Thread: British Armed Forces

  1. #5266
    Member Macaca sylvanus's Avatar
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    Saw her come in about a week ago now. Instead of going straight for the naval dockyards like most visiting ships she had a little patrol around the outside of the detached mole, went near the Spanish border then came about into the docks. That made me smile. We've had Daring and Diamond down here recently too.

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    Kent was in town at the same time apparently.
    Seems a bit quieter with the old Guarda Civil antics recently?

  3. #5268
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyslapper View Post
    Kent was in town at the same time apparently.
    Seems a bit quieter with the old Guarda Civil antics recently?
    Incursions are still happening regularly, although not with the frequency and level of hostility we had last year, but they are still being challenged by the Royal Navy Squadron out here and by local LEAs. They are not been reported in the international press that often that's all, the FCO has reached an impasse with Spain over the incursions and they are understandably not willing to escalate matters over what they see as pettiness and an assertion of their sovereignty claim.

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    Default Army Platoon commanders put to the test



    Cyprus has been hosting one of the largest infantry exercises in its training calendar. The Infantry Battle School has been running Exercise Grim Warrior - the latest platoon commanders battle camp at Episkopi. More than 50 newly commissioned officers have been put to the test. 04.04.13

    Video: BFBS

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    Default Afghanistan - Operation HERRICK 18

    Once the soldiers from the 1st Mechanized Brigade arrive in Afghanistan, they undertake up to 7 days of in-theatre, training known as 'Reception Staging and Onward Integration'. RSOI is a system designed to help train, acclimatise and move soldiers to their deployed locations in Helmand. Topics covered during the training are counter-IED, health issues, cultural awareness and a host of other subjects. The training is long and tiring but is the best training prior to the experiences the soldiers are likely to face whilst on tour.


    MOD/Crown Copyright 2013 - Photographer - Cpl Si Longworth RLC (Army Photographer)





































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    Default Afghanistan - Operation HERRICK 18

    Once the soldiers from the 1st Mechanized Brigade arrive in Afghanistan, they undertake up to 7 days of in-theatre, training known as 'Reception Staging and Onward Integration'. RSOI is a system designed to help train, acclimatise and move soldiers to their deployed locations in Helmand. Topics covered during the training are counter-IED, health issues, cultural awareness and a host of other subjects. The training is long and tiring but is the best training prior to the experiences the soldiers are likely to face whilst on tour.


    MOD/Crown Copyright 2013 - Photographer - Cpl Si Longworth RLC (Army Photographer)























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    Wow, nice pictures, Vor. Thanks for sharing.

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    Fcuking hated RSOI, sucking eggs 101...

  9. #5274
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    HMS MONMOUTH conducts maritime Approach and Assist Operations. Picture: L(Phot) Will Haigh

    As part of her commitment to Maritime Security in the Arabian Gulf, HMS Monmouth regularly conducts maritime Approach and Assist visits to dhows and other small craft working in the area. The prime purpose of these visits is to help local fishermen and other mariners in need of assistance, while also providing reassurance that the Royal Navy and other coalition warships in the area are there to keep the region free of piracy.


    These visits are conducted by the Ship’s “blue” boarding team, consisting of volunteers from the Ship’s Company, in conjunction with the “green” boarding team of embarked Royal Marines. During these visits, the boarding teams will discuss the challenges faced by the small boats operating in the region and are often able learn the sort of valuable grass roots information that the Ship’s sophisticated sensors are unable to detect.


    “Over the course of an average day we will conduct between 5 and 20 Approach and Assist visits to fishing and trading dhows of various sizes”, said Deputy Logistics Officer and Boarding Officer Lt Chris Marsden RN. “The boats’ crews are generally pleased to see us and we are often able to help out by providing them with supplies and information ranging from deteriorating weather conditions to the latest cricket scores! In return the crews are able to provide us with details of any suspicious activity in the area, which we can then act upon”.

    Amy ****son and the Royal Marine Corps of Drums on board HMS VICTORY. Picture: L(Phot) Gary Weatherston


    Internationally acclaimed Australian saxophonist Amy ****son swaps Sydney Harbour for Portsmouth harbour as she meets members of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines Band Service on board HMS Victory ahead of her performance at the South Coast Proms on the 5th and 6th of July 2013.

    HMS MONMOUTH's Operations room at action. Picture: L(Phot) Will Haigh


    Alarms sound, drills commence, monitors flash, switches are made; it seems a lot to think about all at once, but this is the constant tempo in the beating heart of HMS Monmouth; the Operations room. There are banks of displays each showing unique information which, to the untrained eye, is a jumble of letters, numbers and lines, but to the members of the Warfare department who call the Ops room home, it enables them to fuse information together to allow the Ship to operate effectively and is their way of life throughout a 7 month deployment.


    Warfare is the word in the Ship’s nerve centre, whether it’s Above Water Warfare, Under Water Warfare or Electronic Warfare The Ops room is vital to the Ship’s defence and safety, enabling the Monmouth to defend herself and others if required, whilst maintaining a watch over other vessels and aircraft in the Arabian Gulf. The Black Duke’s crew are well trained and even better practiced, having been in Defence watches for 4 months as they pass the half way stage in their 7 month deployment. What a deployment it has been; escorting merchant vessels, counter-piracy operations, protecting Mine-hunters and conducting hundreds of Approach and Assist Visits on vessels in the Gulf as the Ship provides stability to the region through their Maritime Security patrols and Wider Regional Engagement. The Ops room is the electronic eyes and ears of the Ship, extending her reach over the horizon and connecting her to the rest of the Task Force enabling her to contribute fully to Coalition operations in the region. The Operations Officer and Head of the Warfare Department Lt Cdr Ian Feasey commented “Having received specific training at FOST for this deployment the guys have worked hard to maintain operational capability, through regular training and a strong team spirit; they remain ready to react to whatever situation we may face in the remainder of our time on deployment”

    [*******#000000][FONT=Arial]HMS EDINBURGH endures storm force weather in the South Atlantic. Picture: L(Phot) Dan Rosenbaum[/FONT][/COLOR]
    [*******#000000][FONT=Arial]Pictured: Image shows the force of the weather on the F'ocsle from the bridge. 4 metre swells with a 4 metre wave height was recorded giving an effect of 8 metre waves between troughs. The Ship sustained no damage given the extreme conditions.

    [*******#222222][FONT=Verdana]HMS DRAGON’s day of gunnery Picture: L(Phot) Dave Jenkins[/FONT][/COLOR][/FONT][/COLOR]


    Today (26-03-2013) HMS DRAGON flexed her muscles firing every gun on-board The serial started with the ship deploying the killer tomato, a big red inflatable target and engaging it with the ships 4.5 inch gun, quickly followed by the 30mm canons, phalanx, Miniguns and General Purpose Machine Guns.


    Image shows the GPMG aimers shooting at night against a parachute flare

    Photex of HMS DRAGON sailing from Gibraltar 26-03-2013. Picture: L(Phot) Dave Jenkins


    HMS DRAGON sailing from Gibraltar to continue her seven month deployment East of Suez.

    Cdr Nick Borbone, Commanding Officer HMS EDINBURGH embrace his children on his return home Picture: L(Phot) Chris Mumby


    HMS Edinburgh – the Royal Navy’s last remaining Type 42 destroyer – returned to Portsmouth from her final deployment today (March 28).


    The 30-year-old warship has spent the last six months patrolling the Atlantic. She decommissions in June - having clocked up 793,345 miles - as the Type 42s make way for the new-generation Type 45s.


    Edinburgh left her home port of Portsmouth in September for routine operations across the North and South Atlantic in support of British interests worldwide.


    She carried out maritime security operations around the British South Atlantic Islands and supported counter narcotics efforts off West Africa.


    The deployment included many exotic goodwill port visits in South Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas.


    Edinburgh’s Commanding Officer, Commander Nick Borbone, said: “Returning home after a long period of operations is always a special event and, as the ship’s company is reunited with families and friends after six months away, they can reflect on a job well done and take some well deserved leave.

    The Junior Command Course (JCC) conducts their Final Exercise Land operation. Picture: L(Phot) Emz Nolan


    Pictured: The Junior Command Course (JCC) conduct their Final Exercise Land operation on the 18th March 2013 on a very cold Senny Bridge Training Area.

    The Junior Command Course (JCC) conducts their Final Exercise Land operation. Picture: L(Phot) Emz Nolan


    Pictured: The Junior Command Course (JCC) conduct their Final Exercise Land operation on the 18th March 2013 on a very cold Senny Bridge Training Area.

    HMS MONMOUTH's Operations room at action. Picture: L(Phot) Will Haigh


    Alarms sound, drills commence, monitors flash, switches are made; it seems a lot to think about all at once, but this is the constant tempo in the beating heart of HMS Monmouth; the Operations room. There are banks of displays each showing unique information which, to the untrained eye, is a jumble of letters, numbers and lines, but to the members of the Warfare department who call the Ops room home, it enables them to fuse information together to allow the Ship to operate effectively and is their way of life throughout a 7 month deployment.


    Warfare is the word in the Ship’s nerve centre, whether it’s Above Water Warfare, Under Water Warfare or Electronic Warfare The Ops room is vital to the Ship’s defence and safety, enabling the Monmouth to defend herself and others if required, whilst maintaining a watch over other vessels and aircraft in the Arabian Gulf. The Black Duke’s crew are well trained and even better practiced, having been in Defence watches for 4 months as they pass the half way stage in their 7 month deployment. What a deployment it has been; escorting merchant vessels, counter-piracy operations, protecting Mine-hunters and conducting hundreds of Approach and Assist Visits on vessels in the Gulf as the Ship provides stability to the region through their Maritime Security patrols and Wider Regional Engagement. The Ops room is the electronic eyes and ears of the Ship, extending her reach over the horizon and connecting her to the rest of the Task Force enabling her to contribute fully to Coalition operations in the region. The Operations Officer and Head of the Warfare Department Lt Cdr Ian Feasey commented “Having received specific training at FOST for this deployment the guys have worked hard to maintain operational capability, through regular training and a strong team spirit; they remain ready to react to whatever situation we may face in the remainder of our time on deployment”

  10. #5275
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    Royal Gibraltar Regiment mounting the guard @ Buck House.











    Royal Yeomanry going for some cheesy phots on their new WMIK2's



    Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Jerusalem 1940:




  11. #5276
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    A&SH. Amate of mine used to be a part of this regt. An absolute legend

    As for the 1940's images... Can't help thinking of the "Devils in Skirts"
    Last edited by Arfah; 04-11-2013 at 09:40 AM.

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    Something off with that WMIK photo, besides it being labeled 'WMIK 2' - New wheel rims, GMG + Clansman?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Messiah UKF View Post
    Something off with that WMIK photo, besides it being labeled 'WMIK 2' - New wheel rims, GMG + Clansman?
    Never take a publicity photograph seriously. The Union Flag, that's hardly tacti-kool

  14. #5279
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arfah View Post
    Never take a publicity photograph seriously. The Union Flag, that's hardly tacti-kool
    That I can take with a pinch of salt, but the rest just got my spidey senses tingling

  15. #5280
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    Quote Originally Posted by Messiah UKF View Post
    That I can take with a pinch of salt, but the rest just got my spidey senses tingling

    Nice'n'shiny headlamps...

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