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Thread: World War II Rangers

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    Default World War II Rangers

    i searched and couldn't find a thread for just WWII Ranger photos...so i decided to make one...heres some that i found


    ^2nd Rangers somewhere in Normandy i believe...maybe Pointe Du Hoc?


    ^Rangers at Pointe Du Hoc..on the left it looks like stretchers with wounded men


    ^6th Ranger Bn in the phillipines...maybe after the raid at cabanatuan?


    ^Rangers on Pointe Du Hoc


    ^These are soldiers fighting at Brest, the site i got it from said they were Rangers but i don't know if they are or not for sure. Anyone know?

    the following flicks are of Merrill's Marauders. The 5307th Composite Group which the modern 75th Ranger Rgt descends from. So i think its appropriate to include them in the thread.























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    ^A group of United States Rangers scramble up a hillside during a battle in Italy in September of 1943.

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    [SIZE=2]^When asked why he had joined the Rangers, famous volunteer commando-type outfit, Pvt. Thomas R. Nabors, Jr., of Nashville, Tennessee, replied, "After ten months in the Army I still hadn't seen action, so I thought I'd like the Rangers - and I do. " This is a typical reason given by the members of the Rangers who always spearhead the invasion forces.[/SIZE]

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    Senior Member AroundTheCorner's Avatar
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    cool pic's. thank's alot

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    Senior Member Dave76's Avatar
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    E Company, 5th Ranger Battalion


    2nd Ranger Battalion, Pointe du Hoc

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    Great thread, very nice photos! Thanks a lot!

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    Could you find any photos of the Rangers training prior to D-Day? Can anyone remember what Bn was founded in Northern Ireland?

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    yeh good pics, good thread, thanks mate

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    Senior Member JJHH's Avatar
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    ca. August, 1942, Members of a U.S. Ranger Battalion in maneuvers with British commandos somewhere in England, go through battle maneuvers in which live ammunition is used to add realism.




    Ranger training Scotland







    ORIGINAL CAPTION: U.S. Rangers round up enemy equipment at El Guettar. At left is the PzKw Mark II, smallest and oldest German tank. Once it was a Panzer standby, adding speed and punch to the rapid invasion of Poland and the Low Countries and carrying Nazi infantry in swift pursuit of a disorganized enemy. Now obsolescent, its Mark II chassis has been used to mount several SP guns. At the right is Nazi 8-wheeled armored car.




    U.S. Army Rangers in a landing craft, before the Normandy invasion, 1944




    Army Rangers resting in Pointe du Hoc area, Omaha Beach




    February 13, 1945, three men who led U.S. Rangers on Cabanatuan prison camp on Luzon, P.I. Left to right: Captain Robert W. Prince, commanding officer of Rangers; Lt. Col. Henry Mucci and Sgt. Theodore R. Richardson.





    GREAT site with photos of 5th Ranger Batalion:
    http://www.5thrib.com/originalphotos.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelle H. View Post









    GREAT site with photos of 5th Ranger Batalion:
    http://www.5thrib.com/originalphotos.htm
    thanks for the site...i guess the Ranger on the far left was killed on D-Day...was that picture taken on D-Day before they went off to hit the beaches?

    the 5th Rangers landed on Omaha i think

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    ^Ranger in Italy with Mt Vesuvius in the background...you can see his Ranger scroll on his arm


    ^artists depiction of the battle of Cisterna

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    ^Rangers securing Arzew Harbor


    ^Rangers speed marching through the tunisian hills


    ^lol @ this ****...[FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]Stern captures the human side of combat by snapping a picture of Col. Darby relieving himself in Tunisia.


    ^[/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]Ranger infantry and supporting tanks assault the 10th Panzer Divsion at El-Guettar. Stern was wounded shortly after taking this photo, 3/43.


    ^[/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]"Ranger" hitting the Licata Beachhead.


    ^Ranger rifle squad in action on sicily


    ^
    [/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]Ranger Warren Evans, Topkick of Easy Co., lights up with a Commando instructor during a training break at the Commando Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scottland, July 1942

    i got all these from this site...i just posted up the ones that caught my eye...check it out

    http://www.thedropzone.org/scrapbook/stern6.html
    [/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]
    [/SIZE][/FONT]

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    ^caption on this one said "Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division and the US Army Rangers dead following the Dieppe Raid"

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    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4]hill 400 in the hurtgen forest. A little something about the battle below the pic


    The 2nd Ranger Battalion was brought in. It had fought on Omaha Beach on D-Day and fought costly battles in Normandy and although it had taken 100 percent casualties, the core of the force that Lt. Col. James E. Rudder had led ashore on June 6 was still there. The battalion was assigned to the 28th Division in the Hürtgen and moved into the line. It immediately took casualties from mines and artillery, then the men sat in foxholes and took a pounding.
    [/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] On December 6, orders were given to attack [*******#ff0000]Hill 400[/COLOR] (named after its height in meters). It was on the eastern edge of the forest and therefore the ultimate objective of the campaign. The hills provided excellent observation as the highest point in an area of mixed farmland and forest around it. The Germans had utilized it so effectively that neither GIs nor vehicles moved during the day as the slightest movement around it would bring down 88's and mortars. The First Army had thrown four divisions at Hill 400 but after every attempt, the Germans were able to hold it. More blood would be needed. [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] Ranger companies A, B, C, D, E and F moved to the base of the hill under cover of darkness ready with fixed bayonets to charge at first light. Sgt. Bill Petty, who had distinguished himself on D-Day, recalled that "tension was building up to the explosion point." At first light, he shouted, "Let's go get the bastards!," and firing from the hip, he led the Rangers as they charged. Sgt. Bud Potratz remembered hollering "Hi ho, Silver!" It was worse than D-Day but the Rangers had caught the Germans by surprise and although the Germans were good that day, they were not good enough! [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] When Sgt. Petty reached the top of the hill, he "found a situation of turmoil." With another Ranger (named Anderson), he approached the main bunker and heard Germans inside. They pushed open the door and tossed in two grenades. Just as they were ready to rush in and spray the room with their BAR, a shell exploded a few feet away -- the Germans were firing back on their own positions. The explosion blew Anderson into Petty's arms. Anderson was dead, killed instantly by a big piece of shrapnel in his heart. [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] Sgt. Petty had the unusual and very sad experience of having another Ranger named Anderson (brother of the Anderson who had just died in his arms) get hit by German fire and had him die in his arms within the hour. The Germans were not going to give up the hill no matter what the cost. By 9:30, the first of five counterattacks that day began. They used machine guns, burp guns, rifles, and three potato masher grenades. Hand-to-hand fights developed on top of the hill often with bayonets. [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4][*******#ff0000] German Field Marshal Model[/COLOR]offered Iron Crosses and two weeks' leave to any of his men who could retake the hill. The Germans threw in everything they had. On the American side, Ranger Lt. Lomell remembered, "we were outnumbered ten to one. We had no protection, continuous tons of shrapnel falling upon us, hundreds of rounds coming in." At one point, Lt. Lomell saw his platoon sergeant, Ed Secor, "out of ammo and unarmed, seize two machine pistols from wounded Germans and in desperation charged a large German patrol, firing and screaming at them. His few remaining men rallied to the cause and together they drove the Germans back down the hill." [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] Lomell was a legend among the Rangers for what he did on D-Day, but in 1995 he commented, "June 6, 1944 was not my longest day. December 7th, 1944 was my longest and most miserable day on earth during my past 75 years." [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] As Ranger numbers dwindled and ammunition began to run out, American artillery saved the day. During the night, ammo bearers got to the top of the hill and brought down the wounded on litters. Lt. Lomell was among the wounded and hence lived to tell the tale. The combined strength of the three companies left on top of the hill was five officers and eighty-six men. [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial Narrow][SIZE=4] Just after daylight, the Germans shelled the hill with such intensity that one explosion would cover the sound of the next approaching shell. But when the Germans attacked the hill with infantry, a combination of artillery and small arms fire of the rangers drove them back. Late on December 8, an infantry regiment and tank destroyer battalion relieved the surviving Rangers. The Rangers had suffered 90 percent casualties and once again would have to be replenished with very few of the originals alive to be part of the new Ranger Battalion.

    http://bellsouthpwp2.net/e/a/ea_herr...genForest.html[/SIZE][/FONT]

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    The real O.G.'s-"Rangers lead the way!"

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