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Thread: Rhodesian Bush War Phtotographs

  1. #1771
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    Default Moz pics

    These were in my army section - a couple I cant remember from where:

    On the subject of Grey Scouts did anyone work with a guy named Neville Bosworth?

    The pics are from Inyanga - 3 indep turf. Honde valley but from Mt Inyanga side. (Worlds view?) The big granite gommo is from the same area - on the way to Ruda BAse Camp? We had a good few beers at the pubs at Hotsprings and Birchenoff Bridge. Note the lack of sand bags and guards at the bridge- so it must be 1975/6. We used to go past Rupisi hot springs on our way to Gonarezou/ South East Rhodesia. Does anyone remember the water slide at the top of Burmah Valley? The picture with ball point pen writing on it is of Burmah Valley. A farm in the valley was Robandi - referred to in Alexandra Fullers book "Lets not go to the dogs tonite". Good read.
    RAR guy with the MAG shows the loose belt method of carrying rounds and the second more fuzzy one is the looped method as previously described.
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    Junior Member tap2's Avatar
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    A piece by Robin Moore here.

    For those discussing Greys and, or Major Mike Williams, I think I have a piece by him. In fact, I think I've got another article with photos of Williams at Moore's place in Salisbury. I'll try digging around for them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tap2 View Post
    A piece by Robin Moore here.

    For those discussing Greys and, or Major Mike Williams, I think I have a piece by him. In fact, I think I've got another article with photos of Williams at Moore's place in Salisbury. I'll try digging around for them.
    Whilst at 2 Indep we had a Major Pete Burford as OC. He was replaced, I think in about '79, by a guy from Grey Scouts... This was a Major Williams, not sure of his first name. I'm pretty sure that when he first arrived he was still wearing the rank of Captain and was promoted to Major within a few weeks. Guess he was just waiting for the red tape to be flushed through the system.
    Always walked around with his stupid riding crop under his arm - a real idiot in my opinion, although in reflection, this opinion was based on the fact that he delayed my promotion to Sgt for 3 months for what I considdered to be petty reasons.

    Could this be tha same Williams refered to in Tap2's post?

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Of The Few View Post
    Whilst at 2 Indep we had a Major Pete Burford as OC. He was replaced, I think in about '79, by a guy from Grey Scouts... This was a Major Williams, not sure of his first name. I'm pretty sure that when he first arrived he was still wearing the rank of Captain and was promoted to Major within a few weeks. Guess he was just waiting for the red tape to be flushed through the system.
    Always walked around with his stupid riding crop under his arm - a real idiot in my opinion, although in reflection, this opinion was based on the fact that he delayed my promotion to Sgt for 3 months for what I considdered to be petty reasons.

    Could this be tha same Williams refered to in Tap2's post?
    The Maj Mike Williams of Greys Scouts fame had to leave the army in 1978 after taking a reporter(Ross Baughman) with him on ops. Ross Baughman took photos of Greys in the bush ,after leaving Rhodesia he wrote a story about Greys Scouts doing nasty things to the "povo" in the bush(as if), he (Baughman) got the pulitzer prize for his article and Maj Mike had his balls on the chopping block and had ???? to resign from the army he left Rhodesia in 1978... He wrote a book (ghosted by Rodin Moore) about his time in Rhodesia around 1982 I read it at the time it was a bit I, I ,I, I me me me me but then again he was an officier)

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    Default Will the real Major Williams please stand up...

    As I recall from somewhere back in the thread, it seems there were a couple of Major Williams' who served in Greys Scouts.

    There was Mike Williams, Yank of 'Ross Baughman photo scandal' fame, and then there is Major Williams (given name unknown) who is pictured in this thread addressing a US Army Special Forces Assn. dinner.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tap2 View Post
    As I recall from somewhere back in the thread, it seems there were a couple of Major Williams' who served in Greys Scouts.

    There was Mike Williams, Yank of 'Ross Baughman photo scandal' fame, and then there is Major Williams (given name unknown) who is pictured in this thread addressing a US Army Special Forces Assn. dinner.
    Hi the Major Williams addressing a US Army Assn Dinner was a member of Selous Scouts not Greys, I'm sure it was covered in a thread (many pages back) some how who ever wrote the article put his regiment down as Greys Scouts..

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    Dear sirs, I`ve some question about patrol webbing of RLI. Text information a have says "SA `60 pattern and british `58 pattern". But i totally cant get what is `60 looks like, and simply cant find any sights of`58 webbings. Can someone clear this?? "Troopie" belt with roll, pouches and canteens may be, but still not sure.

    And, as well, about terr`s small arms, exept worldwide made AK series, ww II stuff and other soviet style things, was there something "exotic", as CZ 61 "Skorpion" in Аngola??

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    Default FN v AK v Shotgun

    In September 1975 we had an incident where a curfew breaker was shot. We had called all the local farm workers the day before to tell them to stay away from the border area as we would be ambushing the paths from Mozambique. Not that they ever listened to us. It also shows to what lengths the army would go to avoid some of the less fortunate incidents. Anyway at a bout 9pm we had 4 ambush sticks out (4-6 men per stick)when we heard a one of them start up. The shots went on for about 3-5 minutes but sounded like a whole platoon of gooks was being hammered.
    Anyway word came through that they had got one "AM" - african male.
    Next morning we went to view the ambush site. Sure there was one dead African male, but when we viewed the body there wasnt a scratch on the his front (he was lying on his back). so we turned him over. No sign of a bullet wound. So the ouens were very "confussed". Anyway they had used up the better part of a belt of 50 rounds on the MAG plus 5 or 10 rounds on each FN. The corporal had shotgun with SG and had fired two rounds. So we jumped to conclusion the AM had died of a heart attack!!! HAHA.
    In due course police arrived and took one AM to the local police station.
    A further medical examination there determined that a single ball of the shotgun had gone through the AM's eye ball and bounced around inside his head killing him instantly.
    So much for over 100 rounds of 7,62 and all our crack shots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by velmak View Post
    Dear sirs, I`ve some question about patrol webbing of RLI. Text information a have says "SA `60 pattern and british `58 pattern". But i totally cant get what is `60 looks like, and simply cant find any sights of`58 webbings. Can someone clear this?? "Troopie" belt with roll, pouches and canteens may be, but still not sure.
    To my knowledge, the Rhodesian Army never used the British Pattern '58. At least officially, parts may have found their way through Brit volunteers.
    The official webbing equipment when the RLI was created was the British Pattern '44. By the late 60s, it had been replaced by the South African Pattern '61/64, soon to be copied by the Rhodesians as the Pattern '69, which was of lesser quality - as any vets would tell you.

    This was later supplemented in the RLI (and many other units) by chest webbing or combat vests.

    Here are some components of the Pattern '69 webbing.


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    Quote Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
    To my knowledge, the Rhodesian Army never used the British Pattern '58. At least officially, parts may have found their way through Brit volunteers.
    The official webbing equipment when the RLI was created was the British Pattern '44. By the late 60s, it had been replaced by the South African Pattern '61/64, soon to be copied by the Rhodesians as the Pattern '69, which was of lesser quality - as any vets would tell you.

    This was later supplemented in the RLI (and many other units) by chest webbing or combat vests.

    Here are some components of the Pattern '69 webbing.
    Hm, it looks very same to `58, exept the size of mag pouches defference are not obvious, may be that the reason of possible mistake? I find some graphics, buy the way

    And here - http://selousscouts.tripod.com/EQUIPMENT.htm belt order looks like modyfied `58 without suspenders as well.

    So what rhodies will say?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxdray View Post
    Hi the Major Williams addressing a US Army Assn Dinner was a member of Selous Scouts not Greys, I'm sure it was covered in a thread (many pages back) some how who ever wrote the article put his regiment down as Greys Scouts..
    That explains a lot.

    Now I'm wondering if this Major Williams (of Selous Scouts) was one in the same with One of The Few's Captain Williams (of Greys Scouts) who became Major Williams (of 2 Indp) or a third Major Williams...

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    Booty shorts in the bush just doesn't seem like a good idea to me...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red_Fern View Post
    Booty shorts in the bush just doesn't seem like a good idea to me...
    ...but nice and cool when patrolling the Zambezi valley We used to wear them and put camo cream on our legs (as well as faces and arms) to cover white skin. Even the most tanned skin still stood out in the bush.
    At some time during my national service, orders came through that only long trousers were to be worn on patrol, but some people still changed into shorts once away from camp. Having very fair skin, I was happy to wear combat trousers to protect myself from the sun, but it was hot!!

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    I read sometime ago the book by Pete McAleese, No Mean Soldier. His Rendition of service in the RhSAS and life in Rhodesia in general was pretty condescending to say the least.

    At one point he goes on to say how he wasn't accept well in Rhodesia as he was an outsider. I found this statement rather interesting as he arrived in Rhodesia from the UK. There were, literally, boat loads of Brits living in Rhodesia, so I think it's safe to say one could easily blend in to life in Rhodesia if one was from the UK.

    I now from my own family experience, we were (are) Canadian with definite accents to prove it, and we were very well accept in Rhodesia.

    My question is. Does anyone know anything about this guy and how well received was he during his time in Rhodesia? Also anyone else on here who spent time in Rhodesia, how was your experience of life in Rhodesia, and how well accept were you by Rhodesians?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cnd Riflemen View Post
    I read sometime ago the book by Pete McAleese, No Mean Soldier. His Rendition of service in the RhSAS and life in Rhodesia in general was pretty condescending to say the least.

    At one point he goes on to say how he wasn't accept well in Rhodesia as he was an outsider. I found this statement rather interesting as he arrived in Rhodesia from the UK. There were, literally, boat loads of Brits living in Rhodesia, so I think it's safe to say one could easily blend in to life in Rhodesia if one was from the UK.

    I now from my own family experience, we were (are) Canadian with definite accents to prove it, and we were very well accept in Rhodesia.

    My question is. Does anyone know anything about this guy and how well received was he during his time in Rhodesia? Also anyone else on here who spent time in Rhodesia, how was your experience of life in Rhodesia, and how well accept were you by Rhodesians?
    Rhodesians were, (by the time I arrived in country Jan/79) quite insular and had closed ranks within their society due to the unique combination of circumstances that had arisen since their arrival and conquest of Matebeland in the late 1800's. Their insularity grew proportionately after UDI in 1965 when they really had to go it alone against the rest of the world.

    Try and remember this was truly a pioneer society far removed from the Empire and the people living there reflected that spirit - tough, independant and scornful of outsiders. However, for all of their flaws I found the majority of Rhodesians (both black & white) to be decent, honest people caught up in the whirlwind of change that was visiting their part of the world.

    McAleese may have been condesending in his book but it sure wasn't towards the Rhodesian SAS whom he (a former member of 22 SAS) described as doing things that their compatriots on 22 SAS could only dream of doing:

    "Furthermore, by direct contrast with most recent British Army campaigns, soldiers in Rhodesia expected to see and fight the enemy every time they went out on patrol."

    Korvinag, don't mistake this McAleese with the other McAleese of 22 SAS fame who recently lost his son in A-stan. (I think it is he who has the pub business?)

    Cheers!

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