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Thread: Massive USCG Thread!

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    nice shots dude!!

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    Senior Member Ravage's Avatar
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    Isn't this a MacMillan M88 .50 cal sniper rifle ?



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    Senior Member nullterm's Avatar
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    Awesome thread, keep em coming.

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    Fun trivia: Only about six countries have a navy bigger than the U.S. Coast Guard.

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    Senior Member flanker7's Avatar
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    Very interesting thread Brian. Thank you

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    Member Far's Avatar
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    Never knew the USCG were such bad-a$$es! Great pix! Thank you.

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    Senior Member IMTT's Avatar
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    Very cool pics, as a very young man I was aboard the USCG Glacier, Walnut and Venturas as well as the Point Camdan and Point Carew. I think the point boats are out of service now. I'm glad to see these photos posted, outstanding!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Far View Post
    Never knew the USCG were such bad-a$$es! Great pix! Thank you.
    One of the largest Navies in the world, operating the world's seventh largest naval air force.

    [CENTER]
    [/CENTER]

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    Senior Member jetsetter's Avatar
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    Pascagoula, Miss. (Feb. 15, 2008) - The first National Security Cutter, Bertholf (WMSL 750), returned Monday after four days of builder's trials in the Gulf of Mexico. The ship's return to Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's Pascagoula facility marks the latest milestone for the first NSC, which is nearing completion.

    During the trials, extensive testing of propulsion, electrical, damage control, and combat systems were conducted. This culminated in the successful completion of a four-hour full power trial, standardization trials, as well as 57 mm gun and close-in weapon systems (CIWS) testing.
    "When you combine this extremely capable cutter with our high performing crew, you have a recipe for legendary achievement," said Captain Kelly Hatfield, prospective executive officer, Bertholf. "We are building the legend one step at a time. The latest step was taken during builders trials with the successful first ever firing of the 57mm gun from a U.S. ship."

    Bertholf is the first of eight planned ships in the new class of highly capable, technologically advanced multi-mission cutters being acquired under the Deepwater Program. Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding is building the NSCs, while Lockheed Martin is building and integrating the command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) capabilities onboard the cutters.
    Over the four-day trial, the C4ISR systems tested the surface and air tracking radars as well as the communications and navigational systems.

    "The C4ISR systems demonstrated multi-mission capabilities simultaneously several times during the trials," said Brian Hillers, Lockheed Martin NSC C4ISR lead system engineer. "All systems performed very well and we look forward to continued success as we approach acceptance trials and delivery."

    Among those onboard the NSC during builder's trials were 25 members of Bertholf's prospective crew. The majority of the crew arrived in the Pascagoula area last month and is completing familiarization training before taking delivery of the ship later this spring.

    "I have served over 22 years on Coast Guard ships and this is the most pleasant, easy ride, technically advanced, and modern ship I have ever been on," said BMCS Bob Montague, Bertholf command senior chief. "I can't wait to sail her under Coast Guard command."

    Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman
    Good that they are getting new ships.

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    Member LTGunner's Avatar
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    The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf visits Miami Thursday, June 19, 2008. Miami was the first port call for the Bertholf crew. (Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Nick Ameen)













    Source: http://cgvi.uscg.mil/media/main.php?g2_itemId=77427

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    Purveyor of intelligent reading material Lt-Col A. Tack's Avatar
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    Default Coast Guard Takes Troubled New Cutter on Grand Tour

    Coast Guard Takes Troubled New Cutter on Grand Tour

    August 2008

    by Stew Magnuson
    BALTIMORE


    The month of June marked the coming out party for the Coast Guard’s shiny new national security cutter — the Bertholf.

    Making its way north up the eastern seaboard, the flagship vessel of the much maligned Integrated Deepwater System, held on-board parties for VIPs and tours for the media and public.

    Adm. Thad Allen, commandant of the Coast Guard, after riding from Washington, DC., to a Baltimore pier, said he believed that the program had “turned a corner.”

    Deepwater, a system of boats, aircraft and a software and communications backbone that will one day tie them all together, has suffered from cost overruns, delays, and a radical change in the management structure. It is also the subject of one FBI probe.

    About the same time the Bertholf arrived at Washington’s Navy Shipyard, a Government Accountability Office report titled “Change in Course Improves Deepwater Management and Oversight, but Outcome Still Uncertain,” landed on lawmakers’ desks.

    Like Allen, the report was mostly upbeat.

    “Coast Guard leadership is making positive changes to its management and acquisition approach to the Deepwater Program that should put it in a position to realize better results,” the report said.

    A major change was the removal of the prime contractor, Integrated Coast Guard Systems, as the de facto manager of the program. The Coast Guard was ill-prepared to oversee the contractor’s work. Since the Coast Guard took over the program, the service has faced a difficult task in building up its own acquisition workforce, the report noted.


    It has changed the way it procures boats, aircraft and other equipment. The “asset-based” approach has allowed the service to hold competitions for individual pieces of equipment outside of the ICGS contract. This differs from the “systems-of-systems approach,” where the program’s progress was judged holistically.

    The new system allows managers to spot technical glitches and cost overruns more easily, GAO noted.

    The problem is that the technological backbone — the communications, software and sensors suites that will tie the 12 new ships and aircraft together — doesn’t fit well into this revised approach.

    “An asset based approach —- would entail some risk, as interoperability among all Coast Guard units and DHS components, as well as Navy and others, must be assured,” GAO said.

    The Bertholf is not certified to tie into the Defense Department’s secure network, SIPRNET. The common operating picture, which would allow pilots and intelligence officers on board the cutters to see and share what their sensors are picking up, is also not yet in place, since most of the boats and aircraft are still under development.

    For example, the MH-65C helicopter on board the Bertholf does not have the ability to transmit live video back to the ship, said the cutter’s assistant operations officer, Lt. Krystyn Pecora.

    National security cutters will be the service’s command-and-control ships, so it is crucial to ensure that all sensors and communications systems work seamlessly, and that they can communicate with Defense Department and other agencies.

    “How the Coast Guard structures … the [network] is fundamental to the success of the Deepwater program,” GAO pointed out.

    Allen told reporters that some of this technology will be installed on the cutter during three maintenance periods scheduled to take place during the next year.

    “We will start integrating the command-and-control structure inside the Coast Guard and with our partners,” Allen told reporters on the pier outside the ship.

    GAO said the service’s new management structure “is not fully positioned to manage these aspects under its new paradigm.”

    Allen said, “We will not operate the ship until it is in compliance.”

    Despite all the elements of the network not being completed, the crew is eager to prove the new ship’s worth, Pecora said.

    After its East Coast publicity tour, the cutter was scheduled to return through the Caribbean and the East Pacific on its way to its home port in Alameda, Calif.

    “We’re all hoping for a drug bust on the way around,” Pecora said. “We all want to prove that we’re the Bertholf. We’re here. And we’re here to work.”

    The first national security cutter has several new features not found on the 378-foot high endurance cutters, the largest of the service’s legacy boats.

    The engineering room uses a machinery control and monitoring system, which allows crewmembers to monitor the propulsion on one screen using point-and-click interfaces.

    The propulsion system, which has one gas turbine and two diesel engines, can switch between five modes. Combinations of the turbine and the engine can drive one or both shafts. For example, one engine can drive both shafts or the engines and turbine can combine their power to propel the ship.

    This allows the cutter to accelerate from 5 to 30.5 knots in two minutes. The 378 cutter reaches about 29 knots.

    Engineering room crews can monitor the entire ship with internal cameras. If a fire breaks out, operators can shut down ventilation systems and seal compartments.

    All of its controls are duplicated at a workstation on the bridge.

    Another unique feature is the ability to launch and land boats from the stern.

    A recent man-overboard drill was completed in 4 minutes, 55 seconds. Launching a small boat from the side of the 378-foot cutter would take upwards of 10 to 15 minutes, Pecora said. And doing so at speeds of 20 knots could be harrowing.

    When the boat returns, the coxswain throttles up onto a platform, which captures the boat with a net and automatically pulls it in.

    A starboard side hatch, roughly the size of a small garage door, also allows for easy loading and unloading of supplies and personnel.

    The Bertholf is also the first ship to use a 57 mm, self-loading Bofors gun.

    Ammunition is automatically placed into the breech. Weapons specialists can control the loading, aiming and firing process on a computer screen.

    “This whole boat is just one floating computer… for the point-and-click generation, this is the boat,” Pecora said.

    Crew members also are raving about the improved living conditions. The galley is significantly larger and centralized. Passageways are almost twice as wide as the 378. Six coasties share one room and one shower. The older cutter berths 20 per room, and residents share three showers.

    While the shower-per-crewman ratio is not much better, “No one likes sharing a room with 20 people,” Pecora pointed out.

    Link


    The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf visits Miami Thursday, June 19, 2008. Miami was the first port call for the Bertholf crew. (Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Nick Ameen)



  12. #12

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    i can't see any of the old photos... any way you could repost them

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    Member alsadiyarto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ****nalfootball View Post
    i can't see any of the old photos... any way you could repost them
    ^^me too...

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    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]U.S. Coastguardsmen assigned to Port Security Unit 311 (PSU 311) get under way on a port security operation Feb. 12, 2009, at Kuwait Naval Base. PSU 311 is deployed to support maritime security operations and port security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth G. Takada/Released)[/FONT]


    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]03/23/03, North Arabian Gulf - Seaman Michael A. Joiner, 21, and Boatswain Mate Second Class Brett E. Christenson, 27, members of boarding team "Swordfish" off of the Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell, homeported in Alameda, Ca., approach a tanker ship for boarding. Coast Guard boarding teams are searching vessels in the Gulf Region for weopons, terrorists and Iraqi military personnel in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.[/FONT]


    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]U.S. Coast Guard members of a visit, board, search and seizure team from high-endurance cutter Boutwell (WHEC 719) conduct drills March 4, 2009, aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain (CG 57), in the Indian Ocean, while Boutwell stays in close proximity. Boutwell and Lake Champlain are deployed as part of the USS Boxer (LHD 4) Expeditionary Strike Group supporting maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)[/FONT]

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    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]A U.S. Coast Guard HH-65 Dolphin helicopter lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) March 31, 2009, in the Arabian Sea. The Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group is under way for a regularly-scheduled deployment in support of the on-going rotation of forward-deployed forces. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jesse ****/Released)[/FONT]


    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher Wheeler radios to the crew of an HH-65 Dolphin helicopter during a search and rescue mission in Fargo, N.D., on March 26, 2009. The Coast Guard and several state and local response agencies are coordinating a joint rescue effort for citizens in flood-****e communities in Fargo, Oxbow and Bismarck, N.D. DoD photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Blackwell, U.S. Coast Guard. (Released)[/FONT]


    [FONT="Arial Narrow"]MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (Jan. 06, 2007)- Crews from FEMA and Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento load 25,000 pounds of MRE’s (Meals Ready to Eat) onto a Coast Guard C-130 aircraft to be flown to Naval Air Station Fallon, Nev. For victims of the flood following the levee break in Fernly, Nev. (Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Kevin J. Neff)[/FONT]

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