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Thread: Blue Infantry cord and other branches?

  1. #1

    Default Blue Infantry cord and other branches?

    [*******black][FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2]Wondering about the Blue Infantry Cord, the aiguillette that all Infantrymen receive upon becoming... Infantrymen (after completing their training) [/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2]I searched the forum and came up with this:[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]Posted by Moriarti on 08-31-2008: [/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]Quote:[/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]Originally Posted by [/FONT][/COLOR][*******black][FONT=Verdana]RS_Leo1A5[/FONT][/COLOR][*******black][FONT=Verdana] [/FONT][/COLOR][*******blue][FONT=Verdana][/FONT][/COLOR][*******black][FONT=Verdana][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]Different question, but related:
    What's the meaning of the cords worn on the shoulders (the blue one on the right and the one with the metal tip on the left)?[/FONT][/COLOR]


    [*******black][FONT=Verdana]The cord on the right shoulder is particular to the infantry. Sky blue in color.
    Infantry Blue Cord

    General Washington selected the color blue to distinguish his tough and resolute infantry in the Continental Army from other types of soldiers. General LaFayette chose a light blue color to outfit his American Infantry Corps. For the next 120 years, the official Infantry color alternated between blue and white until 1904 when the Army officially adopted what we now know as "Infantry Blue."

    In 1847 light blue was designated as the official shade of an Infantry NCO's shoulder sleeves.

    Blue denoted the Infantry of both sides during the Civil War. Union soldiers wore a blue braid on their dress hats. Rebel Soldiers sewed blue piping along their trouser seams.

    Khaki supplanted blue as the Army's fatigue uniform during the Spanish-American War, however in 1904 light blue was officially adopted as the color of the United States Infantry. In 1951, the Army leadership (General "Lightning Joe" Collins, Chief of Staff for the Army) sought to encourage and recognize foot soldiers who were bravely fighting intense battles in Korea. It was decided that blue would be used to enhance the uniform of the Infantryman, so that everyone would know that the soldier was an Infantryman who would be fighting on the front lines. They soon adopted the Infantry Blue Cord. The blue cord was created to be worn over the right shoulder of both officers and enlisted men. This cord would only be worn by fully qualified Infantrymen and would announce for all to see that these men would be on the front line when our nation was at war. Blue plastic disks were placed behind the branch insignia and crossed rifles. The new enhancements were first worn by the 3rd "Old Guard" Infantry Regiment.

    The blue cord and disks became standard for all Infantrymen in 1952.

    Today, enlisted graduates of Infantry Basic Training receive their blue cord at the end of their final FTX. Graduates of the Infantry Officer Basic Course complete their weeklong final FTX and after road marching back to building 76 have their blue cords pinned on them by their platoon trainer NCOs. The SSG or SFC who pins on the blue cord then renders an honorary salute in symbolic recognition of their welcoming the Lieutenant into the ranks of the Infantry [/FONT][/COLOR][*******black][FONT=Verdana]

    [/FONT][/COLOR][*******black][FONT=Verdana]
    The cord on the left is the french fourragere of the Croix de Guerre awarded as a unit award to 82nd ABN DIV for action in WWII[/FONT][/COLOR]
    [SIZE=2]so I know a general history and origin of the blue cord. I understand that other branches have a respective color: Field Artillery (Scarlett), Armor/Cavalry (Yellow), Aviation (ultramarine blue and golden orange), Signal Corps (orange and white), etc. And, these branches have a cord but it is not authorized to wear (or receive).[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]I'm not trying to start an argument between the branches...[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]But, who (or what department) made it official for Infantry to wear/receive the blue cord and did they specifically say that the other branches (even Combat Branches) cannot wear/receive a branch cord?[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]Unlike the CIB or EIB... the blue cord is awarded just FOR completing training. They can say all they want about the fighting, horrors, sacrifices, and suffering of the 'poor Infantry' and they are on the frontlines... but it is not awarded for any of that. It is awarded before any of that and it is awarded for and after completing Basic-AIT (enlisted) and IOBC (officers). [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]Since it is awarded upon completion of training why not allow ALL the branches to receive and wear their respective branch cord? I mean, they earned it right? They completed their branch training and thus earned the right to represent and show it off. So, basically why? And it cannot be because they do not have the "experiences" (as I've underlined) as Infantrymen... because that is not in regs or criteria. Plus, with recent operations[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]Plus, in current operations in Afghanistan and Iraq... infantrymen are not the only ones on frontlines, which do not exactly exist in COIN. If that was the criteria or definition (As previously underlined) then many other branches, even non-combat arm branches would receive a branch cord. [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2]I've checked the site and google/yahoo but it did not lead to anything specific or official. So, again, who or what department allowed only the Infantry to receive and wear the branch cord and why not the branches and did the regs specifically say that no branch can wear one and why or why not?[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2](not starting CAB vs. CIB type thread)[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]

  2. #2
    Hellfish Junior gaijinsamurai's Avatar
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    Another question: If a soldier leaves the infantry and gets a new MOS, is he authorized to continue wearing the cord on his class A's?

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    Senior Member LineDoggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijinsamurai View Post
    Another question: If a soldier leaves the infantry and gets a new MOS, is he authorized to continue wearing the cord on his class A's?
    No, also if the 11 Series Soldier is in a Unit which is not Infantry (ie: Div Hqtrs, STB, etc).

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    Hellfish Junior gaijinsamurai's Avatar
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    Thanks, Linedoggie. I spent five years as an 11B in the Oregon National Guard, but I have to admit I never really became very knowledgable in regards to Army regulations.

    The "Once a Marine, always a Marine" slogan kinda fit, i guess. I was smoked more than once for using USMC/Navy terminology during those years, even as an E-5.

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    Senior Member LineDoggie's Avatar
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    I just lost my rope and blue disc's when they transferred me to the Div TAC. Now I'm a Pogue

  6. #6
    Hellfish Junior gaijinsamurai's Avatar
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    That sucks.

    It's even worse when you have to work with pogues, who've never served in the combat arms.

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    Waywickedcool Federal Ninja Laconian's Avatar
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    The Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) would be the deciding factor in authorizing the wearing of a cord for all other branches, just as Lightning Joe Collins did for the Infantry cord and Shinseki did for the black beret.

    As for why the infantry gets a cord and other branches don't, I really don't know the answer. I will say this: There are really only two branches in the Army - Infantry and Infantry Support. Everything in the Army is (or is supposed to) be designed around putting some young stud on a piece of ground, with a fixed bayonet, to close with and destroy the enemy.

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    Senior Member bababooey's Avatar
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    I was happy to see Combat engineers get the "sapper" patch approved. All that stuff, patches, cords, etc. are all earned and should be worn with pride. I wonder if its like soldiers who get attached to a Special Forces unit and wear their patch. Doesn't mean they are special forces.

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    Member paracrusader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linedoggie View Post
    No, also if the 11 Series Soldier is in a Unit which is not Infantry (ie: Div Hqtrs, STB, etc).
    Not necessarily. I fall into that category, and we all wear our infantry branch items. It may very well be that we're wrong, but nobody is going to change it! Another example: LRS detachments used to fall under MI battalions, and infantry-specific uniform items were worn. Maybe it has to do with whether or not it's an MTOE 11-series position? I don't know. For that matter, maybe it's just a matter of nobody knowing or caring enough to correct it. "Take off my cord? Them's fighting words!"

    Other branches have specific uniform items as well, don't they? I vaguely remember engineers being authorized buttons on their class-As with their branch insignia, and artillery guys being authorized red *****es on their dress blue pants. Maybe I read a very old reg, and maybe I'm wrong. I don't have AR 670-1 handy just now.

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    Senior Member ZoneOne's Avatar
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    An E-6 buddy of mine got pretty heated when we were going through OCS and had a Class A inspection. He was told to remove that blue cord (by an e-6 cadre), b/c he was "no longer an infantryman"

    I expected to see fists flying.

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    Member JJ_BPK's Avatar
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    Google is your friend..

    AR 670-1, [FONT=Arial][SIZE=7][SIZE=2]Wear and [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Appearance of [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Army Uniforms [/SIZE][SIZE=2]and Insignia[/SIZE]
    [/SIZE][/FONT]

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    You're absolutely right. We should give everybody a cord, so we can all be special. Just like the black beret. That was a great idea. Maybe there's no frontline anymore, and maybe softskills are getting shot at occasionally, but if you think some transportation company can throw on rucks and move as fast as an infantry company and be able to shoot, move, communicate, and generally rain mayhem on the enemy like an infantry company, then you're serously delusional. And that's why we get the cord.

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    Waywickedcool Federal Ninja Laconian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianT View Post
    You're absolutely right. We should give everybody a cord, so we can all be special. Just like the black beret. That was a great idea. Maybe there's no frontline anymore, and maybe softskills are getting shot at occasionally, but if you think some transportation company can throw on rucks and move as fast as an infantry company and be able to shoot, move, communicate, and generally rain mayhem on the enemy like an infantry company, then you're serously delusional. And that's why we get the cord.
    Get some, Brian.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ_BPK View Post
    Google is your friend..

    AR 670-1, [FONT=Arial][SIZE=7][SIZE=2]Wear and [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Appearance of [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Army Uniforms [/SIZE][SIZE=2]and Insignia[/SIZE][/SIZE][/FONT]
    ok...

    [FONT=Arial][FONT=Arial]28–30. Distinctive items authorized for infantry personnel[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]a. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Cord, shoulder.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](1) Description. The shoulder cord is infantry blue, and it is formed by a series of interlocking square knots around[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]a center cord.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](2) Approval authority. The commanding general of the U.S. Army Infantry Center authorizes the award of the [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]shoulder cord to infantrymen who have successfully completed the appropriate training. For Army National Guard [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]soldiers, commanders of divisions, separate brigades, infantry regiments, the infantry scout group, and state adjutants [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]general for separate infantry battalions and companies are authorized to award the shoulder cord to Army National [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Guard soldiers who have successfully completed the appropriate training.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](3) How worn. The shoulder cord is worn on the right shoulder of the Army green, blue, and white uniform coats, [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]and the AG 415 shirts. The cord is passed under the arm and over the right shoulder under the shoulder loop, and [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]secured to the button on the shoulder loop. In order to attach the cord, officer personnel will attach a 20-ligne button to [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]the right shoulder seam, [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]1[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]⁄[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]2 [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]inch outside the collar edge (see fig 28–173).[/FONT]

    [FONT=Times New Roman](4) By whom worn.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](a) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Officers and enlisted personnel of the infantry, holding an infantry PMOS or specialty, who have been awarded [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]the Combat Infantryman badge, the Expert Infantry badge, or who have successfully completed the basic unit phase of [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]an Army training program or equivalent.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](b) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Enlisted personnel who have completed one station unit training (OSUT) resulting in the award of an infantry [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]PMOS.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](c) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Infantry officers who have graduated from the resident infantry officer basic or advanced course.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](d) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Infantry officers who have graduated from the Infantry Officer Candidate Course (during mobilization).[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](e) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Infantry officers and enlisted personnel in the Reserve components who hold an infantry PMOS or specialty.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](5) When worn. Infantry personnel (as described above) may wear the infantry cord as follows.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](a) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]During the period of assignment to an infantry regiment, brigade, separate infantry battalion, infantry company[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](including the headquarters and headquarters company of an infantry division), infantry platoon, or infantry TDA unit.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]In addition, infantrymen assigned to infantry sections or squads within units other than infantry units may wear the[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]cord when authorized by battalion or higher-level commanders.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](b) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]During the period assigned for duty as an Army recruiter or advisor, ROTC instructor, or member of the staff[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]and faculty of the U.S. Military Academy, as long as personnel retain their infantry PMOS.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](c) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]During the period of assignment at brigade- or lower-level BT or AIT units, or in OSUT infantry units, as long[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]as personnel retain their infantry PMOS.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](d) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Infantry OSUT and IOBC graduates may wear the cord en route to their initial follow-on infantry assignment.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman](e) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman]Soldiers en route from an assignment where wear of the shoulder cord was authorized are permitted to wear the[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]shoulder cord if they are pending reassignment to another organization authorized wear of the cord, or when assigned[/FONT]
    [FONT=Times New Roman]to a separation point for discharge purposes.[/FONT]
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][FONT=Verdana]hmmm did not answer the question I am asking. And "The commanding general of the U.S. Army Infantry Center authorizes the award of the [FONT=Times New Roman]shoulder cord to infantrymen who have successfully completed the appropriate training. " He authorized it for that specifically but someone above him gave permission for the shoulder cord to be worn.[/FONT][/FONT]

    You're absolutely right. We should give everybody a cord, so we can all be special. Just like the black beret. That was a great idea. Maybe there's no frontline anymore, and maybe softskills are getting shot at occasionally, but if you think some transportation company can throw on rucks and move as fast as an infantry company and be able to shoot, move, communicate, and generally rain mayhem on the enemy like an infantry company, then you're serously delusional. And that's why we get the cord.
    No, that is not what I am saying... it is not to make people feel special. It is to show that soldier completed of their branch training.
    But... if you want to go that way... all it takes to make an Infantrymen feel special is a rope... hahahaha.... awww how cute. [dangles blue cord outside the fence around Sand Hill and watch the recruits jump up/down].
    [remember... you chose to go that angle]

    And you're trying to make this into a or believe "well the Infantry are the ONLY ones who shoot, move, communicate, engages and is engaged by the enemy... no other branch, especially Combat Arms branches do ANYof that... only we, the Infantry, do!" arguement/thread... then you are also delusional.

    And, you are wrong... the blue cord is NOT awarded for or because of ANY of the reasons you listed... it is awarded FOR (and only for) the completion of training [refer to AR 670-1, DIs, CSMs, etc.]

    And I am/was against the black beret for general wear.. the beret is gay anyway, I prefer the patrol cap.


    if a soldier needs a piece of rope to make them feel special, unique, distinct, and stand out... if a blue rope is all it takes... then that is sad and self-estem issues exist.
    Keep your rope... I don't want it... I'll keep my funny hat and anklets.

    I didn't want one anyway... I was just curious as to see why if it is only for completion of training why was it never awarded or allowed for other branchs.[/FONT]

  15. #15
    Member Mordecai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gungnir View Post
    [FONT=Arial]...I didn't want one anyway...[/FONT]
    So you are just begrudging those who have one then...

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