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Thread: New Zealand Defence Forces

  1. #106
    Senior Member goat89's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ordie View Post
    Long stoy short......don't mess with a Kiwi.
    DUH! What did them buggers expect? A small fat feathered guy?
    WRONG!

    PS: Maori too eh? Damn.

  2. #107
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default NZ Army Photos

    A few new NZ Army Photos to keep the thread going - Sorry but no captions with these Photos


















  3. #108
    strange little boy - Eco warrior - level 5 vegan kinney_bmx's Avatar
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    Damn can that Minimi optic mount get much higher?

  4. #109
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default NZ Army Photos

    A few new NZ Army Photos to keep the thread going - Sorry but no captions with these Photos









  5. #110
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default New Kit for the NZDF

    An Artical from the NZ - MOD about new kit for the Army - I will try and find some better Photos of the New Kit





    [FONT=Verdana]17 September 2009 [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) troops deploying to Afghanistan this October will be equipped with the latest, battle tested body armour and protective equipment.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Army has invested in a variety of gear, from patrol packs to ballistic glasses, to ensure the modern soldier is equipped to do the job they need to do on operations overseas.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The improved body armour has been developed based on lessons learned in Afghanistan and Iraq. The body armour is a Special Forces variant and is currently in use with US Navy SEAL’s and US Army Rangers.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The protective equipment includes new, lighter combat helmets, improved body armour, ballistic goggles and gloves, modular webbing and pouches, an enhanced individual torch, ergonomic camelback patrol pack, and for some, an improved hand-held GPS unit.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] “While the soldier is the first part of Army capability, it is also about ensuring our soldiers are well-equipped to do the job they are required to do,” says the Chief of Army Major General Rhys Jones.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] “This new protective equipment will enable our soldiers to undertake the tasks and demands we require of them in a range of complex operational environments like Afghanistan, Timor-Leste and the Solomon Islands.” [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The equipment will be first used by NZDF personnel deploying to Afghanistan in October. Remaining missions will be supplied with equipment in order of threat level over the next six months.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]“There are currently 790 New Zealand Defence Force personnel deployed on 14 operations, UN missions and defence exercises in 10 countries around the world,” MAJ GEN Jones says. “They are often twelve months away from their families and the Army is committed to investing in their safety by ensuring they have the equipment and training to achieve their goals to a world-class standard.”[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] The new equipment is lighter, more comfortable and provides the wearer with enhanced ballistic and fragmentary protection. The modular system can also by personalised by the soldier in how they attach the pouches to their webbing.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The current operational pool of equipment will be distributed for wider Army training purposes as the new equipment is phased in. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Quick Facts – Soldier Survivability Equipment:[/FONT]

    • [FONT=Verdana]The new advanced combat helmet is 0.5kg lighter than its predecessor, has an internal mounting system that makes it more comfortable to wear and allows greater functionality with ballistic glasses or communications equipment. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The improved body armour (IBA) provides enhanced ballistic and fragmentation protection and is now sized to the individual rather than one-size-fits-all. The IBA also includes side, groin and bicep protection should it be required by the wearer and has a modular webbing system so soldiers can customise the pouches they attach directly to their webbing. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The IBA is fully modular and also has a quick release system to enable the user or another person to discard the vest quickly if the user is injured or submerged in water. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The improved patrol pack is ergonomic in design, has an adjustable, removable back comforter and is adjustable for height. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The Revision Desert Locust ballistic goggles were selected as they offered the greatest durability and functionality. These protect the wearer against blast fragmentation and other non-ballistic threats whilst also protecting the eyes from wind, sand, dirt and snow. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]New individual general purpose torch: The Sidewinder stood out as the individual torch choice as it is small, light-weight and has excellent functionality. It provides four types of light: red, blue, white and Infra-red. It has four levels of brightness on each including a strobe function. The torch also comes with a helmet mount so that it allows a hands-free operation. With the IR function it significantly improves the local area illumination when used with an night vision goggles. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]Improved individual GPS: The Garmin 60cX GPS is a unit that provides a cheap but very functional GPS. The Garmin provides colour mapping and new maps can be downloaded via the internet as required. The users found it easy to operate and accurate as an individual navigation aid for tactical commanders.[/FONT]

  6. #111
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    Great pics there!

  7. #112
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default A New NZ SAS Book

    There is a new book out about the NZ Special Air Service called ' NZSAS -The First Fifty Years' by Ron Crosby

    Below i have added a few Photos and info on the book, all of which is from the NZ Army Website







    [FONT=Verdana]NZSAS, The First Fifty Years, by Ron Crosby. Published by Viking, Auckland[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The award of a Victoria Cross to Corporal Willie Apiata in 2007 not only recognised a signal act of gallantry, it also threw the spotlight firmly on one of New Zealand’s most shadowy military units — the SAS. The SAS’s aversion to publicity of its personnel or their activities had ensured that the public generally had little idea of its role or composition, other than that joining it demanded successfully completing a notoriously difficult selection course. Now the veil was drawn back at least a little. The SAS basked in the glory of Apiata’s award. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The series of activities undertaken by the SAS in the last decade or so, and the emphasis since 9/11 on counter-terrorism, indicate that the NZSAS has a secure and respected place in New Zealand’s defence structure. Readers of this excellent account of the SAS’s first fifty years will find, perhaps to their surprise, that this has not always been the case. The NZSAS has struggled at times to secure acceptance. Even as late as 1999 its future still looked ‘decidedly shaky’ to its commander. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]In part, this sense of insecurity derived from concern that politicians at the highest levels did not fully appreciate the important capacity residing in the NZSAS. But ill–informed or unsympathetic politicians were not the only threat. Senior and other officers in the military often either did not understand the SAS role or were jealous of the SAS’s privileged position. Successive NZSAS commanders had to use their initiative to get round obstacles thrown up by their obstruction, intentional or otherwise.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The corps originated in New Zealand’s decision in 1955 to send a specially recruited SAS unit to Malaya to join the newly formed British Commonwealth Far East Strategic Reserve. More than 800 men applied and the 130–man unit left New Zealand in November 1955 under the command of Major Frank Rennie. During its two–year stint in the reserve, it hunted communist terrorists — or CTs, as they were known — in Malayan Emergency operations, achieving several important eliminations. Two members of the unit lost their lives, the first of eleven NZSAS to do so either on operations or in training during its half-century existence. Upon its return to New Zealand in 1957, the unit was disbanded.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Recreated in 1959, the NZSAS led a somewhat tenuous existence at first, as it fought to secure a viable role within the existing army structure, and to obtain the equipment it needed. But deployments in Thailand, Borneo and South Vietnam kept the unit busy for much of the 1960s in operations well described in this book. While the Thai sojourn did not involve any hostilities, SAS troopers took part in cross-border incursions in Borneo, and had occasional clashes with the Indonesian Army. In South Vietnam a troop served as part of an Australian SAS squadron from 1968 to 1971, and the operational tempo was much higher than in Borneo. The 155 patrols carried out by the troop were mainly reconnaissance but also often involved ambushes. Especially in 1968 clashes with the Viet Cong were frequent, and some patrols had narrow escapes from being surrounded and overwhelmed. Opportunity was also taken to spend periods with American special forces units, broadening the experience and abilities of the New Zealanders. One SAS sergeant was killed in Vietnam.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]After Vietnam the unit experienced a quarter of a century of uncertainty. SAS troopers continued to improve their capacity, steadily acquiring new skills, but doubts remained about what role they might play. During this period, counter-terrorism emerged as a new facet of the SAS’s work. Its counter-terrorist or ‘black’ role was highlighted during the APEC Leaders’ meeting in Auckland in 1999, with the NZSAS heavily involved in protecting the visiting dignitaries. There is interesting material in this book about how the capacity of the SAS to deal with potential hostage situations was brought home to politicians like Robert Muldoon, who was surprised to find that live ammunition had been used in a demonstration in which he was a central character. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Not until nearly the end of the century did the SAS come into its own with a series of overseas deployments–in Bougainville, Kuwait, East Timor and Afghanistan. A 19-strong SAS detachment formed part of the Truce Monitoring Group in Bougainville in 1997-98. The deployment to Kuwait, prompted by a US-led build up against Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, provided the opportunity for a 24-man squadron to practice in a desert environment. Forty NZSAS personnel were involved in the deployment of INTERFET in East Timor in 1999 and unit members returned to the island in the following year. But it is Afghanistan that has provided the NZSAS with its greatest opportunities this century. A squadron deployed there for a year in December 2001 following the 9/11 attacks on the United States, Taliban-controlled Afghanistan having been the training ground for the Islamic group responsible. This book throws light on the type of operations undertaken by the SAS, and the innovation and skill required to operate in Afghanistan’s difficult environment. Two further deployments took place in 2004 and 2005, and it was during the former that Apiata performed his gallant deed. Now in 2009 the government has decided to send the NZSAS back for a further stint.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Ron Crosby faced unusual problems in recounting the story of the NZSAS. Operational security considerations had always to be borne in mind. This is most evident in the use of first names or initials only of SAS members mentioned in the text in coverage of more recent operations and the blurring of faces in some photographs. Despite these difficulties, and the loss of records (made up for by the dedicated efforts of some SAS men to gather unit historical material), Crosby brings out clearly the elements that set the NZSAS apart from the rest of the army, not least its focus on the pursuit of excellence, commitment to high quality leadership and emphasis on flexibility. His account benefits from the many interviews he conducted with former and serving SAS personnel. He is better on the activities of the unit than on the political background to its formation or sustenance. One aspect that is conspicuously absent from Crosby’s treatment is the role of women in the NZSAS. This has been limited, to be sure. So far none have been badged members of the unit, though women are not prevented from attempting the selection course. Female soldiers have, however, served in the unit in a variety of specialist support roles and have even deployed overseas with it. The contribution of some does get mentioned behind the anonymity of initials, and will, of course, be recognised by SAS personnel if not by ordinary readers. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]In describing the SAS’s overseas deployments and its problems between them, Crosby emphasises the qualities that go to make up the NZSAS — adaptability, determination, professionalism. These have as their basis very stringent selection procedures, intensive training and inculcation of traditions — and the recording of these traditions is an important function of this book. SAS members reading this book will gain a new perspective on the elite role they play as a ‘vital strategic tool’ for the government in responding to crises both here and abroad, and of the achievements — and tribulations — of their predecessors. Other readers will find the glimpse it provides inside a relatively secretive element of the armed forces both illuminating and fascinating. This useful corps history is strongly recommended.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]
    [/FONT]

  8. #113
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default NZ Army - Soldiers Diary

    While looking at the NZ Army Website i read a very interesting article written by a Young Female Soldier doing her Basic Training, and i thought it was really interesting and would post some of the photos and the Diary on here.








    [FONT=Verdana]Soldiers Diary[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]All Arms Recruit Course (AARC) 329 [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]My name is Deahna Frank. I'm 17 years old, and I was born and raised in Hawera. Until I was 9, I lived with my Mum, Dad and older brother, who is now 20. My parents divorced and I stayed with my mum. A couple of years later, Mum's partner and his son moved in with us. My brother later went to live with Dad, who remarried last year. My Dad has two step children, so going from a regular family of 4, to having an extended family made a huge change in my life. This is a picture of me with my Dad and Stepmum.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]I started school at Hawera Primary School, went on to Hawera Intermediate, and High School. In the 4th form, I moved to New Plymouth Girls High School, and I loved making so many cool new friends. It was pretty hard to start with my new school was over three times bigger than the old one but I soon settled in, and was there for two years. Eventually though, I went back to Hawera High School. This next picture is me with my friends.[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Last year, I started going hard out with my athletics, training twice a day for a total of three hours a day. After three weeks training, I managed to come fourth in the triple jump at the North Island Secondary School Championships.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]I play as many sports as I can, but I haven't joined any teams this year, because I had a job, and couldn't make the practices. I play Touch, Basketball, Netball, Volleyball, and well anything else that's going.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]I danced for ten years, and considered going into dance teaching, but I couldn't see myself doing it right now I guess I can still think about it later. I decided to try out for the Army because I love sports, and I want to become a personal trainer, and I thought the Army would give me the opportunity to help me achieve this.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]I don't remember exactly when I applied to join the Army, sometime earlier this year (2004). Suddenly it all fell into place, and now I'm off to Waiouru. I'll be writing each week about my experiences during the 12 week recruit course, so check back to see how I'm doing.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 1[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]We arrived at Palmerston North at 11:30 on Monday morning (7th of June) to catch the Army bus to Waiouru. When we arrived, we were put into our platoons, and then headed to the barracks to unpack. There are six of us in the room we have during Recruit Course. We get our own rooms after that. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]We have spent the first week learning basic drill, getting sized for our kit, and learning where to be and when. Like meal times you don't want to miss those! This is me and my other platoon members having our first drill lesson.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On the Wednesday night, we all went to the Army Museum for our Attestation Ceremony. It's where we take an oath, and sign an attestation form that we will serve New Zealand, the Army, and the Queen. We do it in front of a greenstone wall, which is a memorial to New Zealanders who have been lost in wars and conflicts around the world. This is me taking my oath.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]And here is me signing my attestation form. Now I've done this, I'm officially in the Army![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]We've had heaps of lectures about everything from the Defence Superannuation Scheme to staying healthy. So far, it's been pretty fun, meeting all these new people. Check back next week, to see how I'm doing.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 2[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Everything stepped up a knotch this week. We started Physical Training (PT) sessions on Monday and that tested us all. To get into the Army, you have to pass whats called an Required Fitness Level (RFL), and you know before you join, that you have to be fit for the Army, but still a few people left after realising what they had to do. Our first session consisted of hill runs, over what they call "Paradise Valley". We also did swimming and circuit training.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]As well as PT, we spent quite a bit of time with instructors who are teaching us about things like drill, navigation, first aid, drill, how to look after ourselves in the field, and more drill. Here's me, sitting a Navigation test.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Wednesday, we got issued rifles and that the definitely been the highlight of my week! So far, we've learnt how to do safety checks, break them down for cleaning, and general safety with firearms.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]After spending last week in overalls, this week, we got kitted out and now think we look primo in our Disruptive Pattern Material (DPM) uniforms. What do you think?[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 3[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Well we're on week three now, and this week we experienced our first live firing attempt. we went out to the range to practice safety drills with our rifles, and then shot rounds of blank and live shots.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Also that day, it started snowing. For at least half of us, it was our first snowfall, and there we were standing out on the parade ground in shorts and t-shirts ready for physical training (PT). Bone chilling![/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The next day, we got to do the assault course, and most of the trenches - they're FULL of water - had started to form ice, but sure enough, we jumped right in!
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]One PT session we did a 9km run, and another we had circuit training. We also played an inter-platoon softball match on Saturday.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Over the week, we still had a range of lectures. We started navigation training and although I didn't know what to expect, it's been pretty interesting, learning about plotting and grid references, how to use a compass, and measuring bearings.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 4[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On to week four! On Monday, we spent the whole morning in lectures, learning how to locate positions by resection. Then, to put us to the test, we were all piled into the back of a Unimog - you know, those huge Army trucks you see on the road sometimes - and driven to the back of who knows where, and we had to use the morning's resection training to find out where we were. It wasn't too hard because we'd spent the whole previous week looking at the Waiouru map.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Later, we had ....physical training (PT). It was introduction to rep runs. For this we ran in ranks, and did sprints and leaps frogs. We ran some hills, and when we got back to the Gym, an hour later, we discovered the session had only just started! We had two more 1.5 km reps and we had to make a certain time.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Tuesday, we had lectures all day, from 0800 to 1930 hours. We learned about communication radios - from how to speak properly on them to how to assemble and disassemble them.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Wednesday, we had battle PT where we climbed ropes, and carried logs. It was a pretty difficult task for all of us, and required a lot of team work. Our lectures that day were about how to camouflage ourselves into our surroundings.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Thursday was an awesome day! We were out at the range all day doing our Live Firing Training Tests (LFTTs). We got to fire live rounds to ensure our aim was correct. We also got to put up our hoochies - they're tents, a bit like pup tents. Too cool![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Friday started with circuit training. Circuit training mostly consists of weights, press ups, pull ups, that kind of thing - strength training, but we also do some aerobic training, like shuttle runs. We ran a lap of the 1.2 km Required Fitness Level (RFL) test, then headed back out to the range to complete our LFTTs. For this, we had to fire at a target to see how good our aim really is!
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Saturday we had rep runs for PT, but it was the easiest session we've had so far, because everyone worked hard and we didn't have to repeat anything.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Sunday it was visitor's day - the first one since we started. It was so good seeing everyone after a month - just the thing to raise our spirits and help us keep going.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 5[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The first three days of this week we had a round robin where 2 platoons would head out to the range and the other platoon would stay round camp. When we were out at the range, Monday and Wednesday, we were doing our rr3's. This consisted of shooting with the rifle at different kinds of targets. Whether they were moving, or we were stalking up on them. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]When we stayed in camp on Tuesday we moved out to an open area. Here we learnt how to detect targets, judge distances and we received a demonstration on how to look at ground.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Monday evening we had a chaplains hour, which is always good and a nice change from the regimentality of being in barracks.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On Wednesday, Yeah Ha! We had physical training (PT). For some reason PT had become part of our life and it felt strange to not have it. At this PT session we had circuit training, which was always a mission in itself, because while your pair was doing weights you were doing shuttles and vice-versa.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Thursday, all three platoons moved out to the range to qualify on the number one shoot. We were being tested on what we had learnt the previous two days on the range. We were out there for most of the day and it was pretty tiring so it was a good thing we didn't have PT scheduled that day.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Friday we went back to the range to complete our number one shoot and start our qualification two shoot.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Saturday we went out for a touch of drill. We learnt how to do for inspection, port arms and shoulder arms.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]At 0940 we had PT. Today we had repetition/interval runs. It was a pretty cruisy session. It consisted of running round the RFL track and making the timings given to us. We did this about 5 times.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Saturday afternoon we had inter-platoon basketball. Each platoon put in two teams. Our platoon's strategy was to have a team of basketball players and a team of the rest. Due to hard work and commitment our better team made it to the final with Stagpoole platoon, but their team was just to strong for us and they ended up taking out the competition. All in all it was a fun afternoon.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Sunday, we either stayed in barracks for personal admin or headed into town for church. We had personal admin for the rest of the day and then headed to the All Arms Inn for Waiata practice.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 6[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Monday, we went out to the range to sit our AWQs. This was just a combination of things that we were doing the week before. We were out there for most of the day, until dinner. We then had personal admin time, until we went to the conference centre for a lecture with Captain Warnock about our hygiene and keeping healthy.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Tuesday, because everyone in the company had already completed their AWQs, we had weapons drill all morning. We went over drill we had already learned, and then did some new moves, such as grounding the weapon, and take up arms. We also practiced our slow march.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Wednesday we had physical training (PT) first up, and we did an 11km run, then more drill where we learned to about face during a slow march. Then - lucky us - we got more injections, just to celebrate being here for 6 weeks. We were also issued with our ID cards. Before dinner, we did more navigation revision then after, we had chaplain's hour.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]You know the old saying, "an Army marches on its stomach"? Well they feed us pretty well here. We have plenty of meat and veg, and usually three or four choices, so we don't have to eat anything we don't like. Then there's dessert, and fruit and bread and other things to fill us up - we need it![/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Thursday morning, we had the obligatory drill, and we learned the open and close order on slow march. Sergeant Ferman then gave us a lecture about mines and land-mines. We also learned how to pack our backpacks properly. When you're carrying everything you will need for a week, on your back, you want to know you're making the most of the space![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]We've been learning hakas too, and we had a couple of hours practice Thursday evening, with the whole company.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Friday was pretty cruisy - well mostly. We had PT, and did our RFL (Required Fitness Level) again. Most of the company have improved since our last test. Personally, I dropped 1 minute 50 seconds, and some of the others were dropping more than three minutes from their last times. After a bit more haka proactive, we had personal admin time for the rest of the day.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Saturday, to give us a little "half way" boost, we had a day trip to Taupo. We played paintball, and it was so cool - but pretty messy. It was pretty fun though to be able to practice our stalking and aiming techniques. Then we had four hours free time. We only had three rules - no booze, no bars and no brothels.... After a couple of hours at the hot pools, we made our way back home and watched the rugby - what a wicked day![/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Sunday, a few of us headed up to church. We're going into the field for a week next week, so we spent the rest of the day packing our packs.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 7[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]This week, week seven, we headed out into the field for exercise Kaimanawa. We were scheduled to be out there for five days. Monday morning, we were on the move out, and straight after breakfast we caught our ride on the choppers. For most of us, this was our first chopper ride, and was almost the best part of the week.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]We arrived after a couple of hours, to who knows where, and we were ready for lunch. After lunch, we had a couple of lessons about what was going to happen for the next few days, and we were off.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The first objective was to find a temporary harbour, and then a permanent harbour to set up camp. It took us a couple of hours, seeing it was our first time, but we found the right place, and set up our hoochies. We had to cook our own meals and we made noodles. Then we had stand to, which is done every morning and night at first and last light. We were all pretty tired by then, so most of us headed off to sleep, but some of us had sentry duty, and it was a pretty restless first night for the rest of us being woken at times during the night for our turn at sentry duty.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Next morning we did our normal routine of stand-to, breakfast, hoochies down, shave (for the men anyway) and packs on ready to go. We needed to find a new temporary harbour for the day. We pack marched about two kilometres before getting to a suitable location and once we arrived, we set about getting the camp ready. After lunch, we set off in our sections to do a round-robin kind of thing, where we did resections, toets, and putting up our hoochies, and then headed back to meet up with the platoon, and then the company for a hot meal. You can probably tell by now that meals are pretty important to us . After dark, we practised our night navigation, then we'd all completed a pre-test, we rode back to camp on a Unimog.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Wednesday, we headed out of the bush and into the open. We practised the formations we patrol in, and also fire manoeuvres in pairs, so that if we got enemy contact, we could move forward onto them. We waited until it got dark, and did our real night navigation tests. This night, we got back to camp about 2200, and did our night routines and went to sleep. In the night, we got enemy contact and had to get out of our warm sleeping bags and into our firing positions. We attacked for about half an hour before we got the all clear.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Thursday morning, we practised things we'd learnt on this exercise, and then we got the news that a weather front, bringing snow, was expected in the area we were in. We jumped into Mogs and found ourselves back at the Waiouru Camp, where we started cleaning our weapons and the rest of our gear.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Things can get pretty dirty out in the field, so we spent most of Friday morning cleaning our kit and boots and things. Then, because we hadn't pack-marched out of the bush, we had a physical training (PT) session where we each got issued with a 15kg shell that we had to run around with, up and down hills, and sometimes using a fireman's lift to carry someone else and their shell too! Then the snow started, and we had a snowman building competition. After having a little fun, we got to jump into a creek and walk 40 metres down it, and then double back to barracks. I don't know how I made it - I couldn't feel my legs.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Over the weekend, we were lucky enough to watch a few DVDs and even go to the bar. It was a great night and lots of us got a bit tipsy, because it's been so long since we could go to a bar. The bliss didn't last though - 0515 Sunday morning we were woken and told to be on the parade ground in 2 minutes in our PT kit! We had to partake in what the Army colourfully call the "chunder run". I actually enjoyed it, but there were a few green faces I can tell you![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 8[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On Monday and Tuesday we got to handle the LSW C9. This is an automatic machine gun. We started the lessons learning all about this weapon, the technical date and theory side of things. We then went on to learn how to carry out the safety precautions and how to ***** and assemble the gun, followed by lessons on how to clean and care for the gun. We then started weapon drills on the hold, aim and fire. To be sure we had this down packed we spent the majority of the day on these points having one on one lessons with our section commanders. Monday evening after tea we had Platoon and Company photos.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Tuesday we carried on with the LSW C9 lessons. We started with revision of everything we had learned the previous day, and went over any points that anyone was unsure of, as it can be very dangerous if you don't fully and completely understand everything. Then we moved onto more complicated drills such as gas stoppages and immediate action drills. We carried on with this for the rest of the day.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Wednesday we headed out to the range. We started with qualifying on the dry training tests. These were necessary so the NCO's (Non-commissioned Officer) testing us were sure we knew what we were doing before we started firing. After these were done we went onto the live training tests. After everyone had completed these we went back to camp for platoon admin.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]At 1400 we had PT. We had BPT (Basic Physical Training) Introduction to Ropes and a Pack Walk. When we arrived we got split into two groups. One group went off to do the ropes and the other group went to do the pack walk. Learning how to climb ropes properly isn't as easy as it looks. The first day I tried them, I couldn't get up them, but with some practice the next time we had ropes I was able to climb to the roof several times. It was all about technique. So once my group had finished doing ropes and the other group came back we headed off for what we thought was going to be a pack march. To our surprise we went about a kilometre and a half and dropped our packs. Instead we went and did the concourse![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]That evening we had chaplain's hour again. But when we got back to barracks we found we had a big night ahead of us. For the next morning was CSM's barrack inspection. Everything had to be just right. Not a thing out of place. We had to ensure that our drawers we set out the same as the person next to us, the room across from us and the barracks down from us. All our ironing and washing had to be done, which proved a problem when there were only 4 washing machines and 4 dryers for 60 people. But despite this we managed to make it to bed that night.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]We all woke up on Thursday feeling the effects of our hard work put in the night before. The CSM came through barracks at 0800 and inspected everything you could imagine. Luckily we got through it with only a few persons getting charged.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]At 0850 we had battle PT. Again we did the ropes and concourse. It really took your energy away trying to drag your wet body, boots and webbing up and over different obstacles but we made it. After we had all showered and regained feeling in our frozen limbs we went out for drill. We learnt turning in quick time.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]After lunch we went off to the pool to have a lesson in different floatation techniques. This was great as we learnt how to survive in water. We then made floatation devices with our packs. Incredibly we made them float and did a length of the pool with them.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Friday morning we had a pack walk for PT. This was about 8km and was a challenge as we did it as a platoon. But the feeling of achievement afterwards was primo.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]At 1030 we were introduced to the CDF - Charge Directional Fragmentation Mine. We spent all day learning everything we could about this weapon system. It was a real challenge to learn the set-up drills, as it is a very complicated weapon. At the end of the day we got tested on the safety drills and the rest of the knowledge we had acquired during the day.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Saturday morning we had platoon admin until we were issued our weapons and went out for drill. We learnt ground and take up arms.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]
    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana]After we took our weapons back we had platoon admin until we headed to the field for an inter platoon touch competition. Thankfully our platoon took out the competition, which helped us on the scoreboard towards getting top platoon.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Sunday we had the choice of going to church or staying in barracks to do personal admin. We were all excited and buzzing because it was our second visitors day and the majority of us were going to see our family and friends. We had about 4 hours with them which was also an opportunity for us to eat as much junk as we could.[/FONT]

  9. #114
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default NZ Army - Soldiers Diary Weeks 9 to 12

    [FONT=Verdana]
    Soldiers Diary[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]

    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana]All Arms Recruit Course (AARC) 329[/FONT][FONT=&quot]




    [/FONT][FONT=Verdana]Weeks 9, 10 & 11[/FONT][FONT=&quot]

    [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana]This week we had our second field exercise. Monday morning we left camp at 0800hrs and pack marched six kilometres to get to our destination. From there we got into our permanent harbour positions and got into digging. We had to dig a gun pit, and for ourselves a shell scrape to sleep in, and a fighting pit. This took us through to lunchtime Tuesday. Then we just sorted the rest of our gear out and got settled in.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On Wednesday morning we went out and practiced our patrolling and forming. We were out for a couple of hours until we were wet through because the weather was really bad. We went back to our position at lunchtime and made a hot feed. After we got a chance to warm up we went up to headquarters to learn how to do wire fences. This took a good two hours. When we got back to Camp it was time to have a hot feed and get ready for stand to.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On Wednesday night we started night patrol. Each section had a turn at going out to make sure there were no enemy surrounding our area. Because our section did not do night patrol until Friday night we had to do sentry duty for the section that had gone out. If we weren't on sentry we were allowed to sleep until it was our turn.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Thursday we went out practicing our navigation and resections. Thursday afternoon we went to headquarters again. Here we learnt about Prisoners of War, How to retreat from mines and how to do river crossings. That night we had our normal night routine, while another section went on their night patrol.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Friday we went out and patrolled where we were heading that night so we knew the ground. We also practised our forming and contact fronts. We had down time that afternoon cleaning weapons and what not. That evening it was our turn to do the night patrol. We patrolled for a couple of hours just clearing the area. After that we either went to bed or off to sentry. Friday night we got two attacks one was at 2200 hours and lasted for about an hour until the enemy retreated.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]We got another stand to the next morning at 0500 hrs but this time we had to pack up and retreat from our position. From there we went about two kilometres to meet up with the company. We then went to a secure location to have breakfast. At about 1000 hrs we returned to our position to dig in. This meant filling in all our pits and re-turfing to make it look like no-one had been there. Lucky for us the weather was forecasted to snow so we got MOG rides home.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]From Saturday afternoon and pretty much the following week (week 11) we were cleaning up and checking our kit, ensuring that nothing was missing or damaged.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]On Monday we had Skill-at-Arms, this entails a kit check a timed pack march, a falling target shoot, navigation and all the weapon tests we had learnt during basic. We were also meant to do the concourse but it was snowing so that got cancelled. This day was a good day to reflect on everything that we had learnt in our 10 weeks. Luckily enough and due to a lot of hard work, my section (Section One Temple Victor Company platoon) took out and won both the fastest pack march and the overall Skill-At-Arms. So for the rest of the week we continued to clean our kit and replace what was missing. We also had a few lectures during the week, of which one was on the Geneva Convention. This went for about six hours but was really interesting and good to learn about.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Week 12[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Our final week. This week was all about drill. Unfortunately it kept snowing this week so we didn't get that much practise but whenever we could we would be out on the parade ground practising for our march out ceremony and the drill competition.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]So on Thursday each platoon headed out one at a time to the parade ground to compete in the drill competition. For this we did the drill we were to do for our march out. We got marked on our drill movements and our appearance. After the third platoon had been through, the whole company formed up outside the Headquarters for the decision. After a ten minute build-up we heard it "the platoon to win the drill competition is "Temple VC Platoon."" We couldn't believe it, we just looked at each other. Then the best news of all we had also won the overall top platoon. As a result of this we got to march out right of line (this is an honour given to the top platoon in that they lead the March Out parade). We couldn't be happier, but we carried on to prepare for Saturday. D-day.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Friday night we were allowed to have visiting time with our families if they had travelled to Waiouru for the March Out. If we didn't go visiting we watched DVD's and ordered in pizza.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Finally we woke up to our last day on basic training. How good it felt. That morning we had one more rehearsal and then finished packing our stuff and cleaning the barracks. At 0950hrs we were formed up on the road next to the parade ground ready to march on in front of friends and family. The music started playing and the ceremony began and lasted for just over an hour. In this time we did a slow and a quick march-by, an award presentation and then we performed a song, the national anthem and the haka. This was followed by our march off with a chant. This day was the best feeling of accomplishment. We came in three months earlier not expecting or understanding what was to come, and here we were celebrating our achievements. But the hardest part of all was to come... saying goodbye. Because we were all getting posted to different parts of the country, we had to detach ourselves from mates we had been with everyday for twelve weeks. We had made such close bonds the majority of our new mates were more than just friends, we were now family. So to all of 329, congratulations!
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Thank you to all who supported me and best of luck. You know who you are.[/FONT]

    End of Article - More info can be found on the NZ Army Website
    [FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT]

  10. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by vor033 View Post
    An Artical from the NZ - MOD about new kit for the Army - I will try and find some better Photos of the New Kit





    [FONT=Verdana]17 September 2009 [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) troops deploying to Afghanistan this October will be equipped with the latest, battle tested body armour and protective equipment.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Army has invested in a variety of gear, from patrol packs to ballistic glasses, to ensure the modern soldier is equipped to do the job they need to do on operations overseas.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The improved body armour has been developed based on lessons learned in Afghanistan and Iraq. The body armour is a Special Forces variant and is currently in use with US Navy SEAL’s and US Army Rangers.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The protective equipment includes new, lighter combat helmets, improved body armour, ballistic goggles and gloves, modular webbing and pouches, an enhanced individual torch, ergonomic camelback patrol pack, and for some, an improved hand-held GPS unit.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] “While the soldier is the first part of Army capability, it is also about ensuring our soldiers are well-equipped to do the job they are required to do,” says the Chief of Army Major General Rhys Jones.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] “This new protective equipment will enable our soldiers to undertake the tasks and demands we require of them in a range of complex operational environments like Afghanistan, Timor-Leste and the Solomon Islands.” [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The equipment will be first used by NZDF personnel deploying to Afghanistan in October. Remaining missions will be supplied with equipment in order of threat level over the next six months.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]“There are currently 790 New Zealand Defence Force personnel deployed on 14 operations, UN missions and defence exercises in 10 countries around the world,” MAJ GEN Jones says. “They are often twelve months away from their families and the Army is committed to investing in their safety by ensuring they have the equipment and training to achieve their goals to a world-class standard.”[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana] The new equipment is lighter, more comfortable and provides the wearer with enhanced ballistic and fragmentary protection. The modular system can also by personalised by the soldier in how they attach the pouches to their webbing.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The current operational pool of equipment will be distributed for wider Army training purposes as the new equipment is phased in. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Quick Facts – Soldier Survivability Equipment:[/FONT]

    • [FONT=Verdana]The new advanced combat helmet is 0.5kg lighter than its predecessor, has an internal mounting system that makes it more comfortable to wear and allows greater functionality with ballistic glasses or communications equipment. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The improved body armour (IBA) provides enhanced ballistic and fragmentation protection and is now sized to the individual rather than one-size-fits-all. The IBA also includes side, groin and bicep protection should it be required by the wearer and has a modular webbing system so soldiers can customise the pouches they attach directly to their webbing. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The IBA is fully modular and also has a quick release system to enable the user or another person to discard the vest quickly if the user is injured or submerged in water. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The improved patrol pack is ergonomic in design, has an adjustable, removable back comforter and is adjustable for height. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]The Revision Desert Locust ballistic goggles were selected as they offered the greatest durability and functionality. These protect the wearer against blast fragmentation and other non-ballistic threats whilst also protecting the eyes from wind, sand, dirt and snow. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]New individual general purpose torch: The Sidewinder stood out as the individual torch choice as it is small, light-weight and has excellent functionality. It provides four types of light: red, blue, white and Infra-red. It has four levels of brightness on each including a strobe function. The torch also comes with a helmet mount so that it allows a hands-free operation. With the IR function it significantly improves the local area illumination when used with an night vision goggles. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Verdana]Improved individual GPS: The Garmin 60cX GPS is a unit that provides a cheap but very functional GPS. The Garmin provides colour mapping and new maps can be downloaded via the internet as required. The users found it easy to operate and accurate as an individual navigation aid for tactical commanders.[/FONT]
    Its about bloody time.

  11. #116
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default New Kit for the NZDF - More Info and Pics

    Some new Photos and information on the New Kit being issued to the New Zealand Army


    [FONT=Verdana]The modern New Zealand Soldier[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]The modern New Zealand Soldier[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The improvements in our equipment will see soldiers significantly more[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Comfortable, lighter, and notably with an enhanced level of protection from ballistic threats. A recognisable change is the colour, which is now standardised for all PSI as ‘Coyote Brown'. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The improved body armour (IBA) provides enhanced ballistic and fragmentation protection and is now sized to the individual rather than the last one-size-fits-all model. The IBA is truly world-class and has been developed based on lessons learned in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is a Special Forces variant and is currently in use with US Navy SEALs and US Army Rangers.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]
    This is the first part of wider range of equipment that will come on-line over the next five years as part of the Soldier Modernisation Programme including night vision equipment, In-Service Weapon Replacement and Upgrade Programme (ISWRUP), Urban Operations and Less Lethal Projects.[/FONT]





    [FONT=Verdana]Improved Body Armour[/FONT][FONT=&quot]

    [/FONT] The BAE RBAV (SF) provided the greatest overall benefit for capability, durability, comfort, functionality and design. It provides significantly enhanced ballistic and fragmentation protection for personnel over the in-service body armour.


    It contains two main (front / rear), five smaller side and groin plates and soft armour throughout providing ballistic protection. The IBA contains groin, throat, neck, upper arm and side protection and has a MOLLE exterior for attaching pouches.

    The IBA is fully modular and also has a quick release system to enable the user or another person to discard the vest quickly if the user is injured or submerged in water.



    [FONT=Verdana]Enhanced modular (MOLLE) webbing and pouches[/FONT]




    [FONT=Verdana]Advanced combat helmet[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The Rabintex ACH is a lightweight ballistic helmet that provides the same ballistic protection as the current in-service PASGT helmet but is 0.5kg lighter. Its internal mounting system is comfortable to wear and allows greater interoperability with ballistic glasses and TMCS. The design of the ACH helmet allows far greater freedom of movement than the existing PASGT design. The Rabintex ACH is in-service worldwide notably with the ADF.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]
    A helmet cover has also been designed for the ACH which comes in both desert and woodland DPM, is tight fitting on the helmet, has goggle retaining straps, and has several IR patches inserted for combat identification.[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Enhanced Patrol Pack[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Camelbak Trizip provides a significant enhancement to the current in-service patrol pack with its ergonomic design and additional features. The Trizip contains a pouch for a camelback hydration system to be inserted into, has a removable back comforter, and is also adjustable for height. The outside of the patrol pack is MOLLE based which allows other pouches to be applied if required.[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Ballistic goggles[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Revision Desert Locust Goggles were selected as they offered the greatest durability and functionality as a ballistic goggle. These will protect the wearer against blast fragmentation and other non-ballistic threats whilst also protecting the eyes from wind, sand, dirt and snow.[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Ballistic glasses (shrapnel proof eyes anyone?)[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The ESS ICE ballistic glasses are already in-service with the NZDF on current operations. They provided the greatest overall comfort and interoperability with the ACH helmet and PRR. They come with three coloured lenses to allow use in low-light and sunny conditions. These will protect eyes against blast fragmentation and other non-ballistic threats.[IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/peterbar/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/msoclip1/01/clip_image002dotgif[/IMG][/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Combat gloves[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]New pistol holster[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]New pistol holster - also available in evening-wear black[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]New individual torch[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Handheld GPS[/FONT]

  12. #117
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    Shiny! New kit is always good as long as it gives the soldier an edge over the enemy!

  13. #118
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    I wonder how long it will be before we see the local Air Softers wearing kit just like that now they know what it looks like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Engine Mech View Post
    I wonder how long it will be before we see the local Air Softers wearing kit just like that now they know what it looks like.
    Ha Ha, Actually we probley won't see them use it much because it doesnt appear in any big time feature Movies, same with paint ballers. Even the kiwi ones seem to have a ****** for anything multi cam.

  15. #120
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    Good photos, some familiar faces in there too.

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