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Thread: Canadian Armed Forces, Forces canadiennes

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNSoC View Post


    Does anyone know why they choose not to mount smoke grenade launchers of any kind on the G-wagens?

    During the cold war in Germany ,Canada lease-to-buy German made "Iltis" but in 1993 when Canada close the Army base in Lahr and Baden, the Iltis returned in Canadian Soil and was the Primary patrol Vehicle...but this vehicle are so cheap, in 2002-2004 Canada lost many soldiers on this vehicle without protection. And the only vehicle who was capable to doing the Iltis job with enough protection was the G-wagon. Canada purchase 2,000 G-wagon from Mercedes Benz for two version , one with Gun Turret another one with nothing but the only G-wagon possible turret is the C-6 GMPG nothing more.

    Same years Canada purchase South African made, RG-31 with Protector M151.


    Here an exemple of old canadian crap, the famous Iltis....note : Isn't a real doors, but in tissues

  2. #122
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    Canadian officers in Ukrainian Air Force training centre



  3. #123
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    CC-130 help the U.S Search and Rescue during Gustav Hurricane

    CC-177 during Hurricane Gustav, for helped The Federal Emergency Management Agency and The Department of Defense













  4. #124
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    G-Wagons outfitted with gun shields in Afghanistan

    http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/Engl...1_1.asp?id=669(TEXT)

    http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/Engl...abled=1&id=669 (VIDEO)

    The Geländewagen (G-Wagon) from Mercedes-Benz are used to provide tactical control transport in the fields of command and control, liaison, military police and reconnaissance. This one has been fitted with a new armoured turret.

    We, the military personnel, were an integral part of the development team. This turret surely represents what the gunner’s need here, in Kandahar, to conduct their daily tasks. I am really proud of the result. [RIGHT]
    Master Warrant Officer William Bolen[/RIGHT]
    This is the original version from Mercedes Benz , look the minimal protection for the Gunner


    And this is the "New" protection for Gunner, a 360* protection made by canadian engineer in Afghanistan

    It takes approximately one hour for a team of three to install a gun shield.


    Last edited by Factanonverba; 10-16-2008 at 04:44 PM.

  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    Here an exemple of old canadian crap, the famous Iltis....note : Isn't a real doors, but in tissues

    The Iltis isn't crap, it had a job to perform, it performed it. How many casualties have their been since the G-wagons have been purchased? More then with the Iltis.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingswat View Post
    The Iltis isn't crap, it had a job to perform, it performed it. How many casualties have their been since the G-wagons have been purchased? More then with the Iltis.
    [FONT=Arial]
    You can't blame G-wagon when the major canadian casaulty are from LAV-III/Bison/Coyote/[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][SIZE=2][FONT=Arial]TLAV/RG-31

    G-wagon save 16 life and 8 people died comparate LAV-III for exemple ; 25 killed , 70 wounded but more 16IED and 1RPG or road accident.
    Don't blame G-wagon ,so many canadian survive on this vehicle, for sure he was criticised few time but G-wagon are built for resist against small arms, not huge IED or UXO.


    Iltis in Afghanistan, Kaboul 2002-2003...no protection, with only small arms on the next day in CBC/Radio-Canada news :
    "Four Canadian died by Taliban ambush in Kaboul" or "four canadian and 16 afghan wounded after a IED explose in kaboul"

    All canadian survive on this G-wagon, now in the new canadian military musuem, only three wounded
    [/FONT]
    [/SIZE][/FONT]
    Last edited by Factanonverba; 10-16-2008 at 05:09 PM.

  7. #127
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    2008
    Sept. 7: Sgt. Scott Shipway of Saskatchewan, a veteran of deployments in Kosovo, Bosnia and Cyprus, was killed when the armoured vehicle he was travelling in struck an improvised explosive device in the Panjwaii district of Kandahar province.

    Sept. 3:
    Cpl. Andrew (Drew) Grenon, 23, Cpl. Mike Segy, 21, and Pte. Chad Horn, 21, all members of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry based at CFB Shilo, Man., died during a security patrol, when their vehicle was attacked in the volatile Zhari District of Kandahar province.

    Aug. 20:
    Sgt. Shawn Eades, Cpl. Dustin Roy Robert Joseph Wasden and Sapper Stephan John Stock, all with Edmonton's 12 Field Squadron, 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, died when their convoy hit an improvised explosive device outside Kandahar City.
    Aug. 13:
    International Red Cross workers Shirley Case, 30, of Williams Lake, B.C., and Jackie Kirk, 40, of Outremont, Que., were killed along with two colleagues in an attack in Logar province, southeast of Kabul.
    Aug. 11: Master Cpl. Erin Doyle, who served with the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, died during a brief attack by insurgents against a Canadian combat outpost in the middle of Taliban territory. Doyle was from Kamloops, B.C.

    Aug. 9: Master Cpl. Josh Roberts of the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was killed in a confusing firefight in the violence-plagued Zhari district, west of Kandahar City. He was based in Shilo, Man.

    July 18: Cpl. James Hayward Arnal, a veteran soldier who was "utterly fearless under enemy fire" and the glue that held his unit together, was killed by an explosive device planted by insurgents while on foot patrol in the Panjwaii district.
    July 5: Pte. Colin William Wilmot, a medic with 1 Field Ambulance and attached to 2 Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry from Edmonton, stepped on an IED while on foot patrol in the Panjwaii district.
    July 4: Cpl. Brendan Anthony Downey died at Camp Mirage in an undisclosed country in the Arabian Peninsula of non-combat injuries. He was in his quarters at the time. Downey, 36, was a military police officer with 17 Wing Detachment, Dundurn, Sask.

    June 7: Capt. Jonathan Sutherland Snyder, 26, a member of the 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry based in Edmonton, was killed in a freak accident while on night patrol after he fell into a deep open well in the darkness in an area west of Kandahar City.
    June 3: Capt. Richard Steve Leary, a platoon commander with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was killed after Canadian soldiers and Afghan security forces came under fire during a joint foot patrol in the Panjwaii District west of Kandahar City.

    May 6: Cpl. Michael Starker of the 15 Field Ambulance was fatally wounded during a foot patrol in the Pashmul region of the Afghanistan's Zhari district. Starker, 36, was a Calgary paramedic on his second tour in Afghanistan. He was part of a civil-military co-operation unit that did outreach in local villages. Another soldier, who was not identified, was wounded in the incident.
    April 4: Pte. Terry John Street, of Surrey, B.C., and based with the 2PPCLI in Shilo, Manitoba, was killed when his armoured vehicle hit an improvised explosive device to the southwest of Kandahar City.
    March 16: Sgt. Jason Boyes of Napanee, Ont., based with the 2 PPCLI in Shilo, Man., was killed when he steps on a buried explosive device while on foot patrol in the Zangabad region in Panjwaii District.
    March 11: Bombardier Jeremie Ouellet, 22, of Matane, Que., died in his quarters at Kandahar Airfield. He was with the 1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. His death is under investigation by the National Investigative Service.
    March 2: Trooper Michael Yuki Hayakaze, 25, of Edmonton was killed by an IED just days before his tour was scheduled to end. He was in a vehicle about 45 kiklometres west of the KAF base. He was a member of the Lord Strathcona¹s Horse (Royal Canadians).
    Jan. 23: Sapper Etienne Gonthier, 21, of St-George-de-Beauce, Que., and based with the 5th Regiment in Val Cartier, Que. was killed and two others wounded in an incident involving a roadside bomb.
    Jan. 15: Trooper Richard Renaud from Alma, Que., was killed and a second Canadian soldier was injured when their armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb in Kandahar's Zhari district. Renaud, 26, of the 12eme Regiment blinde du Canada in Valcartier, Que., and three other soldiers were on a routine patrol in the Arghandab region, when their Coyote reconnaissance vehicle struck the improvised explosive device.
    Jan. 6: Cpl. Eric Labbe, 31, of Rimouski, Que., and Warrant Officer Hani Massouh died when their light armoured vehicle rolled over in Zhari district.
    2007

    Dec. 30: Jonathan Dion, 27, a gunner from Val d'Or, Que., died and four others were injured after their armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb in Zhari district.
    Nov. 17: Cpl. Nicholas Raymond Beauchamp, of the 5th Field Ambulance, and Pte. Michel Levesque, of the Royal 22nd Regiment, both based in Valcartier, Que., were killed when a roadside bomb exploded near their LAV-III armoured vehicle in Zhari district.
    Sept. 25: Cpl Nathan Hornburg, 24, of the Kings Own Calgary Regiment, was killed by mortar fire while trying to repair the track of a Leopard tank during an operation in the Panjwaii district.
    Aug. 29: Maj. Raymond Ruckpaul, serving at the NATO coalition headquarters in Kabul, died after being found shot in his room. ISAF and Canadian officials have said they had not ruled out suicide, homicide or accident as the cause of death. Ruckpaul was an armoured officer based at the NATO Allied Land Component Command Headquarters in Heidelberg, Germany. His home town and other details have not been released.
    Aug. 22: Two Canadian soldiers were killed by a roadside bomb. Master Warrant Officer Mario Mercier of 2nd Bataillon, Royal 22nd Regiment, based in Valcartier, Que., and Master Cpl. Christian Duchesne, a member of Fifth Ambulance de campagne, also based in Valcartier, died when the vehicle they were in struck a suspected mine, approximately 50 kilometres west of Kandahar City during Operation EAGLE EYE. An Afghan interpreter was also killed and a third soldier and two Radio Canada journalists were injured.
    Aug. 19: Pte. Simon Longtin, 23, was travelling in a LAV-III armoured vehicle when it struck an improvised explosive device.
    July 4: Six Canadian soldiers were killed when a roadside bomb hit their vehicle. The dead are Capt. Matthew Johnathan Dawe, Cpl. Cole Bartsch, Cpl. Jordan Anderson and Pte. Lane Watkins, all of 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, based in Edmonton, and Master-Cpl. Colin Bason, a reservist from The Royal Westminster Regiment and Capt. Jefferson Clifford Francis of 1 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery based in Shilo Man.
    June 20: Three soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, died when their vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device. Sgt. Christos Karigiannis, Cpl. Stephen Bouzane, 26, and Pte. Joel Wiebe, 22 were on a re-supply mission, travelling between two checkpoints in an open, all-terrain vehicle, not an armoured vehicle.
    June 11: Trooper Darryl Caswell, 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Dragoons, was killed by a roadside bomb that blew up near the vehicle he was travelling in, while on patrol about 40 minutes north of Kandahar city. He was part of a resupply mission.
    May 30: Master Cpl. Darrell Jason Priede, a combat cameraman, died when an American helicopter he was aboard crashed in Afghanistan's volatile Helmand province, reportedly after being shot at by Taliban fighters. Priede was from CFB Gagetown in New Brunswick.
    May 25: Cpl. Matthew McCully, a signals operator from 2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group Headquarters and Signals Squadron, based at Petawawa, Ont., was killed while on foot patrol and another soldier was injured when a road-side bomb exploded near them during a major operation to clear out Taliban. The soldier, a member of the mentorship and liaison team, is believed to have stepped on an improvised explosive device.
    April 18: One Canadian soldier, a special forces member, died from injuries sustained in an accidental fall from a communications tower in Kandahar, Afghanistan. It is the first death of a special forces member while on duty in Afghanistan.
    April 11: Master Cpl. Allan Stewart, 30, and Trooper Patrick Pentland, 23, were killed by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan. Both men were members of the Royal Canadian Dragoons based at CFB Petawawa, Ont.
    April 8: Six Canadian soldiers died in southern Afghanistan as a result of injuries sustained when the vehicle they were travelling in hit an explosive device. Sgt. Donald Lucas, Cpl. Aaron E. Williams, Cpl. Brent Poland, Pte. Kevin Vincent Kennedy, Pte. David Robert Greenslade, 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, based in Gagetown, N.B. were killed in the blast. Cpl. Christopher Paul Stannix, a reservist from the Princess Louise Fusiliers, based in Halifax, also died. One other soldier was seriously injured.
    March 6: Cpl. Kevin Megeney, 25, a reservist from Stellarton, N.S., died in an accidental shooting. He was shot through the chest and left lung. Megeney went to Afghanistan in the fall as a volunteer with 1st Batallion, Nova Scotia Highlanders Militia.
    2006

    Nov. 27: Two Canadian soldiers were killed on the outskirts of Kandahar when a suicide car bomber attacked a convoy of military vehicles. Cpl. Albert Storm, 36, of Niagara Falls, Ont., and Chief Warrant Officer Robert Girouard, 46, from Bouctouche, N.B., were members of the Royal Canadian Regiment based in Petawawa, Ont. They were in an armoured personnel carrier that had just left the Kandahar Airfield base when a vehicle approached and detonated explosives.
    Oct. 14: Sgt. Darcy Tedford and Pte. Blake Williamson from 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment in Petawawa, Ont., were killed and three others wounded after troops in Kandahar province came under attack by Taliban insurgents wielding rocket propelled grenades and mortars, according to media reports. The troops were trying to build a road in the region when the ambush attack occurred.
    Oct. 7: Trooper Mark Andrew Wilson, a member of the Royal Canadian Dragoons of Petawawa, Ont., died after a roadside bomb or IED exploded under a Nyala armoured vehicle. Wilson was a gunner in the Nyala vehicle. The blast occurred in the Pashmul region of Afghanistan.
    Oct. 3: Cpl. Robert Thomas James Mitchell and Sgt. Craig Paul Gillam were killed in an attack in southern Afghanistan as they worked to clear a route for a future road construction project. Both were members of the Petawawa, Ont.-based Royal Canadian Dragoons.
    Sept. 29: Pte. Josh Klukie was killed by an improvised explosive device while he was conducting a foot patrol in a farm field in the Panjwaii district. Klukie, of Thunder Bay, Ont., was serving in the First Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment.
    Sept. 18: Four soldiers were killed when a suicide bomber riding a bicycle detonated explosives in the Panjwaii area. Cpl. Shane Keating, Cpl. Keith Morley and Pte. David Byers, 22, all members of 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry from Shilo, Man., and Cpl. Glen Arnold, a member of the 2 Field Ambulance, from Petawawa, Ont., were killed in the attack that wounded several others.
    Sept. 4: Pte. Mark Anthony Graham, a member of 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, based at CFB Petawawa, Ont., killed and dozens of others wounded in a friendly fire incident involving an American A-10 Warthog aircraft. Graham was a Canadian Olympic team member in 1992, when he raced as a member of the 4 x 400 metre relay team.
    Sept. 3: Four Canadian soldiers - Warrant Officer Richard Francis Nolan, Warrant Officer Frank Robert Mellish, Sgt. Shane Stachnik and Pte. William Jonathan James Cushley, all based at CFB Petawawa, west of Ottawa, were killed as insurgents disabled multiple Canadian vehicles with small arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades. Nine other Canadians were wounded in the fighting that killed an estimated 200 Taliban members.
    Aug. 22: Canadian Cpl. David Braun, a recently arrived soldier with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was killed by a suicide bomber outside the gates of Camp Nathan Smith in Kandahar City. The soldier, in his 20s, was a native of Raymore, Sask. Three other Canadian soldiers were injured in the afternoon attack.
    Aug. 11: Cpl. Andrew James Eykelenboom died during an attack by a suicide bomber on a Canadian convoy that was resupplying a forward fire base south of Kandahar near the border with Pakistan. A medic with the 1st Field Ambulance based in Edmonton, he was in his mid 20s and had been in the Canadian Forces for four years.
    Aug. 9: Master Cpl. Jeffrey Scott Walsh, based out of Shilo, Man., with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was shot in a friendly fire incident, just days after arriving in Kandahar to begin his tour of duty. He arrived in Kandahar less than a week earlier.
    Aug. 5: Master Cpl. Raymond Arndt of the Edmonton-based Loyal Edmonton Regiment was killed when a G-Wagon making a supply run collided with a civilian truck. Three other Loyal Edmonton Regiment soldiers were also injured in the crash: Cpl. Jared Gagnon of Sherwood Park, Cpl. Ashley Van Leeuwen of St. Paul and Pte. Adam Keen of Edmonton.
    Aug. 3: Cpl. Christopher Jonathan Reid, based in Edmonton with the 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was killed in a roadside bomb attack. Later the same day, Sgt. Vaughn Ingram, Cpl. Bryce Jeffrey Keller and Pte. Kevin Dallaire were killed by a rocket-propelled grenade as they took on militants around an abandoned school near Pashmul. Six other Canadian soldiers were injured in the attack.
    July 22: A suicide bomber blew himself up in Kandahar, killing two Canadian soldiers and wounding eight more; the slain soldiers were Cpl. Francisco Gomez, an anti-armour specialist from the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Edmonton, who was driving the Bison armoured vehicle targeted by the bomber's vehicle, and Cpl. Jason Patrick Warren of the Black Watch in Montreal.
    July 9: Cpl. Anthony Joseph Boneca, a reservist_with the Lake Superior Scottish Regiment based in Thunder Bay, Ont., was killed as Canadian military and Afghan security forces were pushing through an area west of Kandahar City that had been a hotbed of Taliban activity.
    May 17: Capt. Nichola Goddard, a combat engineer with the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery and Canada's first female combat death, was killed during battle against Taliban forces in the Panjwaii region, 24 kilometres west of Kandahar.
    April 22: Four soldiers were killed when their armoured vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb near Gombad, north of Kandahar. They were Cpl. Matthew Dinning, stationed at Petawawa, Ont.; Bombardier Myles Mansell, based in Victoria; Lt. William Turner, stationed in Edmonton, and Cpl. Randy Payne of CFB Wainwright, Alta.
    March 28-29: Pte. Robert Costall was killed in a firefight with Taliban insurgents in the desert north of Kandahar. A U.S. soldier and a number of Afghan troops also died and three Canadians were wounded. Costall was a member of 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, based in Edmonton. An American inquiry, made public in the summer of 2007, determined Costall was killed by friendly fire.
    March 5: Master Cpl. Timothy Wilson of Grande Prairie, Alta., succumbed to injuries suffered in the LAV III crash on March 2 in Afghanistan. Wilson died in hospital in Germany.
    March 2: Cpl. Paul Davis died and six others were injured when their LAV III collided with a civilian taxi just west of Kandahar during a routine patrol. The soldiers were with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.
    Jan. 15: Diplomat Glyn Berry was killed and three soldiers injured by a suicide bomber in Kandahar. They were patrolling in a G Wagon.
    2005

    Nov. 24: Pte. Braun Scott Woodfield, Royal Canadian Regiment, was killed in a traffic accident involving his light-armoured vehicle (LAV III) northeast of Kandahar. Three others soldiers suffered serious injuries.
    2004

    Jan. 27: Cpl. Jamie Murphy died and three soldiers were injured by a suicide bomber while patrolling near Camp Julien in an Iltis jeep. All were members of the Royal Canadian Regiment.
    2003

    Oct. 2: Sgt. Robert Alan Short and Cpl. Robbie Christopher Beerenfenger were killed and three others injured when their Iltis jeep struck a roadside bomb outside Camp Julien near Kabul. They were from the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment.
    2002

    April 18: Sgt. Marc Leger, Cpl. Ainsworth Dyer, Pte. Richard Green and Pte. Nathan Smith were killed by friendly fire when an American fighter jet dropped a laser-guided 225-kilogram bomb on the soldiers during a training exercise near Kandahar. All served with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

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    Canadian made Digital Pattern (Trade mark & Copyrighted by canadian laws)

    In 1996 canadian government said canadian soldiers need to be modern, and can be the first country to use ultra advanced pattern, and they know in 1960/1980's british and American try to create a Digital Pathern but didn't work and to much expensive the project were abandonned after few months. In 1996 canada create the CADPAT,and like i said the U.S and British made were abondonned so they don't create the first Digital Pattern , but canada , because U.S and British were only in Project stats not in production like canada.

    In 2002,all canadian soldiers use the new Digital Pathern and NATO claimed is the best and still the best pattern in the world. Isn't only a digital pattern,but a NBC protection (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) and they can reduice at more 40% of Infrared and reduice the light reflection on the uniform during night . During day the Digital Pathern work with environement, at between 60m to 200m and more is very hard to see a soldiers with CADPAT [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]Temperate Woodland (TW) [/SIZE][/FONT]and the new one [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]CADPAT Arid Regions (AR) [/SIZE][/FONT]and CADPAT Artic Region

    here is an exemple of CADPAT at 60/200m and more, like you can see is very hard to see a canadian soldiers on our environement.










    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]Sniper using during night CADPAT Arid Regions (AR)[/SIZE][/FONT]

    Here an exemple of non-digital paterhn from U.S Army in Iraq , note the difference with canadian pattern and normal pattern, you can see lot of light on his uniform ,not the digital.

    And here the old canadian green olive, full Infrared reflection

    Here on the left a British pattern, on the right the canadian pattern, like you can see the canadian digital pattern look very great comparate typical camouflage

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    During the cold war in Germany ,Canada lease-to-buy German made "Iltis" but in 1993 when Canada close the Army base in Lahr and Baden, the Iltis returned in Canadian Soil and was the Primary patrol Vehicle...but this vehicle are so cheap, in 2002-2004 Canada lost many soldiers on this vehicle without protection. And the only vehicle who was capable to doing the Iltis job with enough protection was the G-wagon. Canada purchase 2,000 G-wagon from Mercedes Benz for two version , one with Gun Turret another one with nothing but the only G-wagon possible turret is the C-6 GMPG nothing more.

    Same years Canada purchase South African made, RG-31 with Protector M151.


    Here an exemple of old canadian crap, the famous Iltis....note : Isn't a real doors, but in tissues
    interesting bit of information, and i appreciate the response, but not quite the answer i was looking for considering i asked why the CF has not outfitted them (G-wagens) with smoke grenade launchers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    [FONT=Arial]You can't blame G-wagon when the major canadian casaulty are from LAV-III/Bison/Coyote/[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][SIZE=2][FONT=Arial]TLAV/RG-31[/FONT][/SIZE]

    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]G-wagon save 16 life and 8 people died comparate LAV-III for exemple ; 25 killed , 70 wounded but more 16IED and 1RPG or road accident. [/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]Don't blame G-wagon ,so many canadian survive on this vehicle, for sure he was criticised few time but G-wagon are built for resist against small arms, not huge IED or UXO. [/FONT][/SIZE]


    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]Iltis in Afghanistan, Kaboul 2002-2003...no protection, with only small arms on the next day in CBC/Radio-Canada news :[/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]"Four Canadian died by Taliban ambush in Kaboul" or "four canadian and 16 afghan wounded after a IED explose in kaboul" [/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif][/FONT][/SIZE]
    [/FONT]
    You are forgetting about their usage. This depends on when and how the G-wagons and the like are used as well as how many are deployed in the country (which I assume can't be shared due to OPSEX).

  11. #131
    Keeping it in the family pascalywood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNSoC View Post
    interesting bit of information, and i appreciate the response, but not quite the answer i was looking for considering i asked why the CF has not outfitted them (G-wagens) with smoke grenade launchers?
    A guy from the RCH told me they tried to mount a .50 cal on the G-wagens but the bolts broke down because of the vibrations. how true is that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    Canadian made Digital Pattern (Trade mark & Copyrighted by canadian laws)

    In 1996 canadian government said canadian soldiers need to be modern, and can be the first country to use ultra advanced pattern, and they know in 1960/1980's british and American try to create a Digital Pathern but didn't work and to much expensive the project were abandonned after few months. In 1996 canada create the CADPAT,and like i said the U.S and British made were abondonned so they don't create the first Digital Pattern , but canada , because U.S and British were only in Project stats not in production like canada.

    In 2002,all canadian soldiers use the new Digital Pathern and NATO claimed is the best and still the best pattern in the world. Isn't only a digital pattern,but a NBC protection (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) and they can reduice at more 40% of Infrared and reduice the light reflection on the uniform during night . During day the Digital Pathern work with environement, at between 60m to 200m and more is very hard to see a soldiers with CADPAT [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]Temperate Woodland (TW) [/SIZE][/FONT]and the new one [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]CADPAT Arid Regions (AR) [/SIZE][/FONT]and CADPAT Artic Region

    here is an exemple of CADPAT at 60/200m and more, like you can see is very hard to see a canadian soldiers on our environement.










    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=2]Sniper using during night CADPAT Arid Regions (AR)[/SIZE][/FONT]

    Here an exemple of non-digital paterhn from U.S Army in Iraq , note the difference with canadian pattern and normal pattern, you can see lot of light on his uniform ,not the digital.

    And here the old canadian green olive, full Infrared reflection

    Here on the left a British pattern, on the right the canadian pattern, like you can see the canadian digital pattern look very great comparate typical camouflage
    Nice, props to my Canadian brothas.

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    @SickBick

    Isn't really a propaganda , but a reality in fact during 50 years canada has no real uniform, the old uniform was from British Stock the famous olive green.

    exemple (I don't have any picture before 2000's) here is during the Oka Crisis with Canadian Army vs the indian who try to stop stupid Golf terrain for rich people who stoled the ancestral land.

    On the Left :Sldt. patrick cloutier , on the right : brad laroque (Mohwak)

    Like you can see canada in 1990's has no real cammo, and the indian had U.S army surplu uniform during more 50years canada used this old uniforms from korea war and vietnam war. So in 1996 canada gave more 300Million dollar for created newer and better uniform for canada, and for enter in the 21th century, and that happened with the CADPAT, is a copyrighted uniform, and U.S army has the canadian autorization for create his own Digital Pattern called "MARPAT" and another one called "Multicam" for 2010 if i remember.

    Right now the best uniform in the world is the canadian one version CADPAT.

  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post


    Here an exemple of old canadian crap, the famous Iltis....note : Isn't a real doors, but in tissues
    Have you ever even been near a real iltis?

    The iltis is far from crap. In fact, it's a great little jeep. The iltis can get places other vehicles like the humvee could only dream of. They can tow an unbelievable amount of weight for their size (i personally saw it tow a humvee with locked up brakes, with little effort made). I know this, because I work with them a lot, and have talked to soldiers who loved them. Certainly not the cheap crap you call them!

    The G-wagon isn't some marvilous peice of kit itself... I've talked to many soldiers, and while the G-wagon is a good truck, it has it's problems too. It's too narrow for it's height, and is very top heavy. It is not as heavily armoured as you make it sound. A number of soldiers have been killed in G-wagons, and they have since been restricted in it's use overseas.

    All in all, your 'facts' about the iltis and g-wagon seems to based on anything but actual facts...

    I apperciate the photos, thank you, but please, cut the uninformed opinions.

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Factanonverba View Post
    Like you can see canada in 1990's has no real cammo, and the indian had U.S army surplu uniform during more 50years canada used this old uniforms from korea war and vietnam war. So in 1996 canada gave more 300Million dollar for built newer and better uniform for canada, and for enter in the 21th century, and that happened with the CADPAT, is a copyrighted uniform, and U.S army has the canadian autorization for create his own Digital Pattern called "MARPAT" and another one called "Multicam" for 2010 if i remember.

    Right now the best uniform in the world is the canadian one version CADPAT.
    Uh.. the OD Uniform was not Korean or a Vietnam Uniform;we weren't in Vietnam.. or if you meant we wore US uniforms, you are mistaken.

    Oh an it's the US Marines who have MARPAT not the US Army... an the US Military did not create Multicam.

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