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Thread: Miscellaneous post-WWII USAF aircraft (HiRes)

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    Default Miscellaneous post-WWII USAF aircraft (HiRes)

    All photos are in Hires. Click the image for full-size.

    Douglas XB-42 "Mixmaster"

    The Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster was an experimental bomber aircraft, designed for a high top speed. The unconventional approach was to mount the two engines within the fuselage driving a pair of contra-rotating propellers mounted at the tail, leaving the wing and fuselage clean and free of aerodynamics-reducing protrusions. Two prototype aircraft were built, but the end of World War II changed priorities and the advent of the jet engine gave an alternative way toward achieving high speed.






    Douglas XB-43 "Jetmaster"

    The Douglas XB-43 Jetmaster was a jet powered development of the XB-42, replacing the piston engines of the XB-42 with two General Electric J35 engines of 4,000 pounds-force (17.8 kN) thrust each. Despite being the first American jet bomber to fly, it suffered stability issues and the two prototypes never entered production, spending several years testing engines.






    North American B-45 "Tornado" & variants

    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first jet aircraft to be refueled in the air. The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 through 1959.

    Continuously plagued by engine problems along with numerous other minor flaws, the B-45 regained importance when the United States entered the Korean War in 1950 and would prove its value both as a bomber and in a reconnaissance role. The mass dedication of U.S. Forces to the Korean War revealed the vulnerability of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in Europe to Soviet attack and it was in this light that the Air Force made an important decision about the future of the B-45. The B-45, like all post WWII U.S. bombers, could carry both nuclear and conventional bombs.








    [size=1]Note: JRB-45C variant[/size]




    [size=1]JRB-45C in flight with small jet engine mounted on bomb bay test pylon[/size]


    Convair XB-46

    The Convair XB-46 was a single example of an experimental medium jet bomber developed in the mid-1940s but which never saw production or active duty.












    Martin XB-48

    The Martin XB-48 was a medium jet bomber developed in the mid-1940s. It never saw production or active duty, and only two prototypes, serial numbers 45-59585 and 45-586, were built.




    [size=1]Note the tail armament rough-in. The large hemisphere was for the twin .50-cal. turret, and the smaller one was for the fire control radar antenna[/size]










    Northrop YB-49

    The Northrop YB-49 was a prototype jet-powered flying wing medium bomber aircraft developed by Northrop for the United States Air Force shortly after World War II. It was a development of the piston-engined YB-35, and the two YB-49s actually built were both converted YB-35 test aircraft. The aircraft was never to enter production, however, being passed over in favor of the more conventional Convair B-36 in service.








    Martin XB-51

    The Martin XB-51 was an American tri-jet ground attack aircraft designed to a 1945 United States Army Air Forces requirement, and originally designated XA-45. The A ground attack classification was eliminated the next year, and the XB-51 designation was assigned instead. The requirement was for low-level bombing and close support.




















    Douglas B-66 "Destroyer" & variants

    The Douglas B-66 Destroyer was a Tactical Air Command light bomber based on the United States Navy's A3D Skywarrior, and was intended to replace the Douglas A-26 Invader. An RB-66 photo-reconnaissance version was ordered simultaneously and their airframes became the basis for the EB-66 electronic-warfare variant.


    [size=1]RB-66C variant[/size]


    [size=1]RB-66A variant[/size]


    [size=1]WB-66D variant[/size]








    Boeing B-47 "Stratojet" & variants

    The Boeing B-47 Stratojet jet bomber was a medium-range and -size bomber capable of flying at high subsonic speeds and primarily designed for penetrating the Soviet Union. A major innovation in post-World War II combat jet design, it helped lead to the development of modern jet airliners. While the B-47 never saw major combat use, it was the mainstay of U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command in the 1950s.








    [size=1]RB-47E variant[/size]


    [size=1]B-47E variant[/size]








    [size=1]Seven parked B-47As at the Boeing Airplane Co. Plant II, North A****, Wichita, Kan., on Jan. 26, 1951[/size]






    [size=1]YDB-47E variant[/size]




    [size=1]WB-47B, weather reconnaissance conversion, assigned to the 55th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron[/size]


    [size=1]B-47E-65-BW during rocket assisted take-off[/size]


    [size=1]Boeing YDB-47E in flight with GAM-63[/size]


    [size=1]B-47B rocket-assisted take off on April 15, 1954[/size]

  2. #2
    Junior Member Koyunbaba's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Thats some superb shots you got there! Thanks for sharing.

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    Bite my shiny metal ass! beNder's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Nice

    Very nice work drake. Thank you.

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    Member RevengeSeeker's Avatar
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    Neat. That boomerang design is older than I thought.

    Thanks alot for the pics!

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    Senior Member el borracho's Avatar
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    It's crazy when you think that some of these designs just barely missed the war. Maybe that's for the best before things escalated into supersonic jet combat. Good pics.

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    @ RevengeSeeker:

    Two German brothers named Horten could be considered as inventors of the "flying wings". Their first glider already started in 1933 and during WWII their inventions were further developed and lead into the worlds first jet-powered flying wing the Horten Ho 229.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_brothers

    After the end of WWII lots of German inventions and scientists were brought to the USA and Russia to continue development and evaluation. That's how the "flying wings" came to America.


    Greetz
    Plage
    Last edited by T.S.C.Plage; 08-11-2008 at 02:58 AM.

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    oh yeah..the new are begins.
    I ve got some books about post war aircrafts, I ll see if I can scan some.

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    Senior Member Pandemonium's Avatar
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    Thunderbirds are GO

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    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.C.Plage View Post
    @ RevengeSeeker:

    Two German brothers named Horten could be considered as inventors of the "flying wings". Their first glider already started in 1933 and during WWII their inventions were further developed and lead into the worlds first jet-powered flying wing the Horten Ho 229.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_brothers

    After the end of WWII lots of German inventions and scientists were brought to the USA and Russia to continue development and evaluation. That's how the "flying wings" came to America.


    Greetz
    Plage
    Yet another thing with credit to the ingenuity that is German. Thanks Plage!

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    You're welcome! In fact there was a lot of interesting technology invented during that time and further developed later on. Unfortunately most of the "Nazi" inventions were used for the evil which allways gives it a bad taste.


    Greetz
    Plage

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    Member Trael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.C.Plage View Post
    After the end of WWII lots of German inventions and scientists were brought to the USA and Russia to continue development and evaluation. That's how the "flying wings" came to America.

    Are you sure? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_N-1M

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    Senior Member Bitogno's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot.

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    Sorry, maybe that was misleading. I didn't ment that the US didn't had their own program! As mentioned the Horten glider could be considered the first flying wing. After the war lots of stuff got in allied hands and was later on tranfered for further evaluations. I can't proof that Horten technology was used for the later on project by Northrop but I'm really sure that the best or most promising parts of both projects were put together.


    Greetz
    Plage

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    Senior Member Nebelwerfer.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drakegoodman View Post
    Il-28


    Now this is rather interesting. B-45 had first flight in 1947 and Il-28 in 1948, and both entered service in 1950. Who copied from who?

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    Stinky McSmells a lot Evolv5's Avatar
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    thanks a lot for the great quality photos!

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