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Thread: NatGeo: Hitler's stealth fighter (Ho 229)

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    Senior Member jklv's Avatar
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    Default NatGeo: Hitler's stealth fighter (Ho 229)


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    Senior Member Fisker's Avatar
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    Pretty interesting!

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    Member SUDZ23's Avatar
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    Its almost scary to think just how advanced some of there technology was towards the end of the war.

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    Senior Member kalerab's Avatar
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    If this was top secret project of nazi Germany in 1945 I canīt even imagine what projects have countries like USA, Russia or China in store now.

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    I canīt even imagine what projects have countries like USA, Russia or China in store now.
    Sharks with lasers on their heads

    Nice vids! thanks for posting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SUDZ23 View Post
    Its almost scary to think just how advanced some of there technology was towards the end of the war.
    It was made from wood, not very advanced really.

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    Senior Member Connaught Ranger's Avatar
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    The British Mosquito bomber was mainly made from wood and canvas and gave sterling service in WW2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Connaught Ranger View Post
    The British Mosquito bomber was mainly made from wood and canvas and gave sterling service in WW2.
    ...as was the Hurricane, and some Russian aircraft. Admittedly it was 'doped' wood used in the Ho 229, thus its properties were much better than some steels of the time.
    As wood was used extensively around the 1940's (and long before) there was a great deal of skilled 'chippies' who could work wood. Funnily enough, many of the skills they had, the technologies and formulas that they applied to the wood are now lost to us. The expertise died with them.

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    Senior Member Lazy Lob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Connaught Ranger View Post
    The British Mosquito bomber was mainly made from wood and canvas and gave sterling service in WW2.
    The Mosquito had ply with a balsa core is certain areas. Similar to modern honeycomb ali sheeted skins. I maintained G-MOSI and remember re-pannelling the self sealing fuel tanks with the ply panels and covering the edges with canvas and dope. It had metal braided wires around the airframe to conduct all static build up to the tail cone. Stunning aircraft.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eztyga View Post
    ...as was the Hurricane, and some Russian aircraft. Admittedly it was 'doped' wood used in the Ho 229, thus its properties were much better than some steels of the time.
    As wood was used extensively around the 1940's (and long before) there was a great deal of skilled 'chippies' who could work wood. Funnily enough, many of the skills they had, the technologies and formulas that they applied to the wood are now lost to us. The expertise died with them.
    The Hurricane had an internal metal fuselage structure which supported the main loads.

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    Senior Member Ravage's Avatar
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    Thankis for the links, gonna watch it now.

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    Senior Member Bushranger's Avatar
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    Really interesting vids, the Germans made some pretty innovative stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushranger View Post
    Really interesting vids, the Germans made some pretty innovative stuff.
    It was, and still is, the most intensive R & D period of any country in the world. Never since has there been such advances in such a short time in aeronautics.

    The Germans had one of the most advanced wind tunnels of the time too. The French got that as post-war reparations.

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    Krachslhuaba He219's Avatar
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    Erwin Ziller in Dräger pressure suit for Ho-IX/Go-229
    You've all heard of the LAR V / MK25 ..
    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLob View Post
    The Hurricane had an internal metal fuselage structure which supported the main loads.
    So was the Ho229, a tubular steel superstructure incorporating landing gear, turbojet nacelles and covered by composite plywood flight surfaces ..
    Quote Originally Posted by Eztyga View Post
    It was made from wood, not very advanced really.
    Plywood specifically, bonded with a glue that incorporated radar-absorbing carbon dust.


    The canopy was made of Plexiglas, an earlier German invention, used on the Me163 amongst others.


    Here is a link to an earlier thread in the [*******DarkRed]History section[/COLOR] regarding this show:
    Nat. Geo. show on German Horten 229 ( 1 2 3 4)

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    Member Warlock762's Avatar
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    Link saved, have to watch it later, my boss & customer is sitting 2 meters away

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    Senior Member Connaught Ranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eztyga View Post
    ...as was the Hurricane, and some Russian aircraft. Admittedly it was 'doped' wood used in the Ho 229, thus its properties were much better than some steels of the time.
    As wood was used extensively around the 1940's (and long before) there was a great deal of skilled 'chippies' who could work wood. Funnily enough, many of the skills they had, the technologies and formulas that they applied to the wood are now lost to us. The expertise died with them.
    I dont think so . . . . .from wiki:-
    It had a Warren girder-type fuselage of high-tensile steel tubes, over which sat frames and longerons that carried the doped linen covering. An advantage conferred by the steel-tube structure was that cannon shells could pass right through the wood and fabric covering without exploding. Even if one of the steel tubes were damaged the repair work required was relatively simple and could be done by the groundcrew at the airfield. An all metal structure damaged by an exploding cannon shell required more specialised equipment to repair.[4] The old-fashioned structure also permitted the assembly of Hurricanes with relatively basic equipment under field conditions. Crated Hurricanes were assembled in West Africa and flown across the Sahara to the Middle East theatre, and to save space, some Royal Navy aircraft carriers carried their reserve Sea Hurricanes dismantled into their major assemblies, which were slung up on the hangar bulkheads and deckhead for reassembly when needed. Initially, the wing structure consisted of two steel spars, and was also fabric-covered. "Several fabric-wing Hurricanes were still in service during the Battle of Britain, although a good number had had their wings replaced during servicing or after repair. Changing the wings only required three hours' work per aircraft."[5] An all-metal, stressed-skin wing of duraluminium (a DERD specification similar to AA2024) was introduced in April 1939 and was used for all of the later marks.[2] "The metal skinned wings allowed a diving speed that was 80mph (129 km/h) higher than the fabric-covered ones. They were very different in construction but were interchangeable with the fabric-covered wings, and one trials Hurricane, L1877, was even flown with a fabric-covered port wing and metal-covered starboard wing. The great advantage of the metal-covered wings over the fabric ones was that the metal ones could carry far greater stress loads without needing so much structure beneath."[5] In contrast, the contemporary Spitfire used all-metal monocoque construction and was thus both lighter and stronger, though less tolerant to bullet damage. With its ease of maintenance, widely set landing gear and benign flying characteristics, the Hurricane remained in use in theatres of operations where reliability, easy handling and a stable gun platform were more important than performance, typically in roles like ground attack.
    Connaught Ranger.

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