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Thread: Canadian Armed Forces, Forces canadiennes

  1. #106
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    [FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]Since 2001 ,canadian airfield Bagotville and Cold Lake said they're ready to be send in Afghanistan. O'gonnor said that in 2006 [/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][SIZE=-1][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]“I can deny it because no one’s...brought it across my desk”. Few day later he said the canadian gouvernment has the prossibility to send Six CF-18 between 2008-2009

    Don't forget canada sent 26x CF-18 in Gulf war 1991 and Kosovo in 1999 with more 600hours of combat. So why this time canada don't send CF-18 in Afghanistan , we have the fighter and experience munition and for sure the airfield of Kandahar so why canada don't send minimum six CF-18 for escort our troops from Ambush and any sort of situation.


    Here an article from 2007, Toronto Star


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    CF-18 jets are mission-ready TheStar.com - News - CF-18 jets are mission-ready
    Documents show deployment plans to Afghanistan set, but orders unlikely

    February 19, 2007
    Bruce Campion-Smith
    OTTAWA BUREAU
    OTTAWA–Canada's air force has detailed plans to deploy six CF-18s fighter jets to Kandahar, even to the point of predicting how many so-called "smart" bombs would be needed for a six-month air campaign battling insurgents, documents show.
    Defence officials say they have no intention of sending the fighters overseas. But military memos and orders obtained by the Toronto Star make it clear that extensive planning has laid the groundwork for a deployment should the Conservative government give the okay.
    "With respect to the current situation ... there are no plans at this point in time do so," Lt.-Col. John Blakeley, director of air force public affairs, said last Friday.
    But just over a year ago – as Canada's army units made the move to Kandahar from Kabul – it seemed certain the air force's front-line fighter would be deployed to join them in an operation expected to cost $18 million, documents obtained under the Access to Information Act show.
    In January 2006, air force headquarters in Winnipeg sent out an order to the two CF-18 bases at Bagotville, Que., and Cold Lake, Alta., regarding "deployment to Kandahar."
    "The purpose of this (message) is to co-ordinate deployment milestones that will ensure the directed fighter preparedness posture is achieved and maintained," it said.
    The order laid out some of the requirements for the Kandahar operation, such as parking space for six of the sleek fighters with a spot where another jet could undergo maintenance work.
    The documents also reveal that planners predicted how many sorties the jets would be flying each day as well as how many precision-guided bombs would be used in a six-month deployment, although those details have been censored.
    The documents detail the "weapons on hand," including a selection of laser-guided bombs weighing up to 907 kilograms.
    One memo, marked secret, discusses the need for air-to-air refuelling to get the jets from their bases in Alberta and Quebec to Afghanistan.
    Among the papers is a presentation totalling about 45 pages on the threats that would face the fighter team in Afghanistan with topics that include narcotics, the "opposing military force," rockets and mortars, convoy ambush, roadside bombs, kidnappings and suicide bombers, although details on each have been blanked out.
    The documents also stress the need for positive identification to avoid "collateral damage" to allied troops. Five Canadian soldiers have already been killed in Afghanistan in friendly fire incidents involving American jets.
    Air force rules made clear that CF-18 jet jockeys would have to "visually acquire their targets and have the flexibility to deliver ordinance in lower flight regimes to avoid fratricide."
    The air force convened a two-day meeting in Winnipeg in November 2005 involving air staff from across the country to discuss issues "related to preparation, deployment, employment and force sustainment of an eventual fighter force supporting the Afghan theatre of operations" reads one memo.
    A 14-member military team was to head to Afghanistan in April 2006, to scout out the Kandahar airfield for the unfolding CF-18 deployment.
    Blakeley couldn't say whether that trip ever went ahead. But he said it's common for planners to develop contingency plans for possible operations.
    The deployment, planned for sometime after May 2006, never took place and now seems to have been shelved indefinitely.
    Today, a CF-18 deployment remains a sensitive topic for senior federal government officials who fear the public may perceive Canadian jets in Afghanistan as an escalation of Canada's involvement in a divisive mission.
    And because British, Dutch and U.S. fighters are already providing air support for allied troops in southern Afghanistan, it's unlikely Canadian fighter pilots will be called on to show off their skills, defence officials say.
    Canada has about 2,600 troops in Afghanistan, with most based in the volatile Kandahar region.



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  2. #107
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    What are these?

  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyB View Post
    What are these?
    What do you mean about "what are these" ?

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    Zang Za San Chong Nyon Ho from North Korea, escorted by HMCS Ville de Québec




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    The Canadian naval task group comprising (from left to right) the frigate HMCS Toronto, the destroyer HMCS Iroquois, the frigate HMCS Charlottetown, and the replenishment ship HMCS Preserver

    AOR HMCS Protecteur



    HMCS FREDERICTON (right), HMCS IROQUOIS (centre forward), HMCS REGINA (left) and HMNZS Te Mana ( A New Zealand warship positioned rear) sail in a diamond formation in the Arabian Gulf.

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  9. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    What do you mean about "what are these" ?
    he's referring to the M113A2 TUA or "TLAV" as it is commonly called in the CF

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    Does anyone know why they choose not to mount smoke grenade launchers of any kind on the G-wagens?

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    Canadian soldiers assigned to 1st Battalion of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry board a Marine Corps CH-53 Super Stallion helicopter during an assault operation as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC)


    Large Canadian,Australian,South Korea and U.S Fleet during
    Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC)



    U.S and Canadian vessels during RIMPAC

    Two Canadian vessels escort a U.S Aircraft carrier

    Last edited by Factanonverba; 10-16-2008 at 04:18 PM.

  12. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNSoC View Post


    Does anyone know why they choose not to mount smoke grenade launchers of any kind on the G-wagens?

    During the cold war in Germany ,Canada lease-to-buy German made "Iltis" but in 1993 when Canada close the Army base in Lahr and Baden, the Iltis returned in Canadian Soil and was the Primary patrol Vehicle...but this vehicle are so cheap, in 2002-2004 Canada lost many soldiers on this vehicle without protection. And the only vehicle who was capable to doing the Iltis job with enough protection was the G-wagon. Canada purchase 2,000 G-wagon from Mercedes Benz for two version , one with Gun Turret another one with nothing but the only G-wagon possible turret is the C-6 GMPG nothing more.

    Same years Canada purchase South African made, RG-31 with Protector M151.


    Here an exemple of old canadian crap, the famous Iltis....note : Isn't a real doors, but in tissues

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    Canadian officers in Ukrainian Air Force training centre



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    CC-130 help the U.S Search and Rescue during Gustav Hurricane

    CC-177 during Hurricane Gustav, for helped The Federal Emergency Management Agency and The Department of Defense













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    G-Wagons outfitted with gun shields in Afghanistan

    http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/Engl...1_1.asp?id=669(TEXT)

    http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/Engl...abled=1&id=669 (VIDEO)

    The Geländewagen (G-Wagon) from Mercedes-Benz are used to provide tactical control transport in the fields of command and control, liaison, military police and reconnaissance. This one has been fitted with a new armoured turret.

    We, the military personnel, were an integral part of the development team. This turret surely represents what the gunner’s need here, in Kandahar, to conduct their daily tasks. I am really proud of the result. [RIGHT]
    Master Warrant Officer William Bolen[/RIGHT]
    This is the original version from Mercedes Benz , look the minimal protection for the Gunner


    And this is the "New" protection for Gunner, a 360* protection made by canadian engineer in Afghanistan

    It takes approximately one hour for a team of three to install a gun shield.


    Last edited by Factanonverba; 10-16-2008 at 04:44 PM.

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