Thread: Aircraft Carriers Intensive PIX!!

  1. #5221
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cedar Rapids Iowa USA
    Age
    60
    Posts
    10,260

    Default

    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Chopper[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Any helicopter.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    Only black shoes, US Army and USAF call helicopters "choppers"...In Naval aviation helicopters are called "Helos".

  2. #5222
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    A Greek in the Netherlands who struggles with the bad weather every day..
    Posts
    7,920

    Default

    From the British Armed Forces thread

    And a video: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...scrapyard.html

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnCD95 View Post
    HMS Ark Royal begins her final voyage to the scrapyard.









    Last edited by D-Mitch; 05-22-2013 at 10:41 AM.

  3. #5223
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    A Greek in the Netherlands who struggles with the bad weather every day..
    Posts
    7,920

    Default

    Hyuga class, the biggest warships in Japanese Navy (JMSDF) (photo was taken in May 15th)




  4. #5224
    How's that Hopey Changey thing workin'? C.Puffs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Leading maxima10 around by the nose.
    Posts
    23,234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D-Mitch View Post
    Hyuga class, the biggest warships in Japanese Navy (JMSDF) (photo was taken in May 15th)



    I wonder if the deck is strong enough to handle F-35s. On that note I wonder if it would be possible for Japan and SK to build some QE's or Ford's under license.
    Last edited by C.Puffs; 05-22-2013 at 08:03 PM. Reason: Can't type for $hit today.

  5. #5225
    Member Eugene Schmidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    USS ESSEX CVS-9
    Age
    72
    Posts
    541

    Default U S Navy Slang

    "Around the Boat"

    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Davy Jones’
    Locker[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]The depths of the seven seas, as in a grave. Honored final resting place of tens of thousands of ships and hundreds of thousands of seafarers.
    (The origin of Davy Jones and his locker is lost, as I understand it, but the legend has persisted for centuries. It was described by Tobias Smollett in “The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle,” 1751: “...according to the mythology of sailors, the fiend that presides over all the evil spirits of the deep, and is often seen in various shapes, perching among the rigging on the eve of hurricanes, ship-wrecks, and other disasters to which sea-faring life is exposed, warning ... of death and woe.” And Mr.Jones’ appearance? “I’ll be damned if it was not Davy Jones himself. I know him by his saucer eyes, his three rows of teeth, his tail, and the blue smoke that came out of his nostrils.”)
    Just trying to help, in case you should happen to meet...[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Deck[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]1. Of course it means what we expect it to mean: A “floor” on a ship. On the carrier the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hangar Deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] is deck “1”, with the lower decks numbered downward from the hangar deck: The deck just below the hangar deck is deck “2”, etc. Decks above the hangar deck are numbered upward, preceded by the letter “O” (as in “Over”). The [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Flight deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] is normally “O-3” - the third deck up from the hangar deck. And not just on a ship: If you grew up in a Navy family, how many times did your dad say, “Quit whimpering and get up off the deck!”
    2. When you’re flying, “The Deck” usually means the ground, as in: “After the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]GIB[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] barfed during the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]zero G[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] maneuver, I was glad to get back on the deck and get hosed off.” On [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ACM[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] (dogfighting) training hops squadron policy may require pilots to observe a “deck” at 10,000 feet. The idea is to pretend that 10K is the ground, so if you dip below it you’ve crashed and lost the fight. Of course no one ever admits to busting “the deck,” but (shh ... don’t tell) you do what you have to do to win.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Deep six[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Whatever gets “deep six’ed” is on its way to the bottom of the ocean. Like: “Pay me the $5 you owe me or I’ll deep-six your girlie mag.” The “deep six” phrase apparently derives from the original “Six seas”.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Dip[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]There are dips and there are dips. This dip is a common but completely unauthorized maneuver by a pilot on final approach to the carrier. Just about when passing over the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ramp[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], the pilot makes a quick coordinated move with stick and throttle: Slightly relax back pressure on the stick, while easing off the throttle. Then reestablish. Takes about 1/5 of a second, and drops you perhaps a foot on the glide slope. If you’re quick enough the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]LSO[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] may not notice, but he probably will. (Sometimes known as a CAG-dip, ‘cause [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]CAG[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] is often a master at it.)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Dog[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Most [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]hatches[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] on the carrier can be secured against flooding or fire with a system of pivoting steel levers (“dogs”), either on the edges of the hatch or on the surrounding [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]bulkhead[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. When a lever is moved, the short end of the lever is wedged against the opposing surface, securing the hatch. Dog is also a verb; you dog the hatch. (“Dog” was also, back in the day, radio spelling code for the letter “D,” and held all the meanings now found under “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Delta[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]”, so see that.)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]The Drink[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]The Sea. Going into the drink is not a good thing. Not in an airplane.



    EJ[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]

  6. #5226
    Member Eugene Schmidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    USS ESSEX CVS-9
    Age
    72
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bd popeye View Post
    Only black shoes, US Army and USAF call helicopters "choppers"...In Naval aviation helicopters are called "Helos".
    I should remember that BD. It's hard to break old habits. As a Snipe, we called them "choppers", "helos", and some other stuff I don't remember. Snipes have a somewhat different view of the ship than aviators and aviation support crews.

    EJ

  7. #5227
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Some where in the Land of Sacré Coeur
    Posts
    10,012

    Default

    From todays!!!!


    Download HiRes

    PACIFIC OCEAN (May 20, 2013) Sailors assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 perform helicopter maintenance on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Derek A. Harkins/Released)



    Download HiRes
    SAN DIEGO (May 14, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) returns to its homeport of Naval Air Station North Island. Carl Vinson and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 completed flight operations off the coast of Southern California. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jacob G. Kaucher/Released)


    Download HiRes

    SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 19, 2013) Sailors are lowered into the water during rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) launch and recovery operations aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr./Released)



    Download HiRes


    Download HiRes

    SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 18, 2013) MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to the Wolf Pack of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 maneuvers over the South China Sea. HSM-75 is part of Carrier Air Wing 11 deployed with the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr./Released)



    Download HiRes

    PACIFIC OCEAN (May 18, 2013) Sailors stow chain on the catwalk aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Linda S. Swearingen/Released)



    Download HiRes

    PACIFIC OCEAN (May 18, 2013) Gunnery Sgt. Erika Ibarra assigned to Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 323 serves Sailors dinner on the mess decks aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68).(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Sam Souvannason/Released)



    Download HiRes

    PACIFIC OCEAN (May 18, 2013) Aviation Structural Mechanic Seaman Desirae Key, from Trenton, N.Y., inspects an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6 for a daily inspection aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)



    Download HiRes

    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (May 18, 2013) A Sailor signals an SA330J Puma helicopter on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) during a vertical replenishment-at-sea. Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)



    Download HiRes

    ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 17, 2013) Aviation boatswain's mates (handling) direct two MV-22 Ospreys during a launch and recovery cycle on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Bataan is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting routine training and qualifications. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A Prill/Released)



    Download HiRes

    SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 22, 2013) A Sailor refuels an F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr./Released)



    Download HiRes

    SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 22, 2013) An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 moves into position to launch from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Derek W. Volland/Released)



  8. #5228
    Member Eugene Schmidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    USS ESSEX CVS-9
    Age
    72
    Posts
    541

    Default U S Navy Slang

    "Around the Boat"

    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Engagement[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Has nothing to do with prospective marriage. In pilot lingo, this has a couple of different meanings:
    1. The [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]tailhook[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] catching a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]wire[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] on a carrier landing. A good engagement is a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]trap[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. You’ve engaged the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]arresting gear[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. An [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]inflight[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] engagement makes for a really bad day.
    2. In [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]tactics[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], an engagement means “engaging the enemy aircraft,” e.g., a “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]dogfight[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000].” Used both in real battles and in training flights. A “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hassle[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial].”[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Expansion
    joint[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]This Dante’esque invention deserves to be better known. An aircraft carrier is made to bend in the pitch axis in a couple of places along its hull. This is accomplished by building in “expansion joints,” transverse spaces running the width of the hull, one [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]fore[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] and one [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]aft[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], nominally about 3 feet in width, that have overlapping side plates, allowing the spaces to contract and the hull to “bend” in heavy seas. No one would care about this except that these expansion joints are also [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]passageways[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. (That’s Navy for “corridors.”) More particularly, they’re passageways that have led to my stateroom! (Keep calm, Paul.) So you innocently step out of your stateroom in heavy seas, into the passageway, because you’ve been ordered to make a flight to defend the country, when without warning the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]bulkheads[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] (“walls” to you landlubbers) of the passageway squeeze inward and threaten to impact your body with some 200 thousand gross tons of force, and you’re hoping the engineers have correctly figured that it won’t quite squeeze your head to the size of a turnip. Keep calm, you say??[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fantail[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]The back end of the ‘boat’. The stern. I know where it’s at. Somebody else knows why it’s called a “fantail.” (Isn’t that a kind of pigeon?) [/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Final checker[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]A good idea in every quality assurance program, this individual gives the final OK on a finished maintenance job. He brings responsible good sense and overview to a job that up until then has perhaps been handled by specialists, each of whom has approved their own job. On the flight deck, the F.C. gets “thumbs-up” from the small army of specialists scurrying under and around the aircraft as it is on the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]catapult[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] awaiting launch: One hooks up the catapult [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]holdback[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] and checks the alignment of the A/C on the cat, others pull ordnance safety pins and show them to the F.C., one checks for leaks under the A/C, etc. The F.C. checks the overall condition of the A/C (tires, gear struts, canopy, wing flaps or position, fire ?!, etc.). The F.C., identified by his white shirt or jacket, then gives the final thumbs up to the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]catapult officer[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]. All this happens in less than ten seconds. The F.C. is usually a Chief Petty Officer or a Maintenance First Class P.O.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fire[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Nothing gets your attention aboard the carrier like the rapidly repeated bell over the loudspeakers, followed by “Fire, fire, there’s a fire in space ....” Fortunately, the ship’s emergency procedures are usually equal to the situation, and the small fire is put out. (Let’s not talk about the BIG fires, the ones we all worry about. The ones on the Forrestal and Oriskany, that took hundreds of lives.) We may even get a little blasé about fire calls onboard. No matter, as long as you’re on the carrier, with its constant fueling and ordnance-handling operations, fire will be your chief nightmare.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Flat-top[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]An aircraft carrier. [/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Flight deck[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The business district of the carrier, about 60-70 feet above the sea surface. Includes the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]angle[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] deck landing area and the forward catapult take-off area. The 70-some A/C of the carrier’s [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]air wing[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] are parked aft on the deck in preparation for take-off on the catapults. During the landing phase, A/C are taxied forward after landing and parked on the bow end, leaving the landing area free. Huge elevators carry A/C to the Flight deck from the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hangar deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], where maintenance is performed. No film representation can do justice to the deafening sound level, the constantly hazardous interaction of men and machines, and the precise application of immense power that is Flight deck operations. There is nothing else on land or sea remotely like it. The flight deck is coated with a “non-skid” substance, which is slightly tacky when dry, and which when sprayed with salt water, jet fuel, and oil - as it almost always is - becomes the slipperiest surface known to man. When the ship heels, heaves, yaws, and pitches, which it does in spite of [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]stabilization[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial], aircraft on the deck want to move in undesirable directions. And they have. (For this reason, all aircraft aboard ship are tied down with chains at all times when not being moved.)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fore[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Forward or front. Used mainly in phrases like fore & aft, viz. “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Fore-and-aft cap[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial].”[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fouled deck[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The carrier’s landing area is “fouled” when it is not ready to land aircraft. During landing (“[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]recovery[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]”) operations, aircraft may come aboard with less than 30 seconds interval. During that time the previous aircraft must clear the landing area. Until it has cleared, the deck is fouled, and a red light indicates this to the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]LSO[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. If the deck is not “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]clear[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]” before the incoming a/c reaches a critical decision point (just a few seconds from the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ramp[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]), the LSO will [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]wave off[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] the a/c in the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]groove[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial].[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fox Corpen[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The carrier’s heading for flight operations. Normally, if there’s natural wind, there’s only one ideal heading for launch: straight into the wind. For recovery the ship would turn slightly to starboard to get the wind down the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]angle deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. (Hearsay: “Corpen” indicates course, while “Fox” stands for the “F” in “Flight ops.” Analogously, “Romeo Corpen” means the course steered during an “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Unrep[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]” - Underway Replenishment - operation.)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Fresnel lens[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]An ingenious arrangement of prismatic lenses, invented by the Frenchman Augustin Fresnel (****ounced frenél) early in the 19th century. After decades of use in lighthouses, the technology became standard for U.S. carrier [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]OLS[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] only in the 1960’s. Provides a more powerful, narrower beam than the traditional [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]mirror[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], and is more readily [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]stabilized[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. If technically interested, check this site: [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]http://www.lanternroom.com/misc/freslens.htm[/COLOR][/FONT]



    EJ[*******#000000][FONT=Arial] [/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][SIZE=3][*******#000000][FONT=Arial][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]

  9. #5229
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Some where in the Land of Sacré Coeur
    Posts
    10,012

    Default

    My Friend Eugene please keep going and you can cover the whole alphabet of US Navy Slangs

    from todays


    Download HiRes

    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (May 22, 2013) Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Sandra Ortiz-Melo, from San Antonio, Texas, stencils an F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Rampagers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 83 in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)

    Download HiRes
    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (May 22, 2013) Seaman Eric Graham stands helmsman and Seaman Bryan Scott stands lee helmsman on the bridge of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Lauren Booher/Released)


    Download HiRes
    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (May 25, 2013) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Jolly Rogers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103 launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)



    Download HiRes
    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (May 22, 2013) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Jolly Rogers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103 performs an arrested recovery on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)



    Download HiRes
    SOUTH CHINA SEA (May 23, 2013) Sailors perform tail wing maintenance on an F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Derek W. Volland/Released)



  10. #5230
    Senior Member Kunal Biswas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTAN ..
    Posts
    7,516

    Arrow INS Vikramaditya ( Model )


  11. #5231
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    A Greek in the Netherlands who struggles with the bad weather every day..
    Posts
    7,920

    Default




















  12. #5232
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    A Greek in the Netherlands who struggles with the bad weather every day..
    Posts
    7,920

    Default
























  13. #5233
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    A Greek in the Netherlands who struggles with the bad weather every day..
    Posts
    7,920

    Default

    The following images are not paint-art




  14. #5234
    Member Eugene Schmidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    USS ESSEX CVS-9
    Age
    72
    Posts
    541

    Default U S Navy Slang

    [SIZE=2]"Around the Boat"

    [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Galley[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The word “kitchen” doesn’t exist in the Navy. It’s a ‘galley.’ Naturally, to a career Navy man the room in his house with the stove and fridge is also a galley.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]General
    Quarters
    [/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]“Boing, boing boing” reverberates throughout the ship, followed by: “General Quarters, General Quarters, all hands man your battle stations. This is not a drill.” G.Q. is the ship’s battle readiness and emergency condition. The ship goes to G.Q. when there is serious danger of battle damage, from within or without. At G.Q. each sailor and officer has an assigned station. Pilots muster in the squadron’s [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ready room[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000].[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]GQ[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]General Quarters, as above. Used colloquially to indicate an overreaction: “She went to GQ when I told her I had donated her ugly red shoes.”[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Groove[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The aircraft’s final, visual approach to the ship, when the pilot picks up the “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ball[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]” on the ship’s [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]OLS[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. The pilot makes his [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ball call[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], adjusts the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]angle of attack[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], and concentrates on the ball, controlling speed with the stick and rate of descent with the throttle, unless using [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]autothrottle[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], in which case it’s backwards, or [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ACLS[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], in which case he “monitors” with hands on. In the groove the (perfect) pilot does not look at the deck, except for quick scans for line-up, but “flies the ball” all the way to touchdown.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hangar deck[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The carrier’s vast cavern of a deck, enclosed and running nearly the length of the ship a couple of decks below the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Flight deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], where aircraft are brought for maintenance, or tucked away in bad weather or when the Flight deck needs to be clear for any reason. The Hangar deck has space for all the carrier’s aircraft. The Hangar deck is labeled the #1 deck of the ship; lower decks are numbered 2,3, etc. downward, while decks above the Hangar deck are numbered O-1, O-2, etc, upward. (The Flight deck is typically deck O-3.) Each [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]squadron[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] has its assigned areas on the Hangar deck. Almost any level of maintenance short of a total rebuild can be done here. Three huge A/C elevators allow movement of aircraft between the Hangar deck and the Flight deck. For curious etymological note, see “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hangar[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]”.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hatch[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]There aren’t “doors” onboard a Navy ship. Even if it looks like a door, it’s a “hatch.” Most hatches have a method of watertight closure by, say, four to eight [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]dogs[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] around the perimeter of the hatch. The high-speed type is tightened (or “dogged”) quickly with a turn of a wheel centered on the hatch, which wedges the dogs against the surrounding [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]bulkhead[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. An old-salt sailor will naturally call a door in his house a hatch.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Head[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]It’s said that “a dear child has many names.” If so, this spot must be dear indeed. Known to landlubbers by such names as John, comfort station, commode, throne, rest room, wash room, W.C., closet, toilet, crapper, and various less gentile appellations, onboard ship there’s one and only one term for the little room in question: The Head. The name is said to have originated on ancient square-rigged sailing vessels, where the sailors relieved themselves at what was then called the head of the ship: the bow, off the bowsprit. Now this may sound crazy. My blessed grandmother always told me, “Never piss off the bow!” and I’ve found that to be reliable advice. So what were these square-rigged sailors doing? Well, the answer lies in the relative wind. My granny was used to motorboats, where the wind usually comes over the bow. If you relieve yourself over the bow on a motor ship you may get a face-full of it. On a sailing ship, on the other hand, the wind normally comes from behind or off a rear quarter, so the bow is the perfect place to let go a stream, which is gracefully carried off in a forward direction.
    [An alternate etymology has been suggested (but only by me, here and now, as far as I know): Doesn’t common sense, not to mention common experience, suggest that the term reflects the key decisions, the profound plans, the inspired stratagems, that have a way of clarifying themselves at that special moment in this special space?]
    In any case, it goes without saying that - be it thirty years after a Navy career - whether in a California split level or a classic Cape Cod, this special place will always be “the Head” to a Navy man.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Helo[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Helicopter. Around the carrier, “The Helo” is the rescue helicopter ([/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]angel[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]), always airborne during flight ops.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Holdback[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The lowly holdback fitting stands (or hangs) between the pilot and a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]cold cat[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] shot. It’s a solid steel rod, 6-7 inches long, with a machined collar at either end. As the aircraft taxis onto the catapult track, the forward end of the holdback is fitted into a receptacle in the aircraft’s belly.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE][SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The aft end is secured to a cable from the deck. The A/C is inched forward very slowly to take up the slack in the cable. (If this is done too quickly the holdback can be stressed, and the A/C must be pushed back and a new holdback fitted. An unpopular mistake by the pilot.) As the aircraft turns up to full power, the holdback fitting is the weak link in the high-tension train that holds the A/C back. And here’s the idea of the holdback: At one point the rod is machined down to a smaller diameter which gives a weak point. When the catapult fires, the force of the cat stroke breaks the holdback fitting at the weak point, and the A/C is free to be pulled down the cat track. Simple, but the Navy pays a lot for holdback fittings because the tolerances and quality control must be perfect. The tensile strength of the steel must be exact, and the tensile breaking point at the weak groove must be precisely known. The holdback fitting (which is specific to each type of aircraft) must break at the right millisecond during the pressure build-up phase of the cat’s power stroke. Too soon, you may have a cold cat shot. Too late, you can tear the aircraft apart or smack the pilot silly. The aircrew’s lives literally hinge on the holdback manufacturer’s quality assurance program.[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hook-skip[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Every Navy pilot’s favorite excuse for a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]bolter[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. If the pneumatic bungee pressure (or whatever) holding the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]hook [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]extended is low, the hook may bounce upon hitting the deck, and will probably not catch a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]wire[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. A worn hook point may give the same result, or, worse, may [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]spit a wire[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000].[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Hook-to-
    ramp[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The critical vertical distance between the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]tailhook[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] point and the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]ramp[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] on carrier landings. These few feet of distance can easily evaporate to nothing in the case of a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]pitching deck[/COLOR][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [FONT=microsoft sans serif][SIZE=2][*******#000000]On the smaller (27C class) carriers like the Shangri-La (right) the hook-to-ramp was minimal (8-9 ft) even on a perfect pass. Catch a [/COLOR][*******#000000]1-wire[/COLOR][*******#000000] and you barely cheated the devil.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]“Huffer”
    (start cart)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The jet engine start cart, used on the carrier, and ashore if no fixed airhose is available. The jet engine compressor needs to turn at perhaps 20% RPM before it’ll sustain ignition, and since fighters don’t have starter motors (too heavy), the huffer does the job by blowing a high velocity air stream through a special fitting to turn the engine. The pilot signals with a two-finger “turn-up” sign to the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]plane captain[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] to start turning the engine.



    EJ[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]

  15. #5235
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Some where in the Land of Sacré Coeur
    Posts
    10,012

    Default

    From todays!!!


    Download HiRes

    INDIAN OCEAN (June 1, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59) transit the Indian Ocean. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)

    Download HiRes

    NORTH ARABIAN SEA (June 1, 2013) An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Pukin Dogs of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 143 launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Lauren Booher/Released)



    Download HiRes

    U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (May 31, 2013) Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Tanner Merino, from Woodstock, Ga., wipes down an F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Jolly Rogers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69).(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Lauren Booher/Released)



    Download HiRes
    GULF OF ADEN (May 29, 2013) Marines from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 266 (Rein) chain an AV-8B Harrier to the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). Kearsarge is the flagship for the (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Abraham Essenmacher/Released)


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •