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Thread: The United States Marine Corps

  1. #376
    Member len173's Avatar
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    Why is it still so common to see Marines carrying the M16 with the full stock (C7A1 in Canada)? How come they have not phased it out for a collapsible stock? We still use the C7A1 here as well, but only in the reserves as far as I know.

  2. #377
    Senior Member AroundTheCorner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by len173 View Post
    Why is it still so common to see Marines carrying the M16 with the full stock (C7A1 in Canada)? How come they have not phased it out for a collapsible stock? We still use the C7A1 here as well, but only in the reserves as far as I know.
    The DOD had (?) plans to replace the stock of the M16 with an M4 stock, but they had some problems with the rings (?).

  3. #378
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    The DOD had (?) plans to replace the stock of the M16 with an M4 stock, but they had some problems with the rings (?).
    Understood. That must have been a ***** to work with in built up areas.

  4. #379
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default USMC Photos

    [FONT=Verdana]Target Acquisition Helps Artillery in Battle [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]CAMP FUJI, Japan They're few, they're silent and they can't be detected, but they can track a 60mm mortar round from several miles away.

    More than 25 Marines from target acquisition platoon, 12th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, combed the ranges of the North Fuji Manoeuvre Area Nov. 2-10, 2009, to practice their skills in locating enemy indirect firing positions and collecting weather information during Artillery Relocation Training Exercise 09-03.

    Of the two sections, radar and sensors, the radar section uses state-of-the-art technology to locate and track indirect fires from enemy positions and determine where the shots originate. In turn, acquired target locations are forwarded to an artillery unit's fire direction centre to calculate how to eliminate the threat, according to Chief Warrant Officer 2 John Crites, officer-in-charge of the platoon.

    "If we tell you where the enemy shot from, you can bet that's where they're going to be," said Crites who hails from Chicago, Ill.

    In reference to artillery, the 'King of Battle,' may be the heavy weights in the fight, but without the information acquired by the target acquisition platoon and the forward observers, the guns would be at a stand still, according to Crites.

    The tools the radar section uses for success includes a counter battery radar, a lightweight counter mortar radar and a ground counter fire system that analyzes acoustic sound to locate enemy positions.

    During the exercise, the Marines performed tactical day and night movement that included setting up and tearing down their equipment within minutes. In addition, the Marines were careful in selecting each site by considering the radars' ability to observe the battle space, and also local security capabilities such as entry and exit routes and defensive firing positions, Crites added.

    Within the platoon, the meteorological team plays an important role in the battlefield as well. One of the ways these Marines collect meteorological data is by using the piloted balloon method.

    According to Cpl. Mark Castro, a meteorological Marine with the regiment, the Marines monitor the ascent of a helium-filled balloon at various time intervals. As the balloon changes direction, the team determines the wind's speed and direction. The Marines manually track the balloon with an electronic magnetic meteorological theodolite, a telescope used for measuring horizontal and vertical angles, with the observed azimuth and elevation angles recorded at certain time intervals. Additionally, the Marines factor in predetermined surface temperature and atmospheric pressure from Department of Defence chart tables of the region.

    For the gun line, weather data plays an important role in firing accuracy. It determines how the battery will send rounds down range, according to Castro.

    According to Col. Keil Gentry the commanding officer of 12th Marines, there has been nearly an 80 percent turnover in personnel from the regiment.

    "For most of the Marines and sailors here, this is their first trip to the Fuji area," Gentry said.

    Despite the majority of the sections being new, their leaders were proud of the performance of the Marines.

    "For some of my guys, this was their first time out in the field, so it was a good opportunity to hone our skills and build a cohesive team from the bottom up," said Sgt. Dennis Littlepage, non-commissioned officer-in-charge of the target acquisition platoon.








    [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana]Scout Observers Lead Way for 12th Marines Fire Support[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]CAMP FUJI, Japan While indirect fire support from artillery, mortars, naval gunfire or aircraft can significantly shape the battlefield, the power of their effectiveness often lies in the hands of Marine artillery scout observers and forward observers.

    As part of Artillery Relocation Training Exercise 09-03, Marine scout observers from Echo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force negotiated the grassy hills of the North Fuji Manoeuvre Area to practice and develop their trade, Nov. 2-11. The exercise also included members of 3rd Battalion, 12th Marines and the regimental headquarters.

    The scout observers' goal during the exercise was to meet the training requirements of acquiring a target within one minute and calling in fire missions accurate to within 200 meters, according to Lance Cpl. Michael Ryan, a scout observer for the battery and a Modesto, Calif. native.

    In the fire support community, a scout observer's tools of the trade are as basic as a map, compass, protractor, radio and a range finder. Using these tools, and dressed up in ghillie suits to camouflage themselves along the hills and draws of the range, they called in fire missions on simulated targets increasing accuracy, proficiency and an ability to support infantry manoeuvre.

    "The paramount goal is to provide the most accurate and timely fires possible in support of ground forces," said Lt. Col. Sean Wester, commanding officer, 3rd Bn., 12th Marines.

    Throughout the exercise, scout observers practiced observation techniques and provided target location information to the regiment's forward observers and fire direction centre , which processes firing data for the gun line using state-of-the-art computer systems. While the scout observer job is solely an enlisted designation, many fire support team officers would agree that their job would be anything but easy without a scout observer's skill.

    "The scout observers are the eyes of the battery," said 2nd Lt. Aaron W. Meek, forward observer, Echo Battery 2nd Battalion, 12th Marines. "Without them, the artillery unit loses power, range, and the ability to shape the battlefield."

    While indirect fire is known to change the tide of battle, the scout observer's role is essential to the success of target acquisition and accuracy, added Meek, a Plano Ill., native.

    According to Pfc. Travis English, a scout observer with the battery, a scout observer earns the military occupational specialty of 0861 after completing the five-week Marine Artillery Scout Observer Course, at Ft. Sill, Okla., and the Fire Support Man Course at the Expeditionary Warfare Training Group Pacific in Coronado, Calif.

    While attending the courses, Marines practice advanced land navigation and learn how to use the tools needed for target location. Those tools include the M2 compass and the Vector 21 Laser Rangefinder, which determines a target's distance and elevation from the observer's position.

    The battery, which arrived in Okinawa, Japan this October, is currently deployed with 12th Marines under the recently re-established Unit Deployment Program.[/FONT]

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  5. #380
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    Default HMLA-367 'Scarface' Introduce Yankees

    [FONT=Verdana]HMLA-367 'Scarface' Introduce Yankees[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]Marine Aircraft Group 40[/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]CAMP BASTION, Helmand province, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan The sound of four blade rotors echoes across the Helmand sky, as the UH-1Y Huey helicopter made its first combat deployment with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 367 "Scarface".

    The squadron arrived in October, with the first UH-1Y helicopters arriving Oct. 23 on the back of a C-17 aircraft. The UH-1Y made its first flight Nov. 4.

    "You wanna mess with me? Okay. You wanna play rough? Okay. Say hello to my little friend," said the character Tony Montana in the movie "Scarface".

    The UH-1Y is the "little friend" of HMLA-367, as it brings increased speed and carrying capacity, offering a better option for the Afghan terrain than the UH-1N model did for HMLA-169, the squadron being replaced by HMLA-367 in Afghanistan.

    The UH-1Y is the most significant and recent upgrade to the battle proven UH-1N Huey, which has been around since Vietnam. The duel engine "Yankee" is equipped with a modified four blade, all composite rotor and has upgraded engines and transmissions to give it increased payload and performance capabilities.

    "This aircraft is more agile, has greater speed, range and loiter time, carries more weight and is more survivable on the battlefield," said Lt. Col. William Randall, executive officer of HMLA-367, Marine Aircraft Group 40, Marine Expeditionary Brigade-Afghanistan. "All this results in better overall support for that Marine on the ground."

    It has been a long time coming for the upgraded Huey.

    "I spent five years as a developmental test pilot at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., where I was involved in the initial ground test, flight test and evaluation of both the UH-1Y Huey and the AH-1Z Cobra," said Randall. "Overall, I have spent almost 11 years of my career working on getting the UH-1Y to the fleet. It's been a great pleasure to see the aircraft come out on its first combat deployment."

    The UH-1N has been everything the Marine Corps has wanted it to be, but the UH-1Y simply has more to offer the aviation community and ultimately, the Marines on the ground.

    "For years, the Huey community has been unable to perform many of their utility missions simultaneously," said Capt. Alexis Paschedag, a department of safety and standardization officer for HMLA-367. "While the 'November' was able to perform different missions sequentially, the new UH-1Y is able to perform a myriad of utility missions on the same sortie."

    As the transition begins between the Vipers of HMLA-169 and Scarface, and from the UH-1N to UH-1Y helicopters, the mission of the light attack squadron remains the same.

    "Other than the UH-1Y, Scarface is a lot like the Vipers, whose main effort is giving that Marine or sailor on the ground the best support possible," said Capt. Curt Rose, a pilot training officer for HMLA-367.

    "The level and type of support that we can provide the ground combat element is greatly increased. Our ability to go farther, faster, carry more internal cargo and passengers and stay on station longer will greatly enhance the Marine Corps' overall combat effectiveness on each and every mission we support," said Randall.

    "The UH-1Y transition is significant because it's never been deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq - a definite milestone in Marine Corps aviation history," said Rose.

    The results of the transition will require time to assess, but the first UH-1Y on the flight schedule brought more ordnance to the fight, showing the immediate impact of the new air power in Afghanistan.









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  6. #381
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    And the Huey still lives!

  7. #382
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default USMC's 234th Birthday on the USS Intrepid, NYC, November 10th 2009

    [FONT=Verdana]United States Marines from the U.S.S. New York (LPD-21) celebrate the Marines 234th birthday on the U.S.S Intrepid. The U.S.S. New York, a newly commissioned San Antonio class vessel, was constructed with over seven tons of steel from the wreckage of the World Trade Center in its bow.










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  8. #383
    Hellfish Junior gaijinsamurai's Avatar
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    Question: I got out of the USMC back in '91, and I coulda swore that my Dress Blues belt buckle didn't have the EGA (I was a sergeant), and the emblem was reserved for Staff Sergeants and above. Any of you current Marines know if/when this changed?

  9. #384
    Senior Member KEEPER0311's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijinsamurai View Post
    Question: I got out of the USMC back in '91, and I coulda swore that my Dress Blues belt buckle didn't have the EGA (I was a sergeant), and the emblem was reserved for Staff Sergeants and above. Any of you current Marines know if/when this changed?
    NCO where the buckle with an EGA on board. And SNCO wear buckles with EGA and stylized reef. I'm not sure when this changed, I'll do some scrounging.


    http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/mcub/libra...CH3.htm#UR3002

  10. #385
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    Default Wardogs and Delta Main Tag Team 205

    [FONT=Verdana]Nov. 10 is recognized widely across the Marine Corps as the day the Marine Corps was born 234 years ago.

    While other Combat Center Marines were busy celebrating the birthday of the Corps with the day off, the Marines and Sailors of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, were celebrating it by doing what Marines do best putting rounds downrange.

    Co. G staged at the Delta Prospect training area aboard the Combat Center to complete their final training with 1st Platoon, Company D, 3rd Amphibious Assault Battalion, in preparation for their January deployment with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit from Okinawa, Japan.

    The company did pause in their training, however, to honor the traditions of the Marine Corps Birthday and hold a company formation. In keeping with tradition, they read Lt. Gen. John A. Lejeune's Birthday Message and even had a cake-cutting ceremony featuring a fudge brownie from a Meal-Ready-to-Eat and a pocket knife.

    After observing their birthday, Co. G Marines and sailors continued their training. They spent Tuesday and Wednesday leading live-fire raids from their mock beach head, fending off ambushes and repeatedly overrunning the simulated town at Range 205.

    The Marines and Sailors from both 3rd AABn and 2nd Bn., 7th Marines, staged at the Delta Prospects, the 'beach' from which they launched endless raids by loading onto amphibious assault vehicles, or AAVs, and taking off to Range 205.

    When the road to Range 205 narrowed and s***** between two sets of hills, the convoy of AAVs was forced to a halt because of obstacles in the roadway. As they began to clear the road, they were attacked by mock improvised explosive devices and indirect artillery fire.

    This forced both the infantrymen and the AAVs to unload on the notional enemy with small arms fire, heavy machine guns and 60 mm mortars.

    Once the enemy's ambush was repelled and the roadway clear, the push to Range 205 was resumed.

    Range 205 offered the Marines and Sailors an opportunity to hone their skills in Military Operations in Urban Terrain tactics as they ran from building to building, cleared houses and diffused simulated ****y traps.

    The Marines are refining and sustaining the skills they learned from the Special Operations Training Group's Mechanized Raid Course aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., in October, said Capt. Marcelo B. Castro, the company commander of Co. G, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines.

    Working side-by-side with Co. G was 1st Plt., Co. D with 3rd AABn, who are also slated to deploy with the 31st MEU in January.

    "We've had the good fortune of deploying with a unit from Twentynine Palms," said 1st Lt. James Smith, the 1st Plt. commander with Co. D, 3rd AABn. "Our platoon will support Golf Co. on the MEU, so to be able to train together here makes things a lot easier."

    He said his platoon began working with Co. G soon after the platoon's return from Iraq in May, and the opportunity to practice together will allow them to work together more efficiently while on the MEU.

    "Live-fire exercises like this allow us to practice our control and ensure we'll be able to operate effectively as a team should the need arise," Castro said.

    While the training isn't easy, the Marines and Sailors refused to quit.

    "We're blessed with a fine group of Marines," Smith said. "I've been challenging them every time we go to train and every time, they have risen to the challenge."






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  11. #386
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Combat Center Reflects on History

    [FONT=Verdana]Combat Center Reflects on History[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana]As visitors stepped onto the Combat Center's Lance Cpl. Torrey L. Grey Field Nov. 6, they may have noticed something strange about the way some Marines were dressed.

    Marines from the Combat Center's Headquarters Battalion dressed in Marine Corps uniforms dating back from 1775 to the Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniform worn today during the 234th Marine Corps Birthday Pageant.

    Combat Center personnel, children from local elementary schools and members of the community were among those who came to watch the historical event.

    "The Marines busted their tails out here all week," said 1st Sgt. Nelson Hidalgo, the first sergeant for Company B, Headquarters Bn., about the long hours and hard work the pageant period players put in to prepare for the ceremony.

    As each Marine crossed the field in their respective, historical attire, a short synopsis of the era they represented was narrated to the crowd.

    "This is an important time to remember our history," said Lance Cpl. Daniel M. Barulich, who portrayed a World War II era Marine during the ceremony. "The Marine Corps Birthday is Nov. 10, Veterans Day is the 11th, it's important to remember those who have come before us."

    After the last uniform-clad Marine marched onto the field, that is exactly what happened.
    Lt. Gen. John A. Lejeune's birthday message, along with a message from the Commadant of the Marine Corps Gen. James T. Conway, was read followed by comments from Brig. Gen. H. Stacy Clardy III, the Combat Center's commanding general.

    In keeping with the traditions of a Marine Corps Birthday celebration, a traditional cake-cutting ceremony was held to conclude the event.

    The cake is traditionally cut with a sword, representing the Marine Corps' commitment to fight for right and freedom. The first piece is shared by the oldest and youngest Marines present. This sharing represents the passing of knowledge from one generation of Marines to the next.

    The oldest Marine at the pageant was Maj. Jay Rogers, 56, the food service officer with Headquarters Bn., and the youngest was Pfc. Amber Martin, 18, a student at the Marine Corps Communications-Electronics School here.

    "Events like [the birthday pageant] give us as Marines a chance to reflect on our core values and appreciate the traditions of our Corps," said Barulich after the pageant.




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  12. #387
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default USMC Photos

    [FONT=Verdana]Marines from Company C, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, on a company-sized exercise at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona, Oct. 27, 2009. The Camp Lejeune, N.C.-based battalion spent approximately one month the Yuma area, making use of its surroundings' rocky, mountainous terrain in preparation for a deployment to Afghanistan early next year. The exercise stressed the approximately 220-Marine force to use combined arms tactics, ranging from rifles and machine guns to mortars and TOW missiles.(Photo by Cpl. Pete Zrioka USMC)[/FONT][FONT=&quot]

























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  13. #388
    Hellfish Junior gaijinsamurai's Avatar
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    ^ Cool! I was attached to C 1/2 Marines during Desert Storm.

    Thanks for answering my Q, Keeper0311.
    I very well may have forgotten because it's been so long, but I coulda swore I didn't have the EGA on my buckle when I was a sergeant...of course, I could be wrong!

  14. #389
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    nice pictures again guys.
    does some1 has more pictures or info about the museum ship intrepid?
    thank you

  15. #390
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    Default More Photos of Talisman Saber 2009

    </span></p> [FONT=Verdana]TS09 is a biennial combined training activity designed to train
    Australian and U.S. forces in planning and conducting combined task
    force operations, which will help improve ADF/US combat readiness and
    inter-operability. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana] [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana]The exercise is a major undertaking, which reflects the closeness of our alliance and the strength of the military relationship. Essex, commanded by Capt. Brent Canady, is the lead ship of the only forward-deployed expeditionary strike group and serves as the flagship for CTF 76, the Navy's only forward-deployed amphibious force commander. Task Force 76 is headquartered at White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, Japan, with a detachment in Sasebo, Japan. (U.S. Navy photos by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nardelito Gervacio/Released)[/FONT][FONT=&quot]




















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