Thread: British Armed Forces

  1. #4981
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Operation QALB (HEART) 8

    [FONT=Verdana]Afghan troops have moved through a insurgent stronghold in Helmand with their British colleagues to provide greater security in the Upper Gereshk Valley. Soldiers from the Afghan National Army’s Third Brigade based all around Helmand Province came together to clear an insurgent stronghold, pushing through the area of Yakchal. The operation i[/FONT][FONT=Verdana]nvolved 1200 Afghan soldiers with around 200 British troops advising their Afghan counterparts. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Operation Qalb (meaning Heart in Dari) looked to improve security around Highway one, which is Afghanistan’s central ring road, clearing an area ten kilometers to the south of the vital life line. British soldiers from the Brigade Advisory Group, commanded by the 3rd Battalion The Rifles, have taken a back seat on combat operations for some time, and this was no exception, with the Afghan warriors taking responsibility for the planning and execution of the operation. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Photos: Sergeant Andy Reddy RLC Crown Copyright 2012[/FONT]























  2. #4982
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Operation QALB (HEART) 8

    [FONT=Verdana]Afghan troops have moved through a insurgent stronghold in Helmand with their British colleagues to provide greater security in the Upper Gereshk Valley. Soldiers from the Afghan National Army’s Third Brigade based all around Helmand Province came together to clear an insurgent stronghold, pushing through the area of Yakchal. The operation i[/FONT][FONT=Verdana]nvolved 1200 Afghan soldiers with around 200 British troops advising their Afghan counterparts. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Operation Qalb (meaning Heart in Dari) looked to improve security around Highway one, which is Afghanistan’s central ring road, clearing an area ten kilometers to the south of the vital life line. British soldiers from the Brigade Advisory Group, commanded by the 3rd Battalion The Rifles, have taken a back seat on combat operations for some time, and this was no exception, with the Afghan warriors taking responsibility for the planning and execution of the operation. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]Photos: Sergeant Andy Reddy RLC Crown Copyright 2012[/FONT]













































  3. #4983
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Partnered ALP Operation



    Image: Rifleman Callum Dibben, 21, A Company 3 Rifles from Bournemouth. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Corporal Verdell Davis, 30, A Company 3 Rifles from St Vincent. Cpl Davis previously served on Op Herrick 4. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: (L-R) Major Andrew Ridland, 35, A Company 3 Rifles from London and Rifleman Shane Hibbert, 23, A Company 3 Rfiles from Swindon. Major Ridland previously served on Op Telics 3 & 9. Rfn Hibbert previously served on Op Herrick 11. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area.Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Colour Sergeant Tommy Turner, 33, A Company 3 Rifles from Plymouth. Colour Sergeant Turner previously served on Op Herrick 13 and Op Telic 8. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Corporal Marcel Cook, 28, A Company 3 Rifles. Cpl Cook previously served on Op Herrick 11 and Op Telics 2 & 9. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area.Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: (Seated Left) Corporal Marcel Cook, 28, A Company 3 Rifles. Cpl Cook previously served on Op Herrick 11 and Op Telics 2 & 9.(Standing Right)Rifleman Shane Hibbert, 23, A Company 3 Rfiles from Swindon. Rfn Hibbert previously served on Op Herrick 11. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Corporal Verdell Davis, 30, A Company 3 Rifles from St Vincent. Cpl Davis previously served on Op Herrick 4. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Rifleman Shane Hibbert, 23, A Company 3 Rfiles from Swindon. Rfn Hibbert previously served on Op Herrick 11. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Colour Sergeant Tommy Turner, 33, A Company 3 Rifles from Plymouth. Colour Sergeant Turner previously served on Op Herrick 13 and Op Telic 8. Today, 05/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Jeker carried out part of a combined operation with the Afghan Local Police around the Nahr-e Seraj South area to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area. Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012


    Image: Corporal Shane Pendall, 25, A Company 3 Rifles from Plymouth. Cpl Pendall previously served on Op Herrick 11. Today, 07/07/2012, members of 3 Rifles based at Check Point Prrang carried out a routine partnered patrol with the Afghan Local Police around their check point to provide confidence to the local population and deter insurgent activity in the area Images by Cpl Paul Morrison Army Photographer Crown Copyright 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by wotsnext View Post
    The land rover has been one of the most enduring and versatile platforms for military and law enforcement task-execution. They were a staple of the Jamaican forces from 1962 to 1990. I cut my teeth on a standard 109 in 1982, the forerunner to the 110 config in this pic. One significant use of these units in the Jamaica Constabulary was the *****ping down of the 88s in some of our crime ridden divisions for our QRUs or Special Squads. They were called 'jump-outs' by the populace and in their heyday were the most 'feared' of special crime units. They were in fact, the most facile in quick insertion and deployment and despite the sp**** metal cover, carried strong psychological advantages which enhanced the deterrent factor of these units. The more successful units were very rarely or never 'messed with'. The more notable of these were 'Primus' at Kingston Western (which includes Tivoli Gardens); 'Serpico' at St Andrew South; the Raiding Squad of the Mobile Reserve; and the somewhat lesser known 'Jump-Out' in St Thomas of which I was a member from 1982 to squad leader in 1993. The standard arms carried by these personnel began in the 1970s with the S&W .38 Special and British Sterling SMG; then Browning Hi-Power 9mm and Sterling SMG; then since 1981 the Browning HP and the Colt M16A1 and later included the Standard and Mini Uzi SMG, then the Colt M16A2 up to 1990 by which these squads had been phased out when Commissioner Thompson declared them 'Renegade Squads'. Just a little bit of Jamaican LE history. Sorry I can't supply any pics.
    Last edited by dongorgonspec; 12-26-2012 at 03:25 PM.

  5. #4985
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    Quote Originally Posted by vor033 View Post




















    Nice to see the Royal Gib Regt out in force.

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  7. #4987
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Bravo Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines on patrol in Afghanistan

    [FONT=Verdana]Images taken on patrol with Bravo Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines,[/FONT][FONT=Verdana]in the vacinity of Torghai, Narh-e-Saraj, Central Helmand, Afghanistan on the 14 and 15 Dec 12. The patrol was conducted to disrupt insurgent activity in the surrounding area.

    All Photos: LA(Phot) Rhys O'Leary, 40 Commando Royal Marines Unit Photographer[/FONT] - [FONT=Verdana] Crown Copyright 2012[/FONT]



















  8. #4988
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    Bloody hell, your up early vor, nice pix though

    Quote Originally Posted by vor033 View Post
    The MTP blends in well here

  9. #4989
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NovocastrianUK View Post
    Bloody hell, your up early vor, nice pix though
    Stuck at work as most of my 'Team' has gone sick

  10. #4990

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    Quote Originally Posted by NovocastrianUK View Post
    The MTP blends in well here
    Which is more than can be said for wearing black boots with MTP....c'mon guys, black boots with MTP looks...terrible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiggyMac View Post
    Which is more than can be said for wearing black boots with MTP....c'mon guys, black boots with MTP looks...terrible.

    I was just thinking the same!!

  12. #4992
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    Desert boots might look good but they aren't the best boots for an afghan winter so until we start seeing these mythical brown ones through the system or buying your own black it is.

  13. #4993
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    Is it comfortable wearing that... I'm not sure what it is but looks like kevlar briefs? Any idea why the UK opted for that and not the nut-flap as seen with the US?

  14. #4994
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    US forces also wear the combat diaper.

  15. #4995
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    Quote Originally Posted by AIRBORNEJOCK View Post
    US forces also wear the combat diaper.
    If you are doing alot of vehicle based Ops I think it is pretty damn handy. Any additional protection from IEDs for the meat and potatoes is a good thing.
    How much of a hinderance is it doing foot patrols?

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