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Thread: Aircraft Carriers Intensive PIX!!

  1. #31
    the Ralph Wiggum of Mp.net. timetraveller's Avatar
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    Awesome pics ... All round


    I would have loved to experience life aboard a Carrier ..

  2. #32

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    Tomcats, VF-14 "Tophatters":


    I missing F-14 before in every carrier presence .(Because I am Tomcat fan)

    SuperHornet in carrier , I'm not a habit to the situation .

    But Tomcat start to see service , exactly to lapse into assert or manufacture funds big black hole ! Is true .
    Last edited by jackie yu; 02-26-2008 at 07:17 PM.

  3. #33
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timetraveller View Post
    Awesome pics ... All round


    I would have loved to experience life aboard a Carrier ..
    Really? I spent 6 of my twenty years in the USN actually at sea on CVs..

    Want to be on a CV? Expect to work at least 12 hours a day. Most work a few more. Hope you like standing in line for most everything >> Chow, sick call, ships stores, barber shop, liberty. On some ships you need to bring you own toilet paper. Partial Panel knows what I'm talikng about. Expect to spend lots of days at sea consecutively. Lots. In '81 on the America we had one at sea period of 78 straight days. Our deployment was seven months. Actually it was longer counting work ups..Work ups are training....

    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..

    "Nimitz expects to moor at Alava pier, Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines at time zero eight hundred. Liberty will commence in accordance with the Plan of the Day".

    Trust me..those are some sweet words..

  4. #34
    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Question for BD

    A scene from a movie has stuck in my head and would invite you to comment on whether it was a realistic depiction of how things used to be done on a US carrier circa the Korean war: In the Bridges at Toko-Ri, prop aircraft on the deck of the carrier were being used to maneuver the carrier in port.

    Were aircraft really used for that?

    IIRC, in the movie, the CAG raised the issue with the captain, but subsequently backed down.



    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..
    This brings to mind a scene from a movie called the Caine Mutiny

    Greenwald:

    When I was studying law, and Mr. Keefer here was writing his stories, and you, Willie, were tearing up the playing fields of dear old Princeton, who was standing guard over this fat, dumb, happy country of ours, eh?

    Not us. Oh, no! We knew you couldn’t make any money in the service.

    So who did the dirty work for us? Queeg did!



    Thanks for looking out for us BD!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    Really? I spent 6 of my twenty years in the USN actually at sea on CVs..

    Want to be on a CV? Expect to work at least 12 hours a day. Most work a few more. Hope you like standing in line for most everything >> Chow, sick call, ships stores, barber shop, liberty. On some ships you need to bring you own toilet paper. Partial Panel knows what I'm talikng about. Expect to spend lots of days at sea consecutively. Lots. In '81 on the America we had one at sea period of 78 straight days. Our deployment was seven months. Actually it was longer counting work ups..Work ups are training....

    But you know hat? I would never trade my sea-going life. Never, ever..

    "Nimitz expects to moor at Alava pier, Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines at time zero eight hundred. Liberty will commence in accordance with the Plan of the Day".

    Trust me..those are some sweet words..
    You forgot to mention "hydro-blasting", in the berthing area heads! (at least that's what they called it on JFK).
    Nothing like walking in to shave and shower, and be confronted with those deadly "brown trout" swimming all over the deck!

    But I'm with you: I wouldn't trade it for anything

  6. #36
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    A few more of the "Big John", CV-67:

    Leaving Mayport:


    Silver Anniversary. Returning to Norfolk for the last time before going in for refit, then redeploying to NS Mayport, Fla. (1993)


    LGB's on deck. Desert Storm:



    It wasn't all smooth sailing. Damage after a collision with the Cruiser USS Belknap. 1975:

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post


























    1958, the year I was born. Too bad the efforts to save her failed, it sure would be something to be able to walk her deck.

    MD

  8. #38
    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lt-Col A. Tack View Post
    Question for BD

    A scene from a movie has stuck in my head and would invite you to comment on whether it was a realistic depiction of how things used to be done on a US carrier circa the Korean war: In the Bridges at Toko-Ri, prop aircraft on the deck of the carrier were being used to maneuver the carrier in port.

    Were aircraft really used for that?
    Allow me to answer that one, by quoting The Times' article Flying Dutchman from 1960:

    All that is left of the once rich East Indies empire of the Dutch is the far-from-wealthy colony of West New Guinea. Indonesia, which inherited all the rest of the empire, covets New Guinea too. Enraged by Indonesia's noisy propaganda threats, The Netherlands last June sent off to Asian waters the aircraft carrier Karel Doorman, along with two destroyers and an oil tanker. The intention: that ancient and largely harmless naval exercise known as showing the flag.
    But in these post-colonial days, showing the flag can be hazardous. Hardly had the Doorman left Rotterdam when the Russians accused the Dutch of increasing the danger of war in Southeast Asia, the Australians (who occupy the other half of New Guinea) asked for an explanation, and Indonesia sent a formal note of protest. To avoid the probability that Sukarno would ask his neutralist friend Nasser to refuse to let the Doorman through the Suez Canal, the carrier was sent the long way around the Cape of Good Hope.

    When the Doorman arrived at Fremantle, Australia, the local seamen's union struck to show sympathy with Indonesia, refused to man tugs or docking lines. The Doorman cranked up her aircraft and maneuvered to her berth by using the propeller blasts to nudge alongside the dock.
    Apparantly, 8 Grumman Avengers were pinned to the deck to perform this feat of aeronautical seamanship. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any pics.

  9. #39

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    [SIZE=-1]USS Kitty Hawk, CVA-63[/SIZE] [SIZE=-1](Yokosuka U.S.Naval Base. [/SIZE]2007)
    Attachments Pending Approval Attachments Pending Approval
    Last edited by yomex21; 03-01-2008 at 05:35 AM.

  10. #40
    Member Charly84's Avatar
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    Default ARA 25 de Mayo





















    The A.R.A. "25 de Mayo" was build by Cammel Laird shipyard. Launched January 17th 1945 and commisioned to the Royal Navy as HMS "Venerable". Served in the Pacific after the 2nd WW. Decommisioned in 1947, was sold to the Netherlands April the 1st 1948 as HMNLS "Karel Doorman" (R81).
    Rebuild in 1955/58 in Wilton Fijenoord with an angled deck, new elevators, new island, AAA guns, catapult and aviation and electronic facilities. Later, due to a fire on it's steam boiler, changed it status to reserve. Sold to argentina October 15th 1968. Requipped with steam boilers and turbines from his twin brother, Leviathan. Comissioned in March 1969 as A.R.A. "25 de Mayo", it replaced "ARA Independencia".
    Took part during the landing April 2nd 1982. Later returned to base, due to the presence of Royal Navy's SSNs in the south Atlantic.
    After 1985 it was out of service and waiting for a MLU, entering in reserve. In January 1999 was sent to Alang, India to be scrapped.

    On his deck served Grumman F9F-2 Panther, T-28 Fennec, A-4Q Skyhawk, Super Etendard, Alouette III, AS-61D Sea King, Sea Lynx and S-2E/F Tracker.
    Source: Histarmar.com.ar
    Last edited by Charly84; 02-27-2008 at 11:38 AM. Reason: URL correction

  11. #41
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    Why the 25 de Mayo wasn´t deploy during the Falklands War in 1982?

  12. #42
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by santana View Post
    Why the 25 de Mayo wasn´t deploy during the Falklands War in 1982?
    The head Admiral of the Argentine Navy feared she would be sunk by the RN. She was kept out of harms way. Also, he feared the USN would assits the RN. Why? The USS Forestal CV-59 was operating near Brazil at the time.
    Last edited by bd popeye; 02-27-2008 at 10:45 PM.

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    Senior Member jklv's Avatar
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    Awesome pictures popeye. Thanks.

  14. #44
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lt-Col A. Tack View Post
    Question for BD

    A scene from a movie has stuck in my head and would invite you to comment on whether it was a realistic depiction of how things used to be done on a US carrier circa the Korean war: In the Bridges at Toko-Ri, prop aircraft on the deck of the carrier were being used to maneuver the carrier in port.

    Were aircraft really used for that?

    IIRC, in the movie, the CAG raised the issue with the captain, but subsequently backed down.





    This brings to mind a scene from a movie called the Caine Mutiny

    Greenwald:

    When I was studying law, and Mr. Keefer here was writing his stories, and you, Willie, were tearing up the playing fields of dear old Princeton, who was standing guard over this fat, dumb, happy country of ours, eh?

    Not us. Oh, no! We knew you couldn’t make any money in the service.

    So who did the dirty work for us? Queeg did!


    Thanks for looking out for us BD!
    Thank you Lt-Col.

    I've seen that movie. And back when I served in the USN ,'71-'91, I knoew quite a few "old salts" that served in the Korean war. And I heard a lot of sea stories but I never heard of prop aircraft used to manuever a CV. I don't think it happened.

    The Caine Munity is a great film. By the way I get around $1300 a month in retired pay... Anybody want some frozen strawberries???

  15. #45
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    A Super Hornet assigned to "The Swordsmen" of Strike Fighter Squadron 32 approaches the catapult during flight operations aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S Truman in the Persian Gulf, Jan. 10, 2008.



    A "Shooter" gives the signal for an F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to the "Swordsmen" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32, to launch from the waist of the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 are underway on a regularly scheduled deployment in support of maritime security operations.



    An F-14 Tomcat Fly over the USS America



    The aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CVN-63) during a 19-ship group photo exercise. The 19 American and Japanese naval ships at the end of ANNUALEX 19G, the maritime component of the U.S.-Japan exercise Keen Sword '08. The exercise was designed to increase interoperability between the United States and JMSDF and increase their ability to effectively and mutually respond to a regional crisis situation.




    The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) transits through the North Arabian Sea conducting flight operations. Enterprise and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 are underway on a scheduled deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and maritime security operations.



    A plane director gives directional signaling to an F/A-18E Super Hornet in preparation for launch from Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 and is en route to the Cental Command area of responsibility as part of the ongoing rotation to support maritime security operations in the region.




    An MV-22 Osprey attached to Marine Medium Tilt-rotor Squadron (VMM) 263 takes to the air from the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1).




    Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transits through the Atlantic Ocean. Truman is underway conducting carrier qualifications.



    Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transits through the Atlantic Ocean. Truman is currently underway conducting carrier qualifications.
    Last edited by santana; 02-27-2008 at 09:29 PM.

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