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Thread: USN conducts test of Standard Missile-6

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    Default USN conducts test of Standard Missile-6

    This is great news. The Aegis/SM-2 is a great system capable of handling saturation air attacks but is limited by the radar's horizon. With the SM-6, an Aegis ship will be able to target aircrafts some 200miles away, before they can launch their AShMs.


    US Navy Conducts First Test of Raytheon's Standard Missile 6
    WHITE SANDS, N.M., June 24, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Navy successfully conducted the first test of the Standard Missile 6 extended range anti-air warfare missile produced by Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN).

    The missile, launched from the Navy's Desert Ship at the White Sands Missile Range, successfully intercepted a BQM-74 aerial drone using the newly developed SM-6 active seeker. The active seeker autonomously acquired and engaged the target using the Navy's legacy command system, resulting in a direct hit. This launch demonstrates the first successful integration of the Navy's active missile technology into the weapon system to provide for both near-term advanced anti-air warfare and future over-the-horizon capability.

    Standard Missile 6 is being developed by Raytheon to meet the Navy's requirement for an extended range anti-air warfare missile. Expected to deploy in 2011, it provides capability against fixed and rotary wing aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles and delivers a transformational over-the-horizon counter to the ever-evolving cruise missile threat. Employing the Standard Missile-2 Block IVA airframe and the newly developed active sensor, Standard Missile 6 will also have an inherent capability to fulfill the Navy's sea-based terminal ballistic missile defense requirement.

    "Standard Missile 6 is the latest advance in Raytheon's ongoing commitment to the Navy and its allies," said Frank Wyatt, Raytheon Missile Systems' vice president of the Naval Weapons Systems product line. "This test proves that Raytheon is on track to deliver this solution to the Navy as scheduled."
    http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...raytheon01.htm

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    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Ehm... So the SM2 has a bigger version in the SM3, and now an enhanced version in the... SM6? What happened to SM4 and SM5?

    Ah, sounds like a nifty rocket. But then again: if the bogey is out of radar's range, how can you make sure it has hostile intentions towards you? Sounds like a perfect missile for all out war of annihilation, but how many of such wars will there be...?

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    Senior Member Winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    Ehm... So the SM2 has a bigger version in the SM3, and now an enhanced version in the... SM6? What happened to SM4 and SM5?

    Ah, sounds like a nifty rocket. But then again: if the bogey is out of radar's range, how can you make sure it has hostile intentions towards you? Sounds like a perfect missile for all out war of annihilation, but how many of such wars will there be...?
    The detection systems we use to acquire over-the-horizon detection has an ability to distinguish object size and dimensions to the point of being able to distinguish type of aircraft or at least deduce missile type. Threat assessments can't be made just with direction, speed & height of target off the ground if you wish to engage at those ranges. You can plot zig zag or dogleg type paths with smart systems to try and confuse your target. You can also control at what speed the missile will travel at different points to provide further confusion as well as adjust the mean level of flight. So, identifying what it is, is crucial for engaging a target at 200nm if the engager/defender happens to be the closest detection assett as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    Ehm... So the SM2 has a bigger version in the SM3, and now an enhanced version in the... SM6? What happened to SM4 and SM5?

    Ah, sounds like a nifty rocket. But then again: if the bogey is out of radar's range, how can you make sure it has hostile intentions towards you? Sounds like a perfect missile for all out war of annihilation, but how many of such wars will there be...?
    200NM is well inside SPY-1 A/B/D range.

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    Senior Member Winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mateona06 View Post
    200NM is well inside SPY-1 A/B/D range.
    Not for sea-skimmers. The missile intercept will rely on more than just the SPY for taking out close to the surface targets past the horizon which it can't detect past 23-25 miles. Remember, the earth is round

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    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winger View Post
    The detection systems we use to acquire over-the-horizon detection has an ability to distinguish object size and dimensions to the point of being able to distinguish type of aircraft or at least deduce missile type. Threat assessments can't be made just with direction, speed & height of target off the ground if you wish to engage at those ranges. You can plot zig zag or dogleg type paths with smart systems to try and confuse your target. You can also control at what speed the missile will travel at different points to provide further confusion as well as adjust the mean level of flight. So, identifying what it is, is crucial for engaging a target at 200nm if the engager/defender happens to be the closest detection assett as well.
    Thanks, but that's just one of my points. I still wonder why we have an SM1, SM2, SM3 and an SM6. No matter any one of these's capacities: where are 4 and 5?

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    Senior Member Alpheus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    Thanks, but that's just one of my points. I still wonder why we have an SM1, SM2, SM3 and an SM6. No matter any one of these's capacities: where are 4 and 5?
    SM-4 is a anti-ballistic missile based on the SM-2ER, and the SM-5 is a canceled land attack missile. The SM-6 is basically a SM-2ER with an AMRAAM seeker head.

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    Senior Member Winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SineJustitia View Post
    Thanks, but that's just one of my points. I still wonder why we have an SM1, SM2, SM3 and an SM6. No matter any one of these's capacities: where are 4 and 5?

    Thanks, but I answered your 2nd question. As to what happened to 4 and 5 I don't know. Maybe some of the SWO's around here can answer that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winger View Post
    Not for sea-skimmers. The missile intercept will rely on more than just the SPY for taking out close to the surface targets past the horizon which it can't detect past 23-25 miles. Remember, the earth is round
    The earth is round cuts both ways. The ship can't see over the radar horizon, and neither can the launching platform(or the missile). So the only way to get a targeting solution would be to increase altitude. The higher up you go, the farther you can see... And be seen.

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    And when you have a Hawkeye over your Head you can see far enough anyway.

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    Senior Member DaveDash's Avatar
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    Why is it the U.S. advertises everything it does to the public? Do they just assume their enemies will know or what? Or is it for Public accountability?

    You don't often hear "China completed test blah blah blah of new weapon XYZ"

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveDash View Post
    Why is it the U.S. advertises everything it does to the public? Do they just assume their enemies will know or what? Or is it for Public accountability?

    You don't often hear "China completed test blah blah blah of new weapon XYZ"
    coz in reality you dont often hear China sucessfully test their weapon or even have it tested

    its good for marketing you know..

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    Senior Member SineJustitia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpheus View Post
    SM-4 is a anti-ballistic missile based on the SM-2ER, and the SM-5 is a canceled land attack missile. The SM-6 is basically a SM-2ER with an AMRAAM seeker head.
    Thanks, I tried googling for it but "SM" turns up a lot of NSFW-stuff...

    And regarding Winger: your answer to my second question is what my "Thanks" was for But still: identifying a target other than missiles, including speed, direction and altitude, is still a long way from understanding it's intends. How many sea-skimming missiles with a 200NM plus range are there anyway?

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    To help clear things up a bit.

    The SM-6 enables the full utilisation of the capabilities the Cooperative Engagement Capability(CEC) brings to the table. So if a E-2C Hawkeye flying 200miles away from the Carrier detects a cruise missile inbound, it can identify the target and transmit targetting information to the ships in the strike group. The warships can in turn launch a SM-6 to the interception point provided by the Hawkeye where it switches on it's AMRAAM seeker and home in on the cruise missile.

    In a littoral warfare scenario, a onshore Marine Corp radar can detect hostile fighters inbound, transmit the data to a Aegis destroyer 50miles offshore which in turn launches SM-6s to intercept the fighters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveDash View Post
    Why is it the U.S. advertises everything it does to the public? Do they just assume their enemies will know or what? Or is it for Public accountability?

    You don't often hear "China completed test blah blah blah of new weapon XYZ"
    Its for deterrence. When the enemy knows that a Carrier strike group is defended by 4 dozen fighters and a 200mile diameter SAM umbrella, they may rethink their assumption that they can neutralise a Carrier Strike Group from the air. And with CSGs lurking in the region, the chances of them winning any conflict is significantly diminished and hence deter them from starting a war in the first place.

    Of course, public accountability and marketing are reasons as well.

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