Thread: Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers - News and Discussion

  1. #1816
    Senior Member cockneyjock1974's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonas View Post
    http://www.navytimes.com/...-tailhook-issues-011712/

    An update on tailhook problem from Lockheed-Martin.
    Cheers Jonas that's a relief actually.

    Okay folks despite some confusion yesterday it looks like the port side sponson didn't get installed. Now this thing was connected to Goliath for 3 days obviously ready to go. Anybody got any ideas why it was stopped?

  2. #1817
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    out of curiosity what sponson is ready to be lifted

  3. #1818
    Member jonodavies12's Avatar
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    Lockheed Martin has traced the Navy F-35C Joint Strike Fighter’s troubles with catching a carrier’s arresting gear wires to the tailhook design.
    Oh really? Thats where it was! :L I sense another caption coming up...

    'It's alright Pete, it wasn't the shape of the nosecone after all.'

    But yeah, good news it'll be fixed in a relatively short timeframe. My bet is you won't see this reported by our doom-mongering media, they don't report good news silly.

  4. #1819
    Member USS Alabama's Avatar
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    It's not a bad design, my understanding is that its mainly designed for coastal defence in US waters originally? They seem like fairly capable ships although time will tell how effective they are. What I don't get is how the hell they developed those ships without a decent cathodic protection system, I mean, this is a fairly basic ship design principle and the cost of damage to the propulsion systems due to this really can't be pretty!
    As CJ pointed out, it's the British Triton design that was selected along with the design for the Independence - the other LCS for production. It would make a fine coastal defense (or even Coast Guard interdiction vessel), but with the cancellation of the DDG1000 program after 3 ships, a large chunk of the envisioned operational doctrine is shot. By itself, as I expressed, it makes a fine anti-piracy and "show the flag" vessel for the 3rd world, however, I'll take a line from my days with the US Army's Light Infantry - "Too light to fight, too dumb to run"!

    JMHO

    Best!

  5. #1820
    Senior Member cockneyjock1974's Avatar
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    Hi Alabama just one wee correction, I said we gave u the design for the Triton! We didn't the US Dod paid handsomely for it

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    Good job you do live in Alabama,if you were in the UK now you would be on the wanted list by every PC organisation in the country.

    Heheh,

    I DO agree with you Jonas about PC running amuck, however, that quote was a historic reference to the days when the European colonial powers and the U.S. used to station their elderly, ineffective, and just plain weird vessels in out of the way corners of the world to show presence and "overawe the Wogs". Good case in point - China Station at Shanghai and the US Asiatic Fleet pre WW2 - The last armored cruiser left in the USN - the ex USS New York (a Spanish War veteran)/ USS Rochester - spent its last years there and it was still actually in the Philippines when the Japanese invaded where it was scuttled and is dived on to this day.

    http://www.pacificwrecks.com/ships/usn/rochester.html

    That's why I have my opinion of these new LCS - I believe they are a modern version of that old naval practice and like the Cyclone Class Patrol Gunboats the USN built a few years ago, they'll eventually be eased out for something more effective (the USN sent them to the Coast Guard).

    http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_di...&tid=2000&ct=4


    Sorry for any misunderstanding!

    Best

  7. #1822
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    Hey CJ!

    TOO BAD!!!!! Hah!

    (Just Kidding)

    Best and Keep up the fine work!

    Bama

  8. #1823
    Senior Member cockneyjock1974's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by USS Alabama View Post
    Hey CJ!

    TOO BAD!!!!! Hah!

    (Just Kidding)

    Best and Keep up the fine work!

    Bama
    Cheers man, question for you if i may, see the carrier video I posted the other day,I've seen all ten episodes and what struck me was the large amount of honking attitude problems the younger crew had, for example basically not wanting to be on ship. Is this typical of the USN?

    CJ

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    Cheers man, question for you if i may, see the carrier video I posted the other day,I've seen all ten episodes and what struck me was the large amount of honking attitude problems the younger crew had, for example basically not wanting to be on ship. Is this typical of the USN?
    Some ships are happier than others, however, considering the large number of crew the CVs have, I don't think it's too hard to find bellyachers... Particularly after a great deal of time out. Having said that, the US Military is drawn from the general population and we get a cut of every segment. Many kids are in the military because they couldn't get a civilian job and were attracted by the benefits and education programs. Many don't need to be there and probably won't be selected for re-enlistment if they apply.

    We're afflicted with the general decline in standards and entitlement attitude that everyone else is, however, due to the number of people applying for the Navy and Air Force these days, we can treat first enlistments as a trial run and be selective about our career force. The Marines only want to retain the top 10% of their first term force - they are VERY picky about it. The Army is less so, but with the cutbacks, I'm sure they will tighten up.

    Very sad. The military is one of the last places left in the US where someone with nothing but a good attitude and a desire to succeed can rise on their own merits to elevated heights... However, I also think that the film-makers were also looking for these guys and gals and if you look, you'll find. Hollywood has a very ambivalent relationship with the military for the most part. I was fortunate to be in a very selective career field and I didn't have to see much of that luckily and I wouldn't have tolerated it in my squadron..

    Best!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonas View Post
    http://www.navytimes.com/...-tailhook-issues-011712/

    An update on tailhook problem from Lockheed-Martin.
    As always the press makeing mountains out of mole hills !

    Could it be to cold for the lift up there,with the chill factor and the minus temperatures? maybe the were being cautious.

  11. #1826

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    Quote Originally Posted by USS Alabama View Post
    Some ships are happier than others, however, considering the large number of crew the CVs have, I don't think it's too hard to find bellyachers...
    To be fair, I thought the majority of the crew featured in the programme came across very well. But as you say, in a 'small town' of 5,000+ people you will always find some who are bellyachers! I wasn't too impressed by those that seemed to lack an understanding of what the Nimitz was doing on it's cruise and why, but I was impressed with their desire to develop themselves and the dedication to their jobs in the navy.

    Overall, it is a good insight into some of the workings of a deployed carrier, and I've enjoyed watching all of the episodes! Also, it reminded me to be grateful that the RN is receiving so much of the USN's expertise of operating strike carriers - long may our alliance continue to be mutually beneficial to both nations!!

    Go Navy!

  12. #1827
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    I
    wasn't too impressed by those that seemed to lack an understanding of what the Nimitz was doing on it's cruise and why
    Case of the blinders I think, such a large operation and when you have such a small part of it, you tend to see only the micro v the macro view. Also, with the advent of instantaneous communications, email, and Wikileaks etc, I'll bet the brass also deliberately restricts the amount of information they put out.

    Not like the old days when the crew couldn't communicate like they can today. All many of the junior ranks know is that they are on a deployment with tentative port calls and they probably get the rest of the long range picture through the cable news onboard and their family and friends!

    I certainly hope we shall continue our friendship and cooperation - I believe in the years to come, this will be vital for both our nations.

    Here's a peek at a past example of that;


    http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/ships/victorious.html

    HMS Victorious renamed USS Robin and seconded to the USN's Pacific Fleet during some grim times in that war.
    Best

  13. #1828
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    Thanks for the insight Alabama, yes that's what struck me as well I like the fact that you can get qualifications in the US military. It's kind of like a double incentive really. I would also like to 2nd Pymes by saying thank you to your country for helping us get back to where we should be, it's a discrace that we let our capabilities go like that, especially when we invented the modern carrier. However we were skint in the 70's right enough but still no excuse.

    Mr Pymes I see your posting on WAFF, that forum used to be brilliant but it's been ruined by the lack of factual stuff on it, that and most of the posters are in their teens.

    @ serge I was thinking that as well but they managed to move the crane back, so can't see it being the cold. I had a good look at it today and still nothing happening .

  14. #1829
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    Quote Originally Posted by USS Alabama View Post
    I

    Case of the blinders I think, such a large operation and when you have such a small part of it, you tend to see only the micro v the macro view. Also, with the advent of instantaneous communications, email, and Wikileaks etc, I'll bet the brass also deliberately restricts the amount of information they put out.

    Not like the old days when the crew couldn't communicate like they can today. All many of the junior ranks know is that they are on a deployment with tentative port calls and they probably get the rest of the long range picture through the cable news onboard and their family and friends!

    I certainly hope we shall continue our friendship and cooperation - I believe in the years to come, this will be vital for both our nations.

    Here's a peek at a past example of that;


    http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/ships/victorious.html

    HMS Victorious renamed USS Robin and seconded to the USN's Pacific Fleet during some grim times in that war.
    Best
    Didn't know about the Victorious being lent to the USN like that, only furthers how impressed I am with the sheer amount of activity the British Fleet got up to across the entire world during the war.

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