karel Doorman in 1962; All Hands and remembrance ceremony in the Dardanelles; Royal Marine Corps Band marching towards bow


    French aircraft carrier De Gaulle leading the second line in 2004 D-Day Sail Past Remembrance; picture taken from Dutch LPD HNLMS Rotterdam leading the first line.

  5. #35
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    A few WWII USN CV PIX>>>>



    Testing machine guns of Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat fighters aboard USS Ranger (CV-4), while en route from the U.S. to North African waters, circa early November 1942. Note the special markings used during this operation, with a yellow ring painted around the national insignia on aircraft fuselages.
    This is a censored photo, since the individual squadron markings (VF-9 and VF-41) are plainly visible on the original negative. (Thanks to Robert J. Cressman).
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-30362).


    A Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat fighter taking off from USS Ranger (CV-4) to attack targets ashore during the invasion of Morocco, circa 8 November 1942. Note: Army observation planes in the left middle distance; loudspeakers and radar antenna on Ranger's mast.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-30244).
    Robert J. Cressman, Head, Ships History Branch, Naval Historical Center, notes: "the original photo, uncropped, shows a crewman directing the plane up the deck to be spotted; all activity on the flight deck appears geared to recovering, not launching, planes, notably the 'asbestos joes' (men wearing protective clothing) by the island, the crewman with the chocks (R), etc."


    Grumman F6F-3 "Hellcat" fighters landing on USS Enterprise (CV-6) after strikes on the Japanese base at Truk, 17-18 February 1944. Flight deck crewmen are folding planes' wings and guiding them forward to the parking area. The original caption gives date as 16 February.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-59314).


    .. USS Enterprise CV-6.. Damaged TBM Avenger, March 1945. The outlined arrow on the tail ("G" symbol) was not the design assigned by the Bureau of Aeronautics, but the ship's CO, CAPT Hall, believed it reduced aircraft visibility during night operations, at a time when his ship was operating as a night carrier


    B-25s were assigned to Hornet for a one time mission to bomb Toyko.
    View looking aft from the island of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. USS [*******#0000ff]Nashville[/COLOR] (CL-43) is in the distance.
    Photo taken off a 16mm film.


    USS Yorktown CV-10
    Ordnancemen working on bombs amid F6F-3 Hellcat fighters parked on the carrier's hangar deck, circa October-December 1943. Other crewmen are watching a movie in the background. Bombs appear to include two 1000-pounders and one 500-pounder. Photographed by Lieutenant Charles Kerlee, USNR.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (# 80-G-419959).


    Gilberts Operation, November 1943 — A Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat fighter makes condensation rings as it awaits the take-off flag aboard USS Yorktown (CV-10), 20 November 1943. The plane is from Fighting Squadron Five (VF-5). Yorktown was then hitting targets in the Marshall Islands to cover the landings in the Gilberts.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (# 80-G-204747-A


    USS Hornet CV-12
    This photo was taken on March 4, 1944 as Hornet was tying up to the mooring at Fox 9 Ford Island, Pearl Harbor with Air Group 15 on the flight deck. The photo was taken from [*******#810081]Essex[/COLOR] (CV-9) who would soon be taking Air Group 15 aboard while Hornet would take Air Group 2 into her first combat with the Japanese.


    USS Hornet CV-12
    One of VB-17's SB2C Helldivers taxiing out for launch, March 1945.


    USS Randolph CV-15
    Grumman F6F Hellcat fighter parked on the port catapult, March 1945. Note the plane's tail markings, unique to this ship.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-5339).


    USS Wasp CV-18
    Flight deck crews prepare to load a Mark XIII torpedo on a TBM aircraft, during strikes in the Luzon-Formosa area, 13 October 1944. Note plywood shrouds on the torpedo's fins and nose. Plane at right is an F6F, others visible are TBMs.
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (Photo #: 80-G-298609).


    One of USS Bennington CV-20 VMF-123's F4U-1D's after flipping, the pilot had a back injury. Photo by Lowell Love.

  6. #36
    the Ralph Wiggum of Mp.net. timetraveller's Avatar
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    Awesome pics ... All round


    I would have loved to experience life aboard a Carrier ..

  7. #37

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    Tomcats, VF-14 "Tophatters":


    I missing F-14 before in every carrier presence .(Because I am Tomcat fan)

    SuperHornet in carrier , I'm not a habit to the situation .

    But Tomcat start to see service , exactly to lapse into assert or manufacture funds big black hole ! Is true .
    Last edited by jackie yu; 02-26-2008 at 07:17 PM.

  8. #38
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timetraveller View Post
    Awesome pics ... All round


    I would have loved to experience life aboard a Carrier ..
    Really? I spent 6 of my twenty years in the USN actually at sea on CVs..

    Want to be on a CV? Expect to work at least 12 hours a day. Most work a few more. Hope you like standing in line for most everything >> Chow, sick call, ships stores, barber shop, liberty. On some ships you need to bring you own toilet paper. Partial Panel knows what I'm talikng about. Expect to spend lots of days at sea consecutively. Lots. In '81 on the America we had one at sea period of 78 straight days. Our deployment was seven months. Actually it was longer counting work ups..Work ups are training....

    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..

    "Nimitz expects to moor at Alava pier, Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines at time zero eight hundred. Liberty will commence in accordance with the Plan of the Day".

    Trust me..those are some sweet words..

  9. #39
    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Question for BD

    A scene from a movie has stuck in my head and would invite you to comment on whether it was a realistic depiction of how things used to be done on a US carrier circa the Korean war: In the Bridges at Toko-Ri, prop aircraft on the deck of the carrier were being used to maneuver the carrier in port.

    Were aircraft really used for that?

    IIRC, in the movie, the CAG raised the issue with the captain, but subsequently backed down.



    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..
    This brings to mind a scene from a movie called the Caine Mutiny

    Greenwald:

    When I was studying law, and Mr. Keefer here was writing his stories, and you, Willie, were tearing up the playing fields of dear old Princeton, who was standing guard over this fat, dumb, happy country of ours, eh?

    Not us. Oh, no! We knew you couldn’t make any money in the service.

    So who did the dirty work for us? Queeg did!



    Thanks for looking out for us BD!

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    Really? I spent 6 of my twenty years in the USN actually at sea on CVs..

    Want to be on a CV? Expect to work at least 12 hours a day. Most work a few more. Hope you like standing in line for most everything >> Chow, sick call, ships stores, barber shop, liberty. On some ships you need to bring you own toilet paper. Partial Panel knows what I'm talikng about. Expect to spend lots of days at sea consecutively. Lots. In '81 on the America we had one at sea period of 78 straight days. Our deployment was seven months. Actually it was longer counting work ups..Work ups are training....

    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..

    "Nimitz expects to moor at Alava pier, Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines at time zero eight hundred. Liberty will commence in accordance with the Plan of the Day".

    Trust me..those are some sweet words..
    You forgot to mention "hydro-blasting", in the berthing area heads! (at least that's what they called it on JFK).
    Nothing like walking in to shave and shower, and be confronted with those deadly "brown trout" swimming all over the deck!

    But I'm with you: I wouldn't trade it for anything

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    A few more of the "Big John", CV-67:

    Leaving Mayport:


    Silver Anniversary. Returning to Norfolk for the last time before going in for refit, then redeploying to NS Mayport, Fla. (1993)


    LGB's on deck. Desert Storm:



    It wasn't all smooth sailing. Damage after a collision with the Cruiser USS Belknap. 1975:

  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post


























    1958, the year I was born. Too bad the efforts to save her failed, it sure would be something to be able to walk her deck.

    MD

  13. #43
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lt-Col A. Tack View Post
    Question for BD

    A scene from a movie has stuck in my head and would invite you to comment on whether it was a realistic depiction of how things used to be done on a US carrier circa the Korean war: In the Bridges at Toko-Ri, prop aircraft on the deck of the carrier were being used to maneuver the carrier in port.

    Were aircraft really used for that?
    Allow me to answer that one, by quoting The Times' article Flying Dutchman from 1960:

    All that is left of the once rich East Indies empire of the Dutch is the far-from-wealthy colony of West New Guinea. Indonesia, which inherited all the rest of the empire, covets New Guinea too. Enraged by Indonesia's noisy propaganda threats, The Netherlands last June sent off to Asian waters the aircraft carrier Karel Doorman, along with two destroyers and an oil tanker. The intention: that ancient and largely harmless naval exercise known as showing the flag.
    But in these post-colonial days, showing the flag can be hazardous. Hardly had the Doorman left Rotterdam when the Russians accused the Dutch of increasing the danger of war in Southeast Asia, the Australians (who occupy the other half of New Guinea) asked for an explanation, and Indonesia sent a formal note of protest. To avoid the probability that Sukarno would ask his neutralist friend Nasser to refuse to let the Doorman through the Suez Canal, the carrier was sent the long way around the Cape of Good Hope.

    When the Doorman arrived at Fremantle, Australia, the local seamen's union struck to show sympathy with Indonesia, refused to man tugs or docking lines. The Doorman cranked up her aircraft and maneuvered to her berth by using the propeller blasts to nudge alongside the dock.
    Apparantly, 8 Grumman Avengers were pinned to the deck to perform this feat of aeronautical seamanship. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any pics.

  14. #44

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    [SIZE=-1]USS Kitty Hawk, CVA-63[/SIZE] [SIZE=-1](Yokosuka U.S.Naval Base. [/SIZE]2007)
    Attachments Pending Approval Attachments Pending Approval
    Last edited by yomex21; 03-01-2008 at 05:35 AM.

  15. #45
    Member Charly84's Avatar
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    Default ARA 25 de Mayo





















    The A.R.A. "25 de Mayo" was build by Cammel Laird shipyard. Launched January 17th 1945 and commisioned to the Royal Navy as HMS "Venerable". Served in the Pacific after the 2nd WW. Decommisioned in 1947, was sold to the Netherlands April the 1st 1948 as HMNLS "Karel Doorman" (R81).
    Rebuild in 1955/58 in Wilton Fijenoord with an angled deck, new elevators, new island, AAA guns, catapult and aviation and electronic facilities. Later, due to a fire on it's steam boiler, changed it status to reserve. Sold to argentina October 15th 1968. Requipped with steam boilers and turbines from his twin brother, Leviathan. Comissioned in March 1969 as A.R.A. "25 de Mayo", it replaced "ARA Independencia".
    Took part during the landing April 2nd 1982. Later returned to base, due to the presence of Royal Navy's SSNs in the south Atlantic.
    After 1985 it was out of service and waiting for a MLU, entering in reserve. In January 1999 was sent to Alang, India to be scrapped.

    On his deck served Grumman F9F-2 Panther, T-28 Fennec, A-4Q Skyhawk, Super Etendard, Alouette III, AS-61D Sea King, Sea Lynx and S-2E/F Tracker.
    Source: Histarmar.com.ar
    Last edited by Charly84; 02-27-2008 at 11:38 AM. Reason: URL correction

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