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Thread: The United States Marine Corps

  1. #871
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Marines, Afghan Forces Assess Social Climate in Key Region of Helmand Province

    [FONT=Verdana]HELMAND PROVINCE, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan – On the near empty streets of Galjan, a small village in the Shorsurak region of Helmand province, Afghanistan, a flock of children gather in an alleyway nestled between coffee brown walls of dry clay, Jan. 20. Talking amongst themselves in voices high with excitement, they gesture and point to a Marine with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment.

    After several minutes of confusion and amid laughter from the young boys and girls gathered around the Marine, an Afghan national army soldier offers a helping hand. Pulling a bag of candy from his pocket and passing it to the father of one of the children, the soldier gestures to the Marine, who understandingly does the same.

    While the kids chew on energy bars and eat hardy on the dusty road, Marines and Afghan army soldiers speak to the village elders during a census patrol in order to get an idea of the geographical layout of the village, as well as the political climate.

    "The purpose of the patrol was to get to know the area and the people, that's ultimately our mission," explained Sgt. Maj. Charlie Stanford, the battalion sergeant major with 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. "We're here to protect the Afghan people and provide them with security and stability."

    The battalion commander for 1/6 and the sergeant major came out on patrol in order to gain perspective, Stanford said, adding "we went out on the patrol because we're Marines like anyone else. It gives us the unique perspective of having eyes on the ground. It's hard to visualize what Marines on the ground go through on a daily basis. The map doesn't do it justice. When we come out, we see what exactly the Marines are going through."

    Platoon sergeants with Alpha Company, 1/6 and the Marines assigned to the battalion commander's personal security detachment, met with villagers to see what assistance they needed, if any.

    "We continue to [speak with] elders and tell them why we're here; to provide security for their families. Those are the key leader engagements that we need," said Stanford, who was with 1/6 on their last deployment with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, when they routed the Taliban in Garmsir, Afghanistan. "They really didn't need our help that day. The village is prosperous and they lived pretty well, but they did express concern about security."

    Village elders shared apprehensions about associating with Marines for a variety of reasons, the most notable being fear of reprisal from Taliban operating in the area.

    "The villagers said that the Taliban think that they are telling Marines where they're putting improvised explosive devices, and once we leave, the Taliban comes in and harasses villagers," explained Arfanullah Habilullah, a linguist with 1/6, who spoke with elders during the census patrol. "Taliban roll through when it's dark, leaving night letters and discouraging villagers from working with coalition forces. They come at night when they can hide their identity and tribal affiliation.

    "Leaving threats and warnings to Afghans who look to be cooperating with coalition forces is a common practice for Taliban all across Afghanistan," said Habilullah, adding that another concern brought up during talks pertained to civilian casualties due to firefights between insurgents and coalition forces occurring near their homes.

    "They're probably wary about us coming through and turning their home into a battlefield," said Sgt. Shields C. Lee, a section leader with personal security detachment, Headquarters and Service Company, 1/6. "They're probably afraid of working with us and having the Taliban come back through once we've gone."

    Patrols have been stepped up in the northern part of region, where the Taliban has been operating, to reduce the risk of violence towards villages friendly to Marine and Afghan forces, said Stanford.

    "The operations to the north have gone well," said Stanford. "The last couple of patrols that went out received no contact to the north, or the south. The Taliban are mindful that Marines are on patrol. We're not going anywhere. We are the strongest tribe, and we'll continue to patrol the area and provide security."

    The final objective of the patrol, and perhaps most critical, was to instill a sense of confidence in locals that the government of Afghanistan is listening to their concerns.

    "Us being in the area makes elders comfortable enough to come out and talk with local commanders in order to figure out what needs to be fixed," said Stanford. "It's hard for people to understand Afghanistan as a whole. Many of the provinces have never seen evidence of the government, like running water or electricity. The Afghan national army represents that and brings credibility to the government."

    As the patrol leaders continued to speak with village elders, more and more Afghans emerged from their homes and came over to speak with Afghan soldiers standing watch nearby.

    As the talks concluded and the patrol prepared to head back out across the fields and barren plateau they crossed earlier in the day, one of the Afghan national army soldiers emptied his pockets and gave the last of his food to the children crowded around him.




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  2. #872
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Marine MV-22 Osprey - Haiti

    A U.S. Marine MV-22 Osprey at the Toussaint Louverture International Airport, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Jan. 27 during Operation Unified Response.

    [FONT=Verdana]Department of Defense assets have been deployed to assist in the Haiti relief effort following a magnitude 7 earthquake that hit the city on Jan. 12.






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    Last edited by vor033; 01-29-2010 at 06:35 PM. Reason: Photo added

  3. #873
    Member Big Mo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vor033 View Post
    [FONT=Verdana]U.S. Marines from the 4th Reconnaissance Battalion, 4th Marine Division, during training at the Camp Ethan Allen Training Site in Jericho, Vt., Jan. 16, 2010. The Marines of the 4th Marine Division are preparing for exercise Cold Response 2010, a NATO-sponsored multinational exercise to be held in Norway.
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    do you got tis in highres?? can't find them on dvidshub...thx a lot

  4. #874
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Marine Administrative Message Clarifies New Tattoo Trends

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    [/FONT] [FONT=Verdana]MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – With new and emerging body art trends, comes a new and updated tattoo policy.

    Marine Administrative Message 29-10 provides clarification to the existing tattoo policy and establishes the new baseline for Marines receiving body art.

    "This is not a new policy," said Sgt. Maj. Carlton W. Kent, Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, in an e-mail. "As the popularity of tattooing continues to grow, it is important that we continue to provide further clarification and updates to address new/continuing trends."

    Effective immediately, Marines are prohibited from getting tattoos on their head, neck, hands, wrists, fingers and in their mouth. They need to follow the same rules when receiving body art that only becomes visible under a black light.

    Tattoos visible when a Marine is wearing the standard physical fitness uniform can't be larger than the service members hand with their fingers extended and joined with the thumb touching the base of the index finger.

    "The Marine Corps' tattoo policy seeks to balance the personal desires of Marines with our high standards for uniformity and personal appearance, while also addressing emerging trends," said Kent. "High standards of professional military appearance remain a part of our Marine Corps heritage; therefore, Marines must set the example and maintain the highest professional standards at all times."

    Tattoos of an excessive nature do not represent our traditional values and are contrary to our professional demeanor and the high standards America has come to expect from Marines, Kent said.

    "All Marines need to be informed, understand the policy before getting a tattoo/brand, and seek guidance from mentors on how excessive tattoos/brands could impact their career goals or future assignments," said Kent. "Marines must understand that having excessive tattoos may adversely affect their world wide assignability as well as restricting an enlisted Marine's ability to become an officer [commissioned or warrant]."
    Officers aren't the only Marines limited on the tattoos they can get. Enlisted alike have to maintain their image and are direct representation of our country.

    "As Marines we are required to present the best possible image at all times and we are to set the ex¬ample," said Staff Sgt. Michael C. Mateos, career planner with Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group. "If a Marine decides to get a tattoo without first reading and understanding Marine Corps Order P1020.34G and the tattoo policy, they may get tattoos that may be 'deemed prejudicial to good order, discipline and morale or are of a nature to bring discredit to the Marine Corps'; therefore can disqualify him/her from these programs or Marine Corps service."

    From having an excess of tattoos, Marines can be turned away from recruiting, Marine security guard and drill instructor duties.

    "Marines can eliminate them¬selves from retention, any B-billet and/or any military occupational specialty due to tattoos," said Mateos, 33, from Los Angeles. "Per MCO P1020.34G the deputy com¬mandant for Manpower and Reserve Affairs is designated as the adjudicating authority for any tattoo issue involving retention or special duty assignments."

    The new tattoo policy will allow Marines success during their enlistment. Marines who have received unauthorized tattoos prior to the new policy will be grandfathered and need to have their body art documented.

    "Grandfathering is typically used to allow Marines to continue to serve in the Marine Corps without being adversely impacted," said Kent. "It protects an individual's career that, by no fault of their own, would otherwise be negatively impacted as a result of emerging policy."[/FONT]

  5. #875
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default 5th Anglico Preps for Upcoming Deployment

    [FONT=Verdana]CAMP HANSEN - Marines with 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, III Marine Expeditionary Force, conducted pre-deployment training at Camp Hansen Jan. 11-15 in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in a few months.

    The Marines will provide tactical fire support for NATO's International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan.

    The company, which consists of three platoons, completed Table 3 Intermediate Combat Rifle Marksmanship training throughout the week,

    They went through the Humvee Egress Assistance Trainer, which simulates a Humvee rollover and how Marines must evacuate the vehicle while gaining and maintaining 360 degree security of the terrain.

    While some Marines were waiting to go through the HEAT trainer, others were sharpening their small-arms weapons handling skills in the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer. The Marines also practiced convoy movements.

    The training is meant to ensure the Marines know how to handle risks of a potential combat environment, said 1st Lt. Brian Aquadro, the officer in charge for 2nd Brigade Platoon, 5th ANGLICO.

    "It is important the Marines maintain proficiency in this training," Aquadro said. "In Afghanistan, where a threat is always prevalent, you need this training to protect yourself and your fellow Marines."

    For some Marines, the training is all-too familiar.

    "I remember on my first deployment to Afghanistan, on convoys, how important it was to maintain communication because visual contact wasn't always available because you might have dust so thick you couldn't see the vehicle directly in front of you," said Sgt. James Jones, a fire support man with 5th ANGLICO.

    "So this training all comes back into play when you get over there. That's why it's so vital, especially for the junior Marines," he added.

    The training comes in handy to all Marines, but none more so than those deploying for the first time with the company.

    Cpl. Landon Beck, a fire support man with 5th ANGLICO, says one great thing about the training is they train with all the required gear Marines in country are wearing so they can get used to its weight.

    "It's my first time going out there, but at least all the training will be fresh on my mind so it kicks back in when I need it," Beck said.

    Staff Sgt. Miguel Navarro, 2nd Brigade Platoon sergeant, 5th ANGLICO, says they have to be on point for this deployment, and there is no space for error.

    "Practice makes perfect, and that's what we need to be in order to complete the mission safely and efficiently," Navarro said.

    The 5th ANGLICO specializes in coordinating artillery, Naval gunfire and close air support for the Marine Corps, Navy, Army, and allied foreign armed forces.






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  6. #876
    Senior Member santana's Avatar
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    [FONT=Verdana]A Marine with Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine regiment hands humanitarian ration at an aid distribution site near a landing zone in Leogane, Haiti, Jan. 26. Marines flew into the area, Jan. 24, establishing a new humanitarian aid receiving area for Haitian earthquake victims at a missionary compound. [/FONT]
    Why this group of marines has different style of hydratation pack???

  7. #877
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Default Marines Conduct a Reconnaissance Patrol in the Streets of the Ouest Region of Haiti

    [FONT=Verdana]Marines from Lima Company, Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, conduct a reconnaissance patrol in the streets of the Ouest region of Haiti, Jan. 24. The company flew into the town of Leogane earlier in the day, set up a command post and conducted reconnaissance patrols to assess the area in order to begin humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions for the people in the surrounding area.





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  8. #878
    Senior Member KEEPER0311's Avatar
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    Nice pics vor. HEAT trainers are fun as hell, especially when I get the chance to through the higher ups through.

    Thank god for the understandable tattoo policy!

  9. #879
    Senior Member vor033's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Mo View Post
    do you got tis in highres?? can't find them on dvidshub...thx a lot
    Hi Mate, I dont have them but follow the link below to the Marine Corps Photostream and you can find them all in Hi-Res

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/marine_corps/

  10. #880
    Senior Member chefjavier's Avatar
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    A Hard Core Marine!!!


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  11. #881
    Senior Member chefjavier's Avatar
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    Get Some!!!




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  12. #882
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefjavier View Post
    A Hard Core Marine!!!
    That is just about the most Motard looking mailbox I have ever seen. Something that a retired Pouge SNCO would get.

  13. #883
    Senior Member cbreedon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodMarine View Post
    That is just about the most Motard looking mailbox I have ever seen. Something that a retired Pouge SNCO would get.
    I just noticed you changed your location... funny...

  14. #884
    Senior Member chefjavier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollywoodMarine View Post
    That is just about the most Motard looking mailbox I have ever seen. Something that a retired Pouge SNCO would get.
    If you notice on the side of the mailbox it said "Corporal" Oh boy! I think he was a GTD six year contract...

  15. #885
    Hunter of Wannabes Blasphemy's Avatar
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    Marines are about the most peculiar breed of human beings I have ever witnessed. They treat their service as if it was some kind of cult, plastering their emblem on almost everything they own, making themselves up to look like insane fanatics with haircuts so short as to be ungentlemanly, worshipping their Commandant as if he was a god, and making weird animal noises like a band of savages. They'll fight like rabid dogs at the drop of a hat just for the sake of a little action and are the cockiest SOBs I've ever known. Most have the foulest mouths and drink well beyond man's normal limits, but their high spirits and sense of brotherhood set them apart and, generally speaking, of the United States Marines with whom I've come in contact, are the most professional warriors and the finest men I've had the pleasure to meet.

    -An Anonymous Canadian Citizen-

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