Page 9 of 50 FirstFirst 123456789101112131415161719 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 135 of 747

Thread: New Zealand Defence Forces

  1. #121
    Member Red Command NZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lurking while working
    Posts
    870

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Engine Mech View Post
    I wonder how long it will be before we see the local Air Softers wearing kit just like that now they know what it looks like.
    im betting until it hits trademe

  2. #122
    Member madmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    557

    Default


    Is the NZSAS only free fall qualified unit of the NZ Armed Force?


    And what about this guys? Any idea who are they? NZSAS troopers?

  3. #123
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by madmike View Post
    Is the NZSAS only free fall qualified unit of the NZ Armed Force?


    And what about this guys? Any idea who are they? NZSAS troopers?

    Hi Mate, Both Photos were from the main NZDF Website and just said 'NZ Army' as a caption, but i presume they both show members of 1 NZSAS Group though i might be wrong.

  4. #124
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,581

    Default

    [QUOTE=madmike;
    Is the NZSAS only free fall qualified unit of the NZ Armed Force?
    And what about this guys? Any idea who are they? NZSAS troopers?[/QUOTE]

    Yes and Yes

  5. #125
    Member madmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    557

    Default

    Thanks for clearing me up guys.

  6. #126
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default NZ Army Photos

    A few Photos of New Zealand Soldiers training with the Australians and Americans



    Last edited by vor033; 09-20-2009 at 07:59 PM. Reason: Spelling

  7. #127
    Junior Member RNZIR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    11

    Default

    cool photos!

  8. #128
    Member DWG193's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    One Does Not Simply WALT into Mordor!!1!
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Are NZDF soldiers still using PASGT? Thought they had changed...

  9. #129
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DWG193 View Post
    Are NZDF soldiers still using PASGT? Thought they had changed...
    Hi Mate, They are in the process of changing to a new Helmet, if you have a look a few pages back you will find some info on that very subject.

  10. #130
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default Officer Cadets - Jungle Training

    [FONT=Verdana]Officer Cadets Tested in Jungle Environment[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]15 September 2009[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Thirty-eight Army officer cadets travelled to a dense Samoan jungle recently for Exercise Kepimpinan, their first close country exercise in a tropical environment and under constant observation. It was, writes Officer Cadet Joshua Saua, a testing but very enlightening experience.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]On 31 July 09 the Corp of Officer Cadets New Zealand (OCS (NZ)) deployed on Exercise Kepimpinan (Ex. K.P.). Translated into English, Kepimpinan means leader, or leadership in Malaysian. Ex K.P. comprised mainly close country jungle tactics techniques and procedures and platoon level Immediate Action drills, as well as section and platoon level command assessments.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]This was our first close country exercise, with the added pressures of being in an overseas tropical environment as well as being assessed and observed 24 hours a day. This made the exercise a testing one for the 38 Officer Cadets, not to mention the media attention with One News tagging along for the ride.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Flying through the blue cloudless sky, we looked down with mixed thoughts as they descended from heights of 30,000 feet seeing the prominent coastline and coral reef through crystal clear water. A New Zealand Royal Air Force Boeing 737 touched on the tarmac and came to a halt. Greeted by temperatures of over 30°C we knew we had arrived at Faleolo Airport, Samoa.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Much to our surprise and relief, the RNZAF had erected most of the forward operating base already, having already arrived with the Navy on the HMNZS Canterbury. The Army component was known as Ex. K.P, however, the Joint Forces exercise was known as Exercise Tropic Astra. It was the first time the Corps of Officer Cadets had worked with the Air Force on an exercise of this scale; it was also the first deployment of the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) to Samoa. As the officer cadets settled into their accommodation, morale lifted to amazing heights after being shown around the forward operating base. Aside from the village of accommodation tents, the forward operating base consisted of one internet tent, separate male and female showering tents and a mess hall tent with an outdoor set up[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The cadets spent the first four days acclimatising and having practical lessons both in the base camp and in the jungle immediately south of base camp. D-day soon came around and we deployed via Unimogs and Helo. Ending up on a lava dump on the south coast, the 38 future leaders of the New Zealand Army began rotating through the platoon commander’s role for assessment.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]An intense 11 days was spent defending, attacking and ambushing the ever-evading “Yui’tumese” fictional enemy, known as the Kamarian Action Group. A variety of tasks were undertaken by the respective platoons to try and destroy this Samoan variant of the Musorians. Ambushes, aggressive patrols, quick and deliberate assaults as well stealthy reconnaissance gave us the upper hand in our never-ending struggle with these insurgents. The morale boosting words of “Aunty Huia” discretely made its way via radio to the officer cadets and after a decent two weeks of intense time in the jungle it was time to scrub up and prepare for the trip home.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Before going home, a couple of days of rest and relaxation were on the cards…amazing! The cadets were fortunate to be able to explore other aspects of Samoa, including the lavish resorts and a cocktail-in-a-coconut or two! One such experience was the Siva Afi cultural night, which translates as “Fire Dance”. True to its translation, the team was entertained by a night of Pacific Island traditional dances from multiple cultures, both on fire and not on fire![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Post exercise administration came around soon enough, and it was time to swap the jandals, shorts and singlet for the field dress and load up the Boeing. It was an experience, which will be discussed in the Mess for many years to come, however the 38 jaded cadets were ready to go home. Currently the officer cadets are preparing for the next exercise, Exercise Santici revolving around urban operations. Graduation is less than three months away, and we are determined to see the year out.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]A Break from the Heat—Tree Planting[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Officer cadets planted over 300 native trees after spending ten gruelling days training in tropical conditions in the Samoan forests. The tree plantings, in the O Le Pupu Pu’e National Park, were part of the tree regeneration programme undertaken by Samoa’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. [/FONT]







  11. #131
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default NZSAS - Selection

    [FONT=Verdana]The Edge of Endurance




    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]10 March 2009[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]It’s what many consider the pinnacle of soldiering – membership of the SAS.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]In what at times seems an almost unbearably gruelling test SAS aspirants will trudge through paddocks and creeks over endless sprawling hills, and past SAS staff who monitor every stage of their performance.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]As one seasoned trooper told Army News, “There is a built in, unseen barrier in the SAS process that gets rid of the clay. The men who can get themselves past that barrier are usually the men we want – the men we will turn into SAS officers and soldiers."[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]One officer, who passed that barrier and is on his way to further SAS training this year, tells his story.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Selection[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Selection.[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] Something many in the military have thought about; something less have attempted and something even fewer have been successful on. I do not intend to preach to you about what you need to do to get there, you can read that online. What I want to do is give you some of the realities of the course, talk about the perceived hardships and myths and go through some of my personal observations that will hopefully give you a better understanding of what you are up against. It is important for you to understand that I am somebody who has passed and failed selection and I give this to you with no ego attached.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Decision[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]The decision[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] to attend. It may sound obvious, but this is probably the most important part of the step. It is when you decide that you want to become part of this unit. Your reasoning must be sound; no “I’ll give it a go” or “people think I should so I will” as people with this attitude will not finish. If you are in a relationship that you want to keep, you will need to talk to your partner in detail and explain to her exactly what it is you want to do and why. If your foundation is not solid at this early stage, for whatever reason, it will surely crumble come selection. Once your decision is made, you can focus on the next step.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Your Training[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Your training[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] will vary depending on your start state. Because the majority of selection is done with a pack on your back, so should your training. For myself, I walked a number of longer sessions to get my mind used to the boredom and fatigue. Ensure that you do not over train. Take time off during training to relax and take it all in. At the end of the day, we are all in the military and can all carry a pack. It is really no different on selection other than the fact that it is you, not your commander who decides when you get up to take that next step.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Pre-Selection[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Pre-selection[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] must be a lot of fun for those who are in the position to observe it from the sides. People of all shapes and sizes turn up with just as many different attitudes and reasons for wanting to be there. It soon becomes apparent that those bristling with confidence and a desire to prove themselves during this phase will inevitably fail. Pre-selection does give you your first glimpse of the badged members though and I would be lying if I did not say that it was inspiring to see people wearing the beret and belt. Just concentrate on what you are there for and forget about the other distractions.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Selection Proper[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Selection proper[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] is the time to show what you have got. Day one starts with the RFL, shortly followed by the BFT, swim test and hares and hounds (webbing run). It is a hard slog of a day but if you break it down into its key elements, it is much simpler. As someone once said to me “the way to eat an elephant is by doing it one bite at a time”. Days two to four are open country pack walking. That’s it, simple; but for some reason it is the time when most people come off the course, not because they do not make the timings (which are not that difficult) but because they take themselves off. For whatever reason, they have given themselves the excuse to depart. If you have your motivation squared away from the start, then this will not be you.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Exercise Von Temptsky, the ‘dunes’ or the ‘Jerries’ as it is affectionately known. Probably the most talked about and anticipated part of selection. I must admit that prior to starting them I was also a little anxious about the next 20 hours until I had a realisation. That realisation was that I am going to be here for the next 20 hours, carrying jerry cans, so deal with it. And I did. Like the others around me, I just knuckled down and got on with it and to be perfectly honest found it easier than I thought I would. If the task was not achievable then no one would have passed, and so many have. So my advice to you is to suck it up and crack on. You have already made the decision to be there so don’t cut yourself short.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The final days of selection are occupied with the close country navigation and the 60km pack walk. Do not let yourself relax because you have ‘broken the back’ of the course by finishing the ‘jerries’, because it will only make the next few days harder. The key, as with the rest of the selection is just to keep on going, and be prepared to go a little further than that. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Passing[/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana]Passing[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] selection for me was an interesting experience. For so long I had been looking at the selection ‘door’ and all of a sudden it was open. It’s a very satisfying feeling to know that you have passed but the reality that it is only the beginning also starts to set in.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]I have a long way in my journey to go and I would not presume to know the ‘in’s and out’s’ of this unit and those that make up its numbers. All I know is that I want to be part of it. I sincerely wish you all the best for your journey.
    [/FONT]



  12. #132
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default NZSAS - Selection Part 2

    [FONT=Verdana]The Edge of Endurance Part 2


    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The road to 1NZSAS GP now has two paths – the Special Air Service (SAS) route, or through the Counter Terrorist Tactical Assault Group (CTTAG). Both directions are voluntary, and each are achievable with grit, determination and the will to succeed.[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] The SAS/CTTAG roads lead to the one goal of "Success for further training within 1 NZSAS GP"[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Here a soldier who tried for SAS selection last year, was not ready, so changed path to CTTAG Assessment tells his story.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]I attempted the NZSAS selection course in November ‘08 for the first time but was unsuccessful; however I was given another opportunity in the CTTAG entry assessment.[/FONT][FONT=Verdana] I had used the training programme provided by the NZSAS for selection. I spent a lot of time pack marching long distances; however I wish I had done more big hills. I joined my local orienteering club to practise navigation and square away my map to ground skills. I was happy with the work I had put in before I arrived and was confident with my navigation. Not worrying about how prepared you are helps with the mental side of it, allowing you to focus on the job at hand.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The SAS selection course began with pre-selection which surprisingly involved a lot of walking, but gave everyone a chance to practise navigation. The course itself was hard mentally and physically. The first four days were tough because you were racing the clock. Add to that a mistake with your nav, some bad weather and rolled ankles, and before you know it you’re behind and trying to catch up. Once at the jerry cans I struggled to keep them from hitting the ground and this weighed heavily on my mind. This is where I came off the course. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]In my debrief interview with the Training Officer I was offered a second chance. There was a CTTAG entry assessment course starting in two days, and if I wanted to be on it all I had to do was get some rest and some food in me. I was driven up north with a couple of other guys who had come off on the jerry cans as well. We got our heads down and in the morning found that pretty much everyone who came off the first selection course was there and ready to go all over again.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]None of us knew too much about the entry assessment and we tried to piece together what we were going to be in for, and assumed it would be not much sleep and a lot of work. That was pretty accurate. The course began with the usual RFL and BET, but the difference being the beep test rather than the pack march. In my mind I was worried about the level of fitness I had having only just come off the first course. I was to realise that the first day is designed to exhaust you, so that those who genuinely want to be there will stick it out.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The attrition rate seemed to be about the same as selection with guys disappearing on the first day. The intensity and tempo of the whole thing was very high. By the end of the first day you knew you had worked hard and there was plenty more to come. I was given a second chance and I wasn’t going to mess it up. I wanted to be there. I remember being so tired that I was falling asleep on my feet. The course was the hardest thing I have done to date, but finishing is an amazing feeling.
    [/FONT]



  13. #133
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default New NZDF Photos

    [FONT=Verdana]Exercise Hellfire 09[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The Royal New Zealand Artillery courses for Bombardier Guns, Signals and Operator Command Post culminated last month with a live fire testing activity, with students being joined by personnel from Kapyong Battery. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Here they were required to display leadership as well as technical and tactical competence in order to qualify. They were further tested by the weather in the training area, having to deal with a good dump of snow followed by a week of sunny days and freezing nights.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]The exercise controller Warrant Officer Class Two John Weel explained that the context of the exercise was based on the conventional operating environment, with a few other activities and was designed to force students to demonstrate initiative and solve problems. As an example, the Battery was “attacked” at the far north of the training area near Engineer Monument, forcing an emergency withdrawal or crash out. Each student was responsible for getting his or her detachment from the current position to a new main position, then coming into action and firing to defeat the attack.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]There was also an opportunity for media training as a TV One film crew was out with the battery doing a story on capability developments within the RNZA. The emergency withdrawal was also observed by staff and students of the Basic Cooks’ course from the Joint Services Catering School, who now have an understanding of the Army’s Offensive Support capability.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The exercise produced synergy of training as Kapyong Battery was also able to test and adjust newly written deployment Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (TTPs ), while the students were being tested. It also provided a springboard for Exercise Black Templar in the South Island in October.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The exercise was a success with 90% of the students qualifying. It identified areas of strength in the Battery while also providing a focus for improvement.






    [/FONT]

  14. #134
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8,863

    Default New NZDF Photos

    A Few New Photos of the NZDF PRT Afghanistan October 2009










  15. #135
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default

    [QUOTE=gafkiwi;4425440]Yes and Yes[/QUOT

    The first yes is true now. But it wasn't so long ago that Signals had a POE (point of entry) Signals unit that were all jump qualified. This was scrapped for reasons as to which I can only speculate.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •