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Thread: Aceh - Dutch War (Perang Sabil) 1873 - 1904

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    Default Aceh - Dutch War (Perang Sabil) 1873 - 1904

    [size=4]The Aceh - Dutch War[/size]

    The Dutch colonial government declared war on Aceh on 26 March 1873; the apparent immediate trigger for their invasion was discussions between representatives of Aceh and the U.S. in Singapore during early 1873. An expedition under Major General Köhler was sent out in 1874, which was able to occupy most of the coastal areas. It was the intention of the Dutch to attack and take the Sultan's palace, which would also lead to the occupation of the entire country. The Sultan requested and possibly received military aid from Italy and the United Kingdom in Singapore: in any case the Aceh army was rapidly modernized, and Aceh soldiers managed to kill Köhler (a monument of this achievement has been built inside Grand Mosque of Banda Aceh). Köhler made some grave tactical errors and the reputation of the Dutch was severely harmed.

    A second expedition led by General Van Swieten managed to capture the kraton (sultan's palace): the Sultan had however been warned, and had escaped capture. Intermittent guerrilla warfare continued in the region for ten years, with many victims on both sides. Around 1880 the Dutch strategy changed, and rather than continuing the war, they now concentrated on defending areas they already controlled, which were mostly limited to the capital city (modern Banda Aceh), and the harbour town of Ulee Lheue. On 13 October 1880 the colonial government declared the war as over, but continued spending heavily to maintain control over the areas it occupied.

    War began again in 1883, when the British ship Nisero was stranded in Aceh, in an area where the Dutch had little influence. A local leader asked for ransom from both the Dutch and the British, and under British pressure the Dutch were forced to attempt to liberate the sailors. After a failed Dutch attempt to rescue the hostages, where the local leader Teuku Umar was asked for help but he refused, the Dutch together with the British invaded the territory. The Sultan gave up the hostages, and received a large amount in cash in exchange.

    The Dutch Minister of Warfare Weitzel now again declared open war on Aceh, and warfare continued, with little success, as before. The Dutch now also tried to enlist local leaders: the aforementioned Umar was bought with cash, opium, and weapons. Umar received the title panglima prang besar (upper warlord of the government).

    Umar called himself rather Teuku Djohan Pahlawan (Johan the heroic). On 1 January 1894 Umar even received Dutch aid to build an army. However, two years later Umar attacked the Dutch with his new army, rather than aiding the Dutch in subjugating inner Aceh. This is recorded in Dutch history as "Het verraad van Teukoe Oemar" (the treason of Teuku Umar).

    In 1892 and 1893 Aceh remained independent, despite the Dutch efforts. Major J.B. van Heutsz, a colonial military leader, then wrote a series of articles on Aceh. He was supported by Dr Snouck Hurgronje of the University of Leiden, then the leading Dutch expert on Islam. Hurgronje managed to get the confidence of many Aceh leaders and gathered valuable intelligence for the Dutch government. His works remained an official secret for many years. In Hurgronje's analysis of Acehnese society, he minimised the role of the Sultan and argued that attention should be paid to the hereditary chiefs, the Ulee Balang, who he felt could be trusted as local administrators. However, he argued, Aceh's religious leaders, the ulema, could not be trusted or persuaded to cooperate, and must be destroyed.

    This advice was followed: in 1898 Van Heutsz was proclaimed governor of Aceh, and with his lieutenant, later Dutch Prime Minister Hendrikus Colijn, would finally conquer most of Aceh. They followed Hurgronje's suggestions, finding cooperative uleebelang that would support them in the countryside. Van Heutsz charged Colonel Van Daalen with breaking remaining resistance. Van Daalen destroyed several villages, killing at least 2,900 Acehnese, among which were 1,150 women and children. Dutch losses numbered just 26, and Van Daalen was promoted.

    By 1904 most of Aceh was under Dutch control, and had an indigenous government that cooperated with the colonial state. Estimated total casualties on the Aceh side range from 50,000 to 100,000 dead, and over a million wounded.

    In the Netherlands at the time, van Heutsz was considered a hero, named the 'Pacificator of Aceh' and was promoted to become governor-general of the entire Dutch Indies in 1904. A still-existent statue of him was erected in central Amsterdam.

    Colonial influence in the remote highland areas of Aceh was never substantial, however, and limited guerrilla resistance remained. Led mostly by the religious ulema, intermittent fighting continued until about 1910, and parts of the province were still not pacified when the Dutch Indies became independent Indonesia following the end of the Japanese occupation of Indonesia.

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    [size=4]Sultanate Of Aceh Darussalam Flag[/size]




    Aceh Flag : Alam Aceh (Atjeh) , Alam Peudeueng , Alam Zulfiqar





    (1496 - 1903)















    Government flag Aceh, named ALAM ZULFIQAR those made by Sultan Ali Mughayat Shah (First Sultan Aceh) old his leadership is from year 916 - 936 H (1511 - 1530)




    [size=4]Meriam Lada Sicupak (Aceh)[/size]




    Acehnese Cannons Used During Fight Again Portuguese And Dutch












    [size=4]Malay / Aceh Firearms[/size]



    # Pemuras (Malay / Aceh Decorated Traditional Gun)

    # Bedil Istinggar (Malay Flintlock Musket)

    # Tarkul

    # Karga (Bullet Case)



    Pendekar Aceh (Aceh Warrior)








    Sultanate Aceh Guard (Nias Island)





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    [size=4]Sultanate Aceh Letters To Ottoman Empire[/size]

















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    Batak Marechaussee (1904)





    An Aceh fort after capture by the Dutch in a 1901 photograph (1904)











    Gunungan, Kutaraja ''Banda Aceh'' (1874)



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    [SIZE=4]V.O.C Korps Marechaussee Klewang (Cutlass)[/SIZE]



    During the Aceh War the acehnese klewangs proved very effective in close quarters combat with Dutch troops and the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army adopted a heavy cutlass, also called klewang, to counter it. Mobile troops armed with carbine and klewang succeeded in suppressing Aceh resistance where traditional infantry with rifle and bayonet had failed.










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    [*******Black][size=4]Aceh Weapon[/size]




    Sultan & Acehnese Noble












    Peudeueng Peusangan (Hulu Meu Apet)


























    Sarung Peudeueng Peusangan






    Peudeueng Peusangan (Hulu Tumpang Beunteung)








    Peudeueng Panjang (Hulu Tumpang Beunteung) Hulu Buaya








    Sarung Peudeung Panjang






    Aceh War Flag













    Sources:


    “Blanke Wapens” by JG Dieles




    [/color]

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    Daddy's little boy RSone's Avatar
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    Might be important to note that the VOC didn't exist anymore by this time, nor was there ever a VOC Marechaussee(from the pictures of the cutlass you posted). The Marechaussee is the Military Police force of the Armed Forces. Back then, they also had a more active combat role.

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    hi y'all was researching the sikin (peudeueng panjang) when i stumbled across this forum and this thread, so i decided to make my first post on this interesting forum here. i've got a recent traditionally made sikin on it's way from indonesia at the moment, hence my interest:


    in-hand pic gives a better sense of proportion.

    the other thing i note is the pics on the dutch military police klewang are a bit fuzzy, so here are a few pics of mine. it is one of the earlier ones the dutch general Van Heutsz had made in solingen before they moved production to hembrug.* these were also of course, later made by the US for use as cutlasses by a couple of US mfg. and is currently copied by 'Cold Steel'*. the japanese apparently captured a number of them in ww2 and cut back the shell guard to a minimum cross-guard and issued them to NCO's. i've seen a couple for sale on ebay but wasn't particularly interested.






    *ref: sword forum thread, post 3 by paul hansen

    another ref where we discussed the klewang on the ethnographic arms & armour forum: Old Dutch ... Klewang

    and if i've not bored you yet, here's a link on the Acehnese sikin
    Last edited by kronckew; 05-08-2008 at 02:30 AM.

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    [*******Black]


    Toekoe Oemar Spel, a popular children's game in 1890s Netherlands involving 25 white figurines (Dutch soldiers) chasing one black figure (Teuku Umar)[/color]

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    Very nice thread. The aggression against Indonesia has gone down as a black page in Dutch history and awareness. Together with the slave trade it's one of the few pages in dutch history we're never proud of.

    The statue's of van heutsz that still exist are sometimes a matter of debate. The same goes for a statue of the 16th/17th century Jan Pieterszoon Coen who also fought against Indonesians with much brutality. But this statue is quite famous, because of its inscription of Pieterszoon's Coen famous quote: "Despair not, spare your enemies not, for God is with us".

    I'll download the movie and hope it's good because it looks very interesting.
    Last edited by -Pieter-; 11-11-2008 at 09:15 PM.

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    Great threat..
    thanks for sharing..
    did any of you got more info about aceh empire before the independence?
    is it true that it covers malaysia, sumatra and some borneo?

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    Thanks Hang PC

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    Quote Originally Posted by makavelli View Post
    Great threat..
    thanks for sharing..
    did any of you got more info about aceh empire before the independence?
    is it true that it covers malaysia, sumatra and some borneo?
    some state like Perak were use to br the vassal of the Achehnese empire.

    Acheh was initially a vassal state of Sultan Marif Shah of Pedir but Sultan Ali Mughayat Shah defied his overlord. While the empire of Acheh di exist quite a while, its meteoric rise in south east asia started after the fall of Melaka in 1511.

    The Portuguese capture of Melaka and their persecution of Muslims forced wealthy Arab and Gujerati merchants to move from Melaka to Acheh. This new wealth enabled Acheh to embark upon wars of aggression and conquest to obtain control of the pepper districts of Sumatra.

    Militarily and economically stronger than any of her neighbours in Sumatra and the Malay peninsula, she quickly took over the mantle of the vanquished Melaka Sultanate as the leading kingdom in the Straits. She overran the pepper ports of Pasai and Pedir and secured control of the part of Minangkabau which was rich in gold.

    The two export commodities of pepper and gold became important in the development of
    Acheh as a commercial centre. Acheh fought the Portuguese for naval and commercial control of the Straits and fought against Johor for political leadership of the dependent states on both sides of the Straits.
    (quoted: Sabri Zain)

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    1881-193∞ Ulytau's Avatar
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    Wow nice infos thank you for share

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