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Thread: Prussia - The Original name for Germany ?

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    the Ralph Wiggum of Mp.net. timetraveller's Avatar
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    Default Prussia - The Original name for Germany ?

    Why did Prussia change it's name to Germany and in what year was it ?

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    Member Alpha-17's Avatar
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    Prussia was just one nation in what we now consider to be Germany. For years there were several independent nations, with Prussia as the most powerful. They weren't united until the late 19th century. Look it up on wiki for the exact date.

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    Senior Member Johnny_H02's Avatar
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    Pretty sure it was 1870 when Germany unified.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha-17 View Post
    with Prussia as the most powerful
    *grabs popcorn and waits until an Austrian finds this thread*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_dualism

    @ Threadstarter who appears to know next to nothing about European History: Here you go.

    First this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire from the middle ages until this short French guy came along and turned Europe upside-down...

    then this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Confederation and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_German_Confederation during 19th century...

    until Bismarck came along and fought a war with France after which we ended up with this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Empire and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austria-Hungary

    ...which was done away with after our defeat in World War 1. Then Weimar Republic which lasted till some guy named Hitler appeared on the scene. Maybe you´ve heard of him.

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_H View Post
    Pretty sure it was 1870 when Germany unified.
    Almost. 1871.

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    Banned user Kitsune's Avatar
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    After the Napoleonic Wars, the Austrian led German Confederation had been established, which had been led by Austria. (See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Confederation)


    In 1866, there was a war between Prussia and Austria, which Prussia won. (See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austro-Prussian_War).

    After it, the Kingdom of Prussia formed the North German Confederation in 1867. (See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_German_Confederation)


    Then, in the Summer of 1870, there was yet another war, this time between France and a Prussian led German coalition, which Prussia won again. (See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Prussian_War)

    Just a few weeks before it ended, on January 18th 1871, the new nation of Germany was declared and formed out of the North German Confederation. The main difference was that this new state now also included Southern German states (like Bavaria and Swabia) which were allied with Prussia in this war. Austria did not join however. Otherwise, the differences were not so great, mostly the constitution of the North German Confederation was adopted for the new state, thus, the resulting German nation was essentially a rather lose kind of federated state.

    The most spectacular difference was that the King of Prussia also added "Deutscher Kaiser" ("German Emperor") to his titles since especially Bismarck saw this as giving additional weight among the various Kings in Germany (Bavaria for example was a Kingdom). This was actually a massively discussed step, although the actual powers in Germany granted to Wilhelm I were essentially the ones of a president, and largely those the constitution of the North German Confederation had given him over that state. The title was carefully worded and explicitely not "Kaiser von Deutschland" ("Emperor of Germany") to prevent that the Austrians, or even the German Swiss or Bavarians felt offended, since until that time the word "Germany" had always been used in the ethnical sense.

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    Prussia practically ceased to exist as a political entity when Hitler took power in Germany in 1933 and gained total legaslative power with his 'Ermächtigungsgesetze', although the formal dissolution of Prussia would not come until 1947 when the allied control council divided its territory into smaller part states.

    Prussia has nothing to do with Nazi Germany. As a matter of fact Prussia especially under the rule of the King 'Frederick the Great' is renowned for its core values of tolerance, sense of justice, modesty and fear of god - all summed up in Prussias motto of "Suum cuique").

    Prussia doesn't exist politically anymore, but certain values like punctuality, obedience, straightforwardness, dilligence, conscientiousness, austerity, sense of order are still typical German charasteristics originating from the times when Prussia ruled the German states.

    Long live Prussia.

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    I find the question offending. Prussians are not the whole of the Volk.



    [*******white]***** Prussia... Bayern rules!!!![/COLOR]

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    Quote Originally Posted by AroundTheCorner View Post
    I find the question offending. Prussians are not the whole of the Volk.



    [*******white]***** Prussia... Bayern rules!!!![COLOR] <=== smart a*s
    Haha, all German states were under Prussian rule and formed the entity called 'German Reich' and later 'Weimarer Republic'. German states like your beloved Bavaria were and still are 'Free States' with certain very very limited autonomies.

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    Still waiting for Russia to change the name of Kaliningrad Oblast' to 'Vostochnaya Prussiya.'

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    Before Prussia there was the Holy Roman Empire.

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    Senior Member Jippo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timetraveller View Post
    Why did Prussia change it's name to Germany and in what year was it ?
    When did Prussia change its name to Deutschland? (<- only joking)

    History of the names is interesting. Germany was called Germany by foreigners already 2000 years ago.

    Funny thing about Finnish language is that whole Germany is still called Saksa after the Saxon tribes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vityaz View Post
    Still waiting for Russia to change the name of Kaliningrad Oblast' to 'Vostochnaya Prussiya.'
    Altough the name Leningrad has changed to St. Peterburg the Oblast is still named Leningradskaya.
    But why not?


    Haha, all German states were under Prussian rule and formed the entity called 'German Reich' and later 'Weimarer Republic'. German states like your beloved Bavaria were and still are 'Free States' with certain very very limited autonomies.
    Prussia and Austria were the dominating states after the napoleonic wars. But Austria didn't want to give up Hungary, Slovenia and Croatia as well as it's emperor his crown.
    So the result has been the Kleindeutsche Lösung (Small-German solution) in 1871 which means a reunification without Austria.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jippo View Post
    When did Prussia change its name to Deutschland? (<- only joking)

    History of the names is interesting. Germany was called Germany by foreigners already 2000 years ago.

    Funny thing about Finnish language is that whole Germany is still called Saksa after the Saxon tribes.
    The name Deutsch (earlier Teutsch) is from the Teuton tribe. Alemania is from the Alemanian tribe.
    Just German (Ger=spear and man=man) is a neutral name given by the Romans.

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    A Latin professor told us once that similar to Native American tribal names translating to "the people" "Teutsch" was from the Latin root "totus" meaning "everyone" and "Alemani" was from the old German "alle mannen" (all people). I've always found that interesting.

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