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Thread: U.S. & Soviet Soldiers in WWII

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    Member SpeedyHedgehog's Avatar
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    Default U.S. & Soviet Soldiers in WWII

    [FONT=Verdana]I don't know if this kind of thread has been done, and the friggin' search function has given me a massive headache. So here goes. In the interest of U.S.-Russian relations here are some pictures of American and Soviet military together during (mostly at the end of) World War II:[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Shooting pool in Alaska during Lend-Lease operations.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Piryati Air Base near Kiev after shuttle bombing mission September 18, 1944. The American airman is Warren Peglar.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Russian officers chat with COL Barton, CO of 483d Bomb Group, and COL Rice of 2d BG, at Mirgorod. Girl in the center is an interpreter.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Russian-American volleyball, Eastern Command HQ at Poltava. (General Ira Eaker is 5th from the right at bottom)[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]LT Vorokev of the Soviet Air Force inspects B-17 tail gunner's position.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]YAK-4 Bomber at Poltava. The GI is from the 348th BS, 99th BG.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]LT Robertson & Russian LT Sylvashko along the Elbe River, April 25, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Russian soldiers greet 82d airborne Division soldiers, Grabow, Germany, May 3, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]GI, Russian and Brit Torgau, Germany, April 26, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Pair of Russian soldiers exchanging insignia with an American Captain, Germany?[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]April 27, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Banks of the Elbe, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]No caption.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Torgau on the Elbe.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Russian and American soldiers, Germany.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]American soldier meeting female Russian officer, Seoul, Korea, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Russian and American soldiers, Korea, October, 1945.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Verdana]Two French soldiers, one American, one British, one Russian in Vienna, 1945. (If you ask me it looks like they're all hitting on that Russian soldier, but I may be wrong )[/FONT]

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    Nice pics, thank you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyHedgehog View Post
    [FONT=Verdana][/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]YAK-4 Bomber at Poltava. The GI is from the 348th BS, 99th BG.[/FONT]
    It's Pe-2, probably 205 series.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TakeIt View Post
    It's Pe-2, probably 205 series.
    You're probably right. I took that straight from the caption on the website where I found the photo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyHedgehog View Post
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    The few short weeks/months after the end of WW 2 must have been very happy times among the Allied soldiers meeting eachother.

    BTW-Didn't the two soldiers above meet again 50 years or more after this photo was taken?

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    U.S. and Soviet soldiers somewhere in Alaska during Lend-Lease operations.

    I believe this is the same female Soviet Officer in Korea as one of the pictures in my first post.

    Two Soviet pilots and an American LT in front of a Russian P-39 (in Poltava?). I always liked the P-39. The Soviets probably put it to better use than the U.S. did.

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    Not exactly "together", but still


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    I always liked the P-39. The Soviets probably put it to better use than the U.S. did.
    Lots of Soviet pilots liked it because it had a lot of guns. Rookie pilots tend to like firepower, while pilots with more experience prefer fewer better guns. Problem is that if your rookies don't last very long you don't get so many veterans.
    Soviets preferred nose mounted guns and guns that fired through the propeller hub.

    Reminds me of the memoirs of a British soldier who came upon a German airfield. Apparently the German officer in command approached him and said the aircraft were armed but needed fuel but they were ready to take off once they were fuelled to take on the Soviets. The Brit just took them all to a holding area so they could be taken to a prisoner of war camp.

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    Senior Member TakeIt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyHedgehog View Post

    Two Soviet pilots and an American LT in front of a Russian P-39 (in Poltava?).
    Poltava indeed, plane number is 48. Uncropped though resized foto:

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    Banned user HorrigEn's Avatar
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    great photos! its sad knowing how the history went. well..**** happens.
    heres my small contribution:
















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    Quote Originally Posted by GazB View Post
    Reminds me of the memoirs of a British soldier who came upon a German airfield. Apparently the German officer in command approached him and said the aircraft were armed but needed fuel but they were ready to take off once they were fuelled to take on the Soviets. The Brit just took them all to a holding area so they could be taken to a prisoner of war camp.
    I dont get it? Did the German officer think the brits were going to use the aircraft against the Soviets? Why? :S

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    He expected Germans to "ally" with the west Allies to fight the Bolsheviks. After all, the 2nd WW was only a stepping stone towards the defining conflict of the last century, West vs. East.

    Of course a huge stepping stone, but with actually relatively little lasting political effects in the grand scheme of things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vandervahn View Post
    He expected Germans to "ally" with the west Allies to fight the Bolsheviks. After all, the 2nd WW was only a stepping stone towards the defining conflict of the last century, West vs. East.

    Of course a huge stepping stone, but with actually relatively little lasting political effects in the grand scheme of things.
    True. I remember hearing that the German command allocated as many combat formations as possible to the Eastern Front once it became evident that they were on their way out. The idea was to hold the Soviet forces back as long and as faraway as possible, whilst letting the Western Allies get as far into Germany as possible. That would minimise the amount of Germany under Sov control once the war ended - they knew they had a lot more to fear from the USSR than from us.

    I also heard that refugees from the East would head West as fast as possible in the last days, in the hope of coming under British/American/French/Canadian occupation rather than Soviet. Same with surrendering soldiers, being taken prisoner by the Soviet Army would not have been an enticing thought.

    Still, this thread is about cooperation of the Western Allies and Soviet Union, not the stand-off that followed. For one I'm glad the Soviets did what they did up until 1945. The great majority of Germans who saw action in WWII did so on the Eastern Front and the casualties the Sovs took were immense compared to our own. We simply could not have won without them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyHedgehog View Post
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    First Amerikan Army

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