Thread: Aircraft Carriers Intensive PIX!!

  1. #5221
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Fresh pics(I think) from PLAN CV-16 ..sorry no captions provided. I do feel these photos are recent.




















  2. #5222
    the Ralph Wiggum of Mp.net. timetraveller's Avatar
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    The First pic I notice CCTV cam in the Bridge not sure if that's normal procedure with other Navies that too me is an eye opener . Spying on the the Crew I wonder if every word is also recorded possibly the whole ship is bugged .

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    Quote Originally Posted by timetraveller View Post
    The First pic I notice CCTV cam in the Bridge not sure if that's normal procedure with other Navies that too me is an eye opener . Spying on the the Crew I wonder if every word is also recorded possibly the whole ship is bugged .
    Pretty sure its China Central TV not closed circuit TV.. edit.. Oh yeah.. Sorry I can see the dome camera too now.
    Last edited by kalboy; 06-23-2013 at 11:04 AM. Reason: too many drinks

  4. #5224
    The soul that is within me no man can degrade bd popeye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene Schmidt View Post
    You'll get the hang of it, hang in there. Nice pics. The pics taken by crew members are the best as they are generally not found anyplace else. Keep posting mate.

    BD Popeye will like these as he served on Hannah.

    EJ
    Thanks for posting..And yes I served on the "Fightin' Hanna" in 1974 & '75...

    We called her Fightin' Hanna .. she was the Queen of the sea!

  5. #5225
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
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    Recent photos of HMS Illustrious












  6. #5226
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
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    Two photos of Sao Paulo that were taken yesterday...



    Last edited by D-Mitch; 06-27-2013 at 08:51 AM. Reason: 1 more photo was added

  7. #5227
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    From todays!!!


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    AQABA, Jordan (June 22, 2013) A Marine from the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU) dives near the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) during a swim call after the conclusion of Exercise Eager Lion 2013. Eager Lion 2013 is an annual, multinational exercise designed to strengthen military-to-military relationships and enhance security and stability in the region. Kearsarge is the flagship for the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 26th MEU, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released)



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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 19, 2013) The amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) is underway during exercise Dawn Blitz 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mark El-Rayes/RELEASED)


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    GULF OF OMAN (June 20, 2013) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Black Knights of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154 launches from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr./Released)



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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 21, 2013) Marines from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU) descend from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter to the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) during a fast rope exercise. Boxer is conducting amphibious squadron and marine expeditionary unit integrated training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joe Bishop/Released)


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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 21, 2013) Marines from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU) descend from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter to the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) during a fast rope exercise. Boxer is conducting amphibious squadron and marine expeditionary unit integrated training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joe Bishop/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 22, 2013) A Sailor maintains and cleans ordnance aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr./Released)


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    GULF OF OMAN (June 19, 2013) A Sailor polishes the canopy on an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Bartlett/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 20, 2013) An E-2C Hawkeye assigned to the Wallbangers of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 lands on the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)


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    EAST CHINA SEA (June 21, 2013) AH-1W Super Cobra helicopters assigned to Marine Medium Helicopter (HMM) 265 lands on the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6). The Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group is conducting joint force operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Achterling/Released)



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    ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 19, 2013) A Sailor signals an F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Wildcats of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131 onto a catapult aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)


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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 13, 2013) An aviation boatswain's mate (handling) directs an MV-22 Osprey onto the flight deck during flight operations aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Paul Coover/Released)



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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 13, 2013) An aviation boatswain's mate (handling) directs the pilot of an AV-8B Harrier II at takeoff during flight operations aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). Boxer is conducting predeployment training during amphibious exercise Dawn Blitz. Dawn Blitz is a scenario-driven exercise led by U.S. 3rd Fleet and I Marine Expeditionary Force that will test participants in the planning and execution of amphibious operations through a series of live training events. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Paul Coover/Released)


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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 14, 2013) An AV-8B Harrier jet aircraft assigned to the air combat element of the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU) performs a vertical landing on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). Boxer is conducting amphibious squadron and marine expeditionary unit integrated training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mark El-Rayes/Released)



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    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 26, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) departs Fleet Activities Yokosuka for deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Everett Allen/Released)

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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) transits through the Gulf of Oman. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Shayne Johnson/Released)


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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Antonio Greenhill tends wounds on a dummy while Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Elizabeth Anderson observes during a training exercise aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Shayne Johnson/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Amanda Damerow, from Atlanta, prepares an intravenous injection for Midshipman 2nd Class Samantha Damon, from Oregon State University, during a training exercise aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan R. McDonald/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) Midshipman 3rd Class Suzy Waters, from Penn State University, and Midshipman 3rd Class Kathleen Laboa, front, from Carnegie Mellon University, clean a bulkhead during cleaning stations aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Andrew Price/Released)



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    PACIFIC OCEAN (June 25, 2013) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman Megan Barrows cleans the mess decks aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). Carl Vinson is underway off the coast of Southern California conducting unit-level training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dean M. Cates/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) Gunner's Mate 1st Class Matthew Quave, left, from D'Iberville, Miss., gives training on the disassembly of the M-240 machine gun in the armory aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Derek W. Volland/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) An E-2C Hawkeye assigned to the Wallbangers of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68).(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Derek A. Harkins/Released)


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    GULF OF OMAN (June 25, 2013) An F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (June 24, 2013) Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Forrest Sledge, assigned to the Argonauts of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, carries chains across the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)


  9. #5229
    Senior Member happyslapper's Avatar
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    For those who don't regularly follow the QE thread, the aft island was lifted into place this morning. A few pics:










  10. #5230
    Member Eugene Schmidt's Avatar
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    Default U. S. Navy Slang

    "Around the Boat"

    This is the last of the "Around the Boat" slang series. The next series I have is "Navy Aircraft and Flying" mostly about aircraft carriers. Navy Pilots, aircrews and support personel have their own language, just like ships company sailors do.


    Will start posting them next week.

    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Tailhook[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Or just “Hook”. What distinguishes a naval aircraft. A steel hook lowered hydraulically or pneumatically from the rear of the aircraft, intended to [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]engage[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] a cable of the carrier’s [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]arresting gear[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] to bring the aircraft to a quick stop. Attaches to the aircraft via a flexible fitting required to take the full force of bringing a 25 ton aircraft from 150+ mph to zero in about 2 seconds. Its engineering is one of the marvels of modern technology.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Three-point
    landing[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Ouch! A Navy jet is built to land on its two main [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]mounts[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. After touchdown the hook catches a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]wire[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] and slams the nose gear down. But landing on the three mounts together is a bad deal; it may well collapse the nose gear. You get into this predicament when you’re high on the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]glide slope[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. Seeing the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]meatball[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] climb on the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]mirror[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] you try to correct down with a poorly executed [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]dip[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. Your nose gets low, your sink rate’s high, and before you’re reestablished you hit the deck with all three mounts. If you’re lucky, the hook will catch a wire, and though the nose gear may collapse, as on the grim-looking Crusader at right, at least you’re aboard. If you’re less lucky, with the hook farther from the deck than in the normal landing [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]attitude[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] the hook may skip, the A/C may bounce, and you’re back in the air with a busted nose gear. You’se in big trouble, boy.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Tilly[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]A wheeled crane used on the flight deck. Painted yellow, like all moveable (nonflying) flight deck equipment, the tilly is compact but powerful, able to clear disabled aircraft or parts thereof from the landing area in a hurry.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Topside[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]You just can’t say “upstairs” onboard a ship. It’s Topside. Navy folks use this term ashore, too. (You can’t say “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]downstairs[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]”, either. And of course there aren’t “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]stairs[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]” onboard ship.)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]A Trap[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]An [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]arrested landing[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. Navy pilots practice carrier landing techniques constantly when ashore. See [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]MLP[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial].[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Unrep[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Underway Replenishment. A carrier can stay at sea for months at a time, but needs a steady supply of groceries, razor blades and toilet paper. And one or two other things, like fuel if it’s oil burning, and jet fuel in any case. While some high priority items may be delivered by [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]COD[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], most supplies come aboard from a cargo ship or oiler which rendezvous’es (?) with the carrier at sea. The at-sea resupply “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]evolution[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]” (the Unrep) can be more exciting than you really want when the high seas are really high (sea state of 5 is the max for Unrep), as the two ships are steaming side by side, connected by one or more high lines or fuel hoses, with about 160 feet of separation. (As a bonus factoid for trivia buffs, the Unrep heading is known as the “Romeo Corpen.”)[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Wardroom[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The officers’ dining room onboard. Chipped beef is a real favorite. And coffee made with water that tastes of jet fuel. (The ship makes its unique “fresh” water from the polluted salt water it’s steaming through. It also disposes of its wastes in the same waters. During “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]cyclic ops[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]” the ship steams back and forth in the same sea lane, dumping waste and making drinking water.) You’re expected to behave in the wardroom, a challenge for most aviators. (But if you’re in-between flights in a sweaty [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]flight suit[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] you can go to the dirty-shirt [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]mess[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] and not have to behave at all.) You’re not supposed to talk about politics, ***, or religion in the wardroom. It often gets very quiet there.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Watch[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]A period, usually 4 hours, when the young fighter pilot is actually asked to do something other than eat, sleep, swear, fart, and fly. All young fighter pilots take offense at being told to stand a watch; it seems an inexcusable waste of their immeasurable talents. Onboard ship their least favorite watches are the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Boat Officer Watch[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Integrity Watch[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], and the all-day [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Squadron Duty Officer[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] (SDO) watch, also known by the Stalinesque-sounding appellation “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]”The Duty”[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]”.
    [Now here’s a scoop - the logic is complex, but try to follow it: The Navy needs [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Landing Signal Officers[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] (LSO’s) to keep their pilots alive. LSO’s regularly stand an often miserable and always hazardous watch on the LSO platform, out in the weather and practically under the wingtip of landing aircraft. Now, no one in their right mind would volunteer for that. (Let’s dismiss the puling claim that no one in their right mind flies jets off boats...) Except that the LSO is a hero among his peers. He has powers - seemingly magical - and for many he’s the reason they’re still alive. And if there’s one thing more precious than life itself to a fighter pilot, it’s getting the respect of his peers. (Are you with me so far?) Ergo, an LSO doesn’t have to stand any other watches, like the great unwashed masses of young aviators do. So, the bottom line is: A [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]J.O.[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] is motivated to get out of these crappy watches that waste his exceptional talents by becoming an LSO and getting peer respect! And that’s why these watches exist. (You read it here first!) All this was figured out decades ago by the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]brass[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial], and I take back everything I’ve said about them. They’re obviously brilliant.][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Wave[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Traditional term for what the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]LSO[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] (Landing Signal Officer) does. As in “Who’s waving this [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]recovery[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]?” The LSO doesn’t usually wave his arms any longer, but used to be he waved a pair of [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]paddles[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] to indicate [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]glide slope[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] and [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]lineup[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] information to the pilot on final approach to the carrier. The paddles were obviated by development of the landing [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]mirror[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial], but LSOs still need to learn to work the paddles, in case the mirror goes down. And pilots need to learn to fly by the paddles - being literally waved aboard. This skill is not sufficiently practiced nowadays, so losing the mirror is now an emergency condition.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Wave-off[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]An aborted carrier [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]pass[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], where the pilot adds power and climbs back in the landing [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]pattern[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. A hazardous condition may have developed - such as the deck pitching up, or the deck was [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]fouled[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], or the pilot’s pass was unsafe. Usually the command to wave off a pass is issued by the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]LSO[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial], but the pilot can make his own choice to wave it off.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Wind[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The aircraft carrier likes to have close to 30 [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]knots[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] of wind down the deck for aircraft launch and landings. If there’s natural wind, the Captain heads the carrier into the wind to launch. For landings, you want the wind to come down the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]angle deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], 10-12° off the ship’s axis, to reduce the need to [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]crab[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] on final approach. So for landings, the Captain will head the ship a few degrees to [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]starboard[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] of the natural wind. If there’s no natural wind, the Captain makes wind. It’s not what it sounds like. He does this by [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]steaming[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] at 25-30 knots; but in this case the wind relative to the carrier will come down the axis of the ship, giving the pilots a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]starboard[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] cross wind on final approach and bringing the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]burble[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] into the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]groove[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial].[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Windward[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]The side of the ship closest to the wind, or in the upwind direction. If you’re planning to relieve yourself over the rail, select the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]leeward[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial] side instead.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Wire[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]“The Wires” is the set of 4 heavy wound steel cables comprising the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Arresting Gear[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. They’re numbered from 1 (furthest aft) to 4. On the ideal landing the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]hook[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] snags the 3-wire. Miss all 4 and you [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]bolter[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. Each wire has a personality. The 1-wire: You don’t want to catch this. The [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]LSO[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]’s unhappy and you may get a [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]cut pass[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. You’re too low at the ramp and putting the aircraft in danger. The 2-wire: This isn’t necessarily bad [the LSO may mark it “(OK)” in his book]. It just isn’t perfect. You’d like a little more ramp clearance. The 3-wire: This is the target wire. Your hook-to-ramp clearance is normative. An “OK-3” grade from the LSO is the goal. If you’re “on rails” down the glide slope to an OK-3, your grade is underlined and you gain stature in the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Ready Room[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]. A 4-wire is usually safe, though you’re high on the glide slope. But if your glide slope is leveling in close, or you have a right-to-left drift, you may get an [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]inflight[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000] engagement, or wind up at or over the port side scupper of the [/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]flight deck[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000], hanging by the hook (more a problem on older, smaller carriers), or worse. “[/COLOR][/FONT][FONT=Arial][*******#000000]Fly-by-wire[/COLOR][/FONT][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]” is something else altogether.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Yellow Shirt[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE] [SIZE=2][*******#000000][FONT=Arial]The enlisted flight deck directors who have control of movement of A/C on the flight deck. A pilot does not move his aircraft, or any external component of his aircraft, without a positive direction from a Yellowshirt. The Yellowshirts of course wear yellow shirts. There are also White, Green, Purple, Red, and a couple of other color shirts on the flight deck, designating specific roles. (Green = maintenance, Purple = fuelers, etc.) These guys work in an indescribably hazardous environment, and deserve a lot of the medals the pilots get.

    Watch for Navy Aircraft and Flying - next week.


    EJ[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]
    [/SIZE]

  11. #5231
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    Eugene Schmidt

    Excelent my friend, keep up the good job!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. #5232
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    I never understood why the Queen Elizabeth class has two islands (one navigation and one flying operations) instead of a bit larger one, as it happens in all the aircraft carriers of the world until now. Why the British want to differ once again?

  13. #5233
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    From todays!!!


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    SAN DIEGO (July 1, 2013) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) pulls into homeport at Naval Air Station North Island. Carl Vinson was underway off the coast of southern California conducting unit-level training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee/Released)


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    PACIFIC OCEAN (July 2, 2013) Sailors aboard a rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) return to the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) after the successful recovery of a simulated casualty during a man overboard drill. George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ricardo R. Guzman/Released)


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    MAYPORT, Fla. (July 1, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) pulls into Naval Station Mayport to embark the crew's friends and family for a family tiger cruise to its homeport in Norfolk. Dwight D. Eisenhower is returning from deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey Barker/Released)


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    MAYPORT, Fla. (July 1, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) is pierside in Mayport, Fla., before their 2013 Tiger Cruise. Dwight D. Eisenhower is returning to her homeport of Norfolk, Va., after operating in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Wesley J. Breedlove/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (July 1, 2013) An F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Death Rattlers of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323 launches off of the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)



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    GULF OF OMAN (July 1, 2013) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Trevor Grimes directs a plane in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kelly M. Agee/Released)



  14. #5234
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    From todays!!!


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    NORFOLK (July 3, 2013) Sailors man the rails on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Dwight D. Eisenhower arrives at Naval Station Norfolk. as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKECSG), following a deployment to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. IKCSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, and USS Hue City (CG 66). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Andrew Schneider/Released)



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    ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 3, 2013) Adm. Bill Gortney, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, arrives via an HH-60H Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Tridents of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Schneider/Released)


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    ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 2, 2013) An F/A-18E/F Super hornet breaks the sound barrier during an air power demonstration from the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew R. Cole/Released)



  15. #5235
    Senior Member D-Mitch's Avatar
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    HMS Illustrious



    Juan Carlos



    ... have no idea



    Ise



    Principe de Asturias

    Last edited by D-Mitch; 07-04-2013 at 06:23 PM.

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